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Drivers.project.management.education.india

Drivers.project.management.education.india

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Sections

  • 2.3.1PM In Other European Countries
  • 2.4.1Specific Cases in India
  • c)Symbiosis Institute of Operations Management
  • d)National Institute of Technology and Industrial Engineering
  • 3.5 Methodology
  • 3.6 Academic Institutions
  • 3.7 Practising Executives Of Project Based Companies
  • 3.8 Human Resource Managers Of Project Based Companies
  • 5.2PART I – A & B : Respondents’ Particulars And Project Details
  • 5.2.1PART I – A
  • 5.2.2PART I – B
  • 5.3Part II: Project Management Curricula
  • 5.5PART IV: Current Position Of Project Management In India
  • 6.2PART I : Respondents’ Particulars
  • 6.3 PART II: Dimensions Of Project Management Training Design
  • 7.2Institutional Data Analysis And Inferences
  • 7.5Human Resource Managers’ Data Analysis And Interpretation
  • 7.7Limitations Of The Research
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • ANNEXURE 1
  • A.List Of Respondents Participating In Institutional Survey

Drivers of Project Management (PM) Education in India

A Research Study

Authors
Dr. M.G. Korgaonker Dr. Mona N. Shah Dr. J. K. Koner Prof. M.V. Madurwar Prof. Smruti Sanjeevani

