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Baby Products 2010

Baby Products 2010

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Sections

  • BACKGROUND
  • DEFINITION
  • Disposable Nappies
  • Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture
  • Baby Monitors, Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment
  • MARKET BACKGROUND
  • Demographic and Social Factors
  • Number of Children Aged 0 to 2
  • Family Size
  • Older Mothers
  • Multiple Births
  • Working Parents
  • Baby Products and Fashion
  • Trade Bodies
  • Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association
  • Baby Products Association
  • MARKET SIZE
  • DISTRIBUTION
  • Online Retailing
  • COMPETITIVE STRUCTURE
  • MARKETING AND ADVERTISING
  • Main Media Advertising
  • Direct Marketing
  • Sampling
  • Baby Clubs and Social Networking
  • Parenting Magazines
  • THE CONSUMER
  • MARKET FORECASTS
  • 3. Disposable Nappies
  • Alternatives to Disposable Nappies
  • Real Nappy Week
  • SUPPLIERS
  • CONSUMER TRENDS
  • Baby Transport
  • Nursery Furniture
  • RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
  • Baby Monitors
  • Home Safety Equipment
  • Feeding Equipment
  • POPULATION TRENDS
  • 7. PEST Analysis
  • POLITICAL FACTORS
  • ECONOMIC FACTORS
  • SOCIAL FACTORS
  • TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS
  • 8. Consumer Dynamics
  • OVERVIEW
  • Nappies
  • Breastfeeding Versus Bottle Feeding
  • New Versus Second-Hand Baby Equipment
  • Choosing Baby Equipment
  • DETAILED ANALYSIS
  • 9. Supplier Profiles
  • INTRODUCTION
  • BRITAX CHILDCARE HOLDINGS LTD
  • GRACO LTD
  • JACKEL INTERNATIONAL LTD (MAYBORN GROUP)
  • KIMBERLY-CLARK LTD
  • MACLAREN EUROPE LTD
  • MAMAS & PAPAS LTD
  • MOTHERCARE PLC
  • PHILIPS AVENT
  • PROCTER & GAMBLE
  • TOMY UK LTD
  • DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS
  • FORECASTS 2010 TO 2014
  • Associations
  • General Sources
  • Government Sources
  • Other Sources
  • Key Note Sources
  • Number, Profile, Penetration
  • Social Grade
  • Standard Region

Market Assessment 2010

Fifth Edition July 2010 Edited by Dominic Fenn ISBN 978-1-84729-639-9

Baby Products

Baby Products

Foreword

In today’s com petitive business environm ent, knowledge and understanding of your m arketplace is essential. W ith over 25 years’ experience producing highly respected off-the-shelf publications, Key Note has built a reputation as the num ber one source of UK m arket inform ation. Below are just a few of the com m ents our business partners and clients have m ade on Key Note’s range of reports.
“The Chartered Institute of M arketing encourages the use of market research as an important part of a systematic approach to marketing. Key Note reports have been available in the Institute’s Information and Library Service for many years and have helped our members to build knowledge and understanding of their marketplace and their customers.” The Chartered Institute of M arketing “W e have enjoyed a long-standing relationship with Key Note and have always received an excellent service. Key Note reports are well produced and are always in demand by users of the business library.” “Having subscribed to M arket Assessm ent reports for a number of years, we continue to be impressed by their quality and breadth of coverage.” The British Library “Key Note reports cover a wide range of industries and markets — they are detailed, well written and easily digestible, with a good use of tables. They allow deadlines to be met by providing a true overview of a particular market and its prospects.” NatW est “Accurate and relevant market intelligence is the starting point for every campaign we undertake. W e use Key Note because they have a report on just about every market sector you can think of, and the information is comprehensive, reliable and accurate.” J W alter Thom pson “M arket Assessment reports provide an extremely comprehensive source of information for both account handling and new business research, with excellent, clear graphics.” Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising

James Donovan Managing Director Key Note Limited

© Key Note Ltd 2010

Baby Products

Contents

Contents
Executive Summary 1. Introduction 1 2

BACKGROUND ................................................................................................................................2 DEFINITION ......................................................................................................................................2
Disposable Nappies...........................................................................................................................2 Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture............................................................................................2 Baby Monitors, Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment...............................................2

2. Strategic Overview

3

MARKET BACKGROUND ...............................................................................................................3
Demographic and Social Factors......................................................................................................3 Number of Children Aged 0 to 2 .....................................................................................................3 Table 2.1: Number of Children in the UK Aged 0 to 2 Years (000), 30th June 2005-2009 ..............................................................................................................3 Family Size.........................................................................................................................................4 Table 2.2: Total Fertility Rate in England and Wales, 1971-2008 ..................................................4 Older Mothers...................................................................................................................................5 Table 2.3: Average Age of Mother at Childbirth in England and Wales (years), 1997-2007 .......................................................................................5 Table 2.4: Live Births in England and Wales by Age of Mother (000), 1978-2008 ................................................................................................6 Table 2.5: Live Births in England and Wales by Age of Mother (%), 1978-2008...................................................................................................6 Multiple Births ..................................................................................................................................7 Table 2.6: Number of Multiple Births in England and Wales, 1998-2008 .....................................7 Working Parents ...............................................................................................................................8 Baby Products and Fashion ..............................................................................................................8 Trade Bodies .....................................................................................................................................8 Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association ...............................................................8 Baby Products Association ...............................................................................................................9 MARKET SIZE ..................................................................................................................................9 Table 2.7: The UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ......................................................................................................9 Table 2.8: The UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (%), 2005-2009 ................................................................................................................10

© Key Note Ltd 2010

..29 CONSUMER TRENDS ....................................................................................................................................... 2009 ................................................................................ 2005-2009 ........................25 Table 2................................................................... Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents).......................................................14 Bounty ........................................................29 Table 3.....................12 MARKETING AND ADVERTISING ...28 MARKET SIZE ...................................................................................30 Table 3...........................................................................................................16 Table 2...................................28 Table 3..................27 Real Nappy Week ...31 © Key Note Ltd 2010 ............ Years Ending December 2008 and 2009 .............................28 DISTRIBUTION ........................................................................................... March 2010 ...........................................................Baby Products Contents DISTRIBUTION ........................................ Years Ending December 2008 and 2009.......28 SUPPLIERS ..............11: Parents..........................................1: The UK Market for Disposable Nappies by Value (£m at rsp)....11 Online Retailing..............................................................................................................12: Demographic Profile of Parents.......................................................................................14 Baby Clubs and Social Networking...................................... 2009 ...19 Table 2.................................................................14 Emma’s Diary .........................15: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (£m at rsp).........................16 THE CONSUMER .........................................................................3: Household Use of Disposable Nappies in the Last 12 Months — Penetration and Profile by Age of Main Shopper in the Household (%).......................................................................................9: Main Media Advertising Expenditure on Baby Products by Selected Major Retailers (£000)............................................................................................10: Selected Parenting Magazines by Average Net Circulation (000)................................ March 2010 ...4: Household Purchasing of Disposable Nappies in the Last 12 Months — Penetration by Type of Product and Age of Main Shopper in the Household (%)........ March 2010 ........................... Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents).................................25 3........................................16 Table 2.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 2010-2014 .................................15 Parenting Magazines. March 2010 ............................ July-December 2009 ..................................................13 Direct Marketing .....29 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS ....................................................................................................................22 MARKET FORECASTS ..............................12 Table 2.............................................................................................2: Main Media Advertising Expenditure on Disposable Nappies by Brand (£000)..............18 Table 2............................................................................................... Disposable Nappies 27 BACKGROUND ...................................................................................27 Alternatives to Disposable Nappies................................................................................................................................................14 Sampling .........................................................29 MARKETING AND ADVERTISING .............14: Demographic Profiles of Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents)......................12 Main Media Advertising..........................................................................................................31 Table 3....13: Demographic Profiles of Parents of Babies and Children Aged Under 16 by Age of Child/Children (% of respondents).........................................................................................................................................................11 COMPETITIVE STRUCTURE......................................................................................................17 Table 2.......................................................

Baby Products

Contents

4. Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture

32

BACKGROUND ..............................................................................................................................32 MARKET SIZE ................................................................................................................................32
Table 4.1: The UK Market for Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ....................................................................................................33 Baby Transport................................................................................................................................33 Table 4.2: The UK Market for Baby Transport by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ....................................................................................................33 Table 4.3: The UK Market for Baby Transport by Sector by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ....................................................................................................34 Nursery Furniture............................................................................................................................34 Table 4.4: The UK Market for Nursery Furniture by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ....................................................................................................34 Table 4.5: The UK Market for Nursery Furniture by Sector by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ....................................................................................................35 SUPPLIERS ......................................................................................................................................35 DISTRIBUTION ...............................................................................................................................36 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS ............................................................................................................36 MARKETING AND ADVERTISING ...............................................................................................37 Table 4.6: Main Media Advertising Expenditure on Baby Carriages and Nursery Equipment by Brand (£000), Years Ending December 2008 and 2009 ..........................38

5. Baby Monitors, Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment

39

BACKGROUND ..............................................................................................................................39 MARKET SIZE ................................................................................................................................40
Table 5.1: The UK Market for Baby Monitors, Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ..................................................................40 Table 5.2: The UK Market for Baby Monitors, Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment by Sector by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009 ..................................................40 SUPPLIERS ......................................................................................................................................41 DISTRIBUTION ...............................................................................................................................42 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS ............................................................................................................42 Baby Monitors.................................................................................................................................42 Home Safety Equipment ................................................................................................................42 Feeding Equipment ........................................................................................................................42 MARKETING AND ADVERTISING ...............................................................................................43

6. An International Perspective

44

POPULATION TRENDS..................................................................................................................44
Table 6.1: Total Fertility Rates in the US, Europe and Selected European Countries, 2005-2010......................................................................................44

© Key Note Ltd 2010

Baby Products

Contents

7. PEST Analysis

46

POLITICAL FACTORS ....................................................................................................................46 ECONOMIC FACTORS ..................................................................................................................46 SOCIAL FACTORS ..........................................................................................................................46 TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS........................................................................................................47

8. Consumer Dynamics

48

OVERVIEW .....................................................................................................................................48
Table 8.1: Attitudes Towards Baby Products and Related Issues (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................48 Nappies............................................................................................................................................49 Breastfeeding Versus Bottle Feeding ............................................................................................49 New Versus Second-Hand Baby Equipment..................................................................................50 Choosing Baby Equipment.............................................................................................................50 DETAILED ANALYSIS ....................................................................................................................50 Nappies............................................................................................................................................50 Table 8.2: Attitudes Towards, and Use of, Disposable Nappies (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................51 Table 8.3: Use of Non-Disposable Nappies (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................52 Breastfeeding Versus Bottle Feeding ............................................................................................53 Table 8.4: Attitudes Towards Breastfeeding (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................53 Table 8.5: Attitudes Towards Bottle Feeding (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................55 New Versus Second-Hand Baby Equipment..................................................................................56 Table 8.6: Attitudes Towards New and Second-Hand Baby Equipment (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................56 Table 8.7: Aversion to Second-Hand Baby Equipment (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................58 Choosing Baby Equipment.............................................................................................................59 Table 8.8: Attitudes Towards the Range of Baby Equipment That is Available (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................59 Table 8.9: Attitudes Towards the Availability of Unbiased Advice on Baby Equipment (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................61 Table 8.10: Personal Experience of Choosing Baby Equipment (% of respondents), March 2010 ...................................................................................................62

9. Supplier Profiles

64

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................64 BRITAX CHILDCARE HOLDINGS LTD .........................................................................................64
Table 9.1: Financial Results for Britax Childcare Holdings Ltd (£000), Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008...........................................................................64

© Key Note Ltd 2010

Baby Products

Contents

GRACO LTD....................................................................................................................................65
Table 9.2: Financial Results for Graco Ltd (£000), Years Ending 31st December 2007-2009 .......................................................................................66 JACKEL INTERNATIONAL LTD (MAYBORN GROUP) ...............................................................66 Table 9.3: Financial Results for Jackel International Ltd (£000), Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008...........................................................................67 KIMBERLY-CLARK LTD .................................................................................................................67 Table 9.4: Financial Results for Kimberly-Clark Ltd (£000), Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008...........................................................................68 MACLAREN EUROPE LTD ............................................................................................................69 Table 9.5: Financial Results for Maclaren Europe Ltd (£000), Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008...........................................................................69 MAMAS & PAPAS LTD .................................................................................................................70 Table 9.6: Financial Results for Mamas & Papas Ltd (£000), Years Ending 1st April 2007, 30th March 2008 and 29th March 2009 ...............................................................70 MOTHERCARE PLC .......................................................................................................................71 Table 9.7: Financial Results for Mothercare PLC (£000), Years Ending 31st March 2007, 29th March 2008 and 28th March 2009...........................................................72 PHILIPS AVENT ..............................................................................................................................73 Table 9.8: Financial Results for Philips Electronics UK Ltd (£000), Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008...........................................................................73 PROCTER & GAMBLE ...................................................................................................................74 Table 9.9: Financial Results for Procter & Gamble Product Supply (UK) Ltd (£000), Years Ending 30th June 2007-2009 ...................................................................................74 TOMY UK LTD ...............................................................................................................................75 Table 9.10: Financial Results for Tomy UK Ltd (£000), Years Ending 31st March 2007-2009 .................................................................................75

10. The Future

76

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS .............................................................................................................76
Table 10.1: Forecast Number of Children in the UK Aged 0 to 2 Years (000), Mid-Years 2010-2014.............................................................................76 FORECASTS 2010 TO 2014 ..........................................................................................................77 Disposable Nappies.........................................................................................................................77 Table 10.2: The Forecast UK Market for Disposable Nappies by Value (£m at rsp), 2010-2014 ....................................................................................................77 Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture..........................................................................................77 Table 10.3: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture by Sector by Value (£m at rsp), 2010-2014....................................................................................77 Baby Monitors, Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment.............................................78 Table 10.4: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Monitors, Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment by Sector by Value (£m at rsp), 2010-2014 ..................................................78

© Key Note Ltd 2010

..............................................Baby Products Contents 11.. Profile.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................81 Understanding TGI Data 83 Number.............79 Government Sources .79 General Sources ...................80 Key Note Sources .................................83 Social Grade ...................................................................................................................................................... Further Sources 79 Associations....................................................................................84 Standard Region ....................80 Other Sources................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................84 Key Note Research The Key Note Range of Reports 85 86 © Key Note Ltd 2010 .................. Penetration..............

combined with the uncertain economic situation. © Key Note Ltd 2010 1 . with retailers stepping up their promotional and marketing activity. partly due to a more difficult economic climate and partly due to the fact that there were slightly fewer births. A very high proportion of respondents agreed that it is perfectly acceptable to use second-hand equipment. The current economic conditions. The next few years are likely to see a greater emphasis on value in baby products — particularly in respect of smaller and disposable items such as nappies and feeding equipment. have benefited the market by increasing the potential spend per child. There were indications from Key Note’s original research that concerns about the environmental impact of disposable nappies did not necessarily influence behaviour. During the latter part of 2009 and the beginning of 2010. combined with the rising birth rate. a number of demographic trends. The rate of growth slowed in 2009. However. the potential dangers of using a second-hand car seat have been well publicised and the majority agreed that this is one item of baby equipment they would never buy second-hand. because this group forms its ‘consumer base’. As a result. including later parenthood and an increase in the number of working mothers of young children. Despite continual product developments by manufacturers. there were indications of the beginning of a ‘nappy price war’.Baby Products Executive Summary Executive Summary The population of children aged under 2 years — and particularly those aged under 1 year — is clearly crucial to the baby-products market. together with growing concern for the environment. Baby monitors are now a standard purchase for most new parents. However. Retail sales of feeding equipment also saw reasonably good growth during the period from 2005 to 2009. it will continue to have a beneficial effect on the baby-products market for at least the next 2 years. the majority agreed that bottle feeding was easier for parents than breastfeeding. Those who agreed that breastfeeding was much better for babies than bottle feeding outnumbered those who asserted that bottle feeding can be just as good as breastfeeding. Although the ‘mini baby boom’ that took place between 2005 and 2008 seems to have abated. The downturn in the birth rate. the sector has struggled to maintain value. means that growth in the baby-products market will be relatively slow between 2010 and 2014. rather than discarding it. In addition. Steady growth in sales of baby transport and nursery furniture between 2005 and 2008 can be attributed to strong product innovation and marketing activity by manufacturers and retailers. the market for disposable nappies has become increasingly price-led. with developments such as digital and video monitors helping to maintain value to an extent. even in the light of the recent birth-rate increases. favour ‘passing on’ baby equipment.

pushchairs. including later parenthood and an increase in the number of working mothers of young children. The previous edition of this Key Note Market Assessment on Baby Products was published in November 2008. Bibs and baby tableware are not included. have benefited the market by increasing the potential spend per child.003 British adults. it will continue to have a beneficial effect on the baby-products market for at least the next 2 years. of products for babies and young children. In addition. © Key Note Ltd 2010 2 . travel systems and car safety seats • nursery furniture — cots. DEFINITION Disposable Nappies This sector covers disposable nappies and disposable training pants. It also features original consumer research. baths.Baby Products Introduction 1. such as: • baby transport — prams. new versus second-hand baby equipment. but they are not included in the market figures. commissioned by Key Note from NEMS Market Research and conducted in March 2010 among 477 purchasers. fireguards and socket covers • feeding equipment — feeding bottles and teats. changing units and playpens. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment This sector covers smaller items of equipment: • baby monitors and home safety equipment — baby monitors. such as bottle warmers and breast pumps. and the wide range of baby equipment that is available today. stair gates. Baby Monitors. baby carriers. soothers and other feeding equipment. drawn from a total sample of 1. cribs. This report covers developments that have taken place in the market since then. Introduction BACKGROUND Although the ‘mini baby boom’ that took place between 2005 and 2008 seems to have abated. or potential purchasers. The survey covers attitudes towards disposable nappies. Reusable nappies are discussed. highchairs. a number of demographic trends. sterilising equipment. Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture The products covered by this sector are mainly major items of baby equipment. breastfeeding versus bottle feeding.

