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TGF Primer v1.0

TGF Primer v1.0

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Sections

  • Notices
  • Disclaimer
  • Part I: Introduction to the Framework
  • Context
  • Purpose of the Transformational Government Framework
  • Transformational Government Framework: purpose
  • Target audience for the Transformational Government Framework
  • Overview of the Transformational Government Framework
  • Component 1: Guiding Principles for Transformation
  • Component 3: Service Delivery Processes
  • Component 4: Benefit Realisation Framework
  • Part II: The Transformational Government Framework
  • Component 1: Guiding Principles
  • Build services around customer needs, not organisational structure
  • Citizen Service transformation is done with citizens, not to them
  • Grow the market
  • Manage and measure these nine critical success factors:
  • Component 2: Critical Success Factors
  • Strategic Clarity
  • Leadership
  • User focus
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Skills
  • Supplier Partnership
  • Future-proofing
  • Achievable Delivery
  • Benefit Realization
  • Component 3: Delivery Processes
  • Business Management Framework
  • Customer Management Framework
  • Channel Management Framework
  • Technology Management Framework
  • Component 4: Benefit Realisation Strategy
  • Terminology and Reference Model
  • Core Terminology
  • Conformance Criteria
  • Part III: Guidance Notes
  • Part III (a): Guidance on the TGF Business Management Framework
  • Introduction
  • Overview of key components in the TGF Business Management Framework
  • Transformational Government Leadership
  • Collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model
  • Common Terminology and Reference Model
  • Transformation Business Model
  • Policy Product Management
  • Transformation Roadmap
  • Part III (b): Guidance on the TGF Customer Management Framework
  • Overview of key components in the TGF Customer Management Framework
  • Brand and Marketing Strategy
  • Identity Management
  • Citizen Empowerment Framework
  • Part III (c): Guidance on the TGF Channel Management Framework
  • Overview of key components in the TGF Channel Management Framework
  • Channel Mapping
  • Channel Transformation Strategy
  • Part III (d): Guidance on the TGF Technology Management Framework
  • Overview of key components in the TGF Technology Management Framework
  • Resources Management
  • Eco-system Participation
  • SOA-based system realisation and governance
  • Acknowledgements
  • Revision History

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Transformational Government Framework Primer Version 1.0
[Type the document title]

Committee Note Draft 01 / Public Review Draft 01 21 July 2011
Document URIs This version: http://docs.oasis-open.org/tgf/TGF-Primer/v1.0/cnprd01/TGF-Primerv1.0-cnprd01.pdf (Authoritative) http://docs.oasis-open.org/tgf/TGF-Primer/v1.0/cnprd01/TGF-Primerv1.0-cnprd01.html http://docs.oasis-open.org/tgf/TGF-Primer/v1.0/cnprd01/TGF-Primerv1.0-cnprd01.doc Previous version: N/A Latest version: http://docs.oasis-open.org/tgf/TGF-Primer/v1.0/TGF-Primer-v1.0.pdf (Authoritative) http://docs.oasis-open.org/tgf/TGF-Primer/v1.0/TGF-Primer-v1.0.html http://docs.oasis-open.org/tgf/TGF-Primer/v1.0/TGF-Primer-v1.0.doc Technical Committee: OASIS Transformational Government Framework TC Chair:

This is a Non18
19 Standards Track 20

Work Product. 21 The patent
22 23

provisions of the 24 OASIS IPR Policy do 25 not apply. 26

John Borras (johnaborras@yahoo.co.uk), Individual Peter F Brown (peter@peterfbrown.com), Individual Chris Parker (chris.parker@cstransform.com), CS Transform

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Editors:

Ltd

TGF-Primer-v1.0-cnprd01 Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. All Rights Reserved.

21 July 2011 Page 1 of 72

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31Abstract:

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This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

32This Primer is intended to serve as an introduction to and detailed overview of 33the “Transformational Government Framework” (TGF) - a practical “how to” 34standard for the design and implementation of an effective program of 35technology-enabled change at national, state or local government level. 36It also covers the Framework’s rationale, purpose, scope, and intended use. 37The Framework is a managed process of ICT-enabled change in the public sector, 38which puts the needs of citizens and businesses at the heart of that process and 39which achieves significant and transformational impacts on the efficiency and 40effectiveness of government. 41The Primer is in three main parts: 42Part I, including an Introduction and Overview, sets out the context in which 43the TGF has been produced, its purpose, and the principal users at whom the 44Framework is aimed. 45Part II describes the Transformational Government Framework itself, 46including the conformance criteria by which users of the Framework may 47determine if they are conformant. 48Part III provides a set of Guidance Notes providing further information to users 49of the TGF on how they can implement it in practice. 51This Work Product was last revised or approved by the OASIS Transformational 52Government Framework TC on the above date. The level of approval is also listed 53above. Check the “Latest version” location noted above for possible later 54revisions of this Work Product. 55Technical Committee members should send comments on this Work Product to 56the Technical Committee‘s email list. Others should send comments to the 57Technical Committee by using the “Send A Comment” button on the Technical 58Committee‘s web page at http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tgf/. 59For information on whether any patents have been disclosed that may be 60essential to implementing this Work Product, and any offers of patent licensing 61terms, please refer to the Intellectual Property Rights section of the Technical 62Committee web page (http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tgf/ipr.php).
63Citation format: When referencing this specification the following citation format should be used: 50Status:

[TGF-Primer-v1.0] Transformational Government Framework Primer Version 1.0. 21 July 2011. OASIS Committee Note Public Review Draft 01. http://docs.oasis-open.org/tgf/TGFPrimer/v1.0/cnprd01/TGF-Primer-v1.0-cnprd01.html.
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10Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. All Rights Reserved.

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[Type the document title]

12 13 65Notices

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This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. All Rights Reserved. All capitalized terms in the following text have the meanings assigned to them in the OASIS Intellectual Property Rights Policy (the "OASIS IPR Policy"). The full Policy may be found at the OASIS website. This document and translations of it may be copied and furnished to others, and derivative works that comment on or otherwise explain it or assist in its implementation may be prepared, copied, published, and distributed, in whole or in part, without restriction of any kind, provided that the above copyright notice and this section are included on all such copies and derivative works. However, this document itself may not be modified in any way, including by removing the copyright notice or references to OASIS, except as needed for the purpose of developing any document or deliverable produced by an OASIS Technical Committee (in which case the rules applicable to copyrights, as set forth in the OASIS IPR Policy, must be followed) or as required to translate it into languages other than English. The limited permissions granted above are perpetual and will not be revoked by OASIS or its successors or assigns.

The name "OASIS" is a trademark of OASIS, the owner and developer of this specification, and should be used only to refer to the organization and its official outputs. OASIS welcomes reference to, and implementation and use of, specifications, while reserving the right to enforce its marks against misleading uses. Please see http://www.oasis-open.org/who/trademark.php for above guidance.

15Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. All Rights Reserved.

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[Type the document title]

This document and the information contained herein is provided on an "AS IS" basis and OASIS DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY OWNERSHIP RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

..................................................................19 94 Future-proofing......................................11 74Overview of the Transformational Government Framework..........................................................11 73 Target audience for the Transformational Government Framework.........31 105Conformance Criteria....................13 76 Component 2: Critical Success Factors................................................. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply..............................................18 87Component 2: Critical Success Factors.................. of Contents 67Notices..............................................24 100 Channel Management Framework..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................17 18 66Table 16 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.........................34 106Part III: Guidance Notes............................................17 85 Grow the market..................13 75 Component 1: Guiding Principles for Transformation.................18 89 Leadership.........................................................19 93 Supplier Partnership..................................37 109 Context.................................................................................................................................................49 19TGF-Primer-v1...................................................................................19 92 Skills...........3 68Table of Contents......................................................................................................................................................17 83 Build services around customer needs.......37 111 Transformational Government Leadership......37 108 Introduction..........................20 96 Benefit Realization......... 21 July 2011 Page 4 of 72 [Type the document title] ..6 70Part I: Introduction to the Framework.................................................................31 104 Core Terminology....... not organisational structure..........43 114 Transformation Business Model.............................................................................. not to them.......................4 69Disclaimer...................22 99 Customer Management Framework.......................................................................................................................................7 71 Context....................18 90 User focus........................................................................................................................................................................................16 80Component 1: Guiding Principles.....................................................................................................................................................................................................45 115 Policy Product Management.17 81 Develop a detailed and segmented understanding of your citizen and business customers 82 .............20 95 Achievable Delivery........................................................................................................................................36 107Part III (a): Guidance on the TGF Business Management Framework..............................37 110 Overview of key components in the TGF Business Management Framework.......................20 98 Business Management Framework......................................................................................................................................................17 84 Citizen Service transformation is done with citizens.................................................................................................14 79Part II: The Transformational Government Framework..................................................................................................................................................25 101 Technology Management Framework...............................................................................................0-cnprd01 20Copyright © OASIS Open 2011................................................................................................................................................................18 88 Strategic Clarity.....................................................13 78 Component 4: Benefit Realisation Framework...............................................................17 86 Manage and measure these nine critical success factors:.................39 113 Common Terminology and Reference Model.................................................29 103Terminology and Reference Model....................................................................................38 112 Collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... All Rights Reserved.......................................................................................................................................................................................20 97Component 3: Delivery Processes.................................19 91 Stakeholder engagement......................7 72 Purpose of the Transformational Government Framework........................................................26 102Component 4: Benefit Realisation Strategy.......................................................13 77 Component 3: Service Delivery Processes.........................................................................

.............................................67 131 Context..............62 126 Context.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................54 121 Brand and Marketing Strategy...................................................................................54 120 Overview of key components in the TGF Customer Management Framework....................54 118 Introduction.............................................................72 138 ...................................................................................................................69 136Acknowledgements.....................................................64 130Part III (d): Guidance on the TGF Technology Management Framework............................................ All Rights Reserved........................................................................................................................67 132 Overview of key components in the TGF Technology Management Framework.....60 124Part III (c): Guidance on the TGF Channel Management Framework..............................55 122 Identity Management........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 5 of 72 [Type the document title] 116 Transformation Roadmap............................................................................................................ 24TGF-Primer-v1. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply....57 123 Citizen Empowerment Framework.............68 133 Resources Management.................................69 134 Eco-system Participation.....................................................................................................................63 129 Channel Transformation Strategy......62 128 Channel Mapping......................62 125 Introduction............54 119 Context...51 117Part III (b): Guidance on the TGF Customer Management Framework...........................69 135 SOA-based system realisation and governance....................................................................... 25Copyright © OASIS Open 2011......................................................................22 23 21 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.........................................................................................................62 127 Overview of key components in the TGF Channel Management Framework.....................71 137Revision History....................................................................................................................................

At this early stage. As such it 148currently contains sections and content that will not be appropriate to the 149Committee Note once approved. 139Disclaimer 140The Committee will be developing OASIS ‘Standards Track’ deliverables in 141parallel to the current document and some material that is currently included 142here will in time and once work has stabilised be included in those deliverables 143and thence be removed from this work. All Rights Reserved. and given the volume of initial 146contributions to the Committee’s work. 30Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 144This is a preliminary draft of what is intended to be produced as an OASIS 145‘Committee Note’. this draft captures a complete overview 147of the work to develop the Transformational Government Framework.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 6 of 72 [Type the document title] .27 28 26 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 29TGF-Primer-v1. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

to reduce taxation. 158Context 159All around the world. the European 186Commission has updated and published its ‘European Interoperability 187Framework’ (EIF)1 and several US agencies are looking to update and consolidate 341 European Interoperability Framework (EIF) for European public services. 179An increasing number of governments and institutions are now starting to 180address the much broader and more complex set of cultural and organizational 181changes which are needed if ICT is to deliver significant benefits in the public 182sector. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. The reality of many countries' experience of e-Government 176has instead been duplication of ICT expenditure. technology was heralded as providing the 171key to deliver these transformations. 170During much of the last two decades. to help our 162economies adjust to financial upheaval. 156An overview with top-level description of the key components of the TGF with 157context on why each is important. All Rights Reserved. to lift the world out of poverty when 163more than a billion people still live on less than a dollar a day. In the same vein. low-carbon society. Canada and Australia have all recently 183published strategies which shift decisively away from "e-Government" towards a 184much more radical focus on transforming the whole relationship between the 185public sector and users of public services. wasted resources.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 7 of 72 [Type the document title] .europa. every government faces the challenge of 166achieving their policy goals in a climate of increasing public expenditure 167restrictions. no critical 177mass of users for online services. Countries such as the UK. to facilitate the 164transition to a sustainable.eu/isa/strategy/doc/annex_ii_eif_en. of the Framework. 36TGF-Primer-v1. 168Responding effectively to these challenges will mean that governments need to 169deliver change which is transformational rather than incremental.it is now clear that Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) 175are no “silver bullet”. 155The audience.with websites.pdf 37Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. inclusive. Now that virtually every government is an 172"e-Government" .32 33 150Part 31 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. intended primary and secondary users. 153The definition of Transformational Government in this context. see 35http://ec. e-services and e-Government strategies 173proliferating around the world. 154The purpose of the Transformational Government Framework (TGF). and limited impact on core public policy 178objectives. and local levels face huge 160pressure to do “more with less”. governments at national. I: Introduction to the Framework 151Part I covers: 152The context and historical background for Transformational Government. Whether their desire is: to raise educational 161standards to meet the needs of a global knowledge economy. or to 165cut back on public administration. even in the least economically developed 174countries . state.