Sponsored by Project Management Institute®, India

October 2010 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AND RESEARCH, PUNE, INDIA
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Balewadi, Pune – 411 045 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We wish to express our sincere thanks and gratitude to the Project Management Institute ® (PMI®) India for their sponsorship of the pioneering study at the National Institute of Construction Management and Research, Pune, India. We would like to specifically acknowledge the overwhelming support and encouragement received from Mr. Raj Kalady, Country Director, Project Management Institute® (PMI®) India, throughout the duration of the study. We thank him for his unlimited patience, in accepting the somewhat inevitable time overrun in the completion of the study and finalization of the report. The study team deeply acknowledges the valuable guidance provided by Dr. M.G. Korgaonker, Director General and Project Director, whose extensive experience in the area of project management as a researcher and pioneer of the 2 years fulltime course on Project Engineering and Management in India at NICMAR, helped the team gain appropriate perspectives about the field of Project Management. His keen interest and leadership throughout the study enabled us to remain on track. We remain indebted to all the respondents to our survey who gave us huge amounts of time unselfishly, helped us to patiently complete the in-depth questionnaires, and hosted our research team with warmth and concern. If the study has seen a successful completion, it is in no small measure due to the vital inputs provided by each one of our institutional respondents. We wish to place on record the valuable assistance provided by Dr. Jonardan Koner, Prof. Mangesh Madurwar and Prof. Smruti Sanjeevani who as members of the investigating team worked with enthusiasm and dedication to complete the survey of institutions, executives and human resource managers and collate it for analysis. We thank Mr. A.R. Jadhav, Sr. Librarian at NICMAR, whose unstinted and cheerful support was always forthcoming throughout the study. We thank Mr. Rajanikant Sagwekar who helped in the page-setting and layout. Dr. Mona N. Shah Principal Investigator October, 2010
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This study is an initial attempt, to investigate the factors that are responsible in driving the growth of Project Management Education in India. The study throws light on specific factors that emerge after studying the available literature on the subject as well as the responses compiled from a cross-section of the primary stakeholders namely the Government, Academic Institutions, Practising Executives and Human Resource Managers connected with project management education and training. We begin with a discussion on the need for PM education to take root and grow in India in the interest of its major stakeholders and users like the government, and industry – both of whom have enormous investments tied up in a range of mega, major and medium sized projects. As per Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation (MOSPI), in the year 2009 alone, a total outlay of stood at over 607,188 crores ( 6072 billion) was tied up in 941 Central Government projects alone. In the private sector, the investment value tied up in projects 100 trillion. As per CMIE data, the aggregate employment in projects sector stood at over 160 million persons. In chapter 2, we review the literature using journals and reports that assess the current status of project management education at a global level as well as in India. The European, North American countries, and Australia show tremendous progress in establishing PM in almost all realms of activity –governmental, industrial, academic, research and societal, through myriad initiatives. In case of China, India’s closest comparable country, PM appears to have taken firm roots since the 1990s decade, using a systematic ‘top down’ approach. In India, efforts to promote PM education in a structured mode appear to have only just begun. Chapter 3 of the study explains the design of the research study, the hypotheses formulated, the scope and methodology. The study has made use of primary and secondary data and was carried out within India. It covered a cross section of faculty/heads of departments of leading technical and management academic institutions from eighty one institutes from all over India. Data was collected using the Personal Interview Technique. The next set of respondents was the practising executives from project based organisations. Eighty eight executives responded to a comprehensive survey questionnaire that had questions ranging
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from work experience and value of projects previously engaged in or currently working, to their perception on the inclusion of subjects that enabled them to perform better on projects and in the careers, as well as other gains that accrued to them after undergoing PM training. The study raised questions about the factors that they perceived were important in influencing the growth of PM in India. The third set of respondents was drawn from a pool of select and leading project based companies from a cross section of construction, power, engineering and IT industries. The respondents were twenty human resource managers with considerable experience in designing training programmes for their companies. Care was taken to ensure that the respondents were geographically distributed, over India. Statistical tools used in compiling and analysing the results were Pie charts, Bar and Column Diagrams, Correlation and Regression Analysis, Factor Analysis and Multiple Regression Analysis. Chapter 4 presents findings of the survey emerging from responses received from Academic Institutions. Significant results were obtained in this analysis. There is a clear case for strong promotion of PM education in technical and business schools, with faculty emphatically admitting that the employability of the students who undergo the PM courses is significantly improved. Overall the faculty has advocated a broad based project management subject curricula to be taught in technical, business, architectural, planning and infrastructure institutes. However their clear preference was for the core PM subjects of i) Operations Management, ii) Project Planning, Execution, Monitoring and Control iii) Statistical Methods for Project Analysis, iv) Health, Safety and Environment, v) Operations Research and vi) Accounting and Control Systems. The faculty suggest that subjects like Macro Economic Policy, Project Strategy, Risk Management, Project Financing, Legal, Commercial and Taxation Aspects in projects should be considered important for curriculum at the post graduate level. The subject in the Behavioural Sciences Area, deemed most important was Managerial Skills. All subjects in the Information Technology Area like Prima Vera, Microsoft Projects (MSP), engineering software, SPSS etc were considered to be uniformly important in PM education. The faculty respondents considered the coverage of sector specific issues in the curriculum to be very important, but appeared unsure about the relative importance of the sectors of economic activity where PM teaching should be directly focused. The correlation analysis provides very good basis for structuring courses in all the subject areas considered in the study. In the Technology and Management area, the results indicate
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that the subjects Project Site and Equipment Management, Project Procurement and Materials Management, Contract Management, Facilities Engineering and Management and Process Design / Engineering / Testing / Commissioning are correlated. This is expected since these issues arise during project execution and have to be dealt with in a coordinated manner. Similarly correlation among the subject areas Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Transportation Management, Facilities Engineering and Management are also quite expected and in most projects, these would be dealt with together. The correlation between subject areas Operations Management and Operations Research, and also between Project Formulation and Appraisal and Project Engineering are also along expected lines. There is also good correlation between Quality Management and HSE subjects and therefore combining these into a single course would be quite appropriate. It is not surprising that in the project management fraternity, the precise differences among these subject areas are not very clear. While most of the subjects grouped in these subject areas are found to be very important, there is a case for combining some of these together, in order to emphasize the importance of managing projects in a coordinated and integrated manner. A direct outcome of the correlation analysis is that in institutions and curricula where it is difficult to introduce several execution oriented courses, it will be quite adequate if a single course emphasizing project execution is included. In the Economics and Strategy area, the subject Social Cost benefit Analysis is most heavily correlated with other subjects including Macroeconomic Policy, Project Strategy, Project Financing, Legal, Commercial and Taxation Aspects. Thus if this course is included as a separate course, care must be taken to ensure that the content is not duplicated in other courses. Alternately the course need not be included, if other courses reflect the content. There is a case for combining the courses Project Financial Management and Project Financing, courses Project Strategy and Macroeconomic Policy, and courses Legal, Commercial & Taxation Aspects and Project Joint Ventures, Strategic Alliances & Special Purpose Vehicles. The correlation analysis provides very good guidelines on the way courses in this subject area could be grouped and introduced in the PM curriculum. In the Behavioural Sciences area, three subjects are correlated to each other, namely Industrial/ Labour Relations, Conflict Management and Diversity Management. So from the point of view of the respondents, these subjects reflect some common issues and concerns
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Chapter 5 presents findings of the survey of practicing executives from leading project based organisations in India. On average. Quantity Surveying and Estimation. from their perspective. ERP and e – Business Applications courses could be combined into a single course. Cost Estimation and Budgeting. Project Procurement and Materials Management. qualified faculty and availability of research facilities. The respondents offered their responses on a variety of issues such as their first systematic exposure to PM training. Most of these were working on projects with value between 200–300 crores using very elementary PM techniques such as PERT/CPM. Health. SPSS. from technical institutions with no prior exposure to PM training. Quantity Surveying and Estimation. Project Procurement and Materials Management. The correlation analysis results provide a useful way of structuring courses in IT area in the PM curriculum. Safety and Environment Management. course materials. DBMS could also be structured as a single course. the faculty recruitment and training process takes 14. some courses are considered far more important by executives compared to the institutions. in case there is difficulty in offering these as separate courses. Project Quality Management. The respondents also strongly endorsed the existence of management vision to support PM endeavours. computer labs. These are : Contract Management. laboratories. Furthermore. the gains from PM training and the factors that they consider important to improve PM training at graduate level.7 months. classrooms. The research involvement of the institutions is found to be quite low and only about 20% institutions reported funded research. Only Project Management Software needs to be taught as a separate course. Contract Management. Similarly Specialized Engineering Software and Common Software such as Excel. The other courses may be taught independently. Cost 6 .and there is a case for combining these together to achieve an integrated approach to deal with these issues and concerns. Majority of the practising executives responding to the questionnaire were from the middle management cadre. Scheduling. Project Site and Equipment Management. The courses rated as ‘extremely important’ include Planning. For instance. the ideal PM curricula. Majority of the sample felt that resources were generally easily available in the institutes in terms of library. Monitoring and Control Techniques. It is interesting to note that ratings assigned to practically all the subjects in the Management and Technology area by executives are higher than the corresponding ratings assigned by the institutions. It takes on average about a year to build the necessary physical resources.