1 million to 2. After rising steadily between 2005 and 2008.Baby Products Strategic Overview 2. there were an estimated 783..3 732 2.000 babies aged under 1 year in the UK. Table 2.6 705 3. compared with 788. Strategic Overview MARKET BACKGROUND Demographic and Social Factors A number of interlinked social and demographic factors can have an effect on sales of baby products. 30th June 2005-2009 2005 Age 0 % change year-on-year Age 1 % change year-on-year Age 2 % change year-on-year Total % change year-on-year Table continues.1: Number of Children in the UK Aged 0 to 2 Years (000). because this group forms its ‘consumer base’. 716 705 681 2.2 717 1. parental age and parental employment.1 2.2 756 3.4 2007 756 3.3 million between 2005 and 2009. the birth rate was projected to fall slightly during 2009.205 2. Number of Children Aged 0 to 2 The population of children aged under 2 years — and particularly those aged under 1 year — is clearly crucial to the baby-products market.102 2006 732 2.4 †2008 †2009 788 4. In mid-2009.2 716 1.2 2.2 756 3.6 788 4. These include trends in family size.5 2.327 2.153 2.7 2. The birth-rate increases meant that the total number of children aged under 2 years rose from 2..3 733 2.2 © Key Note Ltd 2010 3 .277 3.3 783 -0.000 a year previously.

National Statistics/General Register Office for Scotland/Northern Ireland Statistics/2008-Based Population Projections. The Total Fertility Rate (TFR) is a method of estimating trends in family size based on the number of children born to women in different age groups in a given year.97 † — the average number of children that would be born to a woman if current patterns of fertility persisted throughout her childbearing life Source: Population Trends 138 (Winter 2009). National Statistics © Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO (and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland) © Key Note Ltd 2010 4 . In 1971..92 1.table continued † — projections Source: Mid-Year Population Estimates. 1971-2008 1971 1981 1991 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2. the TFR in England and Wales was 2.63 in 2001.79 1. It then fell to 1.86 1.Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2. Table 2. the TFR was 1.1: Number of Children in the UK Aged 0 to 2 Years (000).37 1.79 1.65 1.2: Total Fertility Rate† in England and Wales. the average number of children per family has remained below two for many years.37. before gradually rising again. By 2008.63 1. Government Actuary’s Department © Crown copyright Family Size Despite the recent birth-rate increases.73 1. 30th June 2005-2009 .97.78 1.82 1..

4 31. pushchairs. In 2007.5 Source: Social Trends 39 (2009).2 32.3 28. whatever the size of the family.4 32. 1997-2007 Birth Order All Births 1997 2000 2003 2006 2007 28.4 29.1 to 27. National Statistics © Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO (and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland) Table 2. such as prams.3 in 1997). which details the number of births to women in different age groups.3 27. Table 2. compared with 28. The average age at which women give birth for the first time rose by 1. especially in respect of larger purchases. since such items may well be bought only once.0 31. and then used for subsequent children. while the number of births to women aged under 25 fell in the 30 years between 1978 and 2008. © Key Note Ltd 2010 5 . shows that.2 31.9 29.7 29.3 First 26.3 years.5 27.0 27.5 years. there was a sharp increase in the number of births to women aged 35 and over.8 29. Overall.4 years over the decade between 1997 and 2007. spend per child tends to be higher in smaller families.8 Third 30. cots and highchairs.3 Fourth 31.3: Average Age of Mother at Childbirth in England and Wales (years).5 28. from 26.1 29.Baby Products Strategic Overview Smaller families do not necessarily have negative implications for the baby-products market. Older Mothers The average age at which women give birth is still rising steadily.4.6 30. the average mother in England and Wales was a year older when she gave birth than was the case a decade earlier (29.1 26.7 32.1 29.5 Second 28.9 31.

based on data from Social Trends 40 (December 2009).1 14.7 25 to 34 322.0 100.6 26.7 8.0 † — does not sum due to rounding Source: Key Note.0 100. compared with only 5.8 251.5 381.2 126.0 121.0 †100.4 20.Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2.0 †100. National Statistics © Key Note Ltd 2010 6 .8 25.1% of all live births in England and Wales in 2008.0 100.6 20.1 36.6 161.4: Live Births in England and Wales by Age of Mother (000).3 134.9 54.7% in 1978.0 20.0 100.6 Source: Social Trends 40 (December 2009).8 352.4 377.4 25.6 180.1 Total 100.1 19.0 373.3 59.4 35 and Over 34.2 140.2 55.8 142.6 54.9 25.4 165.5: Live Births in England and Wales by Age of Mother (%).3 175. 1978-2008 Under 25 1978 1988 1998 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 238. Table 2.4 35 and Over 5.0 †100.7 54.1 91.6 346.5 25 to 34 54.7 385.1 25.1 54.5 25.2 54.7 166.5 362.9 173.2 56. 1978-2008 Under 25 1978 1988 1998 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 40.4 19. National Statistics © Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO (and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland) Births to women aged 35 and over represented 20.

1998-2008 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 9. the annual number of births that resulted in two or more babies increased from 9. Manufacturers and retailers of baby equipment need to ensure that they meet these needs. older parents tend to be more affluent.131 9. On the one hand.861 9. Table 2. it means that women tend to have fewer children overall.471 10.080 to 10. National Statistics © Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO (and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland) One of the effects of the trend towards multiple births has been that manufacturers have paid greater attention to the needs of parents with twins when designing prams.907 8. and more used to a higher standard of living.792 8. They are also — arguably — more informed. Multiple Births Another demographic trend that has a small but significant effect on some sectors of the market is the rising number of multiple births. Between 1998 and 2008.700 8.6: Number of Multiple Births in England and Wales. © Key Note Ltd 2010 7 .855. more demanding and more anxious about the health and safety of their offspring.Baby Products Strategic Overview The trend for delaying childbirth has had a number of effects on the market for baby products. This can be linked to the trend for later parenthood (which in itself carries an increased likelihood of carrying more than one baby) and the associated rise in the number of women conceiving through in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) methods. which are also more likely to result in multiple births.080 8.855 Source: Review of the National Statistician on Births and Patterns of Family Building in England and Wales 2008 (series FM1 number 37). and as such are more able to afford premium baby products.137 10.543 10. However. pushchairs and other baby-transport products.521 9.

the media. This has had important effects on all sectors of the baby-products market. they are more likely to seek products that make their busy working and family lives easier. It represents its members’ interests at all levels. Baby Products and Fashion The baby market has been affected by the fact that the population in general have become more style-conscious. The most recent data. because they could not afford to stay at home. together with the rising maternal age. These include the fact that many young homeowners need two earners to sustain the payments on a mortgage. and they may buy two sets of items such as feeding equipment and changing equipment in order to keep one permanently at their chosen childcare facility. National Statistics has not published data on the employment status of men and women by the age of their youngest child since January 2006. In May 2008.Baby Products Strategic Overview Working Parents Various factors have led to an increase in the number of families featuring young children with two working parents. © Key Note Ltd 2010 8 . two-earner households tend to have higher disposable incomes. The Association acts as the voice of the industry in dealings with the Government and other official bodies. Trade Bodies Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association The Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association (AHPMA) is the trade association representing UK manufacturers of disposable nappies. Kimberly-Clark. in terms of both the clothes they wear and the homes in which they live. which has meant that more women are well established in their careers (which they may be reluctant to give up) by the time they give birth for the first time. the energy-supplier comparison company uSwitch published the results of a survey it carried out in which 38% of new parents (defined as parents of children aged under 2 years) said that the main child-carer in the family had had to return to work after their child was born. relating to spring 2005. health professionals and consumers. dealing with regulatory and legislative matters. feminine-hygiene products and continence-care products. Members include Procter & Gamble. Parents are now demanding similar standards for the baby products they purchase. Johnson & Johnson and SCA. For example. showed that more than half of all women with children aged under 2 years were in employment.

5 2007 493 1. 396 405 2.2 2008 507 2. nursery furniture. The organisation plays an active role in the development of product standards and provides support and specialist services to its members. with the objective of promoting baby and nursery products in both the UK and Europe. MARKET SIZE Key Note estimates that. soft goods.3 415 2. The BPA’s Technical Committee comprises industry experts and specialists in a wide range of baby and nursery products. 2005-2009 2005 Disposable nappies (£m) % change year-on-year Baby transport and nursery furniture % change year-on-year Table continues. including wheeled goods.5 427 2.. child restraints. Robert Anslow..12bn. in March 2010. which is held in early October each year.7: The UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (£m at rsp). the overall winner of the award was Chillipeeps — a pre-sterilised teat in a pod that can be directly attached to a ready-made baby formula milk carton. toys and early learning. The teat can then be sterilised and returned to the pod to be re-used. The Association manages and organises the trade fair BPA Baby & Child. BPA members and member representatives sit on a large number of committees and working groups in the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) and the British Standards Institution (BSI). baby walkers.6 475 2006 487 2.9 434 1. Table 2.4 © Key Note Ltd 2010 9 . In 2009. in 2009. The BPA’s Concept and Innovation Awards are presented at the Baby & Child fair. The BPA appointed a new Managing Director.8 2009 519 2. the total UK market for the baby products covered by this report was worth £1.Baby Products Strategic Overview Baby Products Association The Baby Products Association (BPA) was set up in 1945.

Table 2.5 165 4.7: The UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (£m at rsp). followed by baby transport and nursery furniture (38.8 †100.0 100.2 †100.7%).8 1.8: The UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (%).5 1. 2005-2009 .3 38.0 † — does not sum due to rounding Source: Key Note © Key Note Ltd 2010 10 .1 38.040 3.0 158 6.010 - 148 6. 2005-2009 2005 Disposable nappies Baby transport and nursery furniture Baby monitors.9 2009 46.Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2.1 168 1.8 1.3% of sales in 2009.099 3.0 39. home safety equipment and feeding equipment Total 13.0 15. home safety equipment and feeding equipment % change year-on-year Total % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2006 2007 2008 2009 139 1.2 14.8 38.9 2007 46..121 2.0 Source: Key Note The largest sector.8 100.table continued 2005 Baby monitors.9 2008 46.0 14. was disposable nappies.0 15. accounting for 46.0 100.2 38.066 2.4 1.0 2006 46.7 47..

although retail chemists — notably Boots — are also important. in both out-of-town and city-centre locations. are thriving. and some manufacturers. and enabling them to communicate with each other. An online presence is vital for retailers operating in the baby-products market. a subsidiary of the US-based toy retailer Toys R Us. toiletries and nappies.Baby Products Strategic Overview DISTRIBUTION Baby products are available through a wide range of distribution channels: • The leading UK retailer of baby transport. run on a franchise basis. • Boots sells a wide range of baby products. Many independent stores now have online operations. • The growth in importance of non-food sales through supermarkets has meant that these retailers. have become important providers of basic items of baby equipment. Online Retailing The Internet is of particular importance to parents. independent specialist stores retain a relatively strong presence in the market for larger items of nursery equipment and baby transport. • The specialist manufacturer Mamas & Papas entered the retail market in 1998 and now has a chain of more than 50 dedicated stores in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. including baby equipment. Other major retailers with a presence in the baby-products market include the Argos catalogue operation. with the intention of building an online community in order to increase customer loyalty. • Babies R Us. John Lewis and IKEA. Mothercare purchased the Early Learning Centre chain of toy retailers in 2007. Marks & Spencer. offering advice and support to new parents. for a number of reasons. many of whom are first-time parents with little knowledge of what they should buy. both through its stores and online. as well as online and mail-order operations. The convenience of online retailing can make it a less stressful alternative to shopping with babies and toddlers. too. Virtually all baby-product retailers. These stores benefit from the fact that they are in a position to give advice and information to customers. is a major outlet for baby equipment of all types. which has 405 UK stores. • Despite strong competition from the major retailers. Disposable nappies are sold mainly through the grocery sector. Most sites also offer advice and information for expectant and new parents. while the comparative isolation felt by many of those with babies and very young children means that online communities. nursery furniture and equipment is Mothercare. © Key Note Ltd 2010 11 . offer an online shopping service for at least part of their range.

Boots and specialists such as Mothercare and Babies R Us. Some grocery multiples. which offer own-label items as well as branded products • large specialist baby-products suppliers (for example. Kiddicare. including Tesco. offers a next-day delivery service and dealt with 400. including product reviews and discussion forums. They include: • large retailers (such as Mothercare. MARKETING AND ADVERTISING Main Media Advertising Table 2. Sainsbury’s and ASDA.com.9 details main media advertising expenditure on baby products by major retailers. COMPETITIVE STRUCTURE A wide range of companies operate in the market for baby equipment. many of which operate across more than one sector • many niche suppliers that are active in specific market sectors.000 customers placing orders in 2009. with the Pampers and Huggies brands (supplied by the multinationals Procter & Gamble and Kimberly-Clark) dominating sales. Mamas & Papas and Graco). Boots and Babies R Us). in 2008 and 2009. which was founded in 1974 and has a large store in Peterborough. There is much less fragmentation in the market for disposable nappies. including multiple grocery retailers. The company was voted the UK’s Online Retailer of the Year by readers of Mother & Baby magazine in 2009 and was given a similar award by Practical Parenting magazine in the same year. The company’s website offers a wide range of practical information and support for new and expectant parents.Baby Products Strategic Overview Many independent specialist baby-product retailers now have an online presence. Babyworld is a specialist online-only baby-products retailer. which was launched in 1998. carry their own brands of nappies. © Key Note Ltd 2010 12 .

Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2. Years Ending December 2008 and 2009 2008 ASDA Baby product range Pampers Baby Dry nappies Nappies range Huggies nappies Pampers nappy range Morrisons Baby product range Pampers Huggies Sainsbury’s Baby care Nappy range Pampers Tesco Pampers Nappies range Baby range Boots Baby products Pampers nappies Others Mothercare /ELC Babies R Us — product range Co-op — Pampers Nappies Source: Nielsen Media Research 105 180 303 237 128 209 90 444 155 137 111 937 595 154 920 285 225 447 199 188 90 192 212 315 548 247 180 112 2009 © Key Note Ltd 2010 13 .9: Main Media Advertising Expenditure on Baby Products by Selected Major Retailers (£000).

Sainsbury’s and Toys R Us. photography services and healthcare-professional briefings. including ASDA. Direct Marketing Baby products have a small. research. clearly defined target market (parents of children under the age of 2). The site has also increased its content for parents of older children. In March 2009. which had purchased it for £70m in November 2007.com. the company was sold to Barclays Private Equity for £54m by the Canadian online media company Kaboose. to coincide with the organisation’s 50th anniversary. The Bounty website was relaunched in August 2009. and longest-established. The new site has a focus on organising. mailings. checklists and ‘how to’ areas specific to the user’s stage in pregnancy or child-rearing. Bounty announced that it would be investing £50. Bounty’s portfolio of services includes packs. as well as hospital maternity wards.Baby Products Strategic Overview A brand-awareness campaign for Mothercare. sampling companies. It is owned by Lifecycle Marketing.000 in the site and promoting it through the Bounty packs distributed to pregnant women and new mothers. have had a growing presence. Each year. In April 2009. meaning that direct marketing can be particularly effective. online information. was launched in October 2009 on the pre-school television channel Cartoonito. featuring the musician. Both offer sample packs of products for pregnant women and new mothers. aimed at expectant and first-time fathers of babies aged up to 6 months. Bounty distributes more than 3 million product sample packs through a variety of outlets. Sampling Bounty and Emma’s Diary are the two largest. with reminders. © Key Note Ltd 2010 14 . Newdadssurvivalguide. a wholly owned subsidiary of TNT Post Group. guides. • Emma’s Diary Emma’s Diary is a week-by-week pregnancy guide that is distributed by GPs (general practitioners) on confirmation of pregnancy. • Bounty Bounty was founded in 1959 and currently claims to reach 96% of new and expectant mothers. was launched by Bounty in October 2008. television presenter and ‘celebrity mother’ Myleene Klass. Sampling has long been an important means of reaching this market — and more recently ‘baby clubs’. reaching an estimated 1 million expectant mothers. Boots. and online networks.