39 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. see http://www.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 8 of 72 [Type the document title] .gov/omb/e-gov/fea/ 43Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.whitehouse. 190We call this process: Transformational Government 38 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 40 188the ‘Federal Enterprise Architecture’ (FEA)2 into a new ‘Unified Government 189Enterprise Architecture Framework’ (UGEAF). All Rights Reserved. 412 Federal Enterprise Architecture. 42TGF-Primer-v1.

That is not the intent of the Transformational Government 201Framework. cultural. 202economic. which puts the needs of citizens and businesses at the heart of that process and which achieves significant and transformational impacts on the efficiency and effectiveness of government. the focus is on the process of transformation: how a government can 208build a new way of working which enables it rapidly and efficiently to adapt to 209changing citizen needs and emerging political and market priorities. It 212is also about making government transformational through the use of 213technology”3. 214A full understanding of this definition of Transformational Government can also 215be assisted by focusing on the four major ways in which Transformational 216Government programs differ from traditional e-Government programs: 217They take a whole-of-government view of the relationship between the public 218sector and the citizen or business user 219They include initiatives to e-enable the frontline of public services: that is.rather than just looking at transactional services which can be e-enabled on an 222end-to-end basis 223They take a whole-of-government view of the most efficient way of managing the 224cost base of government 225They focus on the "citizen" not the "customer". 49TGF-Primer-v1. staff 220involved in direct personal delivery of services such as education and healthcare 221. So the Transformational Government 205Framework is not a “one-size-fits-all” prescription for what a government should 206look like in future. 2005 50Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 228Each of these defining aspects of Transformational Government is explored in 229more detail below. not as 227passive recipients of services. as is the legacy of business processes and technology 204implementation from which it starts. All governments are different: the historical. That is. political. In the words 210of one of the earliest governments to commit to a transformational approach: 211“…. Transformational Government A managed process of ICT-enabled change in the public sector. 46 191Defining Transformational Government 192The definition of Transformational Government used here and in the Framework 193is 194 195 196 197 198 44 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. they seek to engage with 226citizens as owners of and participants in the creation of public services. 473 See the UK Government’s white paper “Transformational Government – enabled by technology”.45 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 199This definition deliberately avoids describing some perfect “end-state” for 200government. [Type the document title] 207Rather.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 9 of 72 . Cabinet 48Office. social and demographic context within which each government 203operates is different. the vision is not just about transforming government through technology. All Rights Reserved.

It has inevitably resulted in low levels of take-up for e-services.through the ability to co-create 256content and services as individuals or in peer-to-peer networks. and more empowering basis. driven at the whole-of-government level. 53 230Transforming services around the citizen and business user 231Most governments are structured around a set of vertically-integrated silos or 232stovepipes . and 3. a move to a “one-stop” citizen-centric 244service delivered over multiple channels. it is these silos 233which the Governments of developed countries have spent billions of dollars 234"e-enabling" since the 1990s. 253Empowering the citizen 254Citizens' experience of new technologies is shaped by the best that the private 255sector has to offer globally and . An increasing number of 241governments are now seeking to make a fundamental strategic shift. etc. 243This shift includes. but rather in "front line" 249delivery: teachers. because the needs of citizens. 262Cross-government efficiency 263The silo-based approach to ICT investment typical of much e-Government has not 264only resulted in "un-citizen-centric" services (as discussed above). 238Governments in developed countries are now grappling with the legacy of 239thousands of fragmented. but also in 265duplication and inefficiency. ministries. this is an ICT investment strategy which 235is fundamentally not citizen-focused. notification. addresses and so forth. Governments have "reinvented the wheel" in ICT 266terms . The great majority of public sector staff and 248expenditure is not however involved in such services. Where 259traditional e-Government programs focused on the user as "the customer". citizen-centred approach.increasingly .000 in the US 240public sector. Leading governments are beginning to understand how the 251work of such front line staff can be transformed through the use of real-time 252knowledge management and mobile workflow applications. more reciprocated. They will 257demand ever greater interactivity and ownership in their relationship with public 258services. However.000 in Germany. court officials. departments. police.over and over again . Transformational Government programs embrace this. towards a 242holistic. even for universal data sets such as citizen 268identity.52 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 10 of 72 . 246Traditional e-Government has focused on e-enabling transactional services and 247providing online content. 260Transformational Government enhances the relationship between government 261and the citizen on a richer. in leading countries. 245e-Enabling the frontline [Type the document title] 51 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. healthcare workers.000 in the UK. 9. eligibility.with different agencies each: 267maintaining their own databases. By and large. 54TGF-Primer-v1. 269building bespoke applications for e-service functions common to all or many 270agencies (such as payments in and out.agencies. All Rights Reserved. emergency 250response teams. silo-focused websites: more than 270. businesses 236and others cut across the organisational structures and hierarchies of 237government. and 55Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.

283Purpose of the Transformational Government Framework 284Delivering this degree of change is not straight-forward for government. 292The time is now right to set out a clear standardized framework within which 293governments can overcome these challenges to deliver genuinely 294transformational ICT-enabled change in the public sector. Transformational Government Framework: purpose In the increasingly common situation of governments being expected to deliver better and more services for less cost whilst maintaining high-level oversight and governance. 288the fact that it provides a universal service. state/regional and 309city/local levels).reaping efficiency gains while at the 279same time enabling better. and 273doing so in ways which not only duplicate expenditure. as well as for common business processes such as HR and 272Financial Management. 276A key focus of Transformational Government is therefore to move towards a 277service-oriented and building-block approach to ICT and back-office service 278architecture across all parts of government . the Transformational Government Framework provides a framework for designing and delivering an effective program of technologyenabled change at all levels of government. not around meeting citizen needs in a holistic way. 58 271authentication). the purpose of the Transformational Government Framework is 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 56 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. As “cloud 280computing” gains traction and momentum. this approach opens up even greater 281scope to achieve large-scale efficiency savings while simultaneously improving 282organizational agility. 59TGF-Primer-v1. 285government faces unique challenges in delivering transformational change. engaging with the whole population 289rather than picking and choosing its customers. governance. more citizen-focused service delivery.57 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 310Senior executives in industry who wish to partner with and assist governments in 311the transformation of public services and to ensure that the technologies and 312services which the private sector provides can have optimum impact in terms of 313meeting public policy objectives 60Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 286notably: 287the unparalleled breadth and depth of its service offering. but which also will not 274inter-operate with other agencies . 290structures.making it more difficult and expensive to 275move towards inter-agency collaboration in future. 303Target audience for the Transformational Government 304Framework 305The Transformational Government Framework (TGF) is intended primarily to 306meet the needs of: 307Political and administrative leaders responsible for shaping public sector reform 308and e-Government strategies and policies (at national.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 11 of 72 [Type the document title] . All Rights Reserved. Against the 295background. funding & culture which are all organized around specific 291business functions. Indeed.

All Rights Reserved. 323Academic and other researchers working in the field of public sector reform.g.62 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. processes and standards to 321facilitate the production and operation of services and systems within the sector. IADB5) 319Professional bodies that support industry sectors by the development and 320maintenance of common practices. 61 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 644 The Association of Southeast Asian Nations 655 The Inter-American Development Bank 67Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. World Bank.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 12 of 72 [Type the document title] . 322where the sector needs to interact with government processes and systems. 63 314Service and technology solution providers to the public sector. 317whether at a global level (e. 315Secondary audiences for the Transformational Government Framework include: 316Leaders of international organisations working to improve public sector delivery. ASEAN4. 66TGF-Primer-v1. 324Civil society institutions engaged in debate on how technology can better enable 325service transformation.g. 318European Commission. United Nations) or a regional one (e. protocols.

344Component 2: Critical Success Factors 345Programs and projects which seek to deliver Transformational Government face 346significant risks to successful delivery. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. customer management and channel management 350transformations described in Component 3 of the TGF. 351However. validated with OASIS members around the world. there are some guiding principles which 10-15 years of 336experience with e-enabled government around the world suggests are universal. there is now an increasing body of research which seeks to understand 352why some ICT-enabled transformation programs succeed and why others fail. Nevertheless. Typically. 363customer management. all around the world. 343The principles used in the TGF are detailed in Part II below. a “one-size-fits-all” approach to public sector reform does 335not work. 358Component 3: Service Delivery Processes 359The TGF includes four major delivery processes within government. The 353TGF therefore includes nine Critical Success Factors that reflect and respond to 354the findings of such research. 326Overview of the Transformational Government 327Framework 328There are four main components to the Framework: 329Guiding Principles 330Critical Success Factors 331Delivery Frameworks and 332A Benefit Realisation Framework 333Component 1: Guiding Principles for Transformation 334As discussed above. All Rights Reserved. all of which 360need refocusing in a citizen-centric way in order to deliver genuinely 361transformational impact: 362business management. 355These Critical Success Factors need to be taken on board by any government 356seeking to develop and deliver an effective Transformational Government 357program. Such changes are needed within government to deliver the 349business management. these risks are not related to the 347technology itself – which is largely mature and proven – but rather to business 348and cultural changes. [Type the document title] 340In the Transformational Government Framework. 337They are based on the experience of many OASIS member organizations working 338with governments of all kinds. and they form the heart of 339the Framework.69 70 68 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. and 71TGF-Primer-v1. 21 July 2011 Page 13 of 72 .0-cnprd01 72Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 364channel management. we use the term “principle” to 341mean an enduring statement of values which can used on a consistent basis to 342steer business decision making over the long term.

and is a core responsibility for the 373Transformational Government Leadership and the collaborative stakeholder 374governance model described in the TGF Business Management Framework. In order to 383reap the full projected benefits (efficiency savings. resulting in a failure to maximize the potential benefits 390of the ICT investments. All Rights Reserved. and Part 367III gives further guidance on how to implement them. or recycled into priority front-line public services such 401as health and education. Yet these organisational change costs are often not fully 389factored in or delivered. the design and delivery of a Benefit Realisation Strategy is 372a part of the Business Management task. on-going management is essential. Governments historically have fallen into two 379pitfalls which have hindered full benefit realisation: 380Failure to pro-actively manage the downstream benefits after an 381individual ICT project has been completed. Increasingly 404though. 377ICT projects in government (and indeed in the private sector) do not 378automatically deliver benefits. notably Canada.). As the cost of delivering government services falls. 766 Source: e-Government Economics Project 777 IT Outlook 2006. 366Part II of the Primer below describes frameworks for each of these areas. 78TGF-Primer-v1. the UK and Finland. 393Effective delivery of e-Government services – both externally in service delivery 394to citizens and businesses and internally in modernising the operations of 395government – opens up the potential to reduce significantly the cost of 396government. A study for the European 386Commission6 calculated that. ICT projects are seen as 382“completed” once the technical implementation is initially operational. Logically. organizational change accounts 387for 55% of the full costs of e-Government projects in Europe. financial pressures are forcing governments to focus on this issue. It is 375of such vital importance however that it is highlighted as a distinct component of 376the overall Framework. customer service 384improvements etc. often involving 385significant organizational and cultural changes. as a rule of thumb. 391Failure at a whole-of-Government level to undertake the restructuring 392of the public labour market to take advantage of new efficiencies. Often. 368Component 4: Benefit Realisation Framework 369The Benefit Realisation Framework is needed to ensure that the Transformation 370Government program ultimately delivers all of its intended benefits and impacts 371in practice. while ICT only 388accounts for 45%.74 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. so governments 397need to plan and implement the necessary restructuring of the public sector 398labour market to realize efficiency benefits in the traditional paper-based 399channels.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 14 of 72 [Type the document title] . A study by the OECD in 20067 showed that this “whole402of-government” approach to efficiency savings had until that point been a 403feature of only a few countries. These efficiency savings can then either be returned to the tax payer 400in the form of lower taxes. 75 365technology management based on the principles of service-oriented architecture. 73 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. OECD 79Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.