However the executives have assigned somewhat higher ratings to the Technology. The gains derived in Project Planning. At the direct project level. The ratings assigned to these subjects are very comparable to those assigned by institutions. Health. HSE. Roadways. Costing. Sectors like Roadways. In the Behavioural Sciences area.e. Monitoring and Control. The coverage of all the specific sectors is considered ‘very important’ by the executives. On the whole there appear to be significant gains in terms of the enrichment and enlargement aspects of the job. Railways. interpersonal relations and conflict resolution. Chemical Engineering and Defence sectors have received relatively lower ratings.Estimation and Budgeting. training ‘helped immensely’ in Project Planning. and envision the exact fit of a project in the overall corporate strategy. Safety and Environment Management. although executives have assigned slightly lower ratings to Engg Software. PM Software. Monitoring and Control are particularly noteworthy. the overall ratings for all subjects in the area averaged ‘Very Important’. PM training ‘helped immensely’ in the area of Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility Mapping. while the other subject ratings in this area are comparable to those assigned by the institutions. executives saw improvement on two factors. The executives shed light on their perception of the factors they consider important for the growth 7 . Urban Infrastructure. The executives’ ratings are generally similar to the institutions’ ratings. Naturally executives seem to realize their importance far more than the institutions. One possible explanation is that these courses have a strong ‘execution’ and ‘practical’ bias. In individual career enhancement. Scheduling. role clarity. Civil Aviation. Railways. except for Managerial Skills subject rated ‘extremely important’. This subject is rated much higher by the executives. namely improved decision making ability and improved understanding of human related factors i. Quality Management and Communication Skills. Scheduling. In terms of gains derived in developing a better strategic overview of projects. ERP and Excel/DBMS/SPSS are rated ‘extremely important’ and the other subjects are rated ‘very important’. Some experienced higher responsibility coming their way after completion of PM training. Training ‘helped substantially’ in other areas including Contract Management. In the IT area. Thus the executives affirmed that training has helped them to acquire an integrated view of the project. understand work breakdown structures and responsibility mapping on projects. Urban Infrastructure sectors. Civil Aviation and Mega Property Developments are considered relatively more important than others.