It claims to be the largest parenting club in the UK. a social networking site for parents. © Key Note Ltd 2010 15 . an online ovulation calendar and a baby-naming search engine. They include: dads-uk. allowing it to work more directly with agencies. which is also 10 years old.uk. In September 2009.com. childcare and community. aimed largely at divorced and separated fathers.co. as well as a range of discounts and priority parking at Tesco stores.000 members. with 900. A few social networking sites cater for fathers. with a focus on “fathers’ rights”. in October 2007. and newdadssurvivalguide. the site. The site. which offer parents discounts and other benefits. with a focus on food and nutrition. which was founded in 2000 by a journalist and a television producer. Tesco’s Baby & Toddler Club offers expectant and new mothers seven free magazines tailored to particular stages in their child’s development. operated through their websites. focusing on more live content. which claims 850. Members will be offered in-store discounts. Netmums. social and employment issues. which included a new award from the Baby & Toddler Club for Britain’s Bravest Mum. run by Bounty (see earlier profile). advice and information. The site’s advertising sales were also brought in-house. which also publishes Sainsbury’s customer magazine. Netmums is a family of local websites set up and run by mothers. features articles. which claims 100. which had been withdrawn in 2005. taking full control of the site. The many social networking sites founded by and for mothers of babies and young children are important channels for word-of-mouth recommendations of products and services. Sainsbury’s resurrected its Little Ones baby club. underwent a major redesign.Baby Products Strategic Overview Baby Clubs and Social Networking Many retailers and manufacturers operating in the baby-products market run ‘baby clubs’. Tesco was the sole sponsor of Bauer Media’s 2009 Mother and Baby Awards. Procter & Gamble’s Pampers and Kimberly-Clark’s Huggies both have baby clubs. In October 2009. in partnership with the investment company Fleming Media. In February 2009. tutorial videos. A club magazine and website has been produced by Seven Squared. Mothercare launched Gurgle.000 members. with area-specific information on child-related activities.000 unique users a month.000 members.com. The Boots Parenting Club was launched in June 2005 and has had an online presence since 2006. claims 740. The most high-profile of these is Mumsnet. education. Mothercare bought out Fleming Media.

022 10. The average audited circulations for print parenting publications during the 6 months ending December 2009 are shown in Table 2. of the following apply to you?’ The statements listed in Table 2.003 British adults aged 16 and over: ‘Can you tell me which.094 THE CONSUMER Key Note’s original research (see Chapter 8 — Consumer Dynamics) used a sample of 477 current or prospective purchasers of baby products. if any.772 24.037 222. which undertook the survey for Key Note in March 2010. © Key Note Ltd 2010 16 .11 were then read out. the parenting press is still an important channel for reaching new and prospective parents.10. asked 1. In order to generate this sample.Baby Products Strategic Overview Parenting Magazines Although it is increasingly challenged by the Internet. July-December 2009 Emma’s Diary Pregnancy Guide (Lifecycle Marketing Ltd) Your Toddler (Bounty (UK) Ltd) You and Your Newborn First Edition (Bounty (UK) Ltd) Mother and Baby (Bauer Consumer Media) Prima Baby (The National Magazine Company Ltd) Pregnancy & Birth (Bauer Consumer Media) Practical Parenting (Magicalia Ltd) Junior (Magicalia Ltd) Source: Audit Bureau of Circulations 36.694 178.416 412.480 52. NEMS Market Research. Table 2.10: Selected Parenting Magazines by Average Net Circulation (000).534 43.

and 20% said that. although they did not have children under 16. One in five (21%) had an older child or children. the total proportion (48%) who fell into one of these categories was lower than the 55% obtained by adding the figures in Table 2.12 compares the demographic profile of parents. Since some respondents had children in more than one of the stated age groups. These 477 parents. but I am hoping to become a parent within the next 2 years I do not have children under 16.003 adults aged 16+ 1 5 5 21 3 20 Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2. they did currently buy items for babies and/or young children. March 2010 Just 1% of the total sample had a child or children aged under 1 year. and a further 5% were parents of a child or children between 3 and 4 years. Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents). but I do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays Base: 1. 5% had a child or children aged between 1 and 2 years. prospective parents and other purchasers with the sample of 1. prospective parents and other purchasers of baby products were then asked a further series of questions about their habits and attitudes towards baby products (see Chapter 8 — Consumer Dynamics).11.11: Parents. Table 2. aged between 5 and 15 years. March 2010 I have a child/children under 1 year old I have a child/children aged 1 to 2 years I have a child/children aged 3 to 4 years I have a child/children aged 5 to 15 years I do not have children. A total of 3% were non-parents who were hoping to start a family within the next 2 years. © Key Note Ltd 2010 17 .003 adults as a whole.

Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents).12: Demographic Profile of Parents. Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) 100 49 51 15 18 18 49 47 53 100 39 61 5 23 31 41 46 54 36 27 37 37 25 38 Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2. March 2010 Parents. March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 18 .

.13: Demographic Profiles of Parents of Babies and Children Aged Under 16 by Age of Child/Children (% of respondents).13. 100 49 51 8 7 18 18 16 13 20 6 16 25 30 12 10 100 50 50 0 0 62 38 0 0 0 0 5 28 13 54 0 100 50 50 0 13 42 42 3 0 0 7 26 20 27 18 3 100 40 60 0 6 36 47 11 0 0 6 16 35 35 7 2 100 44 56 0 1 23 53 22 2 0 7 19 21 35 15 3 © Key Note Ltd 2010 19 . March 2010 I Have a Child/Children Under 1 Year Old I Have a Child/Children Aged 1 to 2 Years I Have a Child/Children Aged 3 to 4 Years I Have a Child/Children Aged 5 to 15 years Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Social Grade A B C1 C2 D E Table continues. Table 2..Baby Products Strategic Overview Demographic profiles of the parents of babies and children in each of the stated age groups are shown in Table 2.

.13: Demographic Profiles of Parents of Babies and Children Aged Under 16 by Age of Child/Children (% of respondents). March 2010 . 22 31 21 17 9 0 4 18 32 46 0 0 32 35 33 0 4 21 51 24 1 4 19 46 30 8 6 13 4 13 9 16 8 6 7 10 5 0 44 4 4 16 0 21 0 0 6 4 3 22 4 8 6 7 21 9 0 16 0 7 17 5 17 8 10 21 4 7 3 8 4 14 5 10 8 16 16 4 8 5 40 16 17 27 49 20 25 7 61 16 23 0 28 25 42 5 50 30 18 1 © Key Note Ltd 2010 20 .table continued I Have a Child/Children Under 1 Year Old I Have a Child/Children Aged 1 to 2 Years I Have a Child/Children Aged 3 to 4 Years I Have a Child/Children Aged 5 to 15 years Sample Profile Working Status Full time† Part time Not working‡ Retired/invalid Standard Region East Anglia East Midlands Greater London North North West Scotland South East South West Wales West Midlands Yorkshire and Humberside Size of Household One Two Three Four Five or more Table continues....Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2.

. not looking for work or unemployed. March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 21 . excludes the retired and invalids 56 29 4 9 2 9 13 13 75 50 27 11 7 96 4 0 0 0 100 63 32 0 27 31 32 4 82 14 2 0 3 100 49 11 0 48 27 9 17 84 10 2 0 4 90 56 16 0 32 32 13 22 86 5 5 1 3 24 62 62 1 31 46 13 8 Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.table continued I Have a Child/Children Under 1 Year Old I Have a Child/Children Aged 1 to 2 Years I Have a Child/Children Aged 3 to 4 Years I Have a Child/Children Aged 5 to 15 years Sample Profile Marital Status Married/living as married Single Divorced Widowed Separated Presence of Children Aged 0-4 Aged 5-9 Aged 10-15 No children Tenure Own home outright Buying home Rent — council Rent — private † — 30 hours or more per week ‡ — student.. March 2010 .Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2.13: Demographic Profiles of Parents of Babies and Children Aged Under 16 by Age of Child/Children (% of respondents).

Table 2. the figure was slightly lower (82%) among those with children aged 1 to 2 years. Just under one in four (38%) were aged 35 to 44.. The vast majority (96%) of those with children aged under 1 year were married or cohabiting. more than six in ten parents of babies under 1 year old (62%) were in the 25 to 34 age group. Table 2.14: Demographic Profiles of Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents). 100 49 51 8 7 18 18 16 13 20 100 34 66 0 15 60 23 1 0 0 100 33 67 0 6 18 9 15 21 31 © Key Note Ltd 2010 22 .. But I Do Buy Things for Babies and/or Small Children Nowadays I Do Not Have Children. However.14 shows demographic profiles of Key Note’s prospective parents and others who purchased for babies and/or small children.Baby Products Strategic Overview Among those taking part in Key Note’s research. But I Am Hoping to Become a Parent Within the Next 2 Years Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Table continues. March 2010 I Do Not Have Children Under 16.

.table continued I Do Not Have Children Under 16. 8 6 13 4 13 9 16 8 6 7 10 2 4 21 8 5 10 38 3 4 0 3 7 10 6 5 16 10 16 7 4 7 12 40 16 17 27 88 3 9 0 37 10 8 45 6 16 25 30 12 10 6 16 20 48 10 0 6 11 25 33 11 14 © Key Note Ltd 2010 23 . But I Do Buy Things for Babies and/or Small Children Nowadays I Do Not Have Children.14: Demographic Profiles of Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents).. March 2010 ... But I Am Hoping to Become a Parent Within the Next 2 Years Sample Profile Social Grade A B C1 C2 D E Working Status Full time† Part time Not working‡ Retired/invalid Standard Region East Anglia East Midlands Greater London North North West Scotland South East South West Wales West Midlands Yorkshire and Humberside Table continues.Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2.

Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2.14: Demographic Profiles of Prospective Parents and Other Purchasers of Products for Babies and/or Small Children (% of respondents). But I Do Buy Things for Babies and/or Small Children Nowadays I Do Not Have Children. But I Am Hoping to Become a Parent Within the Next 2 Years Sample Profile Size of Household One Two Three Four Five or more Marital Status Married/living as married Single Divorced Widowed Separated Presence of Children Aged 0-4 Aged 5-9 Aged 10-15 No children Tenure Own home outright Buying home Rent — council Rent — private 50 27 11 7 13 74 6 7 54 22 15 7 9 13 13 75 0 0 0 100 1 0 0 99 56 29 4 9 2 44 56 0 0 0 59 21 6 12 3 22 31 21 17 9 38 44 12 6 0 33 53 9 4 1 Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research. March 2010 ... March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 24 .table continued I Do Not Have Children Under 16.

and more than half (52%) were aged over 55. These respondents may buy things for family members and friends who are parents and/or may be stocking up for when they become parents themselves...9 2014 555 0.8 448 1. MARKET FORECASTS The ending of the ‘mini baby boom’ that characterised the period from 2005 to 2008. Table 2. 2010-2014 2010 Disposable nappies % change year-on-year Baby transport and nursery furniture % change year-on-year Table continues. More than two-thirds (67%) of those who did not have children under 16 but who currently bought products for babies and/or small children were aged over 45.2% per year between 2010 and 2014. combined with the uncertain economic situation. and only 15% were aged under 25. In the latter year.3% and 2.15: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (£m at rsp). 442 1. means that growth in the baby-products market will be relatively slow between 2010 and 2014.8 468 1. Total UK sales of baby products at retail selling prices (rsp) are forecast to grow by between 1.Baby Products Strategic Overview Six in ten (60%) of those respondents who were not parents but who hoped to have children within the next 2 years were aged between 25 and 34.3 2012 545 1.4 454 1.1 2011 537 1.5 2013 550 0. Interestingly.3 462 1.9 © Key Note Ltd 2010 25 .3 530 2. The next-largest group of non-parents who purchased baby products were those aged 25 to 34 (18%).22bn. Nearly four in ten (38%) of those hoping to become parents soon lived alone at the time they took part in the survey — indicating that having a live-in partner is not necessarily a prerequisite for making these plans. This demonstrates the importance of ‘grandparent power’ in the baby-products market. those who hoped to become parents within the next 2 years were twice as likely to be female (66%) as male (34%). Just under one in four (23%) were in the 35 to 44 age group. they are forecast to reach an estimated £1.

5 192 2.7 1..215 1.200 1.6 1.4 1.3 Source: Key Note © Key Note Ltd 2010 26 .182 1..2 177 1.4 183 3.162 1. home safety equipment and feeding equipment % change year-on-year Total % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2011 2012 2013 2014 174 3.7 1.Baby Products Strategic Overview Table 2. 2010-2014 .1 1.table continued 2010 Baby monitors.15: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Products by Sector by Value (£m at rsp).146 2.7 188 2.

Modern Baby was founded in 2000 and has two main product ranges: the Close baby carrier and the Pop-in reusable nappy system. The products are stocked by Mothercare and independent nursery-product stores. Brands available in the UK include Tushies. even in the light of the recent birth-rate increases. the sector has struggled to maintain value.Baby Products Disposable Nappies 3. including: Pocket Tots. which does not need liners or waterproof covers. Despite continual product developments by manufacturers. Mothercare and Waitrose. swim nappies. both of which are worn with a separate waterproof wrap. The disposable-nappy sector has also had to respond to strong pressure from both the Government and consumers to minimise the effects of the use of these products on the environment. and in February 2010 it launched the Easy Comfort All In One nappy. product improvements and falling prices. and Bamboozles and Flexitots. Its products are available from a range of retailers. Bambinex has a range of bamboo and microfibre nappies. As a result. which claim to have less harmful environmental effects than conventional products — in terms of both biodegradability and the way in which they are manufactured. Tots Bots. and many environmentally aware parents have turned to reusable nappies. detergent and towels. Boots. A compromise between reusable and conventional disposable nappies is provided by ‘eco-disposable’ nappies. Babies R Us. which is more absorbent than cotton. some made from cotton and some from bamboo. Bambino Mio started life as a nappy laundry service in 1992. however. The company. training pants and swim nappies. founded in 2000. a one-piece nappy with a disposable lining. Moltex and Wiona. biodegradable liners. whose products are stocked at Boots and Mothercare. The product range includes cotton nappies in five sizes. the present company was founded in 1997. with disposable nappies almost completely replacing terry nappies. including ASDA. © Key Note Ltd 2010 27 . when the market grew rapidly due to a combination of growing consumer demand for convenience. Alternatives to Disposable Nappies Reusable nappies have a small but loyal user base. with retailers stepping up their promotional and marketing activity. has a range of reusable nappies. Disposable Nappies BACKGROUND Disposable nappies have been in widespread use since the 1980s. the number of reusable nappies sold is currently too small for reliable market-size figures to be available. the market has become increasingly price-led. also sells reusable and biodegradable liners. The market reached near-saturation point during the 1990s. A range of reusable products are sold in the UK. plus waterproof covers.

Own-brand nappies are produced for most major retailers. © Key Note Ltd 2010 28 . Table 3.5 2007 493 1. a membership organisation including manufacturers and retailers of reusable nappies. Go Real is managed by ReZolve. organised by Go Real. through the not-for-profit company WRAP (Waste & Resources Action Programme). Until March 2007. as well as local authorities. However.1: The UK Market for Disposable Nappies by Value (£m at rsp).Baby Products Disposable Nappies Real Nappy Week Real Nappy Week is an annual promotional event for reusable nappies. which concluded that there was relatively little difference between disposable and reusable nappies in terms of environmental impact. and Kimberly-Clark’s Huggies brand dominate the market for disposable nappies. from Procter & Gamble.8 2009 519 2. MARKET SIZE The value of the UK retail market for disposable nappies was £519m in 2009. but they are generally less important than branded products.4 475 - Source: Key Note SUPPLIERS Pampers. The 2010 event took place between 26th April and 2nd May. environmental networks. this funding was withdrawn following the publication in May 2005 of a lifecycle assessment by the Environment Agency. Real Nappy Week was sponsored by government funding. a social enterprise organisation based in Cornwall.2 2008 507 2. compared with a figure of £475m in 2005. laundries and parents. 2005-2009 2005 Value (£m at rsp) % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2006 487 2.

in July 2009. in the form of absorbent pants shaped like underwear. The range. Years Ending December 2008 and 2009 2008 Pampers Nappies Baby Dry Nappies Simply Dry Easy Up Pants New Baby Nappies Active Fit Kandoo product range Table continues.305 171 3.Baby Products Disposable Nappies DISTRIBUTION Distribution of disposable nappies is mainly through the grocery sector. 205 1. (In addition to the figures shown in Table 3..2. the Pampers brand launched UnderJams. MARKETING AND ADVERTISING Pampers was by far the most heavily advertised nappy brand in 2009. in an attempt to compete with supermarkets and discount retailers.019 118 3. Price is increasingly becoming a factor in the disposable-nappy market.) Table 3. March 2010 saw the start of a possible nappy price war. as ASDA launched its own-brand Little Angels New Arrivals nappies at £1 for a pack of 48 nappies. its first product for older children. Simply Dry.817 946 683 211 125 2009 © Key Note Ltd 2010 29 . Boots is the other main distribution channel. see Chapter 2 — Strategic Overview.2: Main Media Advertising Expenditure on Disposable Nappies by Brand (£000). RECENT DEVELOPMENTS In January 2010. which caters for 4 to 15 year-olds. Kimberly-Clark’s Huggies brand already had a similar range: DryNites. in the form of the major multiple grocery retailers.. Pampers launched its ‘value brand’. although Huggies spent slightly more in 2008. is designed to provide protection from bedwetting for children aged 4 to 12 years. both Pampers and Huggies were advertised as part of individual supermarket promotions.