However. 82 405The Transformational Government Framework does not seek to specify in detail 406what benefits and impacts a Transformational Government program should seek 407to achieve – that is a matter for each individual government. 80 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. the TGF 408does set out a best practice approach to benefit realisation. All Rights Reserved.81 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 84Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 15 of 72 [Type the document title] . 83TGF-Primer-v1.

the Transformational Government Framework provides a framework 414for designing and delivering an effective program of technology-enabled change 415at all levels of government. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 89Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 16 of 72 [Type the document title] . 417made up of four high-level components: 418 419Figure 1: The overall framework 420Each of these components is described in more detail below.86 87 409Part 85 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 416The Transformational Government Framework can be seen schematically below. All Rights Reserved. 88TGF-Primer-v1. II: The Transformational Government 410Framework 411In the increasingly common situation of governments being expected to deliver 412better and more services for less cost whilst maintaining high-level oversight and 413governance.

and make all non451personal government data freely open for reuse and innovation by citizens and 452third parties 453Grow the market 454Ensure that your service transformation plans are integrated with an effective 455digital inclusion strategy to build access to and demand for e-services across 456society 457Recognise that other market players (in the private. built around their needs 434(such as accessibility) 435Don't try to restructure-Government to do this . name.research. voluntary and community 458sectors) will have a significant influence on citizen attitudes and behaviour .build a cross-government strategy for common citizen 443data sets (e.g. not organisational 432structure 433Provide people with one place to access government. and must be used by any 423Transformational Government program conforming to the TGF. 444authentication.g.but use Service-Oriented Architecture 438(SOA) principles to join it all up.build "customer franchises" 436which sit within the existing structure of government and act as change agents 437Deliver services across multiple channels . payments. reduce infrastructure duplication. 424Develop a detailed and segmented understanding of your 425citizen and business customers 426Own the customer at the whole-of-government level 427Don't assume you know what users of your services think . event-level understanding of citizen and 430business interactions with government 431Build services around customer needs. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. not to 446them 447Engage citizens directly in service design and delivery 448Give citizens the technology tools that enable them to create public value 449themselves 450Give citizens ownership and control of their personal data . notifications) 445Citizen Service transformation is done with citizens. address) and common citizen applications (e. research. and to 439encourage customers into lower cost channels where possible 440Don't spend money on technology before addressing organisational and business 441change 442Don't reinvent wheels .91 92 90 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. All Rights Reserved.0-cnprd01 94Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.so 93TGF-Primer-v1. 421Component 1: Guiding Principles 422The TGF Guiding Principles are set out below. 428research 429Invest in developing a real-time. 21 July 2011 Page 17 of 72 [Type the document title] .

have 478base-lined where we are now. 468Strategic Clarity 469All-of-Government view: Transformational government cannot be pursued on 470a project-by-project or agency-specific basis but requires a whole-of-government 471view. 488Leadership skills: our program leaders have the skills needed to drive ICT489enabled business transformation. This is particularly relevant given the realities of 486changing political leadership and underlines the need for continuity across those 487changes. and are 98TGF-Primer-v1. we 475do not spend money on technology before identifying the key organizational and 476business changes needed to deliver our vision. 21 July 2011 Page 18 of 72 . 465Component 2: Critical Success Factors [Type the document title] 466Conformant Transformational Government programs manage and measure these 467Critical Success Factors throughout the life of the program. In particular. 97 459build partnerships which enable the market and others to work with you to 460deliver jointly-owned objectives.0-cnprd01 99Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. connecting up relevant activities in different agencies at different levels of 472government within and between countries. our 481strategy focuses on taking concrete.96 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 477Strong business case: we know what outcomes we want to achieve. All Rights Reserved. 479Focus on results: although we have a vision of where we want to go. 473Clear vision: all program stakeholders have a common. and a set 480of principles by which we will move forwards. 462 463Figure 2: The nine Critical Success Factors 464These nine factors are covered in Component 2 of the TGF. and have access to external support 490Collaborative governance: leaders from all parts of our and other 491organizations involved in the program are motivated for it to succeed. we do not over-plan. 461Manage and measure these nine critical success factors: 95 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. agreed and 474comprehensive view of what the program is seeking to achieve. 482rather than continually describing the long-term vision. and know how we will measure success. 483Leadership 484Sustained support: political leaders and senior management are committed to 485the program for the long term. practical steps in the short to medium term. Instead.

and 498understand their needs on a segmented basis. and have a clear strategy for acquiring and 521maintaining them.101 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.have a clear understanding of our program and how they can 511engage with it. and we encourage customers into lower cost channels 503where possible and compatible with citizen needs (such as accessibility). We know our customers. delivery 509partners elsewhere in the public. 507Stakeholder engagement 508Stakeholder communication: all our stakeholders . We 520have mapped out the skills we need. [Type the document title] 100 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. private and voluntary sector. etc. 104Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. . politicians. 516Skills 517Skills mapping: we know that the mix of business change. 103TGF-Primer-v1. and ensure effective client/supplier integration into an 531effective program delivery team with shared management information systems.users.but across the Government as a 497whole. 499Citizen-centric delivery: citizens can access all our services through a "one500stop" service. are different . and provide them with technology tools that enable them to create 506public value themselves.not just for individual services . 522Skills integration: we have effective mechanisms in place to maximize value 523from the skills available in all parts of our delivery team. and in particular based on our degree of confidence 528that the chosen suppliers will secure delivery of the expected business benefits. 529Supplier integration: we will manage the relationship with strategic suppliers 530at top management level. 504Citizen empowerment: we engage citizens directly in service design and 505delivery. 494User focus 495A holistic view of the customer: we understand who the customers for our 496services are . but we use web-based services to join it all up and reduce 502infrastructure duplication. the 510media. All Rights Reserved. 102 492engaged in clear and collaborative governance mechanisms to manage any risks 493and issues. 525Supplier Partnership 526Smart supplier selection: we select suppliers based on long-term value for 527money rather than price.so our strategy aims to build partnerships 515which enable the market to deliver our objectives. This is available over multiple channels and that respond to 501different needs. 512Cross-sectoral partnership: other market players (in the private. suppliers. voluntary 513and community sectors) often have much greater influence on citizen attitudes 514and behaviour than government . product and 518marketing management.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 19 of 72 . program management. bringing together 524internal and external skills into an integrated team. and technology skills needed to 519deliver transformational change does not already exist in our organisation. both internal and external.

g. Instead. but 559have systems which enable us to understand the current position. reliant on significant levels of simultaneous technological and 548organizational change. open standards 534which are well supported in the market-place.0-cnprd01 [Type the document title] .in particular common data sets (e. 3: Delivery Processes 21 July 2011 Page 20 of 72 109Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. and learn from experience 561Risk management: we need clarity and insight into the consequences of 562transformation and mechanisms to assess risk and handle monitoring. 558Continuous improvement: we expect not to get everything right first time. 107 532Future-proofing 533Interoperability: Wherever possible we will use interoperable. 545Achievable Delivery 546Phased implementation: we will avoid a "big bang" approach to 547implementation. notifications). and then drives forward longer term 557 transformations. and 553 low risk using standard (rather than bespoke) solutions 554 − works first with early adopters within the Government organisation to 555 create exemplars and internal champions for change 556 − learns from experience. and core ICT 544infrastructure. in order to start building a user base 552 − prioritise those services which can be delivered quickly. plan. common citizen 543applications (e. we will develop a phased delivery roadmap 549which: 550 − works with citizens and businesses to identify a set of services which will 551 bring quick user value.106 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. address). benefit tracking and benefit 568delivery. 535Web-centric delivery: we will use SOA principles in order to support all of our 536customer interactions.g. at low cost. 108TGF-Primer-v1. 569Component 105 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 567built around the three pillars of benefit mapping. move 560quickly. payments. authentication. name. All Rights Reserved. from face-to-face interactions by frontline staff to online 537self-service interactions 538Agility: we will deploy technology using common building blocks which can be 539re-used to enable flexible and adaptive use of technology to react quickly to 540changing customer needs and demands. 541Shared services: key building blocks will be managed as government-wide 542resources . recovery 563and roll-back 564Benefit Realization 565Benefit realisation strategy: we have a clear strategy to ensure that all the 566intended benefits from our Transformation Program are delivered in practice.

585 586Figure 3: Relationships between the four Delivery Processes for Transformational 587Government 114Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. each of which must be managed in a 574government-wide and citizen-centric way in order to deliver effective 575transformation: 576Business Management 577Customer Management 578Channel Management 579Technology Management 580A high-level map of these delivery processes and how their constituent elements 581interact is illustrated in summary below. setting out the best practices which 583should be followed in order to ensure conformance with the Transformational 584Government Framework. All Rights Reserved. The Transformational Government Framework 573identifies four main delivery processes. involves re-inventing every stage of 572the service delivery process.111 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 21 of 72 [Type the document title] . in line with the Critical 571Success Factors detailed in Component 2. 112 570Delivering the principles outlined in Component 1. The following sections then look in more 582detail at each of the four delivery processes. 110 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 113TGF-Primer-v1.

0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 22 of 72 [Type the document title] . 592Figure 4: Overview of the Business Management Framework 593• 594 595 596• 597 598 599• 600 601 602 603 604 605• 606 Transformational Government leadership: the key people and governance structures needed to develop and implement a Transformational Government program. All Rights Reserved. engaged and buy-in to the transformation program. 118TGF-Primer-v1. A Transformation Business Model: a new virtual business layer within government. consistent and common understanding of the key concepts involved in Transformational Government. A common terminology and Reference Model: ensuring that all stakeholders have a clear.116 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. how these concepts relate to each other. how they can be formally modelled. and how such models can be leveraged and integrated into new and existing information architectures. 117 588Business Management Framework 589The Transformational Government Framework identifies six key aspects of 590business management which must be tackled at the whole-of-government level: 115 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. focused round the needs of citizens and businesses (the 119Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. A collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model: the process by which all key stakeholders are identified.

121 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 122 607 “Franchise Marketplace”), which enables the existing silo-based structure of 608 government to collaborate effectively in understanding and meeting user 609 needs; 610• The development and management of Policy Products: these 611 documents formally define government-wide goals for achieving government 612 transformation and thus constitute the documented commitment of any 613 conformant agency to the transformational process; 614A Transformation Delivery Roadmap: giving a four to five year view of how 615the program will be delivered, with explicit recognition of priorities and trade-offs 616between different elements of the program.
Any conformant implementation of the TGF Business Management Framework: MUST have Leadership which involves: − Clear accountability at both the political and administrative levels − Deployment of formal program management disciplines − A clearly identified mix of leadership skills − Engagement of a broad-based leadership team across the wider government. MUST have a Collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model MUST have an agreed and shared terminology and reference model MUST have a Transformation Business Model SHOULD use the Franchise Marketplace Model MUST use the Policy Product Map to identify all necessary Policy Products MUST have a phased Transformation Roadmap

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617Further guidance on how to implement this process is given in Part III (a) of the 618Primer.

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[Type the document title]

126 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 127 619Customer Management Framework 620There are three key parts to the TGF Customer Management Framework: 621Brand-led Service Delivery: a user-focused framework for ensuring that: 622Detailed insight is gathered into citizen and business needs 623This insight informs a brand-led product management process covering all 624stages of government service design and delivery 625The brand values for Transformational Government then drive all aspects of 626marketing and communications for government services; 627Identity Management8: the business architecture, technical architecture, and 628citizen-centric identity model needed to enable secure and joined-up services 629which citizens and businesses will trust and engage with; and 630Citizen Empowerment: the internal cultural changes and external market631enabling actions which enable governments to engage with citizens and 632businesses as active co-creators of public services, rather than their passive 633recipients.
[Type the document title]

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634

635Figure 5: Overview of the Customer Management Framework

Any conformant implementation of the TGF Customer Management Framework: MUST have a Brand-led Service Delivery Strategy, which is agreed and managed at a whole-of-government level and which addresses: − Customer Insight; − Product Management; − Marketing and communication; MUST have a Citizen Identity Management Framework, which: − uses a federated business model;
1288 ‘Identity Management’ is correctly termed ‘Identity Information Management’ as identity itself is not
129technically managed but intrinsic to us as humans. It is often shortened to Identity Management, which will 130be used throughout.

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134 135
− −

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uses a service-oriented IT architecture; is citizen-centric, giving citizens control, choice and transparency over personal data; MUST have a Citizen Empowerment Framework, which encourages and enables service innovation in the Citizen-to-Citizen, Business-to-Citizen, and Citizen-to-Government sectors.

636Further guidance on how to implement this process is given in Part III (b) of this 637TGF Primer. 638Channel Management Framework 639The two key parts of the Channel Management Framework are: 640Channel Mapping: a clear audit of what channels are currently used to deliver 641government services. The TGF Channel Mapping approach includes an analysis of 642these channels across two key dimensions: which delivery channels are being 643used (‘channel mix’) and who owns them (‘channel ownership’). 644Channel Transformation Strategy: building a new channel management 645approach centred around the needs and behaviour of citizens and businesses. 646The key concerns of such an approach include: 647 − Channel Optimization; 648 − Channel Shift; 649 − Cross-Channel Management; and 650 − development of a “Mixed Economy” in service provision through private 651 and voluntary sector intermediaries.

652

653Figure 6: Overview of the Channel Management Framework

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[Type the document title]

654Further guidance on how to implement this process is given in Part III (c) of this 655TGF Primer. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. − Optimising the cost and performance of each channel. digital channels. 663Realisation and governance of ICT systems based on SOA principles 142Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.139 140 138 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 661actors and systems that comprise the overall service ecosystem and their 662relationships to each other. and their cost structures MUST have a Channel Transformation Strategy which addresses the following elements: − Shifting service users into lower cost. 141TGF-Primer-v1. − Improving cross-channel management.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 26 of 72 . Any conformant implementation of the Channel Management Framework: MUST have a clear mapping of existing channels. including through use of benchmarking. with the aim of providing a seamless user experience across different channels. 656Technology Management Framework [Type the document title] 657The elements of the TGF Technology Management Framework are as follows: 658Resources Management: the explicit identification and management of all 659information and technology resources. 660Ecosystem Participation: a clear model and understanding of the stakeholders. − Developing a thriving mixed economy in the delivery of government services by private and voluntary sector intermediaries. All Rights Reserved.

664 665Figure 7: Overview of the Technology Management Framework 147Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 27 of 72 [Type the document title] . The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. All Rights Reserved.144 145 143 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 146TGF-Primer-v1.