contracts and such other areas that would enable them to contribute directly to project success. ability to manage contracts in projects. execution of complex projects and employee retention & career development emerge as the key areas for seeking training inputs. designing and organising PM related training for executives within their organisations. factors affecting PM training. and training efficacy. ‘On the Job Training’ and ‘On the Job with Classroom Training’ are the most preferred methods of training. controlling. types of PM training. the companies are found to particularly emphasize the following factors: perceived gains from PM training. Chapter 6 presents findings of the in depth survey of twenty Human Resource (HR) managers of leading project based organisations on issues such as. ii) lack of trained instructors at the undergraduate and post graduate level and iii) being a practical field PM cannot be taught in the classroom. costs and quality. ability to monitor and control projects. ability to execute complex projects. most of the companies have taken steps to initiate PM training in the past five years. ability to deliver projects in right time. in order of priority are i) the lack of awareness amongst the students and educators about PM. execution. The companies generally prefer to deploy employees in the managerial cadre for training. These findings highlight a planned approach for PM training. The HR managers chosen had substantial exposure and expertise in conceiving. ability to plan projects. Given that both skills and knowledge are key components of competencies. employee retention. basic for Supervisory. cadres to whom PM training is to be imparted. The training levels most preferred for various grades of executives are: elementary for Operatives. the most frequently chosen are the middle and senior managers for receiving PM training. Within this section of employees. career development. the most important factors inhibiting growth of PM education. Thus project planning. monitoring & control. On the average. costs of training. Advanced for Middle level managers. According to them. The important objective in organising PM training is to prepare the executives with key skills in planning. For deputing executives for training. training must clearly aim at improving skills and knowledge base of executives. Overall the perception amongst the HR managers is that PM training is quite 8 . Strategic for Senior Level executives. the training design. ‘In house Training’.of PM education in India. iv) mastery comes only from practical experience and v) prior knowledge is not a prerequisite for working in this field.

One factor .expensive on various counts such as trainees’ salaries and time. attitude changes. (iv) Operations Research for Projects. expenses for trainees. Chapter 7 presents the results of the factor analysis.Increase in production / performance. The correlation analysis carried out earlier helped establish that 9 . However HR managers do not mind the loss of productivity of executives during their absence. its share of 11. even though they may not be able to deliver highly custom designed training. Considering that NICMAR is a single entity. which they believe are a great advantage for developing good training content. HR managers view training to be ‘quite benefitial’ on all the factors considered including : increase in production/ performance. is not viewed as benefitial as other factors. The most frequent academic institutions for PM related training appear to be the management institutions together as group.. It is reassuring to know that the HR managers consider international accreditation to be of value. facilities and equipment. and growth of business oportunities. expenses for trainers. independent trainers and academic institutions. The analysis reveals that only 6 subjects (factors) included in the Management and Technology Area namely (i) Operations Management for Projects. (v) Project Quality Management. lesser supervision.43% in PM training is most enviable by comparable industry standards. followed by internationally certified trainers. reduction in errors and improvement of safety standards. research experience. Certified franchisee trainers are considered most efficacious training providers. materials for training.e. But the managers may not be fully aware of the benefits of international accreditation with respect to their organisation. HR managers strongly endorse the benefits derived from Attitude changes. One interpreation is that they look for direct benefits from training in ‘process improvement’ rather than ‘output improvement’. which they feel will be more than compensated by the large scale benefits expected from training. 74%). improved delivery performance. (vi) Health Safety and Environment in Projects account for the highest proportion of the subjects (factors) that are absolutely essential to be included in PM curricula (i. followed by in house trainers and NICMAR. reasonable cost of academic institutions. lost productivity. ability to use new skills and capabilities. However HR managers highly value the highly qualified faculty. (ii) Planning/ Scheduling/ Monitoring and Control Techniques. employee retention. specialised competence. (iii) Statistical Methods for Project Analysis. This may be attributed to the flexibility and highly focussed approach of these trainers.