The babies featured in the ten winning entries were selected to appear in Huggies’ promotional campaigns over the next 5 years.073 414 109 546 183 2009 CONSUMER TRENDS According to data from Kantar Media (see Table 3. also includes tips for mothers-to-be. The site. Seven in ten purchasers of disposable nappies lived in households with a main shopper aged between 25 and 44. 7% of all adult main shoppers said that their household had used disposable nappies during the year ending September 2009.. features a ‘real-time’ video of a baby growing in utero.Baby Products Disposable Nappies Table 3.. which went live in February 2010. called ‘9 months in vivo’. Years Ending December 2008 and 2009 .006 1. Parents were encouraged to upload photos and videos of their child exploring their world. with the theme ‘Everyday Discoveries’.table continued 2008 Huggies DryNites Sleep Shorts Superdry Nappies Natural Fit Nappies Pull-Ups Pants Little Walkers Newborn Nappies Others Sainsbury’s — nappies range ASDA — nappies range Tesco — nappies range Source: Nielsen Media Research In April 2010. An interactive online campaign to promote the Huggies Super-Dry range was launched in January 2010. plus a new Huggies logo incorporating a baby’s handprint.512 1. A global website for Huggies. © Key Note Ltd 2010 30 . 595 285 180 137 837 1. This rose to 19% in households where the main shopper was aged between 25 and 34 years.2: Main Media Advertising Expenditure on Disposable Nappies by Brand (£000). and four in ten had a main shopper aged between 25 and 34.3). the Huggies brand was relaunched with new packaging featuring photographs of babies at the relevant age for each product.

Baby Products

Disposable Nappies

Table 3.3: Household Use of Disposable Nappies in the Last 12 Months — Penetration and Profile by Age of Main Shopper in the Household (%), 2009
Profile (%) All adults Age 15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ 2 15 40 30 6 5 2 2 13 19 12 3 2 1 100 Penetration (%) 7

Source: Target Group Index (TGI) © Kantar Media, Quarter 1 (October 2008September 2009) 2010

Table 3.4, which provides an analysis of household purchasing of disposable nappies by type, shows that ‘normal’ disposable nappies were the most popular choice in all age groups. They were more than twice as popular as flexible nappies among those in the 25 to 34 and 35 to 44 age groups.

Table 3.4: Household Purchasing of Disposable Nappies in the Last 12 Months — Penetration by Type of Product and Age of Main Shopper in the Household (%), 2009
Normal All adults Age 15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 2 8 12 7 1 2 0 5 5 3 1 0 0 4 4 4 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 Flexible 2 Training 2 Other 0

Source: Target Group Index (TGI) © Kantar Media, Quarter 1 (October 2008September 2009) 2010

© Key Note Ltd 2010

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Baby Products

Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture

4. Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture
BACKGROUND
Suppliers of baby transport and nursery furniture have taken advantage of a number of positive social and demographic factors affecting parenthood in the 21st century. The fact that consumers have become increasingly style-conscious has had an impact on both the transport and nursery-furniture segments, with parents demanding high standards of design and functionality in the products they buy for their babies. Most companies in the nursery-furniture segment produce co-ordinated ranges, in colours and styles to suit contemporary tastes, and baby transport too is designed with fashion in mind. The baby-transport segment has responded to the fact that people are becoming more mobile in both their leisure and working lives, and are increasingly reliant on car transport. This has led to a growing need for flexible solutions to enable babies and toddlers to accompany their families, with baby travel systems, combining car seats with prams and/or pushchairs, gradually usurping more traditional baby carriages. Many families also find the need for an additional, more lightweight form of baby transport, such as a baby carrier or a lightweight baby buggy, while two-car families may find it more convenient to purchase two baby car seats than to deal with the logistics of moving a seat from one car to another. Car seats may also be purchased by grandparents, childminders and others who have to transport babies and toddlers on a regular basis. The trend towards older parenthood has been beneficial in that a higher proportion of parents are now settled and reasonably affluent when they embark on parenthood and, as such, are more willing and more able to afford high-quality products for their new baby.

MARKET SIZE
The total UK retail market for baby transport and nursery furniture was valued at £434m in 2009. The steady growth between 2005 and 2008 can be attributed to strong product innovation and marketing activity by manufacturers and retailers, combined with the rising birth rate. The rate of growth slowed in 2009, partly due to a more difficult economic climate and partly due to the fact that there were slightly fewer births.

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Baby Products

Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture

Table 4.1: The UK Market for Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009
2005 Value (£m at rsp) % change year-on-year
rsp — retail selling prices

2006 405 2.3

2007 415 2.5

2008 427 2.9

2009 434 1.6

396 -

Source: Key Note

Baby Transport
Retail sales within the baby-transport sector (comprising prams, pushchairs, baby carriers and car safety seats) reached £297m in 2009.

Table 4.2: The UK Market for Baby Transport by Value (£m at rsp), 2005-2009
2005 Value (£m at rsp) % change year-on-year
rsp — retail selling prices

2006 281 1.8

2007 286 1.8

2008 293 2.4

2009 297 1.4

276 -

Source: Key Note

The products in this sector can be divided into two main groups: prams, pushchairs and baby carriers (including travel systems, which combine car seats with prams and/or pushchairs); and stand-alone car safety seats. The former is by far the larger segment and has been taking share from traditional car seats. Although a number of factors — including multiple car ownership and the fact that using a car seat or booster seat is mandatory for children up to the age of 12 — have combined to increase volume sales of car seats, the value of sales fell from £66m to £59m between 2005 and 2009. The prams, pushchairs and baby carriers sector, on the other hand, has seen healthy sales growth, with fashion and celebrity culture playing a large part in prompting parents (and/or grandparents) to buy premium products. Sales in this segment increased from £210m in 2005 to £237m in 2009.

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8 †297 210 66 276 Source: Key Note Nursery Furniture The nursery-furniture sector has grown in tandem with increasing demand from parents for nursery furniture and baby equipment that reflects their personal tastes in home décor. including cots.Baby Products Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture Table 4. pushchairs and baby carriers % change year-on-year Car safety seats % change year-on-year Total rsp — retail selling prices † — does not sum due to rounding 2006 216 2.6 59 -4.5 281 2007 223 3.9 2009 137 2.2 63 -3.4: The UK Market for Nursery Furniture by Value (£m at rsp). Retail sales of nursery furniture.2 120 - Source: Key Note © Key Note Ltd 2010 34 . Table 4. 2005-2009 2005 Prams. cribs and mattresses.6 293 2009 237 2. playpens and changing units.3: The UK Market for Baby Transport by Sector by Value (£m at rsp). highchairs.0 2008 134 3. having grown from £120m in 2005.1 286 2008 231 3. 2005-2009 2005 Value (£m at rsp) % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2006 124 3.6 62 -1.3 2007 129 4. reached £137m in 2009.9 65 -1.

Baby-transport brands marketed by Dorel include Maxi-Cosi.0 124 2007 89 3.1 25 4. There is also a wide range of suppliers to the baby-transport market.0 16 0. Babies R Us and Mamas & Papas — producing ranges of furniture and accessories.5 23 4. Dorel.Baby Products Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture Cots. with Britax Excelsior being particularly important within the market for dedicated child car seats.3 18 5. The largest of these are Mamas & Papas. with many small companies — as well as larger manufacturers and retailers. Table 4. cribs and mattresses easily constitute the largest segment.5 17 6. Bébécar and Cosatto.3 129 2008 92 3. operates in both the baby-transport and feeding/safety-equipment sectors. cribs and mattresses % change year-on-year Highchairs % change year-on-year Other % change year-on-year Total rsp — retail selling prices † — including playpens and changing units 2006 86 4. © Key Note Ltd 2010 35 . with retail sales estimated at £93m in 2009.9 134 2009 93 1. 2005-2009 2005 Cots. Maclaren and Mothercare’s own brand. including Mothercare.9 22 0. a Canadian company that has had a UK presence since 1988.4 24 4. Other companies of importance in this sector include Chicco.6 137 82 22 16 120 Source: Key Note SUPPLIERS The market for nursery furniture is highly fragmented.2 19 5. Quinny and Bébé Confort. Graco.5: The UK Market for Nursery Furniture by Sector by Value (£m at rsp).

was launched by Cosatto in February 2009. giving a high degree of comfort and safety. Its popularity has been boosted by the fact that its prams and baby accessories have been chosen by a number of ‘celebrity parents’ — and the brand’s ‘street cred’ was further enhanced when six Silver Cross Balmoral prams appeared on stage with the singer Lily Allen at the music industry’s 2010 Brit Awards. plus characters that can be attached to the toy arch over the seat. which offers a four-position. © Key Note Ltd 2010 36 . baby swings. Mamas & Papas launched the Magic Astro Cradle in March 2010.or four-wheeled compact travel system. was launched towards the end of 2009. ‘one-handed’ height adjustment.or forward-facing seat options and space for an additional seat for a second child. from the US toy manufacturer Fisher-Price. The cradle uses ‘Magic Cards’. a double pushchair designed to accommodate one child from birth and another from the age of 6 months. The infant seat. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS The Slidi highchair. each containing songs and sounds. A range of four new pushchairs was launched by Britax in January 2010. meaning that an online presence is now a prerequisite for baby-equipment companies. The product can also be transformed into a travel system for twins with the addition of two Graco car seats. includes baby seats and bouncers. The range included: the B-Lite urban stroller. Maclaren’s Techno XLR travel system was expanded in July 2009 with the introduction of a soft carrycot that is compatible with the system. the B-Mobile three. uses interactive technology and a choice of music and light shows to entertain babies from birth to 6 months old. DISTRIBUTION Many parents undertake extensive research (usually online) before purchasing items of baby equipment.Baby Products Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture The traditional British pram company Silver Cross has experienced a revival of fortunes since its purchase in 2002 by the private company David Halsall International Ltd. car seats and prams/pushchairs: many parents choose either to go in person to a store to examine these products after online research or to buy the equipment online. which has rearward. and the B-Dual travel system. the B-Smart modular travel system. highchairs and booster seats. described by the company as ‘the ultimate electronic infant entertainment system’. It was announced in March 2010 that Britax would be launching the Jockey range of child’s bicycle seats. The Baby Gear range. This applies particularly to travel systems. fitting onto the buggy for the baby’s first few months. The Graco Quattro Tour Duo. February 2010 saw the launch of the Forty Winks 4-in-1 travel cot/playpen from Cosatto.

accounted for by 214 separate brands. during the 12 months ending December 2009. Britax Excelsior Ltd announced that it would offer a free ‘precautionary’ remedy kit for one of its stroller models. (A separate. The remedy kit consists of covers to fit over each of the hinges. having detected a potential risk of injury to fingers or hands from its folding mechanism. these covers were issued only to purchasers who contacted Maclaren themselves. the majority of expenditure within the category was accounted for by a large number of brands (186) spending less than the threshold amount. in February 2010. however. The recall was estimated to affect 1. Chicco was the largest spender. undefined category of ‘baby goods’ recorded a total expenditure of £192. divided between 33 brands. Total expenditure in this sector in 2009 was £1.000) for a separate listing in its published figures. The company stated that it had had no complaints or reports of incidents.2 million products. Graco voluntarily recalled 65 models of its Harmony High Chair due to reports of loose screws and falling brackets that could cause the chair to tip. From 2010. In March 2010. but a routine internal quality check had revealed a potential problem in the mechanical attachment of the IsoFix connectors to the base. Maclaren received some adverse publicity towards the end of 2009. MARKETING AND ADVERTISING The highly fragmented nature of this sector of the baby-products market is illustrated by the fact that. with campaigns for its Trio travel system and Polly highchair brands worth a total of £340. Dorel launched a new range of Maxi-Cosi car seats: the Pebble for infants and the Pearl for toddlers. following reports that 12 children in the US had had parts of their fingers cut off by the folding mechanism of its umbrella strollers.Baby Products Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture In October 2009. Following these problems.2m.) © Key Note Ltd 2010 37 . In November 2009. not a single brand within Nielsen Media Research’s ‘baby carriages and nursery equipment’ category spent more than the threshold (£75. Both fit onto the new Dorel FamilyFix car-seat base. the company distributed hinge covers to all purchasers of the strollers in the US. In 2008. In the UK. Dorel voluntarily recalled all FamilyFix car-seat bases sold before 4th March. In March 2010.000 in 2009. however.000. sold under the Viva and Nexus brands. Again. all Maclaren strollers of this type are being supplied with hinge covers as standard.

which included links to the nursery range on the TK Maxx website. to promote its new range of nursery products. © Key Note Ltd 2010 38 . In January 2010. In addition. reminding parents of the importance of in-car safety and the correct fitting of child car seats.283 1.711 1. TK Maxx also ran display advertisements on the Netmums site. there was a competition to win a £500 gift card. TK Maxx began an online campaign on the parenting website Netmums.188 2009 Britax launched a television advertising campaign in February 2010.Baby Products Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture Table 4.6: Main Media Advertising Expenditure on Baby Carriages and Nursery Equipment by Brand (£000). Years Ending December 2008 and 2009 2008 Chicco Polly Highchair Trio For Me Total Chicco Coo Chi Coo — nursery product range Other Total Source: Nielsen Media Research 155 185 340 88 1. The campaign was supported by online and point-of-sale materials.188 1. The retailer gave a series of Netmums bloggers (online diarists) money to spend in store and then invited them to talk about the shop and products on the Coffeehouse forum pages.

more commonly known as Cot Death). They are also widely used when parents are out and about with their babies — for example. 24% at 4 months and 18% at 6 months. The latest figures from the Department of Health suggest that. Manufacturers have responded to the promotion of breastfeeding by developing new ranges of products for breastfeeding mothers and their babies. at least in the early stages. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment BACKGROUND One of the main factors influencing the market for baby-feeding equipment. but the 2005 Infant Feeding Survey. Widespread media coverage of the dangers that may face babies in their homes has led to a growing demand for home safety equipment. door and cupboard latches. backed by the World Health Organization (WHO). when visiting friends or relatives. in 2009. fridges and other household appliances. For example. Baby Monitors. at least partly. plus soothers. warmers and sterilising equipment. including breast pumps and storage bottles. Both the feeding-products and safety-equipment markets have benefited from the trend for mothers to return to work while their children are still under school age. corner cushions to protect babies from knocking themselves on furniture corners. © Key Note Ltd 2010 39 . in response to a need to provide reassurance for parents in the light of findings on issues such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS. such as: stair gates and bedrails. is the number of mothers who breastfeed their babies. breastfeeding equipment such as pumps. Government policy. revealed that 37% of all mothers were breastfeeding their baby at 6 weeks. and feeding cups for older babies and toddlers. socket covers.Baby Products Baby Monitors. No reliable recent figures are available on breastfeeding rates among older babies. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment 5. published in 2007. just under half of all babies were being totally or partially breastfed at their 6or 8-week check-up. is to encourage that babies are solely breastfed for the first 6 months. and many working parents of young children keep a separate set of feeding equipment at a childcare facility. The feeding-products sector also incorporates bottles and teats for bottle feeding. Children’s Services and Skills]). The market for baby monitors has developed. sterilisers and spare bottles can help mothers to continue breastfeeding after their return to work. and locks for cupboards. as well as being purchased by parents of young children. Home safety equipment is required at the homes of childminders (who are now inspected by Ofsted [the Office for Standards in Education.

4 2009 168 1.1: The UK Market for Baby Monitors.3 82 3.2 168 © Key Note Ltd 2010 40 .8 139 - Source: Key Note Baby monitors are now a standard purchase for most new parents. Retail sales of feeding equipment have also seen reasonably good growth.2: The UK Market for Baby Monitors.2 83 1.5 2007 158 6. reaching £83m in 2009.6 73 7.3 79 8.8 2008 165 4. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment MARKET SIZE Total UK retail sales of baby monitors.4 148 79 5. Table 5.Baby Products Baby Monitors. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment by Value (£m at rsp).8 †165 2006 2007 2008 2009 85 1. Retail sales within the sector were estimated at £85m in 2009.. 2005-2009 2005 Baby monitors and home safety equipment % change year-on-year Feeding equipment % change year-on-year Total Table continues. 71 68 139 75 5. Table 5. with developments such as digital and video monitors helping to maintain value to an extent.2 158 84 6. 2005-2009 2005 Value (£m at rsp) % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2006 148 6.. up from £71m in 2005. compared with £139m in 2005. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment by Sector by Value (£m at rsp). home safety equipment and feeding equipment reached £168m in 2009.

breast pumps and sterilisers. Tomy has a strong presence in the safety-equipment sector. The Tommee Tippee range. such as bouncers and swings. such as socket covers. Source: Key Note SUPPLIERS It is common for suppliers to be active in both the feeding-equipment and safety-equipment sectors.Baby Products Baby Monitors.table continued rsp — retail selling prices † — does not sum due to rounding Note: some figures have been revised since the last edition of this report. including bottles and teats. bedrails and ‘childproofing kits’. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment Table 5.. as well as sterilisers. and toddler cups. pan guards. and door and window locks. includes the Closer to Nature range of bottle-feeding equipment. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment by Sector by Value (£m at rsp). Lindam produces baby monitors and other safety equipment (notably stair gates). the strength is in one sector. bottle warmers and toddler feeding equipment. are important in both the feeding-equipment and safety-equipment sectors. with particular strengths in baby monitors. © Key Note Ltd 2010 41 . The company also produces baby play equipment. as well as toddler cups. however. Lindam was purchased by the US baby-products company Munchkin.. In February 2010. In the majority of cases. The Danish company Baby Dan produces safety gates and other in-home safety equipment. The company also produces thermometers and baby monitors. The company’s product range also includes baby monitors. particularly from Boots and Mothercare. from Jackel International. It also produces feeding equipment. plus a range of playpens and highchairs. Products from Dorel UK’s Safety 1st brand include monitors.2: The UK Market for Baby Monitors. 2005-2009 . Own-label products. with the company having diversified into other products. Philips Avent has a large range of feeding equipment. sterilisers and products to aid breastfeeding.