All Rights Reserved. 152Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. − Discrete service realisation and re-use that provides a capability to perform some work on behalf of another party.149 150 148 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. motivations and requirements that any SOA-based system is intended to address. valued assets including issues related to the Identification. stewardship and usage policies for each asset type. 666Further guidance on how to implement this process is given in Part III (d) of this 667TGF Primer. actors and systems that comprise the overall service ecosystem and their relationships to each other SHOULD maintain and update the stakeholder model on a regular basis MUST use the OASIS ‘Reference Model for SOA’ as the primary source for core concepts and definitions of the SOA paradigm. including − A clear understanding of the goals.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 28 of 72 [Type the document title] Any conformant implementation of the Technology Management Framework: MUST manage information and ICT system resources as distinct. 151TGF-Primer-v1. − The specification of any capability that is offered for use by another party with clear service descriptions and contracts SHOULD consider the OASIS ‘SOA Reference Architecture Framework’ when designing specific SOA-based systems . ownership. MUST explicitly model the stakeholders. − Identifiable boundaries of ownership of all components (and identity of the components themselves) in any SOA ecosystem. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

and tracking progress against 677 planned delivery trajectories aimed at achieving these success criteria.154 155 153 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 21 July 2011 Page 29 of 72 . and 678Benefit Delivery: which ensures that governance arrangements are in place to 679ensure continued benefits after the initial transformation program is 680implemented. 681The relationship between these parts and conformance criteria for this element 682of the TGF are shown below. the immediate outputs these produce. 674• Benefit Tracking: which takes this a step further by baselining current 675 performance against the target output and outcomes.0-cnprd01 157Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. and the final targeted outcomes MUST establish clear and quantified baselines for the current performance of target outputs and outcomes MUST set measurable success criteria SHOULD track progress against planned delivery trajectories for each of the targeted outputs and outcomes MUST establish clear accountability and governance structures to manage benefit delivery 156TGF-Primer-v1. 668Component 4: Benefit Realisation Strategy 669The three parts of the TGF Benefit Realisation Strategy are: 670• Benefit Mapping: which sets out all the intended outcomes from the 671 transformation program and gives visibility of how the outputs from specific 672 activities and investments in the program flow through to deliver those 673 outcomes. All Rights Reserved. defining “smart” 676 success criteria for future performance. [Type the document title] 683 684Figure 8: Overview of the Benefit Realisation Strategy Any conformant implementation of the Benefit Realisation Strategy: MUST clearly identify and quantify the impacts and outcomes that implementation of the TGF aims to achieve SHOULD ensure clear line-of-sight between every investment and activity in the programme.

159 160 685 158 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 161TGF-Primer-v1. All Rights Reserved. 162Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 30 of 72 [Type the document title] .

process of ICT-enabled change in the public sector 718Policy formulation and Policy Products 719 722 725 723 724 720 721 Goal A broadly stated. 693This enables any conformant agency to use a common terminology without 694ambiguity and be sure that these terms are used consistently throughout all 695work. Further guidance on how the 697terminology is composed and how a reference model may be used is given in 698Part III (a) of this Primer.0-cnprd01 . 696Some key concepts are already introduced below. 686Terminology and Reference Model 687The Business Management Framework of the TGF includes formal terminology 688and a reference model in order to ensure that all stakeholders have a clear. how 691they can be formally modelled. citizen-centred. unmeasured but desired outcome. Not to be confused with a Requirement Objective 21 July 2011 Page 31 of 72 167Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. engaged and buy-in to the transformation program 710Transformation Business Model 711 714 717 715 716 712 713 Delivery Roadmap A detailed multi-year plan for the delivery of an overall crossgovernment vision for service transformation Transformational Government A managed.164 165 163 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. [Type the document title] 699Core Terminology 700TGF Leadership. 166TGF-Primer-v1. All Rights Reserved. 689consistent and common understanding of the key concepts involved in 690Transformational Government. how these concepts relate to each other. Stakeholders. Administrations and Agencies 701 704 707 708 709 705 706 702 703 Leadership Key people and governance structures needed to develop and implement a Transformational Government program Stakeholder Any claimant inside or outside an organisation who have a vested interest in any problem and/or its solution Stakeholder Governance Model Model and process in which key stakeholders are identified. Not to be confused with an Objective Need A general statement expressed by a stakeholder of something that is required. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. and how such models can be leveraged and 692integrated into new and existing information architectures.

if achieved.169 170 728 729 730 731 726 727 168 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. measurable and achievable outcome that a participant seeks to achieve Policy Product A document that has been formally adopted on a government-wide basis and aimed at helping achieve one or other goal of citizen service transformation Requirement A formal statement of a desired result that. A specific. All Rights Reserved. Channel A particular means and/or path of delivery of a service to a customer 172Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 32 of 72 [Type the document title] . will satisfy a need 732 733 734 735Service delivery and the Franchise Marketplace Model 736 737 738 739 741 742 740 Accessibility A policy prescription that aims at ensuring that people with disabilities and the elderly can use public services with the same service levels as all other citizens. 171TGF-Primer-v1. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

for example. championing the needs of that segment within government. and delivering that content and services as part of the wider Franchise Marketplace. aggregating content and transactions for that segment from across government and beyond. disabled people. The Franchise Marketplace is the business model recommended by the TGF for best delivering the TGF Guiding Principle of “Build services around customer needs. System A collection of components organized to accomplish a specific function or set of functions 787 177Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. motorists. Inclusion A policy prescription that aims at allowing everyone to take full advantage of the opportunities offered by new technologies to overcome social and economic disadvantages and exclusion. trusted and interoperable content and transactions to citizens and businesses. by means of the exchange of data between their respective ICT systems.174 175 743 744 745 746 747 748 749 750 751 173 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. Franchise Marketplace The virtual business infrastructure within which Customer Franchises collaborate with each other and other stakeholders to deliver user-centric. through the business processes they support. Service-Oriented A paradigm for organizing and utilizing distributed capabilities that may be under the control of different ownership domains. land and property). involving the sharing of information and knowledge between the organisations. Service-Orientation. All Rights Reserved. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 176TGF-Primer-v1. Customer Franchise A collaborative organisation created by the government with the purpose of: understanding the needs of a specific customer segment for government services (such as.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 33 of 72 [Type the document title] . Delegate Some person or agent acting with authority on behalf of another person. parents. 752 753 754 755 756 757 758 759 761 762 764 765 766 760 763 767SOA and Technology Infrastructure 768 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 779 780 782 783 785 786 769 770 778 781 784 Ecosystem A set of ICT systems and stakeholders together with the environment and context within which they all operate Interoperability The ability of disparate and diverse organisations to interact towards mutually beneficial and agreed common goals. Security The set of mechanisms for ensuring and enhancing trust and confidence in a system. not organisational structure”.

793 794 795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 MUST have delivery processes for business management. channel management and technology management which address the best practices described in Component 2 of the TGF. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. MUST have a Collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model MUST have an agreed and common terminology and reference model MUST have a Transformation Business Model SHOULD use the Franchise Marketplace Model MUST use the Policy Product Map as a tool to help identify Policy Products needed within the relevant government MUST have a phased Transformation Roadmap b) A Customer Management Framework which: MUST have a Brand-led Service Delivery Strategy. this means: a) A Business Management Framework which: MUST have Leadership which involves: Clear accountability at both the political and administrative levels. Any conformant implementation of this Framework: 7911. Engagement of a broad-based leadership team across the wider government. which encourages and enables service innovation in the Citizen-to-Citizen. 788Conformance Criteria 789A consolidated view of the conformance criteria described in the TGF is given 790below.0-cnprd01 [Type the document title] . choice and transparency over personal data MUST have a Citizen Empowerment Framework.179 180 178 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. which: Uses a federated business model Uses a service-oriented architecture (as part of the wider SOA described in the TGF Technology Management Framework) Is citizen-centric. Specifically. giving citizens control. − Deployment of formal program management disciplines. Business-toCitizen. All Rights Reserved. 181TGF-Primer-v1. and Business-to-Government sectors c) A Channel Management Framework which: 21 July 2011 Page 34 of 72 182Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. MUST use the Guiding Principles set out in Component 1 of the TGF 7922. − A clearly identified mix of leadership skills. Citizen-to-Government. which is agreed and managed at a whole-of-government level and which addresses: Customer Insight Product Management Marketing and communication MUST have a Citizen Identity Management Framework. customer management.

ownership. independent review of performance against 859 these Critical Success Factors 8605. with the aim of providing a seamless user experience across different channels Developing a thriving mixed economy in the delivery of government services by private and voluntary sector intermediaries. All Rights Reserved. MUST have a clear mapping of existing channels. actors and systems that comprise the overall service ecosystem and their relationships to each other SHOULD maintain and update the stakeholder model on a regular basis MUST use the OASIS ‘Reference Model for SOA’ as the primary source for core concepts and definitions of the SOA paradigm.0-cnprd01 187Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 866A conformant private-sector organisation will be able to demonstrate and 867document that it provides products and services which help governments to 868comply with all these criteria. MUST have a Benefit Realisation Strategy which addresses the areas of 861 benefit mapping. Discrete service realisation and re-use that provides a capability to perform some work on behalf of another party. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. including A clear understanding of the goals. valued assets including issues related to the Identification.184 185 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 183 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. MUST explicitly model the stakeholders. 21 July 2011 Page 35 of 72 [Type the document title] . SHOULD seek regular. benefit tracking and benefit delivery as described in 862 Component 4 of the TGF 863In terms of the primary users identified for the TGF in Part I: 864A conformant government will be able to demonstrate and document that it is 865engaged in a Transformation Program which complies with all these criteria. and their cost structures MUST have a Channel Transformation Strategy which addresses the following elements: Shifting service users into lower cost. The specification of any capability that is offered for use by another party with clear service descriptions and contracts 8563. MUST measure and manage the Critical Success Factors outlined in 857 Component 3 of the TGF 8584. d) A Technology Management Framework which: MUST manage information and ICT system resources as distinct. motivations and requirements that any SOA-based system is intended to address. Identifiable boundaries of ownership of all components (and identity of the components themselves) in any SOA ecosystem. stewardship and usage policies for each asset type. digital channels Optimising the cost and performance of each channel. 186TGF-Primer-v1. including through use of benchmarking Improving cross-channel management.

All Rights Reserved. III: Guidance Notes 870This part of the TGF Primer sets out some initial guidance to help TGF users 871understand and implement the TGF.189 190 869Part 188 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. but this initial set of guidance 878notes is intended to give a deeper view of the context for these major elements 879of the TGF. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. and to highlight best practice approaches to its implementation. 191TGF-Primer-v1. 877We envisage issuing further guidance over time. 192Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 36 of 72 [Type the document title] . focusing in particular on: 872The TGF Business Management Framework 873The TGF Customer Management Framework 874The TGF Channel Management Framework 875The TGF Technology Management Framework 876TGF Terminology.

tax. focused round the needs of citizens and businesses. which enables 912the existing silo-based structure of government to collaborate effectively in 913understanding and meeting user needs 914The development and management of Policy Products that constitute the 915documented commitment to the transformational process of any conformant 916agency 197Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. governments are generally organised around 889individually accountable vertical silos (for example. and local government. III (a): Guidance on the TGF Business 881Management Framework 882Introduction 883The TGF Business Management Framework is in four main sections: 884Context 885Overview of key components in the TGF Business Management Framework 886Detailed description of and guidance on the key components 887Context 888For largely historical reasons. transport) with 890clear demarcations between central. 897Overview of key components in the TGF Business 898Management Framework 899The Transformational Government Framework identifies six key aspects of 900business management which need to be tackled in this way: 901Transformational Government leadership: the key people and governance 902structures needed to develop and implement a Transformational Government 903program 904A collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model: the process by which all 905key stakeholders are identified. consistent and common understanding of the key 909concepts involved in Transformational Government and how these inter-relate 910A Transformation Business Model: a new virtual business layer within 911government. several organisations can have responsibility for 892different aspects of the same person. All Rights Reserved. Yet citizen 893and business needs cut across these demarcations. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. same asset or same process. Even within 891a particular tier of government. health. In moving to a customer894centric approach. and to put in place business management processes which 896operate at the whole-of-government level. engaged and buy-in to the transformation 906program. including to the Guiding Principles described in Component 1 of the TGF 907A common terminology and reference architecture: ensuring that all 908stakeholders have a clear.194 195 880Part 193 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. it is vital to redress this fragmented approach to business 895management. regional. 196TGF-Primer-v1.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 37 of 72 [Type the document title] .