Multiple regression analysis suggests that the three types of institutions wherein PM education is essential are Technical. are not known to emphasize PM in their curriculum. this can be interpreted to mean that the top six subjects (four combined) that emerge from the analysis of academic institutions. in which the above subjects have been grouped. Generally Architectural institutions. Similar results are found in other subject areas also. Alternatively this means that the balance 25 subjects account for only a small fraction of the total PM curricula (26%). Therefore in effect. The infrastructure related to library. They are bound by the structured processes of approval which may take protracted periods of time from government agencies in the form of receiving sanctions to introduce courses. and Planning & Design. Therefore the type of the 10 . Management. other subject Areas (and individual subjects contained therein) such as Behavioural Sciences and IT. This could be attributed to Indian institutions being in the early development stages of PM. suitably combined account for the courses that are ‘absolutely essential’. An intriguing fact is that only a limited number of subjects (factors) continue to describe the whole scope of PM curricula amongst academics in institutions. university affiliated and accredited institutions. only four subject areas. it shows that almost the whole sample has rated subjects in this Area as ‘Extremely Important’ and ‘Very Important’. The remaining two namely architectural institutions and infrastructure management institutions were not explained by the available data and may require some other data. Viewed with the actual ratings awarded by the respondents to the Strategy. Economics and Finance Area. Quality Management and HSE are strongly correlated. comprehensive curriculum with enough emphasis on PM. are considered most crucial for inclusion in PM curriculum by the academics. This means that some other factors are required to explain the relationship of PM education and the institutes’ infrastructure. barring a few exceptions. Similarly there is probably lack of critical mass of institutions in infrastructure management capable of providing full fledged. Therefore for the sake of simplification. classrooms and qualified faculty are found to be important variables in imparting PM education although these factors alone are not enough. It may also imply that except in the well recognized Management and Technology Area. Majority of the institutions were AICTE. availability of course material.Operation management and Operations Research. are not yet considered pivotal to PM education in the Indian technical and management education system.

In conclusion we propose some Model Curricula 11 . In summary. research. The causes can be attributed to the disinclination of technical and business academic institutions to introduce and attract students exclusively in the area of PM. Thus training them to be ‘project ready’ is an imperative for project based organisations. Sustained advocacy at all levels of government is also strongly recommended. iii) low interest in researching PM related subjects amongst faculty. Concerted efforts in the area of curriculum development. This affects the projects industry as a whole and ultimately the national economy. The main barriers are. the availability of infrastructure. iv) lack of trained instructors. HR managers are charged with the responsibility of designing training modules that would bring direct gains to the project and companies.infrastructure currently prevailing is more dictated by the regulatory requirements rather than the targeted requirements of PM education. Currently the options to choose experts are relatively less and therefore the training costs are high. Further multiple regression analysis suggests that two other factors namely introduction of PM courses and effect on employability are also having some impact on the rating of PM education in India. Chapter 8 concludes the study by identifying the barriers to the growth of PM education. Thus the type of institutions. Only limited cohorts of ‘project ready’ personnel available adversely affect the ability of the organisations to deliver consistently on projects. Executives working in project based companies enter with little or no prior orientation of project requirements that are special to project environments. even resorting to mass media support. Finally we make some recommendations to ensure a more sustained growth of PM education in India. ii) lack of systematic curriculum development with a focussed view to develop PM competencies. we find that there is a supply gap in capacity for PM training in the country. creation of awareness regarding the application of PM techniques to the project business are recommended. v) long winding procedures for regulatory approvals for introducing approving PM courses. i) the lack of awareness amongst managements of technical and business management institutions about the importance and relevance of teaching PM. management support in introduction of PM courses and employability of graduates emerge as significant factors impacting the PM education in India. vi) provision of qualified faculty and infrastructure and vii) the costs of training that have to be borne by organisations. Only a handful of elite institutions in India appear to have taken concerted steps in this direction.

2 1. No. 2 3 16 19 20 21 23 12 .4 1.5 CONTENTS TOPIC Acknowledgements Executive Summary Chapter 1 .1 1. Sr. in the Promulgation of PM Education Page No.3 1. A B 1.for PM education and training in technical and business management institutions as well as for executives in project based organisations.Introduction The Government Imperative Key Questions raised in the Study The Private Sector Imperative in PM Key India Level Statistics Of Project Announcements By Indian Corporations Initiatives of Indian Government and Industry.