Lindam launched the numi safety gate. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS Baby Monitors The VTech Clear View Video Baby Monitor. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment DISTRIBUTION Boots and Mothercare dominate retail sales of feeding equipment and safety equipment. and a tap strap: a lightweight device designed to stop children accessing hot-water taps. The range consists of five different products — a soother pack. Tommee Tippee’s Closer to Nature range of feeding bottles became available in a new material that is entirely free from Bisphenol A (BPA) — a chemical that has been linked with possible interactions with hormone systems. The last of these includes a multicoloured nightlight. including a magnetic cupboard and drawer lock.99. the gate slides into. Clippasafe introduced a number of new child safety products in March 2010. Baby bottles containing BPA were banned in the US in 2009 but have not been banned in the UK. enabling it to be easily removed when not in use. with extra features including a digital zoom. but supermarkets have an increasingly important presence. Home Safety Equipment In July 2009. features a 2. from the US company Luv n Care. which was launched in February 2010.4-inch colour display. a weaning spoon pack. Feeding Equipment Fisher-Price introduced a ‘value’ feeding range in December 2009. which can be customised to co-ordinate with the nursery colour scheme. was launched in the UK in spring 2010. a low-profile wall mount. and locks onto. the Digital Monitor TD300 and the Digital Plus Monitor TD350. February 2010 also saw the launch of a new range of baby monitors from Tomy: the Classic Monitor TA100. The Nuby brand of infant feeding products. Marketed as ‘essential for every stylish house’. plus 50 recorded melodies to help the baby get back to sleep. a feeding bottle and a training mug — each retailing at just £1.Baby Products Baby Monitors. sound sensor and feeding timer. © Key Note Ltd 2010 42 . a weaning bowl and spoon set. In February 2009.

© Key Note Ltd 2010 43 .Baby Products Baby Monitors. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment MARKETING AND ADVERTISING None of the brands in either the baby-feeding or safety-equipment sectors recorded a large enough advertising expenditure to appear in Nielsen Media Research’s data for the years ending December 2008 or 2009.

77 1.89 1. at 1.43 1.74 1.1: Total Fertility Rates† in the US. and the more traditional and family-oriented nature of much of the US population.09.89.59 1.84 1.32 † — the average number of children that would be born to a woman if she were to experience the current age-specific fertility rates through her lifetime Source: World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision.Baby Products An International Perspective 6. for example. Europe and Selected European Countries. In France and Norway.84.38 1. A number of explanations have been put forward for this. compared with just 1. averaged across the years from 2005 to 2010. An International Perspective POPULATION TRENDS There are considerable variations in fertility rates among the Western European countries.84 1. The average fertility rate in the UK is at the higher end of the European spectrum.87 1.50 1. is 1. United Nations Population Division © Key Note Ltd 2010 44 .32 in Germany. 2005-2010 US Western Europe Europe France Norway Sweden Denmark UK Belgium Netherlands Spain Austria Greece Italy Germany 2.38 1. Denmark is at the same level. including: a higher birth rate among the majority Hispanic population. Table 6. the fact that it may be easier for American women to combine work and child-rearing. The US has a higher fertility rate than Western Europe. the estimated total fertility rate (number of children per woman).89 1. at 2.09 1.38 1.

Early in 2010. concentrating on Europe. feeding and travel accessories. the company announced a joint venture in India. up from 28 in 2009. with many companies operating across several regions worldwide. The Closer to Nature brand of baby-feeding equipment. were initially available only through Babies R Us in the US. Mayborn launched the Tommee Tippee brand in the US. In October. and it plans a US launch in mid-2010. © Key Note Ltd 2010 45 . mostly on a franchise basis.Baby Products An International Perspective The baby-products market is highly international in nature. but they moved into Toys R Us stores in April. Russia and Japan. Mamas & Papas announced in early February 2010 that it would be expanding its international operations. Mothercare announced plans to launch Mothercare in Australia and the Early Learning Centre in South Africa. Much of the company’s international growth came from India and Russia. Also in January 2010. The company opened its 50th store in Russia in December 2009. The Closer to Nature and Explora brands were marketed in the US as being designed to help relieve common feeding anxieties among mothers. The company also introduced a range of six prams into the Australian market in March 2010. International expansion — particularly in areas of relatively high population growth — has been a focus for a number of UK companies. In January 2010. The Mothercare group opened 115 international stores during 2009. and Explora toddler cups and feeding products. taking it back to its original roots. which produces bath-care. the UK safety-products manufacturer Lindam became part of the US baby-products company Munchkin. the Middle East. it expects to have 65 Indian stores by the end of 2010.

Prior to this. Labour took an advertisement on the main forum page of the Mumsnet site. including weaning sets and toddler cups. with all of the main parties competing for the family vote. was introduced in July 2009. The nappies were typically priced at 11 pence each. In February 2010. © Key Note Ltd 2010 46 . and a number of ‘value’ products have been introduced. In March 2010. this has resulted in a smaller consumer base. ECONOMIC FACTORS Although spending on children is often the last thing to be reduced in recessionary times. ASDA went one step further. • Smaller family sizes — these can mean higher disposable income and greater expenditure per child. from the premium brand Pampers. PEST Analysis POLITICAL FACTORS The political importance of parents with babies and young children is underlined by the fact that the General Election of May 2010 became known as the ‘Mumsnet election’.99 each. pricing its Little Angels New Arrivals product at £1 for 48 nappies. priced at £1. dubbed ‘biscuit-gate’. The Simply Dry nappy range.Baby Products PEST Analysis 7. These include: • The falling birth rate — by definition. claiming that the Conservatives aimed to limit child tax credits to families earning less than £31. SOCIAL FACTORS Many social and demographic factors have a strong influence on the market for baby products. Fisher-Price launched a value range of toddler-feeding accessories. the media had made much of Gordon Brown’s failure to name his favourite biscuit during a live Web chat with Mumsnet users — an incident that was. compared with around 20 pence for a standard Pampers nappy. in February 2010. This was refuted by Teresa May in the Conservatives’ own Mumsnet advertisement. Samantha Cameron’s announcement of her pregnancy in the run-up to the election added to the ‘family focus’ of the campaign.000 a year. the baby-products industry has recognised that economic realities also impinge on parents. predictably.

although no injuries had been reported. Covers were also issued to UK purchasers who contacted Maclaren themselves. The most high-profile of these was the US ‘recall’ by Maclaren of its umbrella strollers in November 2009. the first child not yet having ‘outgrown’ them. Following these problems. Britax voluntarily issued ‘remedy kits’ in the form of hinge covers for its Nexus and Viva pushchair models. It may also mean that they do not wait as long before having a second child. owing to reports of loose screws and falling brackets that could cause the chair to tip.Baby Products PEST Analysis • Later parenthood — this means that couples are likely to be more affluent before starting their families. This can benefit the market. In March 2010. From 2010 onwards. and perhaps subsequent children. with more journeys being undertaken by car — this has resulted in increased demand for products that make it easier to travel with babies and young children. Technology can also cause problems. however. TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS The baby-products market is led by technological innovations designed to provide solutions for mothers and babies. women are more likely to wish to return to work soon after childbirth. • Higher numbers of working mothers — for economic reasons (as discussed earlier in this report) and/or because of a shift in social attitudes. following reports that 12 children in the US had had parts of their fingers cut off by its folding mechanism. cots and travel seats) may need to be bought twice. Graco voluntarily recalled 65 models of its Harmony High Chair. in February 2010. and there were a number of product recalls during 2009 and the early part of 2010. all Maclaren strollers of this type will be supplied with hinge covers fitted as standard. • Greater mobility. The company distributed hinge covers to all purchasers of the strollers in the US. © Key Note Ltd 2010 47 . due to the potential risk of injury from the folding mechanism. because some items of baby equipment (for example.

(See Chapter 2 — Strategic Overview — for a detailed breakdown of the sample and information on how the respondents were selected. of the following do you agree with?’ A series of statements were then read out.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics 8. Table 8.1: Attitudes Towards Baby Products and Related Issues (% of respondents). Which. Consumer Dynamics OVERVIEW This chapter is based on the findings of Key Note’s original research among a sample of 477 parents.. prospective parents and other purchasers of baby products.. Table 8. March 2010 Nappies I am concerned that disposable nappies are harmful to the environment I use/have used only disposable nappies as opposed to non-disposable nappies I use/have used non-disposable nappies Breastfeeding Versus Bottle Feeding Breastfeeding is much better for babies than bottle feeding Bottle feeding can be just as good as breastfeeding Bottle feeding is easier for the parents than breastfeeding The cleansing and sterilising necessary for bottle feeding babies means it can be hard work New Versus Second-Hand Baby Equipment It is perfectly acceptable to use second-hand baby equipment as long as you are satisfied it is safe It is important to buy all baby equipment brand new Table continues. 26 78 53 64 47 29 60 40 59 © Key Note Ltd 2010 48 .1 provides a summary of the results. if any.) Respondents were asked: ‘I am going to ask you some questions about products and equipment you can buy for babies.

However. Breastfeeding Versus Bottle Feeding Nearly half (47%) of respondents agreed that breastfeeding is much better for babies than bottle feeding. or hardly ever. Four in ten were users of reusable nappies. Bottle feeding seems to have a slight advantage in terms of practicalities: nearly two-thirds (64%) of respondents said that bottle feeding was easier for parents than breastfeeding. © Key Note Ltd 2010 49 . However..table continued New Versus Second-Hand Baby Equipment (cont. whereas just under three in ten (29%) asserted that bottle feeding can be just as good as breastfeeding. March 2010 29 47 46 45 80 17 63 Nappies Nearly six in ten respondents (59%) agreed that they were concerned that disposable nappies might be harmful to the environment. either currently or in the past. this proportion almost exactly matched the proportion (60%) who acknowledged that they used (or had used) only disposable nappies.. used I wish I had done more research/been better informed before I bought my baby equipment Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research. March 2010 .1: Attitudes Towards Baby Products and Related Issues (% of respondents).Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8.) I would never buy a second-hand child’s car seat I would not accept baby equipment passed on to me from friends and family Choosing Baby Equipment There are so many different types of baby equipment available that it can be difficult to decide what you actually do need Parenting today is easier than it was 10 years ago because of the wide range of baby equipment available It is difficult to get unbiased advice about what sort of baby equipment to buy I bought some items of baby equipment that I never. just over half (53%) of the sample acknowledged that the cleansing and sterilising that was necessary meant that bottle feeding could be hard work.

the potential dangers of using a second-hand car seat have been well publicised. A very high proportion of respondents (78%) agreed that it is perfectly acceptable to use second-hand equipment as long as one is satisfied that it is safe to do so. However. the plethora of products can also be very confusing. especially for new parents. and 45% of respondents agreed that parenting is now easier than it was a decade ago because of this. and 17% said that they would not even accept used baby equipment from friends and family. and there is clearly a need for help and guidance to enable purchasers of baby equipment to make informed decisions. Choosing Baby Equipment The wide variety of baby equipment that is currently available certainly makes life easier for parents in some respects. and nearly three in ten (29%) wished that they had been better informed before buying baby equipment. compared with just 29% of 16 to 24 year-olds. Levels of concern were highest among respondents living in the Midlands (63%) and lowest among those living in the North (55%). DETAILED ANALYSIS Nappies Older respondents tended to be more aware than younger respondents of the environmental impact of disposable nappies. Almost the same proportion (47%) had bought at least some items of baby equipment that had been of little or no use. However. Eight in ten (80%) respondents said that there are so many different types of baby equipment that it can be difficult to decide what you actually need — and 46% said that it was difficult to obtain unbiased advice on this subject. rather than discarding it. and women were more likely than men to do so (63% of women. together with growing concern for the environment. favour ‘passing on’ baby equipment. Slightly more of those in the C2DE social grades than those in the ABC1 social grades saw this as a concern (62% versus 56%). compared with 53% of men). Nearly two-thirds (65%) of over-45 year-olds who bought products for babies and/or small children were concerned about this.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics New Versus Second-Hand Baby Equipment Current economic conditions. and nearly two-thirds (63%) of respondents agreed that they would never buy this item of baby equipment second-hand. Just over a quarter (26%) said that it was important for them personally to buy all baby equipment brand new. © Key Note Ltd 2010 50 .

Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Just 42% of those aged over 45 had used only disposable nappies for their children. and Use of.2: Attitudes Towards. and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays. Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research. March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 51 . March 2010 S1: “I am concerned that disposable nappies are harmful to the environment. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S1 PP% Pen% 100 35 65 2 21 32 45 43 57 59 53 63 29 53 61 65 56 62 S2 PP% Pen% 100 40 60 7 25 40 29 45 55 60 62 59 86 65 76 42 60 61 100 39 61 5 23 31 41 46 54 37 25 38 35 27 38 55 63 59 35 22 42 58 53 67 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15. compared with 53% of respondents from the Midlands.” S2:” I use/have used only disposable nappies as opposed to non-disposable nappies. Disposable Nappies (% of respondents). Around two-thirds (67%) of those living in the South had used only disposables. Table 8. compared with 86% of 16 to 24 year-olds.

those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years. March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 52 . Table 8. and many women over 45 may not have had the opportunity to use them when bringing up their own babies. Women (46%) were much more likely than men (29%) to agree that they used or had used non-disposable nappies. but differences in penetration by region or social grade were fairly slight. March 2010 S3: “I use/have used non-disposable nappies. and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays.3: Use of Non-Disposable Nappies (% of respondents). This may be related to the fact that disposable nappies have become widely available only relatively recently. Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Respondents aged over 45 were more than twice as likely as those in the 25 to 34 age group to use or have used non-disposable nappies (51% versus 24%).” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S3 PP% 100 29 71 5 14 29 52 44 56 Pen% 40 29 46 42 24 37 51 38 41 100 39 61 5 23 31 41 46 54 37 25 38 39 26 35 42 40 37 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15.

being both more likely than other age groups to say that bottle feeding is just as good as breastfeeding and less likely to say that breastfeeding is much better for babies.. Respondents in the 35 to 44 age group were the keenest proponents of bottle feeding. March 2010 S4: “Breastfeeding is much better for babies than bottle feeding. being the most likely to agree that it is much better for babies (56%) and the least likely to agree that bottle feeding can be just as good (24%).Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Breastfeeding Versus Bottle Feeding Slightly more men (50%) than women (45%) held the view that breastfeeding is much better for babies than bottle feeding — but women were significantly more likely than men (34% to 20%) to say that bottle feeding can be just as good as breastfeeding. Table 8. there was essentially no difference between the two groups in terms of the proportion claiming that bottle feeding can be just as good as breastfeeding. Northern respondents were the most enthusiastic about breastfeeding.4: Attitudes Towards Breastfeeding (% of respondents). 46 54 5 23 31 41 39 61 100 S4 PP% Pen% 100 42 58 5 24 28 43 52 48 47 50 45 48 48 42 50 53 42 S5 PP% Pen% 100 28 72 5 23 36 36 46 54 29 20 34 26 29 33 25 29 28 © Key Note Ltd 2010 53 .” S5: ”Bottle feeding can be just as good as breastfeeding.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Table continues. Although considerably more ABC1s than C2DEs endorsed breastfeeding as being much better for babies (53% versus 42%)..

while those living in the South were the most likely to agree that cleansing and sterilising can make bottle feeding hard work. agreed with this statement. 77%) were the most likely to agree with the former statement. March 2010 . compared with 49% of C2DEs). The youngest respondents (16 to 24 year-olds. However. and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays.. However. men and women were almost equally likely to hold the view that the cleaning and sterilising that is necessary for bottle feeding can be hard work (53% of men and 52% of women). compared with 59% of women. the ABC1s were more likely than the C2DEs to feel that the chores associated with bottle feeding can be onerous (57% of ABC1s. Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.” Sample Profile Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S4 PP% Pen% S5 PP% Pen% 37 25 38 44 21 35 56 39 44 30 28 42 24 31 32 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15. March 2010 Men were more likely than women to say that bottle feeding is easier for parents than breastfeeding: 71% of men. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years. while those aged 25 to 34 (60%) were the most likely to agree with the latter one. © Key Note Ltd 2010 54 . By region. Fairly similar proportions of the ABC1s (62%) and C2DEs (66%) thought that bottle feeding is easier than breastfeeding.” S5: ”Bottle feeding can be just as good as breastfeeding.. those living in the North were the most likely to think that bottle feeding was easier.table continued S4: “Breastfeeding is much better for babies than bottle feeding.4: Attitudes Towards Breastfeeding (% of respondents).Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8.

March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 55 . March 2010 S6: “Bottle feeding is easier for the parents than breastfeeding.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S6 PP% Pen% 100 40 60 5 26 31 38 50 50 64 71 59 77 66 59 65 62 66 S7 PP% Pen% 100 44 56 6 24 29 41 44 56 53 53 52 51 60 52 49 57 49 100 44 56 6 24 29 41 44 56 39 26 36 33 24 43 67 65 60 39 26 36 48 49 60 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15.5: Attitudes Towards Bottle Feeding (% of respondents). Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research. and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays.” S7: ”The cleansing and sterilising necessary for bottle feeding babies means it can be hard work.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years.