921illustrated below. 200 917A Transformation Delivery Roadmap: giving a four to five year view of how 918the program will be delivered. with explicit recognition of priorities and trade-offs 919between different elements of the program. 201TGF-Primer-v1.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 38 of 72 [Type the document title] . All Rights Reserved. However.199 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 920A high level view of the logical relationships between these components is 198 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 925There is no “ideal” leadership structure for a transformation program: the 926optimal positioning of the leadership team will depend on the context of each 927specific government. global experience suggests the following factors 928are vital to address in whichever way is most appropriate for the specific context: 929A clear focus of accountability: at both the political and administrative levels 930there should be an explicit functional responsibility for the Transformation 931Program. These functions should be occupied by individuals with sufficient 202Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 922Figure 9: Key components of the Business Management Framework 923Transformational Government Leadership 924Transformation programs require sustained leadership over a period of years.

including skill audit. The Skills Framework for the 217Information Age is owned by The SFIA Foundation: www. 21210 The Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) provides a common reference model for the 213identification of the skills needed to develop effective Information Systems (IS) making use of ICT. A significant 958effort is needed to include all stakeholders in the governance of the 959Transformational Government program at an appropriate and effective level. such as PRINCE 29. 211 203 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. planning future skill requirements. Sharing leadership roles 950with senior colleagues across the Government organisation is therefore 951important. a key feature of an effective 947roadmap for transformation is that it nurtures and grows support for the strategy 948through the implementation process.204 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. voluntary and community 957sectors as well as with business and citizen users of public services. It 945is not essential that all Ministers and senior management are committed to the 946transformation program from the outset. 937Ensuring the right skills mix in the leadership team. providing an easily tailored and scalable 207project management methodology for the management of all types of projects.SFIA. Further detail on this is set out in the section below on a collaborative 952stakeholder model. 218 219 221Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. enabling 214employers of ICT professionals to carry out a range of HR activities against a common framework of 215reference . All Rights Reserved. not only across the 956whole of government but also with the private sector. Deployment of a 942formal competency framework such as SFIA10 can be helpful in identifying and 943building the right skill sets. 934Deployment of formal program management disciplines: to deliver 935effective-Government-wide transformation. It is in the public domain. offering 209non-proprietorial best practice guidance on project management. 940including: strategy development skills. Effective leadership of a 938Transformation Program requires the senior accountable leaders to have access 939to a mix of key skills in the leadership team which they build around them. However. 216standardisation of job titles and functions. 205 932authority to command the resources and mobilise the support necessary to fulfil 933this mission. if it is to 2069 PRINCE2 is a process-based approach for project management.uk. PRINCE2 is a registered trademark of the 210UK government’s Office of Government Commerce. 960Key elements are set out below that a conformant TGF program will need to 961address in developing its Collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model. stakeholder engagement skills. it is vital to use a formalised program 936management approach. it is important that the program is 949seen not simply as a centralised or top-down initiative. 944Building a broad-based leadership team across the wider government. 220TGF-Primer-v1. commercial skills and technology management skills. development programmes. The method is the de-facto 208standard for project management in the UK and is practiced worldwide. marketing 941skills.org. 953Collaborative Stakeholder Governance Model 954Development and delivery of an effective Transformational Government program 955requires engagement with a very wide range of stakeholders.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 39 of 72 [Type the document title] . and resource allocation. Indeed.

0-cnprd01 226Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 224 962engage successfully with stakeholders and align them effectively behind shared 963objectives.223 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. All Rights Reserved. Each of these elements is then discussed in more detail. 222 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 968The Transformational Government Framework puts the individual – whether as a 969citizen or as someone acting within a business or other role – at the centre: 970 971Figure 11: Landscape of some key stakeholders 225TGF-Primer-v1. 964 965Figure 10: Overview of Collaborative Stakeholder Governance 967It is vital to describe and map the complete landscape of relevant stakeholders. 21 July 2011 Page 40 of 72 [Type the document title] 966Stakeholder Mapping .

we can start to understand how 984stakeholders relate (in different roles): to each other. for example. 980By clearly separating out key stakeholder groups and starting to understand and 981articulate their specific concerns as stakeholders (any individual’s role may vary 982according to context: in one situation.0-cnprd01 227 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. In reality stages are often 1013inter-related. case workers in a 991public administration or developers who have worked with them in delivering a 992specific service. and finally.228 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 988A service (or ICT capability made available as a service) is understood as 989responding to a set of requirements and policy goals (some of which overlap) – 990stakeholders concerned at this level include. in another. a policy983maker. preferring 974rather to identify the different interests and concerns that are at stake (the 975mauve labels) and the key groups of stakeholders (the different people icons) in 976the development of any service. 1004Citizen and Business Needs that. 993Requirements encapsulate and formalise vaguely stated goals and needs of 994citizens and businesses and take on board the policy goals of the political 995sponsor or champion – stakeholders at this level include. for example. 977The figure is by no means complete nor the only ‘valid’ view. the 997information and systems architects who capture those needs as formal 998requirements that engineers can work with to develop services. ultimately. It seeks instead to 978illustrate that the process of transformation requires reappraisal of the current 979set-up and assessment of what needs to change. to various administrations 985and services involved. can only be fully understood by the 1005people concerned themselves – nonetheless stakeholders at this level can also 1006include citizen or business associations. 1014The mapping of stakeholders and their principal concerns at a generic level is 1015used as a key input to the TGF reference model outlined in the next section and 1016that needs to be validated within any TGF program. 21 July 2011 Page 41 of 72 [Type the document title] . or another. 230TGF-Primer-v1. and how these all come 986together in a coherent ecosystem supported by a Transformational Government 987Framework. a person is a parent. managers 996of public service who can articulate the needs of their respective services. consumer and other interest groups who 1007engage with policy makers to advance the interests of certain groups with 1008distinct needs and are able to articulate those needs in ways that can be used by 1009analysts and consultants. goals and requirements. All Rights Reserved. 1010The various ellipses in the diagram above are deliberately not concentric circles. It is valuable as a tool for 1017encouraging collaborative governance as it renders explicit many of the 231Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1011This is to underline that the process of establishing a service or capability is not a 1012linear one going from needs. a service provider). 229 972This view deliberately and completely avoids the rather generic concept of ‘User’ 973that is dominant in traditional IT stakeholder engagement models. to policy drivers and constraints. In this view. 999Policy Goals capture the high-level concerns and priorities of the political 1000authorities and continually assess how these goals reflect key citizen and 1001business concerns – stakeholders include policy makers and senior management 1002as well as consultants and analysts involved in helping identify technology and 1003administrative trends that can be used to leverage those goals.

An effective TGF program will also address the three 1023other dimensions of the model illustrated above: 1024Stakeholder Engagement Structures: the organisational arrangements put in 1025place to lead the transformation programme. e. but any conformant TGF 1046program needs to make sure that it has used the framework above to define its 1047own Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement Model which explicitly articulates all 1048of these elements: a comprehensive stakeholder map. 1051Collaboration between TGF Programs 1052The model clearly focuses attention within any specific TGF program. 1055In the figure below. 236Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. but 1038typical levers being deployed include: 1039 central mandates 1040 political leadership 1041 administrative championship 1042 personal performance incentives for government officials 1043alignment between public policy objectives and the commercial objectives of 1044private sector partners. plus effective stakeholder action in support of it. However 1053(and increasingly) collaboration is required also between governments and. it is not enough simply to map and understand stakeholder 1022relationships and concerns. between TGF programs. we see that collaboration between TGF programs is favoured 1056at the political. All Rights Reserved.233 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. coupled with the 1049structures. These will vary by government. 234 1018relationships and concerns that are often left implicit but nonetheless impact on 1019an organisation’s ability to reflect stakeholders’ concerns. 235TGF-Primer-v1. 1036Stakeholder Incentives: the set of levers available to drive change through 1037these governance structures and processes.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 42 of 72 [Type the document title] . 1020The Stakeholder Engagement Model 1021However. 232 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. at the more ‘tightly-coupled’ semantic and technical levels. e. by 1054implication. if and when 1057necessary.: 1031 reporting and accountability processes 1032 risk management processes 1033 issue escalation processes 1034 consultation processes 1035collaborative product development processes. legal and organisational levels and only later.g.: 1026 central unit(s) 1027 governance boards 1028industry partnership board 1029Stakeholder Engagement Processes: the processes and work flows through 1030which the TGF Leadership and the different TGF Stakeholders interact. processes and incentives needed to deliver full understanding and 1050buy-in to the program. 1045There is no one right model for doing this successfully.g.

often 1084implicitly accepted labels for concepts. For example. 1082Why have a terminology and reference model? 1083In everyday life. a business wishing to establish itself in a second 1066country may need to provide authenticated information and credentials managed 1067by government or business in the first country. 1079We therefore recommend that a TGF-conformant transformation program should 1080seek to agree with stakeholders a common Terminology and Transformation 1081Reference Model. 1058 1059Figure 12: Collaboration between TGF programs through different levels of 1060Interoperability 1061This approach is also consistent with the SOA paradigm for service development 1062– not only are requirements defined and services offered independently of any 1063underlying technology or infrastructure but also one TGF program can be seen 1064(and may need to be seen) as a ‘service provider’ to another TGF program’s 1065‘service request’. 1068A further advantage of this approach is that it becomes easier to identify and 1069manage high level government requirements for services: whether in the choice 1070of ICT standards that may need to be used to address a particular technology 1071issue or determining the criteria for awarding public procurement contracts. 1075Common Terminology and Reference Model 1076In any change program of this breadth and complexity. it is vital that all 1077stakeholders have a common understanding of the key concepts involved and 1078how they interrelate. ‘service’ – as common. we use terms – ‘citizen’.238 239 237 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. The concept is the abstract mental idea 241Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. ‘need’.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 43 of 72 [Type the document title] . All Rights Reserved. and have a common language to describe these in. this 1072approach allows a ‘loose-coupling’ at the level of clearly defined high-level policy 1073needs rather than the more tightly-coupled and often brittle approach of 1074specifying particular technologies. software or systems. 240TGF-Primer-v1. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

24712 “Terminology work – Vocabulary – Part 1: Theory and application” [ISO 1087-1:2000] 249Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.an 1095organisational unit (such as ‘Passport Service’) or something that is performed by 1096one for another (such as ‘a dry cleaning service’). our stakeholders. an ontology is a formal representation of 1108knowledge as a set of concepts within a domain. 244 1085(which should be universal and language independent) to which the term gives a 1086material expression in a specific language. In information science. where the core item of organisation is the 246concept. the distinction is 1088important as it is common concepts that we wish to work with. etc. our business activities. It can be used to describe the domain (the coverage should be 1110sufficiently comprehensive to include all concepts relevant to the domain) and to 1111reason about the domain. It is the broader understanding of the 1104relationships between concepts that give those concepts fuller meaning and 1105allow us to model our world. not the term. definitions and relationships between concepts that the Framework will 1114use consistently as an internally coherent set. 1112The TGF does not include a formal ontology but is sufficiently clear in its 1113concepts. for example. As the 1098TGF is intended for use anywhere in the world. in a 1106way that increases the chance that our digital systems are an accurate reflection 1107of our work. and the relationships between 1109those concepts. it is important to ensure that 1099(ideally) global concepts can be transposed and translated and thus understood 1100in other languages: we therefore need to associate an explicit definition with 1101each concept as we do in a dictionary. Particularly in an international 1087environment such as global standardization initiatives. not common 1089terms11. 1117The TGF Primer already includes formal definitions of key concepts used 1118throughout the Framework and a complete terminology and reference model – 1119that formalizes the concepts and the relationships between them – is prepared as 1120a separate deliverable. 248TGF-Primer-v1. [Type the document title] 242 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. It does include however a 1115“reference model” that is clear enough that subsequent ontology development is 1116possible if so desired. the English term ‘service’ can refer to different concepts . whereas discrete terms are 1097used for the discrete concepts in German (‘Dienst’ or ‘Dienstleistung’).243 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. or a single term in one language could be understood to refer 1093to more than one concept which another language expresses with discrete 1094terms: For example. Terms that may 1091seem similar or the same across two or more languages may actually refer to 1092different concepts. however. All Rights Reserved.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 44 of 72 . 24511 This is central to all multi-lingual thesauri. The TGF uses the structure and 1102methodology of an existing international standard to create its terminology12 1103Concepts do not exist in isolation. 1090This distinction also helps avoid common modelling pitfalls.

254Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 253TGF-Primer-v1. has been the greatest weakness of most traditional e-Government 1128programmes. 1131budgets. The experience of governments around the world over the last two 1134decades is that this simply does not work. 1135So what is the new business model which is required to deliver citizen service 1136transformation? Many attempts have been made by governments to introduce 1137greater cross-government coordination. All Rights Reserved.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 45 of 72 [Type the document title] . A top-level view of such a virtual. 1126It is failure to address this requirement for a new business model which. and hence experience only limited success. For the most part. 1139The Franchise Marketplace Model 1140This Framework recommends implementation of a business model which permits 1141the joining-up of services from all parts of government and external stakeholders 1142in a way that makes sense to citizens and businesses. but intermediated by a "virtual" business infrastructure based around 1146customer needs. the transition to e-Government has involved 1129overlaying technology onto the existing business model of government: a 1130business model based around unconnected silos . but largely these have been "bolted on" 1138to the underlying business model. accountability. yet without attempting to 1143restructure the participating parts of government. Conceptually. 252 1121Transformation Business Model 1122Weaknesses of current models 1123A central task of the TGF leadership and collaborative stakeholder model is to 1124develop a new and effective business model which enables the machinery of 1125government to deliver citizen-centric services in practice. this leads to a 1144model where the existing structure of government continues to act as a supplier 1145of services. decision-making and service delivery are all embedded 1132within a vertically-integrated delivery chain based around specific government 1133functions.in which policy-making. market-based approach to 1147citizen service transformation is set out in the figure below: 250 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 1127arguably.251 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

possibly.which in turn. All Rights Reserved. is proven to drive higher service take-up and 1157greater customer satisfaction. 1166 some outside of government 1167 − Dividing the task into manageable chunks 1168 − Removing a single point of failure 1169 − Working to a new and precisely-defined operating model so as to ensure 1170 consistency 259Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1148 1149Figure 13: Overview of the Franchise Marketplace 1150Key features of this business model are: 1151The model puts into place a number of agile cross-government virtual "franchise 1152businesses" based around customer segments (such as. 258TGF-Primer-v1. 1153motorists. They do this by : 1161 − Enabling government to create a "virtual" delivery structure focused on 1162 customer needs 1163 − Operating across the existing structure of Government (because they are 1164 led by one of the existing "silos") and resourced by organisations that 1165 have close links with the relevant customer segment including. regional and local to work together 1160in a customer-focused "Delivery Community". for example. parents. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 46 of 72 [Type the document title] . These franchises are responsible for gaining full 1154understanding of their customers' needs so that they can deliver quickly and 1155adapt to changing requirements over time in order to deliver more customer 1156centric services .256 257 255 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. disabled people). 1158Franchises provide a risk-averse operational structure that enables functionally1159organised government agencies at national.