Literature Review of Project Management education on a global scale 2.1 PM Research in India 35 2.7 Practicing Executives of Project Based Companies 48 a) Sources of Data 48 b) Data Collection Method – Indirect Method 48 c) Data Collection Instrument 48 d) Sampling Procedure 48 d.3) Sample Unit 49 e) Statistical Tools and Techniques 49 f) Analytical Software 49 3.2 PM Education in America and Europe 27 2.2) Sample Size 46 d.5 Methodology 44 3. MBA Institutions.3 Scope of the Study 43 3.6.4 Hypotheses 43 3. 31 Engineering Colleges b) National Institute of Construction Management and Research 32 c) Symbiosis Institute of Operations Management 32 d) National Institute of Technology and Industrial Engineering 32 2.3.7 India and China: Comparison of PM Education 40 Chapter 3 .4 Indian PM Growth 29 2.1 PM in other European Countries 28 2.Schedules (Questionnaires) 45 c) Data Collection Method .Based Companies 49 a) Sources of Data 49 13 .1) Sampling Area 46 d.Direct Interview Method 45 d) Sampling Procedure 46 d.Chapter 2 .5 PM in Research 33 2.6 PM in Industry 36 2.4.1 Training and Development Expenditure in Indian Projects 37 Industry – A Bird’s Eye View 2.8 Human Resource Managers of Project.1) Sampling Area 49 d.4) Sampling Technique 46 e) Statistical Tools and Techniques 46 f) Analytical Software 46 g) Multiple Regression Model 47 3.2 Objectives of the Study 42 3.1 Basic Approach to the Study 42 3.1 Specific Cases in India 31 a) Indian Institutes of Management.Research Design 3.3 PM In Academia – A Global Snapshot 28 2.2) Sample Size 49 d.6 Academic Institutions 45 a) Sources of Data 45 b) Data Collection Instrument .5.1 Introduction 25 2.3) Sample Unit 46 d.

1 Findings from Multiple Regression Analysis of Significance of 132 PM Education in Technical/ Business/ Specialised Academic Institutions 7.2 Institutional Data Analysis and Inferences 125 7.5 Human Resource Managers’ Data Analysis And Interpretation 144 14 .2 PART I – A & B : Respondents’ Particulars And Project Details 93 5.1 Introduction 108 6.2.1 PART I – A 93 5.2 PART I – B 95 5.1 Results and Interpretation of Factor Analysis for Subjects rated 128 by Faculty from Academic Institutions 7.4 Part III: Curriculum Development 61 4.Data Analysis Of Survey Of Working Executives Employed In Project Based Companies In India 5.2 Commentary on the Extent and Depth of PM Education and 123 Research in India 7.4 The Practising Executives Data Analysis and Inferences 138 7.2) Sample Size 50 d.1) Sampling Area 50 d.b) Data Collection Method 49 c) Data Collection Instrument 50 d) Sampling Procedure 50 d.5 PART IV – Infrastructure.3 PART II: Dimensions Of Project Management Training Design 111 Chapter 7 – Interpretations Of Data Analysis And Findings Of PMI Survey 7. Regulatory 74 Factors And Current Status Of PM Research In Institute Chapter 5 .1 Introduction 91 5.2 PART I : Respondents’ Particulars 109 6.2.1. Management Support.4 PART III: Changes And Work Performance After Completion 100 Of PM Programme 5.1 Introduction 122 7.Data Analysis of Survey of Human Resource Managers employed in Project-based Companies in India 6.3 Part II: Project Management Curricula 96 A Management and Technology Area 96 B Behavioural Sciences Area 98 C Information Technology Area 98 D Sector Specific Area 99 5.Data Analysis of Survey of Technical and Business Institutions in India 4.3 PART II: General Opinion On Existing State Of PM Education 55 In India 4.3 Multiple Regression Analyses of the Factors Affecting 132 Introduction of PM course 7.3.1 Introduction 52 4.2.2 PART I : Respondent’s Particulars And Details 53 4.5 PART IV: Current Position Of Project Management In India 103 Chapter 6 .3) Sample Unit 50 e) Statistical Tools and Techniques 50 f) Analytical Software 50 Chapter 4 .