There was something of an ABC1/C2DE split.. Table 8.6: Attitudes Towards New and Second-Hand Baby Equipment (% of respondents). while just over three in ten men (31%) said that it is important to buy all baby equipment brand new. Second-hand baby equipment was more acceptable to those in the age groups between 25 and 44 than it was to younger or older respondents.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics New Versus Second-Hand Baby Equipment Buying all baby equipment brand new is of rather less importance to women than it is to men. fewer than one in four women (23%) held this view. Northern respondents were the most likely to prioritise purchases of new equipment for their babies. In addition. More than eight in ten women (83%). agreed that second-hand baby equipment is perfectly acceptable to use. March 2010 S8: “It is perfectly acceptable to use second-hand baby equipment as long as you are satisfied it is safe. being more likely than those in other regions to say that this is important to them (32%) and the least likely to think that it is acceptable to buy second-hand (still a relatively high 74%). 46 54 5 23 31 41 39 61 100 S8 PP% Pen% 100 36 64 5 23 33 39 48 52 78 71 83 74 80 82 75 81 76 S9 PP% Pen% 100 46 54 10 19 29 42 39 61 26 31 23 54 22 24 27 22 30 © Key Note Ltd 2010 56 . with the former (generally more affluent) social grades being more relaxed about buying second-hand and less concerned that everything should be new.. The 16 to 24s were the keenest on buying all baby equipment brand new.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Table continues. compared with around seven in ten men (71%).” S9: ”It is important to buy all baby equipment brand new.

Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8.6: Attitudes Towards New and Second-Hand Baby Equipment (% of respondents)..” S9: ”It is important to buy all baby equipment brand new. March 2010 . there was little difference by region in the proportion who said that they would never buy a second-hand car seat. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years.. and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays.table continued S8: “It is perfectly acceptable to use second-hand baby equipment as long as you are satisfied it is safe.” Sample Profile Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S8 PP% Pen% S9 PP% Pen% 37 25 38 35 26 39 74 80 82 45 25 30 32 26 21 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15. © Key Note Ltd 2010 57 . Respondents living in the North or the Midlands were twice as likely as those living in the South to reject baby equipment from people they know. However. March 2010 Younger respondents were particularly averse to buying second-hand car seats (94% said they would never do so) and to accepting baby equipment passed on from friends and family (31% agreed with the statement). Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.

Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S10 PP% Pen% 100 40 60 7 26 32 35 45 55 63 64 62 94 70 64 53 61 64 S11 PP% Pen% 100 40 60 9 22 20 49 44 56 17 18 17 31 17 11 21 17 18 100 39 61 5 23 31 41 46 54 37 25 38 37 24 39 63 60 64 48 30 22 23 20 10 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15. Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research. March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 58 . and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays.” S11: ”I would not accept baby equipment passed on to me from friends and family.7: Aversion to Second-Hand Baby Equipment (% of respondents). March 2010 S10: “I would never buy a second-hand child’s car seat.

46 54 5 23 31 41 39 61 100 S12 PP% Pen% 100 37 63 5 21 33 41 46 54 80 75 83 87 73 84 80 81 80 S13 PP% Pen% 100 41 59 7 20 28 44 41 59 45 47 44 66 40 40 49 40 49 © Key Note Ltd 2010 59 .. Those in the 16 to 24 age group. also showed relatively high levels of agreement with the statement that parenting today is easier because of the wide range of baby equipment that is available. C2DE respondents. agreed with this statement.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Table continues. and those living in the North. March 2010 S12: “There are so many different types of baby equipment available that it can be difficult to decide what you actually do need.8: Attitudes Towards the Range of Baby Equipment That is Available (% of respondents). were also more likely than others to say that greater choice makes it more difficult to make decisions on what to buy.” S13: ”Parenting today is easier than it was 10 years ago because of the wide range of baby equipment available. whilst being more likely than any other age group to agree that the wide choice of equipment makes parenting easier than it was 10 years ago. Table 8..Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Choosing Baby Equipment Women were particularly likely to complain that it can be difficult to decide which types of baby equipment to choose: 83% of women. compared with 75% of men.

Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8.8: Attitudes Towards the Range of Baby Equipment That is Available (% of respondents).. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years. March 2010 ..” Sample Profile Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S12 PP% Pen% S13 PP% Pen% 37 25 38 37 26 36 81 83 77 41 23 36 50 41 43 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15. March 2010 Those who were the most likely to complain about the lack of unbiased advice about the type of baby equipment to buy included the C2DEs (49%) and those in the 16 to 24 age group (54%).table continued S12: “There are so many different types of baby equipment available that it can be difficult to decide what you actually do need. and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays. © Key Note Ltd 2010 60 .” S13: ”Parenting today is easier than it was 10 years ago because of the wide range of baby equipment available.

9: Attitudes Towards the Availability of Unbiased Advice on Baby Equipment (% of respondents). March 2010 S14: “It is difficult to get unbiased advice about what sort of baby equipment to buy. and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S14 PP% 100 39 61 6 17 32 45 42 58 Pen% 46 45 46 54 34 47 50 42 49 100 39 61 5 23 31 41 46 54 37 25 38 32 28 40 40 50 49 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years. March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 61 . Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8.

” S16: ”I wish I had done more research/been better informed before I bought my baby equipment.Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Half (50%) of the men questioned.” Sample Profile All adults Sex Male Female Age 16-24 25-34 35-44 45+ Social Grade ABC1 C2DE Table continues.10: Personal Experience of Choosing Baby Equipment (% of respondents). said that they had bought items of baby equipment that they had never used — but more women than men (34% versus 20%) said they wished that they had been better informed... agreed with this statement. A third of this group (33%) would have liked to have been better informed before buying. or done more research. Table 8. The ABC1s (whose higher disposable income may make them more prone to impulse buys) were more likely than the C2DEs to have made purchases they later regretted. compared with just over four in ten of the latter one (42%). Although those in the 35 to 44 age group were the least likely to say that they had bought items they had not used. before buying. More than half of the former group (53%). used. they were the most likely to say that they wished they had done more research. 46 54 5 23 31 41 39 61 100 S15 PP% Pen% 100 42 58 5 24 28 43 52 48 47 50 45 48 48 42 50 53 42 S16 PP% Pen% 100 28 72 5 23 36 36 46 54 29 20 34 26 29 33 25 29 28 © Key Note Ltd 2010 62 . or hardly ever. respondents living in the North were more likely than those in other regions to have bought items of baby equipment only to find that they did not use them (56%) — but they were less likely than those in the other regions to wish they had been better informed before buying (24%). compared with 45% of women. Interestingly. March 2010 S15: “I bought some items of baby equipment that I never.

10: Personal Experience of Choosing Baby Equipment (% of respondents). Source: Key Note/NEMS Market Research. used.. March 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 63 . and those who do not have children under 16 but do buy things for babies and/or small children nowadays. or hardly ever.. March 2010 .Baby Products Consumer Dynamics Table 8.” S16: ”I wish I had done more research/been better informed before I bought my baby equipment.” Sample Profile Region North (Yorkshire and Humberside/ North West/North/Scotland) Midlands (East Midlands/ West Midlands/Wales/East Anglia) South (London/South East/ South West) Weighted sample: 477 adults aged 16+ S15 PP% Pen% S16 PP% Pen% 37 25 38 44 21 35 56 39 44 30 28 42 24 31 32 Base: respondents with children aged 0 to 15.table continued S15: “I bought some items of baby equipment that I never. those who are hoping to start a family within the next 2 years.

Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008 31/12/06 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc.418 -7.Baby Products Supplier Profiles 9.1: Financial Results for Britax Childcare Holdings Ltd (£000). Supplier Profiles INTRODUCTION This chapter profiles some of the leading manufacturers and specialist retailers operating in the sectors covered by this report. BRITAX CHILDCARE HOLDINGS LTD Corporate Strategy Britax Childcare Holdings Ltd was acquired from its former parent company. The activities of multiple retailers operating within the baby-products sector in addition to other activities are discussed in Chapter 2 — Strategic Overview. the company also offers infant carriers and wheeled goods. Surrey. Known chiefly for its children’s car seats.co. It distributes these products through independent specialist retailers. Australia (where the products are marketed under the Steelcraft and Safe n Sound brands) and the US. for £230m.331 -522 © Key Note Ltd 2010 64 . The company designs.715 -8.208 31/12/08 183. Profitability Britax Childcare Holdings Ltd reported a turnover of £183. by the private-equity company Carlyle Group in September 2005.uk 148. the aircraft-interior and vehicle-safety-equipment manufacturer Britax International. multiple retailers and vehicle original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in Europe.000 for the year ending 31st December 2008.3m and a pre-tax loss of £522. assembles.261 31/12/07 163. Table 9. manufactures and markets child safety products in the UK. Britax Childcare’s headquarters are in Chertsey.

In April 2008.or four-wheeled compact travel system. Britax launched a television advertising campaign in February 2010. Further acquisitions by Newell-Rubbermaid have included Teutonia. one of Europe’s leading manufacturers and distributors of child car seats. GRACO LTD Corporate Strategy Graco Ltd is the UK subsidiary of Graco Children’s Products Inc. The campaign was supported by online and point-of-sale materials. the B-Smart modular travel system. Britax announced a free ‘precautionary’ remedy kit for one of its stroller models. a Japanese manufacturer of childcare products. The Newell-Rubbermaid portfolio also included Little Tikes toys.000 and a pre-tax profit of £172. it was announced that Britax would be launching the Jockey range of child’s bicycle seats. The range included: the B-Lite urban stroller. Graco Europe was established in September 1997. In March 2010. © Key Note Ltd 2010 65 . Profitability Graco Ltd reported a turnover of £850. with operations in the UK. but this company was sold to MGA Entertainments in 2006. and in 2001 Newell-Rubbermaid acquired Klippan Group. Also in February 2010. Finland and Sweden.Baby Products Supplier Profiles Recent and Future Developments A range of four new pushchairs was launched by Britax in January 2010. and the B-Dual travel system. This became part of the group in August 2007. including car seats and strollers. Newell-Rubbermaid purchased Aprica Kassai. having detected a potential risk of injury to fingers or hands from its folding mechanism. which was founded in the US in 1955 and became part of Newell-Rubbermaid in 1999.or forward-facing seat options and space for an additional seat for a second child.000 for the year ending 31st December 2009. giving a high degree of comfort and safety. which has rearward. the B-Mobile three. Germany. The remedy kit consists of covers to fit over each of the hinges. a German company that makes prams and other baby-transport products. sold under the Viva and Nexus brands. reminding parents of the importance of in-car safety and correct fitting of child car seats.

and acquired the UK and European manufacturing licence for the US Tommee Tippee brand of baby-feeding equipment and accessories in 1965. Graco voluntarily recalled 65 models of its Harmony High Chair. a British company producing the Nappy Wrapper nappy-disposal system. In 1983. the company that launched the Steri-Bottle pre-sterilised single-use feeding bottle in 1999. a manufacturer of outdoor play equipment (March 2005). Years Ending 31st December 2007-2009 31/12/07 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc.2: Financial Results for Graco Ltd (£000).2 million products. began life as a manufacturer of hair and nail products. The product can also be transformed into a travel system for twins with the addition of two Graco car seats. a double pushchair designed to accommodate one child from birth and another from the age of 6 months. In August 2003. Jackel acquired Steri-Bottle UK. JACKEL INTERNATIONAL LTD (MAYBORN GROUP) Corporate Strategy Jackel International Ltd. based in Newcastle. was launched in 2006.co. The Graco Quattro Tour Duo. In 2003. The recall was estimated to affect 1.uk 1. including Cotton Bottoms Ltd.254 574 31/12/08 1.Baby Products Supplier Profiles Table 9. relaunching the Maws and Sangenic brands as Tommee Tippee. Jackel International moved to a single-brand strategy. The Mayborn Group was acquired by the private-equity company 3i in 2006. In 1995. The Tommee Tippee Closer to Nature range of feeding equipment. © Key Note Ltd 2010 66 .249 542 31/12/09 850 172 Recent and Future Developments In March 2010. which also produces fabric dyes under the Dylon brand. and Tube Plastics. a supplier of reusable cotton nappies (November 2004). More acquisitions followed. the company became part of the Mayborn Group. and 2 years later the Mayborn Group bought Sangenic. designed to make bottle feeding as similar as possible to breastfeeding. was launched towards the end of 2009. Jackel acquired the long-established Maws baby-feeding-equipment brand. due to reports of loose screws and falling brackets that could cause the chair to tip.

The Closer to Nature and Explora brands were marketed in the US as being designed to help relieve common feeding anxieties among mothers. Huggies is Kimberly-Clark’s disposable-nappy brand. Baby bottles containing BPA were banned in the US in 2009 but have not been banned in the UK. including Andrex and Kleenex. but they moved into Toys R Us stores in April. which produces a number of household paper brands.Baby Products Supplier Profiles Profitability Jackel International Ltd reported a turnover of £38m and a pre-tax profit of £6.517 5.uk 31. Mayborn launched the Tommee Tippee brand in the US.2m for the year ending 31st December 2008. were initially available only through Babies R Us in the US. Tommee Tippee’s Closer to Nature range of feeding bottles became available in a new material that is entirely free from Bisphenol A (BPA) — a chemical that has been linked with possible interactions with hormone systems.223 Recent and Future Developments In January 2010.3: Financial Results for Jackel International Ltd (£000). launched in the US in 1978. Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008 31/12/06 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc. taking it back to its original roots. A new star-shaped Tommee Tippee logo was also launched in February 2009.co. Table 9. and introduced into the UK in the mid-1990s.539 31/12/08 38.589 1. and Explora toddler cups and feeding products. © Key Note Ltd 2010 67 .049 6. KIMBERLY-CLARK LTD Corporate Strategy Kimberly-Clark Ltd is the UK subsidiary of the Dallas-based Kimberly-Clark Corporation. The Closer to Nature brand of baby-feeding equipment.112 31/12/07 33. In February 2009.

for babies from 0 to 3 months. Parents were encouraged to upload photos and videos of their child exploring their world. A global website for Huggies.551 31/12/08 623. The site. with flexible sides.co.263 143.649 48. for babies from 19 to 60 pounds. features a ‘real-time’ video of a baby growing in utero. and Pull-Ups potty-training pants. Little Walkers. Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008 31/12/06 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc. © Key Note Ltd 2010 68 . Profitability Kimberly-Clark Ltd reported a turnover of £623.4: Financial Results for Kimberly-Clark Ltd (£000).954 31/12/07 614. in a range of sizes for babies from 11 to 27 pounds. the Huggies brand was relaunched with new packaging featuring photographs of babies at the relevant age for each product.6m and a pre-tax profit of £48.233 53. which went live in February 2010. The company also produces Huggies-branded wipes and disposable changing mats. with the theme ‘Everyday Discoveries’. Newborn. Natural Fit.Baby Products Supplier Profiles The Huggies range includes: Huggies Preemies (for premature babies).552 Recent and Future Developments In April 2010. An interactive online campaign to promote the Huggies Super-Dry range was launched in January 2010. Super-Dry. The babies featured in the ten winning entries were selected to appear in Huggies’ promotional campaigns over the next 5 years.6m for the year ending 31st December 2008.uk 602. shaped like pants. Table 9. designed to keep babies dry for up to 12 hours. called ‘9 months in vivo’. Little Swimmers swimming nappies. plus a new Huggies logo incorporating a baby’s handprint. also includes tips for mothers-to-be.

Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008 31/12/06 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc. fitting onto the buggy for the baby’s first few months. Table 9.880 31/12/08 30. Maclaren launched Beginning. Maclaren received some adverse publicity towards the end of 2009.co.232 -1.5: Financial Results for Maclaren Europe Ltd (£000). the company distributed hinge covers to all purchasers of the strollers in the US. all Maclaren strollers of this type are being supplied with hinge covers as standard. In November 2009. a manufacturer of nursery products and pushchairs. was established in 1999. a wholly owned subsidiary that markets the company’s products in the US and Canada. Profitability Maclaren Europe Ltd reported a turnover of £31m and a pre-tax loss of £3. the company became Hestair Maclaren.442 -1. with the invention of the lightweight ‘baby buggy’. Later the same year.Baby Products Supplier Profiles MACLAREN EUROPE LTD Corporate Strategy Maclaren began life as Andrews Maclaren Ltd.484 31/12/07 23. Following its 1988 acquisition by Hestair PLC. a range of organic skincare products for mothers and babies. Hestair PLC was purchased by BET in 1990 and there was a management buy-out of Hestair Maclaren during the same year. these covers were issued only to purchasers who contacted Maclaren themselves.978 -3.uk 19. Maclaren’s US arm acquired the nursery-furniture company NettoCollection. In November 2009. founded in Northampton in the late 1960s. In the UK. Maclaren’s Techno XLR travel system was expanded with the introduction of a soft carrycot that is compatible with the system.6m for the year ending 31st December 2008. following reports that 12 children in the US had had parts of their fingers cut off by the folding mechanism of its umbrella strollers. © Key Note Ltd 2010 69 . From 2010. Maclaren USA.623 Recent and Future Developments In July 2009. Hestair purchased Cindico. The company was purchased by the Sunleigh Group in 1994. Also in July 2009.

and Rotherham (November).uk 83.438 30/03/08 83. was founded in 1981 by the Scacchetti family and is still family owned. Harrods and more than 500 independent dealers. The company’s range includes baby transport (in the form of prams. nursery furniture and bedding. Mamas and Papas’ products are sold through a wide range of outlets. run on a franchise basis. Manchester (May) and Broadstairs (June). Openings so far in 2010 have included Lincoln (April). including John Lewis. The company also has a chain of more than 50 dedicated stores in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. pushchairs and car seats). © Key Note Ltd 2010 70 .7m and a pre-tax loss of £1.789 29/03/09 87. Mamas & Papas further expanded its retail operations in November 2009. including one in the Westfield Shopping Centre in West London. and pre-school toys.816 2.382 1.2m for the year ending 29th March 2009.656 -1.182 Recent and Future Developments A number of new Mamas & Papas stores were opened during 2009.co. which was opened in February.Baby Products Supplier Profiles MAMAS & PAPAS LTD Corporate Strategy Mamas & Papas Ltd. The brand also encompasses maternity and baby wear. 30th March 2008 and 29th March 2009 01/04/07 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc. Selfridges. Profitability Mamas & Papas Ltd reported a turnover of £87. one of the first companies to introduce the concept of designer products into the market for baby equipment. Others included Liverpool (in September).6: Financial Results for Mamas & Papas Ltd (£000). when it entered into a partnership with the online fashion retailer Shop Direct to supply its range of maternity clothing through all of Shop Direct’s brand channels. Table 9. Hull and Aberdeen (both in October). Years Ending 1st April 2007.

the Middle East. In February 2010. Mothercare became a public company in 1972. the owner of the Early Learning Centre brand. later expanding into mainly town-centre stores in the UK. the company was reported to be seeking agencies to help manage public relations (PR) and branding for a US launch later in 2010. In October 2007.Baby Products Supplier Profiles In January 2010. © Key Note Ltd 2010 71 . Mamas & Papas launched the Magic Astro Cradle in March 2010. In the same month. bedding. uses interactive technology and a choice of music and light shows to entertain babies from birth to 6 months old. This will be the first product designed by Amanda Scacchetti. Germany. The infant seat. MOTHERCARE PLC Corporate Strategy Mothercare PLC is a specialist retailer of products for mothers-to-be. and in 2007 it acquired Chelsea Stores Holdings Ltd. described by the company as ‘the ultimate electronic infant entertainment system’. the Middle East and the Far East). babies and children up to the age of 8.com. Mamas & Papas introduced the Connect system to enable its international franchise partners to collaborate more closely with each other. the company announced that it had secured funding from HSBC to assist the expansion of its international operations. The Mylo three-in-one pushchair is due to be launched at the Kind & Jugend exhibition in Cologne. plus characters that can be attached to the toy arch over the seat. The Mothercare group’s activities can be divided into three categories: • UK stores • Direct — online and catalogue mail order • International — retail operations in overseas markets (including Europe. Russia and Japan. The cradle uses ‘Magic Cards’. bathing and travel equipment. The first Mothercare store was opened in 1961. The company’s current range includes: maternity and children’s clothing. a social networking and information site for new parents. with a mail-order business following a year later. focusing on Europe. Mothercare launched gurgle. creating a more unified platform for brand and marketing messages. The Early Learning Centre chain of retailers of pre-school toys and games was founded in 1974 as a mail-order operation. each containing songs and sounds. in September 2010. operated as franchises or joint ventures. furniture and home furnishings. feeding. and toys. the daughter of Luisa and David Scacchetti. and later still into international franchised stores. who founded the company.

mostly on a franchise basis. Mothercare announced plans to launch Mothercare in Australia and the Early Learning Centre in South Africa. Early in 2010. was launched in October 2009 on the pre-school television channel Cartoonito. currently unnamed. which previously supplied Boots with children’s clothing. © Key Note Ltd 2010 72 . Mothercare announced that it would be supplying Boots with a new range of children’s clothes and accessories. there were 389 UK stores in the Mothercare group. 29th March 2008 and 28th March 2009 31/03/07 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc.500 18. Table 9. In October.500 28/03/09 723. and 694 franchised international stores. The Mothercare group opened 115 international stores during 2009.6m and a pre-tax profit of £42. The brand.200 Recent and Future Developments In February 2010.co.Baby Products Supplier Profiles As at mid-November 2009.800 4.900 29/03/08 676. Toys from Mothercare’s Early Learning Centre range are already sold through 400 Boots stores. up from 28 in 2009. Much of the company’s international growth came from India and Russia.2m for the year ending 28th March 2009. fell into administration in January 2010. Years Ending 31st March 2007. is to be launched in autumn 2010. the company announced a joint venture in India.600 42. The company opened its 50th store in Russia in December 2009. Adams Childrenswear.uk 498. featuring the musician. Profitability Mothercare PLC reported a turnover of £723. 62 of which were opened during the 6 months to November.7: Financial Results for Mothercare PLC (£000). A brand-awareness campaign for Mothercare. it expects to have 65 Indian stores by the end of 2010. television presenter and ‘celebrity mother’ Myleene Klass.

co. The brand is now part of Philips’s Consumer Lifestyle division. which also includes shaving and oral-healthcare products. launched in 1984. It also incorporates baby monitors and digital thermometers. baby bottles and toddler-feeding equipment.uk 682.uk. © Key Note Ltd 2010 73 . mybabytalk.800 33. was purchased by the Dutch electronics company Royal Philips Electronics in September 2006 and renamed Philips Avent.900 31/12/07 812.4m and a pre-tax profit of £4. Table 9.Baby Products Supplier Profiles PHILIPS AVENT Corporate Strategy The Avent brand.co. skincare products and changing bags.2m for the year ending 31st December 2008. soothers.8: Financial Results for Philips Electronics UK Ltd (£000). Years Ending 31st December 2006-2008 31/12/06 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc. bottle and food warmers. It should be noted that these figures cover a wide range of items other than baby products.200 Recent and Future Developments Philips launched an advice website for new mothers. including breast pumps and breastfeeding accessories. Profitability Philips Electronics UK Ltd reported a turnover of £827. Virtually all Philips Avent products are designed and manufactured at the company’s factory in Suffolk.200 65. The Philips Avent product range includes a wide variety of feeding equipment.400 4. in February 2009.100 31/12/08 827.

Pampers launched its ‘value’ nappy brand.uk 258. based in Ohio. The Pampers disposable-nappy portfolio includes: Pampers New Baby (including Micro for premature and very small babies). The range. Sunnies Swim Pants. Easy Up Pants for older babies. The company produces the Pampers nappy range. Active Fit.073 38. for use by toddlers who are being toilet trained.9: Financial Results for Procter & Gamble Product Supply (UK) Ltd (£000). in an attempt to compete with supermarkets and discount retailers.347 30/06/09 209. with high leg cuffs for extra protection. and Baby Dry. the Pampers brand launched UnderJams. with Extra Sleep Layer for night-time use. in July 2009. Feel N Learn potty-training pants. Years Ending 30th June 2007-2009 30/06/07 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc. was founded in 1837 and expanded into the UK in 1930. which was introduced to the UK in 1982. in the form of absorbent pants shaped like underwear. its first product for older children. Pampers recently launched two new products: UnderJams and Simply Dry (see Recent and Future Developments). Profitability Procter & Gamble Product Supply (UK) Ltd reported a turnover of £209.7m for the year ending 30th June 2009. which have Secure-Me fasteners that overlap for a snugger fit.273 34.528 30/06/08 271.Baby Products Supplier Profiles PROCTER & GAMBLE Corporate Strategy The US company Procter & Gamble. is designed to provide protection from bedwetting for children aged 4 to 12 years. The company also produces Pampers Wipes and Kandoo Wipes.697 Recent and Future Developments In January 2010. with Comfort Stretch for babies who can move. Simply Dry.co.006 40.3m and a pre-tax profit of £34. Table 9. These figures cover a broad range of household products and toiletries. © Key Note Ltd 2010 74 .

714 -996 Recent and Future Developments A new range of baby monitors — the Classic Monitor TA100. BabyDam turns a normal-sized bath into a smaller bathing space suitable for babies and toddlers.683 31/03/08 51.7m and a pre-tax loss of £996. including baby monitors. baby carriers. The last of these includes a multicoloured nightlight. feeding equipment for toddlers. Profitability Tomy UK Ltd reported a turnover of £42. However. cot guards and bedrails. but the Tomy name has been retained for all international subsidiaries. following the 2006 merger of Tomy with its rival toy company Takara. which can be customised to co-ordinate with the nursery colour scheme. a Japanese-owned company. the Digital Monitor TD300 and the Digital Plus Monitor TD350 — was launched in February 2010. Years Ending 31st March 2007-2009 31/03/07 Turnover Pre-tax profit Source: myicc.030 31/03/09 42.159 2.189 3.000 for the year ending 31st March 2009.10: Financial Results for Tomy UK Ltd (£000). © Key Note Ltd 2010 75 . it also produces a range of baby products. Tomy announced that it had signed an agreement with Perry Innovation Ltd to distribute the BabyDam Bathwater Barrier in Europe. and baby activity toys.uk 47.Baby Products Supplier Profiles TOMY UK LTD Corporate Strategy Tomy UK Ltd. Table 9. is principally a manufacturer of toys and games.co. In August 2009. The parent company in Japan is named Takara-Tomy.

4 2. Source: 2008-Based Population Projections.348 0. following increases between 2005 and 2008. in mid-2014. Mid-Years 2010-2014 2010 Age 0 % change year-on-year Age 1 % change year-on-year Age 2 % change year-on-year Total % change year-on-year 777 -0. During the period between 2010 and 2014.1 2014 777 0. Table 10.335 -0.9 2.Baby Products The Future 10.1 775 -0.3 775 0. The Future DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS The next 5 years will see a stagnation of the birth rate. Government Actuary’s Department © Crown copyright © Key Note Ltd 2010 76 .1 Note: figures may not sum due to rounding.6 2012 774 -0. with the total population of under-3s standing at 2.3 million in mid-2014.000 — exactly the same figure as in 2010.8 784 -0. the number of infants aged under 1 year will stand at 777.324 -0.1 775 -0.1: Forecast Number of Children in the UK Aged 0 to 2 Years (000).3 777 -0.8 783 -0.0 2.6 789 4.4 2013 775 0.1 775 0.6 2.9 2011 775 -0. Government projections suggest that.326 0.326 -0.3 777 -0.1 774 -0. the number of children aged between 1 and 2 years will fall slightly.3 2.

5 2013 550 0..0 2012 307 1.Baby Products The Future FORECASTS 2010 TO 2014 The next few years are likely to see a greater emphasis on value in baby products — particularly in respect of smaller and disposable items such as nappies and feeding equipment.0 © Key Note Ltd 2010 77 . By 2014. 301 1. Table 10. where birth rates are higher. Companies will continue to turn outside the UK for growth. 2010-2014 2010 Value (£m at rsp) % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2011 537 1.9 530 2. with retail sales reaching £314m by 2014. but from a lower base. looking at markets in Asia and Eastern Europe.0 2013 311 1. Disposable Nappies The market for disposable nappies will continue to grow at a slow rate over the next 5 years.1 Source: Key Note Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture The market for baby-transport equipment is forecast to grow relatively slowly during the next 5 years.9 2014 555 0.3 2014 314 1. retail sales in this sector are forecast to reach £154m.3 2011 304 1.2: The Forecast UK Market for Disposable Nappies by Value (£m at rsp). 2010-2014 2010 Baby transport % change year-on-year Table continues. with retail sales reaching £555m by 2014. There will be slightly higher growth in nursery furniture.3: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture by Sector by Value (£m at rsp).3 2012 545 1. Table 10..

2 177 1.7 462 1.9 442 1.1 94 2.4 2013 96 3.3 87 1.3 90 3.3 2013 151 2.8 2014 154 2.4 2012 147 2.3 141 2.1 448 1.0 468 1.table continued 2010 Nursery furniture % change year-on-year Total % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2011 144 2. with sales of feeding equipment totalling £94m. Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment Retail sales of baby monitors and home safety equipment are forecast to reach £98m by 2014.Baby Products The Future Table 10.7 2012 93 3.1 454 1.6 Source: Key Note © Key Note Ltd 2010 78 . Home Safety Equipment and Feeding Equipment by Sector by Value (£m at rsp).4 183 3.7 2014 98 2...5 86 3.3: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Transport and Nursery Furniture by Sector by Value (£m at rsp).6 174 3. 2010-2014 2010 Baby monitors and home safety equipment % change year-on-year Feeding equipment % change year-on-year Total % change year-on-year rsp — retail selling prices 2011 90 2.1 88 3.2 92 2.2 192 2. Table 10. 2010-2014 .2 188 2.4: The Forecast UK Market for Baby Monitors.8 Source: Key Note Baby Monitors.

icc.co. risk and business information reports • industry information for benchmarking.b-p-a.kantarmedia.co. business-critical information for risk and credit decision-making.uk Baby Products Association 2 Carrera House Merlin Court Gatehouse Close Aylesbury.uk Nielsen Media Research 1st Floor Atrium Court Bracknell Berkshire. ICC offers access to information through high-speed online delivery tools: Kantar Media Ealing Gateway 26-30 Uxbridge Road Ealing London.org http://www. Further Sources Associations Absorbent Hygiene Product Manufacturers Association 46 Bridge Street Godalming Surrey.uk http://www. W5 2BP Telephone: 020-8433 4000 Fax: 020-8433 4001 http://www.uk • my ICC • my ICC credit management • Plum.co.ahpma.co.nemsmr. shareholders. GU7 1HL Telephone: 01483-418 221 Fax: 01483-419 943 E-mail: info@ahpma. A range of flexible online tools provide access to the most comprehensive content on all UK and Irish businesses. TS23 4HN Telephone: 01642-373 355 Fax: 01642-373 350 http://www.co.uk http://www.org General Sources ICC Ltd Telephone: 020-8481 8855 Fax: 020-8941 6014 E-mail: info@icc.co. stakeholders and consumers • information on limited and non-limited companies • analysed financial.uk http://www. HP19 8DP Telephone: 0845-456 9570 E-mail: info@b-p-a.com NEMS Market Research 22-23 Manor Way Belasis Hall Technology Park Billingham. RG12 1BZ Telephone: 01344-469 100 Fax: 01344-469 102 E-mail: nmrcommunication@ nielsen.nielsenmedia. © Key Note Ltd 2010 79 .uk ICC provides in-depth.co.Baby Products Further Sources 11. The data include: • access to over 370 million original document images • information on individual directors.

SW1A 2NS http://www.uk http://www.uk Government Actuary’s Department Finlaison House 15-17 Furnival Street London.statistics.org/esa/population uSwitch 111 Buckingham Palace Road London.uk Other Sources Audit Bureau of Circulations Saxon House 211 High Street Berkhamsted Hertfordshire.dh. HP4 1AD Telephone: 01442-870 800 http://www.uk National Statistics 1 Drummond Gate London.uk The Stationery Office Customer Services PO Box 29 St Crispins House Duke Street Norwich. SW1V 2QQ Telephone: 020-7533 5888 Fax: 01633-812 599 http://www.Baby Products Further Sources Government Sources Department of Health Richmond House 79 Whitehall London. NY 10017 US Telephone: 00-1 212 963 3179 Fax: 00-1 212 963 2147 http://www.uk http://www.gov.uswitch.services@tso.un.gov. SW1W 0SR Telephone: 0800-404 7908 Fax: 020-7911 6102 http://www.gov. EC4A 1AB Telephone: 020-7211 2601 E-mail: enquiries@gad. NR3 1PD Telephone: 0870-600 5522 Fax: 0870-600 5533 E-mail: customer.abc.gad.com © Key Note Ltd 2010 80 .org.tsoshop.co.gov.co.uk United Nations Population Division 2 United Nations Plaza Room DC2-1950 New York.

uk Key Note Market Reports • Clothing Retailing • Giftware • Home Shopping • Own Brands £460 each Invaluable aids to anyone needing to gain a highly detailed understanding of a specific market for more informed decision-making. these offer the same incisive market intelligence as Market Reports but include additional chapters and primary research data. bringing you invaluable financial information and contact details. Market Report Plus and Market Assessments published in the previous year. providing a one-stop shop for all your research needs.co. Compiled using Key Note Market Reports. Top Markets and Market Forecasts are an indispensable and authoritative mini business library. consultancies and industry experts whose wealth of knowledge is vital in publishing this type of report. dynamics and shape of key UK and European markets. consumer and lifestyle sectors.co. providing an in-depth. TW11 8EE Telephone: 0845-504 0452 Fax: 0845-504 0453 E-mail: sales@keynote. Key Note Market Reviews are designed to inform you of developments and opportunities across entire industry sectors.co.Baby Products Further Sources Key Note Sources Key Note Ltd 5th Floor Harlequin House 7 High Street Teddington Richmond Upon Thames.uk for sector-specific individual volume prices.uk http://www. Key Note Market Assessments • Baby Foods • Children’s Publishing • Non-Food Sales in Supermarkets • Organic Baby & Toddler Care • Supermarket Own Labels • Supermarket Services £899 each Providing in-depth strategic analysis and including primary research. there is a detailed Financial Survey report. with a particular focus on financial services. © Key Note Ltd 2010 81 . strategic and global view of key industries.keynote. Other Market Focus reports are created in conjunction with specialist authors. Key Note Market Reviews £750 each Focusing on the bigger picture. You can choose from approximately 90 industry sectors where thousands of companies are profiled in each report. Key Note Financial Survey Reports £420 each For each key industry sector. these premium reports examine the scope. Top Markets and Market Forecasts add a further dimension to the Key Note range. Key Note Market Focus Reports • Market Forecasts • Top Markets £699 each/£999 set of 10 volumes Please contact sales@keynote. Key Note Market Reports Plus £605 each Concentrating on more dynamic consumer markets.