263TGF-Primer-v1.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 47 of 72 . business and social 1204scenarios. by providing a clear market framework within which private and 1176 voluntary sector service providers can repackage public sector content 1177 and services. 1200Partners: Those who are actors in the normal operation and delivery of the 1201service.0’ type approaches across government that 1179 promote re-use and ‘mash-ups’ of existing content and services. and 1178 − secondly by deploying ‘Web 2. 1174The model enables a "mixed economy" of service provision: 1175 − firstly. 1184Certainly. 1202Influencers: those who have a political. Croatia. But however 1189the Transformational Government agenda develops. 1188It is clearly possible that alternate models may develop in future. 1181The whole model is capable of being delivered using Cloud Computing 1182This Franchise model represents an important break-through in the shift from a 1183traditional e-Government approach towards citizen service transformation. 1193Enabling the Franchise Marketplace Model 1194A number of relationships need to be managed by a franchise to enable it to 1195develop. maintain and deliver transformational citizen-centric services.261 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. [Type the document title] 260 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. every government will need 1190to find some sort of new business model along these lines. plus those internal stakeholders to whom the franchise 1199provides a service within the government. 262 1171 − Working across and beyond government to manage the key risks to 1172 citizen-centric service delivery 1173 − Acting as change agents inside-Government departments / agencies. All Rights Reserved. 1205Internal Customers: Those who work with the franchise to develop and 1206maintain the service. Abu Dhabi 1186and Australia (where it has been adopted by both the South Australia and 1187Queensland governments). 264Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. to make 1180 this simpler and cheaper at a technical level. Hong Kong. These 1196represent different viewpoints that can be broadly classified as: 1197Customers: Those citizens and businesses to whom the franchise delivers 1198content and services. both internally and externally to the government. rather than continue 1191simply to overlay technology onto an old silo-based business model built for an 1192un-networked world. the model as a whole or key elements of it has been adopted 1185successfully in governments as diverse as the UK. business or altruistic interest in the 1203service and the part that it plays in broader government.

consultative and transparent manner. 1217The franchise is responsible for ensuring that all relationships with external 1218bodies are managed and for the provision of supporting assets necessary to 1219allow organisations within the franchise and working with it to discharge their 1220responsibilities in an open. 1207 1208Figure 14: Relationships in the Franchise Marketplace 1209The Franchise 1210The franchise is based around a customer segment. this group SHOULD to be 269Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. Once operational. and state government and others that contribute to 1212serving that segment. regional.266 267 265 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. It may contain bodies drawn 1211from central. All Rights Reserved. 1224Customers 1225Customers are the most important actors in operational services as the services 1226MUST address their needs and those of the people that they represent. it is essential that they are consulted during the 1228proposal stage for all services. it is not intended to add 1222unnecessary bureaucracy – rather. 268TGF-Primer-v1.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 48 of 72 [Type the document title] . 1221Despite the importance of the franchise concept. 1213It MUST have a lead organisation that ensures its interests are represented to 1214other franchises and bodies. it is intended to provide a lightweight 1223framework within which participants can work naturally and cooperatively. as well as being users. It MUST also have sponsoring organisations that 1215with a responsibility for the full range of service perspectives across the 1216segment. 1227Thus.

e. 1265Over recent years. it is vital that they are able to steer developments within 1252and across franchises. 1244It is essential that they ensure the provision and availability of assets that are 1245universal (i. However. 1231It is vital that Franchises identify their internal government customers and apply 1232similar customer research and customer satisfaction measurement to these 1233internal customer relationships as well as to external ones. 1249Influencers 1250The influencers are those who identify. through mandated policies. others just a few 1261paragraphs of text). and second because 1264they then become vital communication and management tools.271 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 272 1229involved in customer satisfaction exercises and the development of any service 1230enhancements to ensure that their needs continue to be met. 1263can help ensure strategic clarity and stakeholder buy-in. [Type the document title] 270 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. fundamental items that are required by all public sector 1246organisations) or common (i. the need for a 1251service. if managed effectively. 1255Policy Product Management 1256We define a "Policy Product" as: any document which has been formally adopted 1257on a government-wide basis in order to help achieve the goals of citizen service 1258transformation.e. and other governments are therefore able to draw on these as 1268reference models when developing their own Policy Products. to informal guidance and best practice) 1260and in length (some may be very lengthy documents. All Rights Reserved. Policy Products are important drivers of change within 1262government: first because the process of producing them. The partnership may involve: 1237• working with the franchise to develop and maintain the service 1238providing the supporting assets which give a technical underpinning for this and 1239other services. 21 July 2011 Page 49 of 72 . Accordingly.0-cnprd01 274Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1234Partners 1235Many partners will be involved in helping the Franchise effectively to deliver the 1236requirements of its customer segment. 1240The supporting assets provide the technical underpinning for project delivery. These documents vary in nature (from statutory documents with 1259legal force. it is intended that they will provide light-touch 1242governance and facilities (primarily technical) to support franchises and inter1243working between them and with standards bodies. assets used across multiple franchises). 1247Tooling SHOULD to be provided with the aim of supporting all stakeholders and 1248facilitating their collaboration. and possibly mandate. several governments have published a wide range of Policy 1266Products as part of their work on Interoperability Frameworks and Enterprise 1267Architectures. we 273TGF-Primer-v1. 1241Where they are publically owned. They also have a responsibility to ensure that all 1253stakeholders are aligned and are organisationally capable of discharging their 1254responsibilities.

taking the Committee Note into account as 1295guidance. 279Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 277 1269believe that the set of Policy Products required to ensure that a holistic.the European Interoperability Framework (EIF): 1280technical. Single sign-on architecture Channel Managemen t Intermediarie s Policy Web accessibility guidelines Presentation architecture Technology Information Service level Physical data Interoperabilit Managemen Security agreements model y Framework t policy 1284Figure 15: A Policy Product Map completed with examples of individual policy products. The TGF Policy Product Map Business Managemen t Customer Managemen t Political Interoperabi lity Strategic Business Case for overall Programme Identity Management Strategy Legal Interoperabi lity Legal vires for interagency collaboration Privacy. 278TGF-Primer-v1. Although the detailed Policy Products in that note are advisory and 1291not all of them may be needed. 1270government -wide vision for transformation can be delivered is much broader 1271than is currently being addressed in most Interoperability Frameworks and 1272Enterprise Architectures. by mapping it against these core 1282delivery processes. organisational. 1273A TGF-conformant transformation program will use the matrix shown below to 1274create a map of the Policy Products that are needed to deliver the program 1275effectively. data protection and data security legislation Procompetitive regulatory framework for the telecoms sector Procurement legislation Organisatio nal Interoperabi lity Benefits Realisation Plan Federated trust model for crossagency identity management Channel Management guidelines Semantic Interoperabi lity Business Process Model Common data standards Technical Interoperabi lity Technology roadmap 275 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. legal and policy interoperability. Customer Management.276 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. any conformant transformation program MUST 1292use the overall framework and matrix of the Policy Product Map in order to 1293conduct at minimum a gap analysis aimed at identifying the key Policy Products 1294needed for that government. a much clearer sense can be gained of the actions which are 1283needed. Channel 1277Management and service-oriented Technology Management) against the five 1278interoperability domains identified in what is currently the broadest of 1279Interoperability Frameworks . 1285Each cell in the matrix may contain one or more policy products depending on the 1286outcome of relevant analysis 1287A full analysis of the Policy Products which we recommend are typically needed 1288to deliver an effective and holistic transformation program will be included in a 1289separate Committee Note “Tools and Models for the Business Management 1290Framework”. semantic. All Rights Reserved. This matrix maps the four delivery processes described in Component 12762 of the TGF (Business Management.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 50 of 72 [Type the document title] . While the 1281EIF framework is conceptually complete.

1302which can be done later.that is. it is essential that the vision. we recommend 1310that the major strategic focus should be on safe delivery . and 1325embedding the strategy in effective governance processes. All Rights Reserved. 1321As the diagram below makes clear. to start driving out some of the more 1319significant transformational benefits that high levels of service take-up enables. and to balance quick 1308wins with the key steps needed to drive longer term transformation. and in what order. 1309In the early days of the Transformational Government program. 1316building demand for online services and creating a critical mass of users. 284Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. it is vital to map out which 1301elements of the transformation programme need to be started immediately.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 51 of 72 [Type the document title] . 1305However. but overlap. But the diagram 280 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.281 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 282 1296Transformation Roadmap 1297Finally. 1314As the programme develops.but which can be delivered with very low levels of risk. strategy. all governments face the same strategic trade-offs: needing to ensure 1306clear line-of-sight between all aspects of programme activity and the end 1307outcomes which the Government is seeking to achieve. prioritising 1311high benefit actions which help to accelerate belief and confidence across the 1312Government and the wider stakeholder community that ICT-enabled change is 1313possible and beneficial . and an increasing number of services become 1315available. 283TGF-Primer-v1. the strategic focus can start to shift towards 1318fuller transformation: in other words. 1324particularly in respect of establishing the business case for transformation. Crucially. Once 1317that critical mass starts to appear. There is no one-size-fits all strategy 1303which governments can use. 1320for example in terms of reducing the cost of government service delivery. in the Safe Delivery phase there will also be 1323some vital steps needed in order to pave the way for longer term transformation. the strategic focus can move towards building take-up: that is. business model and policies for 1298citizen service transformation are translated into an effective Transformation 1299Roadmap. since strategy needs to be tailored to the unique 1304circumstances of each government's situation. 1300Since everything can clearly not be done at once. these strategic foci are not mutually 1322exclusive.

to ensure that the business case for transformation is fully 1335articulated. the first version of the major "one-stop" citizen-facing delivery 289Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. and that all key stakeholders are on-board. setting out the actions needed to 1350 ensure full downstream delivery of the intended benefits from the 1351 transformation programme.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 52 of 72 [Type the document title] . for a 1357minimum of delivery risk and using little or no technology expenditure 1358embedding the Roadmap in governance structures and processes which will be 1359needed to inform all future investments. an effective Delivery 1331Roadmap will cover five main phases. the focus is on building the maximum of 1354momentum behind the Roadmap for the minimum of delivery risk. covering. 1332Plan 1333The preparation and planning needed to develop a tailored Delivery Roadmap for 1334the Government. experience shows 1330that a phased approach is the most successful. Key outputs from this 1336phase should include: 1337Transformation vision: a high level document setting out the agreed future model 1338for transformation of our client organisation and its re-engineered business 1339processes 1340Strategic business case: the key costs and benefits associated with the 1341transformation programme 1342Delivery roadmap: a multi-year transformation plan.286 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. customer service standards and issue/risk management that will be 1361required 1362selecting effective delivery partners. 287 1326shows how the strategic weight between each consideration should shift over 1327time. All Rights Reserved. among other 1343things: 1344 − A change management plan (including communication and training plans) 1345 − Central capability building and governance processes 1346 − A sourcing strategy 1347 − A strategy for moving towards a service oriented ICT architecture 1348 − A risk management strategy 1349 − A high level benefit realisation plan. 1328Figure 16: Roadmap priorities over time 285 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 288TGF-Primer-v1. 1363Deliver 1364In this phase. 1329Guided by the strategic trade-off framework described above. 1352Initiate 1353In this first phase of delivery. some of the more significant investments start coming on stream 1365for example. This means 1355focusing in particular on three things: 1356some early quick wins to demonstrate progress and early benefits. Typically. notably the frameworks of enterprise 1360architecture.

and complete the transition to the full strategic IT 1377platform needed to guarantee future agility as business and customer priorities 1378change.291 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. and using that feedback to specify changes to the business and 1372technology architectures being developed as longer term. 290 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 53 of 72 [Type the document title] . and the first wave of transformation projects from "champion" or 1367"early adopter" agencies within the Government 1368Consolidate 1369In this phase. the focus shifts towards driving take-up of the initial services. learning from user 1371feedback. drive forward the migration of all major citizen-facing services towards 1376the new one-stop channels. 293TGF-Primer-v1. the program looks to build out the broader range of e-transformation 1375projects. All Rights Reserved. 294Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1370expanding the initial one-stop service over more channels. strategic solutions 1373Transform 1374Finally. 292 1366platforms.