This is seen in the launch of mega and major projects by the 15 .6 7.2 Synthesis of Stakeholders of PM Education – Academic Institutions. From the pursuit of economic liberalization. India is committed to fulfil the economic growth targets.1.7 7.2006) c (DEC . and embarking on ambitious projects with the help of privatisation.2007) d (DEC .2005) b (DEC .2008) Annexure 3 Questionnaire For Institutions Annexure 4 Correlation Matrix Of Factors (Subjects) Contained In Questionnaire For Academic Institutions (Part III A) Annexure 5 Questionnaire For Executives Annexure 6 Questionnaire For Human Resource Managers Annexure 7 Model Course Curriculum Designs In Undergraduate Programmes Of Technical And Business Management Schools Annexure 8 Master Database File Of Primary Data CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.7. Practising Executives and Industry Limitations Of the Research Scope For Future Research Chapter 8 .Conclusions and Recommendations Conclusions Barriers Recommendations BIBLIOGRAPHY ANNEXURES 147 148 148 150 151 152 154 159 159 164 168 169 170 171 172 187 190 203 210 215 Annexure 1 A List Of Respondents Participating In Institutional Survey B List Of Respondents Participating In Working Executives Survey Annexure 2 a (DEC . aligning with the global economy.1 8.8 8.1 The Government Imperative The promulgation of Project Management education in India has assumed great significance considering the position in which India finds herself in this millennium.1 8. fast and furiously.

in/plans). have been given project targets in order to improve infrastructure and aid development under various programmes such as Bharat Nirman Scheme. it is slated to rise to $ One Trillion (www. India currently faces a deficit of between $150 billion and $190 billion in infrastructure funding. illiteracy and unemployment. The country faces a challenge in bridging the existing infrastructure gaps. The government is looking at 25% of the infrastructure investment to be funded through Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). the government too assumes the role of a key stakeholder (owner) and therefore is affected by any project related problems and issues. planningcommission. the government itself is a huge sponsor and initiator of projects. and the funds that could have entered the country.Central Government departments to cover the historical gap between what is available and what is required. Because of this. remains the greatest challenge for administrators and stakeholders alike. In the Twelfth Five Year Plan. 2010). 6.nic.nic. it is the consistent lack of responsiveness of Indian government. According to the 2010 report. namely. industry as well as the people to solve the infrastructure bottlenecks that are retarding India’s momentum. 2010). Out of the total target that has been set for investment in infrastructure ($514 billion). The estimated investment plan for infrastructure development stands at $ 514 billion during the Eleventh Plan. initiating mega and major development projects in various sectors. due to the global financial crisis.in/plans) 16 . In the Twelfth Five Year Plan (2012.2017). planningcommission. There were 941 such projects and involved a total outlay of Rs. This is more than twice that of $ 217. Table 1 indicates the number of mega and major projects under the aegis of the Central Government in the year 2009 alone.86 billion allocated during the Tenth Plan. In addition. imperative to maintain the economic growth rate of around 9%. the State Governments and Local Government agencies too. malnutrition.188 crores 1 (www.07. Sustained pursuit of the twin objectives of the government. more advanced economies in Asia1 According to the reports of McKinsey Consulting Group (Reports 2001. (i) ensuring a steady GDP growth rate of around 9% and (ii) elevating the major section of India’s populace from poverty. in order to be on par with. being withdrawn. $430 billion is earmarked only for the transport and utilities sector. the investment through Public Private Participation (PPP) route is sought to be raised to the extent of up to 50% of the Plan outlay (ET. In any country. India plans to increase the gross capital formation in infrastructure from 5% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to 9% by 2012.

Government of India The Table 2 shows the most important causes for delay of projects as listed by MOSPI.(MOSPI. No. 1 2 3 Factors Fund Constraints Land Acquisition Problems Slow Progress in Works other than Civil Works Law and Order Delay in Supply of Equipment No. Table 2 Causes of Delay of Projects Sr. 5 Power.06. 3 Coal and 1 in Power sectors) 11 (5 in Railways. 2 Power and 1 in Railway sectors) 4 5 17 . 2009). 1 Petroleum and 1 in Power sectors) 78 (63 in Railways. 6 Petroleum. 1 Coal and 2 projects in Power sectors) 20 (12 Railways. 6 Coal. The table indicates that majority of the projects (466) are in the delayed mode with 195 projects not having any clear indicated Date of Completion (DOC). Table 1 Sector –Wise Implementation Status of Central Government Projects 2009 (Status as on 30. of Projects 31 (28 projects are of Railways. 4 Power and 2 in Coal sector) 5 (2 Petroleum. MOSPI.2009) (Number of Projects) Without Delaved DOC Origi Late Origi Late nal st nal st 3 3 0 0 22 22 0 4 55 51 5 18 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 37 37 0 6 33 33 0 1 33 32 3 2 0 0 0 1 67 65 131 122 159 24 27 12 1 0 474 159 23 27 12 1 0 466 0 3 0 3 0 0 146 9 15 11 5 0 0 195 Ahead Sector ATOMIC ENERGY CIVIL AVIATION COAL I&B MINES STEEL PETROLEUM POWER HEALTH & FW RAILWAYS ROAD TRANSPORT & HIGHWAYS SHIPPING & PORTS TELECOMMUNICATIONS URBAN DEVELOPMENT WATER RESOURCES INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Total Origi nal 0 1 7 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 16 Late st 0 1 8 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 3 0 1 0 0 18 On Schedule Origi Late nal st 2 2 4 4 49 52 0 0 0 0 11 11 24 24 50 51 0 0 6 24 26 10 6 10 0 2 200 26 11 6 9 0 2 222 Source: Quarterly Project Implementation Status.