Contact us for more information: sales@keynote. You can also choose from these further services: Key Note Bespoke Data Service As well as choosing the companies you want to analyse. Contact us for more information: bespoke@keynote. Our comprehensive market research and information consultancy service is managed in house.uk Key Note Research Consultancy We can offer a full-service bespoke solution for any research requirements not covered by the published report range. analyse and comment on the financial performance of the leading companies in each marketplace. you can also choose exactly what performance information you need on them — with our Bespoke Data Service. contrast. Key Note Regional Leads Reports £420 For each region of Great Britain. which are profiled in each report. Contact us for further details: sales@keynote.uk © Key Note Ltd 2010 82 . the publication will allow the reader to gain a greater level of market intelligence as well as a good knowledge of the current state of UK industry. Key Note UKplc Report UKplc is an indispensable guide for managers and for those interested in gaining a greater insight into the financial performance of an average company operating in each of the main industries in the UK. ratios and other data items specific to your individual requirements alone. We will be able to provide you with information covering the companies.co. Providing up-to-date information and analysis.Baby Products Further Sources Key Note Business Ratio Reports • Clothing Retailers • Department & Variety Stores • Mail Order & Catalogue Houses • The Retail Industry • Supermarkets • The Toy Industry £365 each Over 148 titles evaluating each UK industry sector. Even historical figures can be provided. bringing you invaluable financial information and contact details for thousands of companies. there is a detailed Regional Leads Report.co. sectors.co. performance figures.uk Key Note Carnet A service that offers a discount on multiple report purchases. They compare.

7 19.0 Penetration (%) 66.557 10.03 12. 1995 TGI data used in Key Note reports are broken down by age. housewives. • Housewives — a member of a private household who is solely or mainly responsible for the household duties. Number. who are users. Profile.4 55. etc.0 61.5 71.045 2.9 2. Profile.1 . who live together and whose food and other household expenses are managed as one unit.2 Source: Target Group Index. 1. These terms are explained in the following table. Across The % of 15-24 year-olds. 7. Each subgroup should total 100% vertically.371 This is the projected number of people in each subgroup who use the product.0 . The total number of adults.697 Down The % of each subgroup who are users.Baby Products Understanding TGI Data Understanding TGI Data TGI tables. produced by Kantar Media.4 All housewives Age 15-24 25-34 Social Grade AB C1 Region Greater London 20. and/or Penetration. social grade and standard region. but not always. Penetration Tables used in Key Note reports may give figures for the Number. members of one family.9 0. • Adults — any person aged 15 or over. households. etc. © Key Note Ltd 2010 83 . are generally based on one of the following groups: • Households — a private household consists of either one person living alone or a group of people.535 Profile (%) 100. © Kantar Media. Table Heading Population Number (000) 13. usually.

Social grade is checked by Kantar Media’s coding and editing office.Baby Products Understanding TGI Data Social Grade This is normally based on the occupation of the Head of the Household. presence of domestic help etc. Social Grade A B C1 C2 D E Social Status Upper middle class Middle class Lower middle class Skilled working class Working class Those at lowest levels of subsistence (no other earner) Head of Household’s Occupation Higher managerial. administrative or professional Supervisory or clerical and junior managerial. © Key Note Ltd 2010 84 . based on information given personally and verbally by the respondent. administrative or professional Intermediate managerial. or if the Head of the Household is retired. administrative or professional Skilled manual workers Semi and unskilled workers State pensioners or widows Standard Region This is as defined by the Registrar-General. therefore. The following table broadly defines the six social grades used. their former occupation. The relationship between social grade and net income of the Head of the Household is a complex one and readers should note that income is not determinant of social grade. Social grade is assessed by the interviewer when collecting the information and is. If this information is not available social grade is based on environmental factors such as type of dwelling. amenities in the home.

trade journals and specific company contacts. are used for essential background data and market trends. business-to-business and services titles. Trade sources. With over 25 years’ experience. various official publications published by National Statistics. 2010 © Key Note Ltd 2010 85 . Up-to-date figures are inserted where possible. questionnaires may also be used. either face-to-face or by telephone. and covers the period from the last edition of the report to the current day. The ‘my ICC’ service is used to select company information relevant to the particular report. industrial. although there will be some instances where a realistic estimate cannot be made or external sources request that we do not update their figures. etc. Key Note estimates are derived from statistical analysis and trade research carried out by experienced research analysts. concise. For all reports. This provides qualitative data (‘industry comment’) to enhance the statistics in reports. are invaluable to the Key Note research process. quality market information. Key Note Editorial. The financial information extracted may then be backed up by further online searching on particular companies. In addition. Interviews are undertaken by Key Note for various reports. publishing an extensive range of consumer. Field research is commissioned for various consumer reports and market reviews.Baby Products Key Note Research Key Note Research Key Note is a leading supplier of market information. Secondary data are provided by Kantar Media (TGI) and Nielsen Media Research for consumer/demographic information and advertising expenditure respectively. and is carried out by NEMS Market Research. such as trade associations. Key Note represents clear. Key Note undertakes various types of research: Online searching is carried out by product code or free search method.

across both the Key Note and Market Assessment product ranges.Baby Products The Key Note Range of Reports The Key Note Range of Reports Key Note publishes over 180 titles each year. lifestyle. The total range covers consumer. Title Edition Published Title Edition Published Market Reports and Reports Plus A China & Earthenware Cigarettes & Tobacco Cinemas & Theatres Closed-Circuit Television Clothing Manufacturing Clothing Retailing Commercial Radio Commercial Vehicles Computer Hardware Computer Services Computer Software Confectionery Consumer Internet Usage Consumer Magazines Contraception Contract Catering & Foodservice Management Contract Cleaning Cooking Sauces & Food Seasonings Corporate & Promotional Giftware Corporate Hospitality Cosmetics & Fragrances Cosmetic Surgery Courier & Express Services D 27 23 9 11 15 7 8 15 8 8 7 28 4 17 4 21 21 4 3 6 23 8 15 3 5 11 3 4 1 2 19 7 13 1 14 5 2010 2009 2001 2009 2008 2009 2004 2009 2010 2008 2008 2010 2000 2010 2009 2010 2010 2010 2008 2007 2010 2010 2008 2004 2008 2010 2000 2009 2009 2003 2009 2009 2009 2007 2009 2005 Access Control Accountancy Aerospace Agrochemicals & Fertilisers Air Freight Airlines Airports Animal Feedstuffs Arts & Media Sponsorship Automatic Vending Automotive Services Autoparts B 11 13 12 3 2 21 14 11 3 24 7 19 14 2 22 17 19 16 25 14 27 15 5 16 10 13 10 14 10 13 17 16 13 13 8 15 2010 2009 2003 2002 2005 2010 2010 2001 2008 2010 2010 2009 2009 2007 2009 2010 2007 2009 2010 2009 2008 2008 2010 2008 2009 2008 2010 2009 2004 2002 2009 2009 2010 2010 2009 2009 Baths & Sanitaryware Bearings Betting & Gaming Biscuits & Cakes Book Publishing Bookselling Bread & Bakery Products Breakfast Cereals Breweries & the Beer Market Bricks & Tiles Bridalwear Builders’ Merchants Building Contracting Building Materials Bus & Coach Operators Business Press C Dark Spirits & Liqueurs Debt Management (Commercial & Consumer) Defence Equipment Design Consultancies Digital Broadcasting Digital Communications Digital TV Direct Marketing Discount Retailing Disposable Paper Products Document Imaging Systems Domestic Heating Dry Cleaning & Laundry Services Cable & Satellite TV Camping & Caravanning Canned Foods Carpets & Floorcoverings Catering Equipment Chemical Industry Childrenswear Chilled Foods © Key Note Ltd 2010 86 . financial services and industrial sectors.

Ventilating & Air Conditioning Home Furnishings Home Shopping Horticultural Retailing Hotels Housebuilding Household Appliances (Brown Goods) Household Appliances (White Goods) 15 9 22 9 19 13 17 24 18 11 16 16 18 2010 2009 2003 2002 2009 2009 2008 2009 2009 2008 2008 2009 2008 Factoring & Invoice Discounting Fast Food & Home Delivery Outlets The Film Industry Finance Houses Fire Protection Equipment Fish & Fish Products Fitted Kitchens Football Clubs & Finance Footwear Franchising Free-To-Air TV Freight Forwarding Frozen Foods Fruit Juices & Health Drinks Fruit & Vegetables Further & Higher Education G 2 23 4 11 8 14 7 4 16 12 8 17 24 12 21 6 13 5 18 15 25 2003 2008 2002 2000 2006 2010 2007 2009 2009 2010 2004 2009 2009 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 Household Detergents & Cleaners Household Furniture I Ice Creams & Frozen Desserts Industrial Fasteners Industrial Pumps Industrial Valves Insurance Companies Internet Usage in Business IT Security IT Training J 14 8 5 8 12 8 9 12 25 7 9 14 9 10 1 20 17 5 23 7 2 2010 2001 2000 2001 2009 2005 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2002 2010 2003 2005 2009 2009 2009 2009 2010 2007 Jewellery & Watches K Kitchenware L Garden Equipment Gas Industry Giftware Glassware Greetings Cards Laboratory Equipment Lighting Equipment Lingerie M Management Consultants Market Forecasts Meat & Meat Products Medical Equipment Metal Recycling Milk & Dairy Products Mobile Phones Mobile Telecommunications © Key Note Ltd 2010 87 .Baby Products The Key Note Range of Reports Title E Edition Published Title H Edition Published Electrical Contracting Electrical Wholesale Electricity Industry Electronic Component Distribution Electronic Component Manufacturing Electronic Games Equipment for the Disabled Equipment Leasing Estate Agents Ethnic Foods Exhibitions & Conferences F 9 5 6 12 11 4 5 12 17 15 11 2009 2009 2009 2002 2002 2003 2009 2003 2008 2009 2009 Hand Luggage & Leather Goods Health Clubs & Leisure Centres Health Foods Heating.

Baby Products The Key Note Range of Reports Title N Edition Published Title S Edition Published Natural Products New Media Marketing Newspapers Non-Metal Recycling O 2 3 17 2 2007 2002 2008 2008 Sauces & Spreads Shopfitting Short Break Holidays Slimming Market Small Domestic Electrical Appliances 11 14 4 8 12 20 17 3 12 15 7 24 17 21 19 23 5 23 18 22 4 9 4 8 2008 2009 2001 2000 2010 2010 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2007 2008 2010 2001 2009 2009 2009 2008 2010 2007 2005 Office Furniture Offshore Oil & Gas Industry Ophthalmic Goods & Services OTC Pharmaceuticals Own Brands P 21 5 16 14 12 6 13 12 15 15 14 11 14 13 10 3 5 8 15 20 7 26 7 11 10 10 3 24 16 22 2008 2009 2008 2010 2007 2010 2008 2003 2010 2010 2002 2000 2005 2007 2003 2008 2007 2009 2010 2009 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010 2010 2009 2009 2010 2009 Snack Foods Soft Drinks (Carbonated & Concentrated) Soup Market Sports Clothing & Footwear Sports Equipment Sports Sponsorship Stationery (Personal & Office) T Packaging (Food & Drink) Packaging (Glass) Packaging (Metals & Aerosols) Packaging (Paper & Board) Packaging (Plastics) Paper & Board Manufacturing Personal Banking Photocopiers & Fax Machines Plant Hire Plastics Processing Poultry Power Tools Premium Lagers. Beers & Ciders Printing Private Healthcare Protective Clothing & Equipment Public Houses R Take Home Trade Telecommunications Timber & Joinery Toiletries Tourist Attractions Toys & Games Training Travel Agents & Overseas Tour Operators Tyre Industry V Vehicle Security Videoconferencing Video & DVD Retail & Hire W Wallcoverings & Ceramic Tiles Waste Management Water Industry Windows & Doors Wine White Spirits 17 10 5 19 20 1 21 12 11 11 3 7 10 2006 2010 2010 2008 2009 2005 2009 2008 2004 2009 2007 2003 2009 Rail Travel Ready Meals Recruitment Agencies (Permanent) Recruitment Agencies (Temporary & Contract) Renewable Energy Restaurants Retail Chemists & Drugstores Road Haulage Market Reviews Catering Market Clothing & Footwear Industry UK Computer Market Construction Industry Contracted-Out Services Defence Industry Distribution Industry © Key Note Ltd 2010 88 .

Baby Products The Key Note Range of Reports Title Edition Published Title Edition Published DIY & Home Improvements Industry Drinks Market Energy Industry Film Market Food Industry Healthcare Market Insurance Industry The Legal Services Market Leisure & Recreation Market Leisure in the Home Leisure Outside the Home Local Government Services Mechanical Handling Motor Industry Music Industry Office Equipment Industry Packaging (Food & Drink) Industry Passenger Travel in the UK Pharmaceuticals Industry Process Plant Industry Publishing Industry Railway Industry Security Industry Sports Market Travel & Tourism Market UK Internet Market B2B Marketing 11 19 8 2 20 10 10 1 15 2 2 3 1 12 2 9 1 5 6 1 13 2 13 13 16 1 2009 2009 2010 2009 2010 2005 2009 2005 2005 2008 2008 2010 2001 2008 2010 2010 2003 2007 2008 2000 2010 2006 2010 2010 2009 2009 Business Travel Market C Cable and Satellite Services Charity Funding Childcare Children’s Publishing Clothing Retailers Coffee & Sandwich Shops Commercial Dynamics in Financial Services Commercial Insurance for Small Businesses Condiments and Sauces Consumer Credit & Debt Contact Centres Contraception Cooking & Eating Cross-Border Shopping Cruise Market Customer Loyalty in Financial Services Customer Magazines & Contract Publishing Customer Relationship Management Customer Services in Financial Organisations C2DE Consumer D Diet Foods DINKY Market Direct Insurance 2008 2009 2007 2000 2010 2000 2006 2010 2000 2000 2002 2007 2003 2002 2008 Direct Mortgages Domestic Lighting and Electrical Products Domestic Telecommunications E E-Commerce: The Internet Grocery Market E-Commerce: The Internet Leisure & Entertainment Market Electronic Banking EMU — The Impact on the UK Financial Services Industry E-Recruitment E-Shopping Estate Agents and Services Ethnic Foods European Electricity Industry European Gas Industry 2008 2008 2002 2005 2008 2008 2000 2009 2005 2009 2008 2007 2010 2002 2009 2000 2008 2000 2009 2008 2010 2008 2009 2007 2010 2008 2000 2006 Market Assessment Reports A ABC1 Consumer Activity Holidays Advertising Agencies All-Inclusive Holidays Alternative Healthcare Audio-Visual Retailing B Baby Foods Baby Products Baths and Showers Beds. Bedrooms and Upholstered Furniture Betting and Gaming Book Retailing on the Internet Bottled Water Bridalwear Business Postal Services 2009 2008 2008 2003 2006 2002 2010 2002 2007 2007 © Key Note Ltd 2010 89 .

Baby Products The Key Note Range of Reports Title Edition Published Title Edition Published European Long-Term Insurance European Oil & Gas Industry European Renewable Energy Industry European Short Breaks European Telecommunications European Tourist Attractions European Trends in Food Shopping European Water Industry Extended Financial Families F Financial Services Marketing to ABs Financial Services Marketing to ABC1s Financial Services Marketing to BCs Financial Services Marketing to C1C2DEs Financial Services Marketing to DEs Financial Services Marketing to Over 60s Financial Services Marketing to the Affluent Financial Services Marketing to the Retired and Elderly Financial Services Marketing to Start-Up Businesses and the Self-Employed Financial Services Organisations on the Internet The Fish Industry Forecourt Retailing Functional Foods Funding in Higher Education G General Insurance Generation Y Global Waste Management Green and Ethical Consumer Grey Consumer H Healthy Eating Holiday Purchasing Patterns Home Entertainment Hot Beverages I In-Car Entertainment Independent Financial Advisers Individual Savings Accounts Insurance Prospects Internet Advertising 2008 2007 2008 2008 2002 2009 2009 2007 2005 2006 2000 2009 2006 2009 2004 2009 2007 Internet Service Providers Issues and Challenges in the UK Life Assurance Market Issues in Higher Education Funding IT Recruitment L Lifestyle Magazines Low-Fat & Reduced-Sugar Foods The Luggage Market M Marketing to Children 4-11 Marketing in the Digital Age Medical & Health Insurance Men and Women’s Buying Habits Men’s Toiletries & Fragrances Millennium Youth Mobile Marketing Motor Finance N The Newspaper Industry Non-Food Sales in Supermarkets Nutraceuticals O Off-Trade Spirits Opticians & Optical Goods Organic Baby & Toddler Care Organic Food & Drink OTC Pharmaceuticals Over-40s Consumer Over-50s Consumer P Pay TV Pension Extenders Pensions Personal Banking Personal Lines Insurance Personal Loans Pet Market Planning for Retirement Plastic Cards in Europe Plus-Size Fashion Private Sector Opportunities in Education Public Relations Industry Public Transport 2005 2002 2006 2010 2008 2008 2000 2003 2009 2007 2008 2008 2002 2009 2008 2005 2008 2008 2004 2010 2007 2010 2000 2005 2009 2004 2002 2009 2003 2010 2008 2009 2008 2005 2009 2001 2007 2001 2003 2009 2001 2010 2010 2002 2010 2007 2007 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009 2000 2008 2005 2008 2009 © Key Note Ltd 2010 90 .

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