296 297 1379Part 295 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. This in turn 1397often requires new skills and management practices to be brought into 1398government. 298TGF-Primer-v1. event-level understanding of citizen and business interactions with government” .0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 54 of 72 [Type the document title] “Develop a detailed and segmented understanding of your citizen and business customers: • Own the customer at the whole-of-government level. The TGF Customer Management Framework draws together best 1399practice on how to do this. market-driven 1396approach to every step of the service design and delivery process. research. research. III (b): Guidance on the TGF Customer 1380Management Framework 1381Introduction 1382The TGF Customer Management Framework is in three main sections: 1383Context 1384Overview of key components in the TGF Customer Management Framework 1385Detailed description of and guidance on the key components 1386Context 1387The first of the Guiding Principles identified in Component 1 of the TGF is: 1390 1391 1393 1394 1392 1388 1389 1395Putting these principles into practice involves taking a holistic. 1400Overview of key components in the TGF Customer 1401Management Framework 1402There are three key components of the TGF Customer Management Framework: 1403Brand-led Service Delivery 1404Identity Management 1405Citizen Empowerment 1406A high level view of the logical relationships between these components is 1407illustrated below. 299Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. • Don't assume you know what users of your services think research. All Rights Reserved. • Invest in developing a real-time. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.

as being equivalent to 1414advertising or perhaps. yet is something 1412at which government traditionally does not excel. 1415Properly understood. in a way which fully delivers 1424on the brand values 1425Generating awareness about the offer 1426Creating desire/demand for the offer 1427Reminding people 1428Changing the offer in the light of experience 1429This is the process that a brand-led consumer product company such as Proctor 1430and Gamble or Virgin would go through when developing a new product. the 1433challenge faced by governments is significantly more complex than any private 1434sector company. marketing is 1413fundamentally misunderstood within government . All Rights Reserved. however.a set of underpinning 1421statements that adequately describe what the product or service will deliver and 1422how 1423Delivering that offer though appropriate channels. Yet if governments are to succeed in the ambition of shifting service 303TGF-Primer-v1. and governments generally lack the skills to do it. more broadly. Moreover. 21 July 2011 Page 55 of 72 . 1408 1409Figure 17: Overview of the Customer Management Framework [Type the document title] 1410Brand and Marketing Strategy 1411Marketing is critical to effective citizen service transformation.301 302 300 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. it is not typically how governments manage their own service 1432development.0-cnprd01 304Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1431However. as being equivalent to communication. Often. marketing is the process of: 1416Understanding the target market for government services in all its breadth and 1417complexity 1418Learning what is needed in order to meet citizen needs 1419Developing an offer for citizens and businesses that they will engage with 1420Establishing a clear set of brand values for that offer . The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. given the greater range and complexity of services and 1435governments need to provide a universal service rather than pick and choose its 1436customers.

0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 56 of 72 [Type the document title] . 1439And given the fact that a) citizen needs cut across organisational boundaries in 1440government and b) the skills for delivering an effective brand-led marketing 1441approach to service transformation will inevitably be in short supply. All Rights Reserved. 308TGF-Primer-v1. A key output from this will be a set of 1457brand values for the service.306 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 309Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. and involves a 1452comprehensive programme of qualitative and quantitative research to 1453understand and segment the customer base for government services. 1438then these marketing challenges have to be met. 1443A TGF-conformant Transformation Program will establish government-wide 1444processes for managing the three core elements of the TGF Brand-led Service 1445Delivery Framework illustrated below: 305 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.not as a one-off input of initial research. it is 1442important that these challenges are addressed at a government-wide level. and marketing communications for the service. but through a continuous process of 1456iterative design and customer testing. 307 1437delivery decisively away from traditional channels to lower-cost digital channels. 1446 1447Figure 18: Brand-led Service Delivery Framework 1448Citizen insight 1449Brand-led product management 1450Marketing communications 1451Citizen insight must inform all aspects of the process. The 1454learnings from this need to be fed into a brand-led product management process 1455. which then need to drive all aspects of service 1458delivery.

across a range of channels. [Type the document title] 310 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 1484Identity is a complex. best practice management information 1464systems can be deployed to ensure that the Government now has real-time. concept. legal and social issues around online identity assurance (such as 1479promoted by Open Identity Exchange.php?wg_abbrev=pmrm 31414 See http://openidentityexchange. 1460Continuous citizen insight research is needed to ensure that both the service 1461delivery experience and the marcoms activity remain aligned with the brand 1462values. 1468Often. It is not the purpose of the 1480Transformational Government Framework to address the details of identity 1481management or recommend specific policies or approaches but rather to give 1482high-level guidance on the main issues that a conformant program should seek 1483to address. 1475A wide range of agencies. a single citizen in fact has multiple.org/committees/tc_home. 31313 See http://www.org/ 316Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. and by definition deeply personal. 1471Identity Management 1472Identity management is a key enabler. As the following 1485figure illustrates. 312 1459This is an iterative process of continuous improvement. As the service is 1463implemented. At the heart of that struggle is often a failure to put the 1474citizen at the centre of government's thinking about identity. from technical models for privacy 1477management (such as the OASIS PMRM technical committee13) through to the 1478business. through successive phases of release deployment. this will require the Government to bring in specialist resources. 315TGF-Primer-v1. not a linear one. OIX14). All Rights Reserved. yet something with which most 1473governments struggle. standards bodies and advocacy groups are deeply 1476involved in many aspects of this work. because 1469typically it may face significant gaps in terms of the people and skills needed to 1470manage brand-led product development and marketing cycles of this nature.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 57 of 72 .311 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 1465event-level management information about the experience of all customers 1466which in turn provides a powerful feedback loop into further innovation in the 1467service design. overlapping "identities".oasis-open.

Although the advent of e-Government held out the promise of 1499significant simplification of identity management . The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply.bringing service improvement 1500gains for the citizen and efficiency savings for the Government . And attempts to join up databases to 1509enable cross-government efficiencies and service improvements have often been 1510met with mistrust and suspicion by citizens. 1497have tended to build up separate and inconsistent business processes for identity 1498verification. 321Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. have in practice acted 1508as barriers to take-up of online services. These include legal barriers that have grown up over centuries 1502of piecemeal approaches taken by public administrations (as well as.318 319 317 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.significant 1501barriers remain. 1491the citizen may want them to be joined up. identity 1494is defined separately in relation to each silo-based government service. 1486 1487Figure 19: Complexity of identities 1488Each identity may be associated with different rights and permissions. and be frustrated at constantly 1492having to furnish government with the same information over and over again. At other times. but in some cases the citizen may 1490want to keep them separate in order to protect his or her privacy. more 1503recently. Typically. also by the private sector) and put in place often to protect individuals 1504from the effects of equally piecemeal processes. where there has been a single population register since 1634). 1506Many of the tools which governments have put in place to guarantee security in 1507the online world (passwords. 1493Governments have often struggled to manage this complexity. PINs. 320TGF-Primer-v1. All Rights Reserved. As such the impact of any 1505changes must be considered very carefully.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 58 of 72 [Type the document title] . even 1489different addresses. Even 1495countries which have traditionally had the simplicity of a single citizen identifier 1496(such as Finland. These identities overlap. digital signatures etc).

a technology architecture to support this which does not rely on 1522monolithic and potentially vulnerable large databases.323 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. in line with the 1523SOA paradigm. 1526Citizen-centric Identity Model 1527Thirdly .0-cnprd01 326Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. a business architecture for identity management which is based on 1517federation between a wide range of trusted organisations (the Government. 21 July 2011 Page 59 of 72 . and a clear model for cross-trust between these 1519organisations. a set of best practices is emerging around the world which 1512we believe represents a way forward for citizen service transformation. 324 1511Increasingly. 1514Key aspects of this are: 1515Business Architecture 1516Firstly.and perhaps most importantly . however. All Rights Reserved. This 1532citizen-centric approach to identity management is illustrated in the figure below. which is 1513broadly applicable across a very wide range of governments. 1518banks. but all are 1536being successfully deployed around the world. but which.a citizen service model for identity 1528management which places citizens themselves directly in control of their own 1529data. employers etc). uses Internet-based gateway services to act as a broker between 1524the different databases and IT systems of participants in the federated trust 1525model. 325TGF-Primer-v1. and together they represent our 1537view of the approach to identity management which will best help deliver 1538Transformational Government. 1520Technical Architecture 1521Secondly. 1533 1534Figure 20: Overview of Citizen-Centric Identity Model 1535No one-Government has implemented all features of this approach. [Type the document title] 322 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. able to manage their own relationship with government – whether on their 1530own behalf as citizens or in another identity relationship or intermediated role – 1531and with clearly visible controls to reassure them that this is the case.

is particularly challenging in the 1566 public sector given the strong tradition of internal control over decision1567 making and policy development.although such technologies do have a role to play. 1551The key shift is to think of service delivery not as something which is done by 1552government to citizens and businesses but as something in which they are active 1553co-creators of services . which we 1560believe are important to address as part of a Transformational Government 1561program: 1562• Action on the supply side within government. 331Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. It is also more 1549fundamental than the application of the latest generation of technologies to 1550government . 1545What does this mean in practice? 1546Citizen empowerment involves a set of changes which are much more 1547fundamental than the online consultations and "e-participation" initiatives which 1548characterised the first wave of e-Government programmes. 329 1539Citizen Empowerment Framework 1540We argued in Part I of the TGF that a defining feature of Transformational 1541Government programs is that they focus on the "citizen" not the "customer" 1542that is.328 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. Such a culture change . So pro-active change management is 1568 essential.which reflects an 1564 increasing trend in the private sector to see external ideas and collaborations 1565 as being the key to successful innovation .0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 60 of 72 [Type the document title] . 1557 1558Figure 21: Overview of Citizen Empowerment Framework 1559This figure also highlights two important enablers of this innovation.or even where public services are delivered directly 1554citizen-to-citizen with no or minimal government involvement. All Rights Reserved. they seek to engage with citizens and businesses as owners of and 1543participants in the creation of public services. Innovators in 1555government who are making that shift are starting to develop a wide range of 1556new ways to create public value and enhance services. as illustrated: 327 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 330TGF-Primer-v1. not as passive recipients of 1544services. to help create a culture of open 1563 innovation within the public sector.

Action to enable demand-side pull by citizens and third party organisations outside-Government. By opening up government data.which for digital information means free. Particularly important here is the principle that all nonpersonal data held by government should be open. Most governments also find that simply making data and content available in theory is not sufficient: in practice they also need to facilitate market-based public service delivery by: − building a business model of rules and processes which enable a levelplaying field for new market entrants (see the “Wholesale Intermediary Market” component of Part III (b)) − establishing a service-oriented technology architecture based around open standards and technologies which makes it easier in practical terms for third parties to re-purpose and repackage-Government content (see Part III (d)).0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 61 of 72 [Type the document title] .333 334 1569• 1570 1571 1572 1573 1574 1575 1576 1577 1578 1579 1580 1581 1582 1583 1584 1585 332 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. and available at marginal cost . public. easily reusable. content and services for reuse and repurposing by others. 336Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 335TGF-Primer-v1. All Rights Reserved. government can enable a level of service innovation and market reach that it could not hope to achieve on its own.

The key components of such an approach include: 1621 − Channel Optimization 1622 − Channel Shift 1623 − Cross-Channel Management 341Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. Experience has 1596shown the common pitfalls to include: 1597Managing new. by building 1608a channel management approach centred around the needs and behaviour of 1609citizens and businesses. digital channels as "bolt-ons". 340TGF-Primer-v1.338 339 1586Part 337 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. inefficiency and lack of user-focus. The TGF Channel Mapping approach includes an 1616analysis of these channels across two key dimensions: which delivery channels 1617are being used (‘channel mix’) and who owns them (‘channel ownership’). unit costs and service standards for many channels which 1602fall well below standards set for those channels in the private sector 1603A reliance on government-owned channels. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 1610Overview of key components in the TGF Channel 1611Management Framework 1612The two key elements of the approach recommended in the Transformational 1613Government Framework are: 1614Channel Mapping: a clear audit of what existing channels are currently used to 1615deliver government services.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 62 of 72 [Type the document title] . with insufficient understanding of 1604how to partner with private and voluntary sector organisations who have existing 1605trusted channels to government customers 1606Unproductive and costly competition among service delivery channels 1607Transformational Government programs seek to avoid these pitfalls. All Rights Reserved. with business and technical 1598architectures which are entirely separate from traditional face-to-face or paper1599based channels 1600No common view of citizen service across multiple channels 1601Operational practices. III (c): Guidance on the TGF Channel 1587Management Framework 1588Introduction 1589The TGF Channel Management Framework is in two main sections: 1590• Context 1591• Overview of key components in the TGF Channel Management Framework 1592 Detailed description of and guidance on the key components 1593Context 1594Channel management is often a weak spot in government service delivery. 1618Channel Transformation Strategy: the TGF helps build a new channel 1619management approach centred around the needs and behaviour of citizens and 1620businesses. with 1595widespread duplication.

having multiple high-street locations in the same town serving 1636different government departments or agencies). 1643Much of the contact that results between citizen or business users and the 1644Government is therefore: 1645unnecessary . 342 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 346Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. For 1641example.because only some of these customer contacts are caught 1649by existing management information systems.because the user is struggling to find the right place to get the 1646service they need. and to 1633put a cost to each transaction delivered through these channels based on 1634standard industry assumptions. 344 1624 − Development of a “mixed economy” in service provision through private 1625 and voluntary sector intermediaries. The rest are just lost within the 1650broader operational structure and budget of government. 1628 1629Figure 22: Overview of Channel Management Framework 1630Channel Mapping 1631A vital first step in developing a citizen-centric channel management strategy is 1632to carry out a mapping of existing delivery channels across government. This will highlight duplication across government 1635(for example. hidden and uncosted. resulting in multiple contacts before their need is finally 1647resolved 1648hidden and uncosted . 345TGF-Primer-v1. 1639A common finding in channel audits of this type is that much customer contact 1640between governments and citizens is unnecessary.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 63 of 72 [Type the document title] .343 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 1626A high level view of the logical relationships between these components is 1627illustrated below. many governments have literally thousands of public service telephone 1642contact numbers. All Rights Reserved. and the savings that can be 1637achieved by joining government services together and using the most efficient 1638delivery channel in each case.

it is important to map out a strategy for the future desired channel mix. the physical type of channel being used.348 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. contact centres. the variety of "channel 1669ownership" options which are available. Traditionally. channels for government 1670services have been branded as belonging to a specific government agency. 1652therefore provides essential data in building the business case for service 1653transformation. 347 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. traditional mail and the traditional 1662telephone. 1681The key elements of this Channel Transformation Strategy are discussed below. interactive voice recognition (IVR) and the Internet 1663have become important channels. or requires some form of 1665intermediation . 1654In undertaking this mapping. 1671Increasingly. by telephone 1667or email). 349 1651A clear map of customer interactions by channel. 1680and the future customer experience over different channels. It can be helpful to think of that range as varying across 1658two key dimensions. which spans walk-in offices. 351Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1660channels for government service delivery have included the face-to-face channel 1661(through high-street and other locations). and the web).0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 64 of 72 [Type the document title] . as illustrated below: 1659Channel mix: that is. All Rights Reserved.g. 1668Channel ownership: it is important to understand. too. A key distinction is the extent to which the 1664channel is based around self-service by the citizen. governments looking to develop a citizen-centric approach have 1672also started to badge these on a government-wide basis: either covering a single 1673channel (such as a national government portal).either in person (e. and the true costs of these. we recommend that a holistic approach is taken to 1655understanding the range of channels through which government services are and 1656could be delivered. the citizen visiting a government office or 1666an official visiting the citizens in the community) or remotely (e. More recently. Traditionally. or multiple channels (such as 1674Service Canada. 1675 1676Figure 23: Overview of Channel Mapping 1677Channel Transformation Strategy 1678Once a full Channel Mapping has captured the current channel mix and cost 1679base. 350TGF-Primer-v1.g. Government services can be delivered through a wide range 1657of different channels.

Citizens do not want simply want services to 1719be available through a choice of channels. government has an obligation to provide services on a universal basis. 1708Transformational Government programs seek to optimise the performance of 1709each individual channel. They also take a hard1686nosed approach to channel management.353 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. And they 1688realise that channel shift is a complicated process. Whereas an online bank or 1700retailer is limited by the size of the online population in the market. "Directed choice" towards cheaper channels is therefore the strategy 1696selected for most citizen-facing services (although a number of governments are 1697increasingly looking to make Internet-only services the norm for businesses).hm357treasury. In the UK for example. Transformational Government 352 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 65 of 72 [Type the document title] .pdf 359Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. are therefore an 1704important part of government channel strategies which would not normally be 1705seen in their private-sector counterparts.uk/+/http://www. government is in a unique position 1699compared with any other online service provider. There are two imperatives for taking a cross-channel approach 1717to service delivery: 1718First. see 356http://webarchive. Rather they want services to be 1720delivered in an integrated way across channels. so they differentiate services across channels. 1714Cross-Channel Service Management 1715However. a government-wide review15 of 1710customer contact found that contact centre performance lagged significantly 1711behind private sector benchmarks. 358TGF-Primer-v1.gov. and that on average operational savings of 171225% could be achieved in public centre contact centres over a 3 year period by 1713adopting best practices. a better deal for taxpayers.nationalarchives. Typically though they recognise two distinct 1692differences between the public and private sector: 1693First. 1702"Digital inclusion" policies. 1684They understand that each channel opens up different ways to create value for 1685customers. setting out 1691clear strategies for channel shift7. so is 1694not able to pick and choose which customers it will engage with through different 1695channels. it is vital not to think about channel optimisation solely on a channel1716by-channel basis.uk/media/4/F/pbr06_varney_review. 1706Channel optimisation 1707As well as seeking to shift future service delivery to an optimal channel mix. 35515 Service Transformation: A better service for citizens and businesses. All Rights Reserved. 354 1682Channel Shift 1683Successful private-sector businesses are more effective at this than government. to improve service to citizens. aimed at increasing the proportion of citizens who 1703have access to and confidence in using online channels. a 1701government can take action significantly to increase that online population. which needs planning over a 1689multi-year period. with customers being incentivised to 1687use the channels that are most efficient from a business point of view. 1698Second. 1690Transformational Government programs adopt a similar approach.gov. in terms of the online channel.

This can be challenging for governments. 363TGF-Primer-v1. 362 1721programs therefore focus on achieving an integrated view of customer 1722interactions across all channels. By building channel support services around 1725a common. it is essential to recognise that a citizen-centric approach involves 1729delivering services where citizens want to receive them . however. 1723Second.and this may often 1730mean that it is important to deliver services through private or voluntary sector 1731intermediaries. 1732This is particularly important as services become digitised. 1727Development of a Mixed Economy in Service Provision 1728Finally. web-based infrastructure.361 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. potentially reducing 1733the marginal costs of delivery to near zero and hence making it easier for third 1734party organisations to bundle public sector services with their own service 1735offerings. 1737Establishing clear ground rules for how this sort of mixed economy of service 1738provision should work. to reduce costs. governments can both reduce costs while 1726also facilitating joined-up services. is therefore an important task 1740for government in creating the policy framework for Transformational 1741Government and SHOULD be addressed using the Franchise Marketplace Model 1742outlined above. 360 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. since for the first 1736time it means that they are "competing" for customers with other organisations. 364Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 66 of 72 [Type the document title] . All Rights Reserved. A shared service approach to channel management can 1724deliver significant efficiency savings. on a basis that will encourage private and voluntary 1739sector organisations to become actively involved.

While much can be 1769learned from the private sector. then Transformational Government 1778becomes impossible . 369Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.the dynamically-scalable set of private and public computing resources 1765now being offered as a service over the Internet. customer and channel management described 1751above require a new approach to technology and in particular a commitment to 1752the paradigm and principles of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and SOA1753based infrastructure. 1756delivered inside an integrated business and channels architecture. since 1777without this sort of technology flexibility. 1766Governments are increasingly taking this 'building block' approach to technology 1767development. others 1773identify lead departments to build and implement common solutions. finding 1776an effective approach which works within a specific government is vital.or possible only at great expense and with significant 1779wasteful and duplicated ICT expenditure. where common building blocks using open standards can 1760be re-used to enable flexible and adaptive use of technology to react quickly to 1761changing customer needs and demands. as defined in the OASIS ‘Reference Model for Service1754Oriented Architecture [SOA-RM]. companies are gaining 1762even greater efficiency benefits by managing these building blocks as a service. 368TGF-Primer-v1. In terms of 1757ICT.366 367 1743Part 365 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. allowing departments to develop their own 1775solutions according to a common architecture and standard set. III (d): Guidance on the TGF Technology 1744Management Framework 1745The TGF Technology Management Framework is in three main sections: 1746Context 1747Overview of key components in the TGF Technology Management Framework 1748Detailed description of and guidance on the key components 1749Context 1750The transformations to business. common data sets. [Type the document title] 1755Transformational Government demands a single view of the citizen or business. all of this requires governments to learn from private-sector best practice. However. All Rights Reserved. 1771Governments are taking different approaches to the co-ordination function: some 1772build central infrastructure for use by all departments and agencies. service-orientated 1759enterprise architecture. Key building blocks such as ICT infrastructure. others have 1774a more decentralised approach. Increasingly. 1758Industry is moving towards a model of company-wide. simply importing industry practices will not solve 1770this coordination problem within government.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 67 of 72 . 1768and identity verification need to be co-ordinated effectively. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 1763provided not only from within their own ICT architecture but also from within "the 1764Cloud" .

370 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 68 of 72 [Type the document title] . 1794 1795Figure 24: Overview of Technology Management Framework 374Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1787The three key elements of the approach recommended in the Transformational 1788Government Framework are: 1789Resources Management which underpins ecosystem governance 1790Ecosystem Participation 1791Realisation and governance of SOA-based ICT systems 1792A high level view of the logical relationships between these components is 1793illustrated below. but it is concerned with more than “just” the delivery of 1784services using ICT. All Rights Reserved. Its focus on the SOA paradigm is key to an approach that puts 1785citizens and businesses as customers at the centre of a service ecosystem with 1786many stakeholders. 373TGF-Primer-v1. roles and systems involved.371 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 372 1780Overview of key components in the TGF Technology 1781Management Framework 1782The Technology Management Framework is modelled as one of the four TGF 1783delivery processes.

as potential customers. composed and re1834used – it remains agile and flexible without being brittle. Stakeholder composition is also a good predictor of 1820project risk – understand and modelling stakeholder types helps identify and 1821mitigate risk. 1824SOA-based system realisation and governance 1825Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) must be understood in its broadest sense – 1826as a paradigm for organising and using capabilities distributed and managed 1827across different ownership domains. actors and systems that comprise the overall service 1803ecosystem and their relationships to each other. 1800Eco-system Participation 1801Best practice technology management requires a clear model and understanding 1802of the stakeholders. SOA is technology and 1828platform agnostic and thus provides an appropriate foundation for the technology 1829management framework.) and technology ‘soft products’ (systems. applications and services. This encourages 1833ecosystem agility. processes. Stakeholder modelling underlines that every participant in an ICT 1822development project is implicitly an intermediary representing diverse 1823stakeholder interests in the deployed service. are identifiable as 1832distinct from the underlying technologies that deliver them. The model must be maintained 1804and updated as stakeholders change over time and over the course of any 1805development effort thus ensuring that requirements are continually evaluated 1806and revised.376 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 1807 1808Citizens and businesses. All Rights Reserved. Requirements 1815in turn are revised and updated to reflect changes in stakeholder composition 1816and concerns. but citizens and businesspeople are 1811also human actors interacting with pieces of technology in precisely-defined 1812interactions. as with many systems 1835where service functionality is tailored and tightly-coupled to addressing a specific 1836problem. 1817Stakeholders are clearly distinguished and modelled – including the fact that they 1818play different roles in different contexts (and which therefore has implications for 1819role-based authentication). 379Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1830Disparate systems are weaved together as part of a coherent ecosystem while 1831specific ‘services’. allowing services to be mixed and matched. models.0-cnprd01 375 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. These system-focussed interactions are a result of accurately 1813modelling the processes required of both system and user in order to deliver a 1814particular service capability conforming to explicit ‘requirements’. 1799etc. 21 July 2011 Page 69 of 72 [Type the document title] . broken down into functional components. must be understood as 1809stakeholders in the ecosystem with ‘needs’ (often imprecisely formulated) that 1810they seek to satisfy through use of a service. Ownership and governance – of information resources as well as ICT 1837products – is federated across ownership boundaries and explicit service 378TGF-Primer-v1. documents. 377 1796Resources Management 1797This entails the explicit identification and management of resources as valued 1798assets. whether information resources (data sets. In this sense.

1844 − Identity Management. 384Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. 1843 − Service policies. based on end-user needs 1847 380 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. 1845 − Cloud Computing (Service and Infrastructure Virtualisation). 1846Interaction Design.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 70 of 72 [Type the document title] . 1840Key concerns of such an approach include: 1841 − SOA technical architecture and component service (“building block”) 1842 realisation and re-use. 383TGF-Primer-v1. 382 1838descriptions and contracts ensure that everyone knows the ‘rules of engagement 1839and use’ when using any service.381 The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. All Rights Reserved.

Individual Member Peter F Brown. Individual Member Pothiraj Selvaraj. New Zealand Government David Webber. Nomura Research Institute Gershon Janssen. MTG Management Consultants. LLC Takao Yamasaki. Oracle Corporation Joe Wheeler. Fujitsu Ltd Ted Haas. CS Transform Ltd Chet Ensign. University of Bologna Chris Parker. Belgian SPF Finances Steve Mutkoski. Individual Member Bill Edwards. Oracle Corporation Colin Wallis.386 387 385 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product. Microsoft Corporation John Borras. Individual Member 389Copyright © OASIS Open 2011. Microsoft Corporation Monica Palmirani. Individual Member Nig Greenaway.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 71 of 72 [Type the document title] . Individual Member Arnaud Martens. Individual Member Oliver Bell. All Rights Reserved. 388TGF-Primer-v1. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. 1848Acknowledgements 1849The following individuals have participated in the creation of this specification 1850and are gratefully acknowledged: 1851Participants: 1852 1853 1854 1855 1856 1857 1858 1859 1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871 1872 Hans Aanesen. GS1 Andy Hopkirk. CS Transform Ltd John Ross. GCE Trond Arne Undheim.

Numbering of Figures 1876 394Copyright © OASIS Open 2011.391 392 1873Revision 390 This is a Non-Standards Track Work Product.0-cnprd01 21 July 2011 Page 72 of 72 [Type the document title] . 393TGF-Primer-v1. All Rights Reserved. History 187417-03-2011: (compared to Working Draft 02) Finalised remaining edits agreed by 1875TC at adoption. The patent provisions of the OASIS IPR Policy do not apply. Update of ToC.

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