Technology problems 8. Another programme. in the field of Real Estate and Urban Infrastructure Management. clearance) Source: Quarterly Project Implementation Status.2 Key Questions Raised In The Study 18 . This was followed by another pioneering two year full time Post Graduate Programme in Project Engineering and Management for all types of mega and major projects and their management. Government of India In addition. geo mining. Geological surprises The severity of the lack of project management expertise is now being felt at the highest level of governance in India.6 7 Environmental clearance Others 1 (Railways sector) 47 (these include the problems of technology selection. The Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation ( MOSPI ) has felt a strong need to introduce a full time MBA type programme in Project Management. Delay in finalisation of detailed engineering plans. the same report attributes the causes of delay to the following 1. award of contract. Industrial relations and law and order problems 5. delay in civil work. MOSPI. Pre commissioning teething troubles 7. bad weather and Govt. Lack of supporting infrastructure facilities 2. has had the longest running pioneering Post Graduate Programme in Advanced Construction Management (focussing on construction project management) in the country. Changes in scope/delay in finalisation of the scope 4. Delay and uncertainty in feedstock supply 6. inadequate infrastructure. Development and Management is due to be launched from the next academic session in 2011. court cases. the first of its kind in the country. This programme too devotes substantial attention to managing projects in these sectors. The Institute has further innovated and introduced another two year Post Graduate Programme. release of drawings and delay in availability of fronts 3. 1. The National Institute of Construction Management and Research (NICMAR). the two year full time Post Graduate Programme in Infrastructure Finance.

1. namely India and China. with the objectives of both countries being the same.In view of the burning intensity of this problem. that the Private Sector has a better track record in building PM competency as against Public Sector enterprises. 2001). The maximum growth in project management education in the near future is foreseen in the world’s two most significant countries. the key questions that are sought to be investigated and reported in this study relate to the factors that are affecting the growth of PM education and training in our country. etc. to alleviate poverty through economic development. as the former are often contractors to many governmental projects. undergraduate. More discussion on China’s efforts in spreading PM education is contained in the next chapter of the report. face intense competitive pressure arising out of tight bidding frameworks like ‘lowest bid’ acceptance criteria. do we have adequate human resources to undertake and see a series of mega projects through? Is the PM human resource base expanding? • Is research in PM adequate and of the kind that would help the industry? Is it solutions driven? Is it helping the creation of theoretical precepts and is it integrative in its nature? Globally the demand for Project Management professionals is increasing and as a result there is a growing interest as well as availability of PM education at all levels i.e. advanced / doctoral level programmes with developed regions like North America. i. The study specifically aims to explore issues from the perspectives of academic institutions. Australia and some advanced nations in Asia leading the race (Turner & Heumann.3 The Private Sector Imperative In PM A hypothesis may be offered. Also of importance is 19 . postgraduate. and therefore would require use of latest and best techniques of managing and completing projects on time and within the stipulated costs and quality parameters. we would like to know : • At present what is the role that educational institutions are playing in the technical and business education domains to create capacity? • • How is the industry overcoming the problem of skills and competency deficiency in PM? To what extent the recipients of PM training and education find it useful and are able to apply their skills and knowledge in the real world of managing and executing projects? • Further. For instance.e. industry users and industry sponsors of executive training and development. Europe. to ensure better project returns.

Such companies or ‘concessionaires’ therefore find that adoption of superior project management techniques is fundamental to their success. Transfer. are implemented through Project / Programme mode. Transfer (BOLT). Own. (CMIE.Capex) is an authentic information database which catalogues industry information of Indian companies obtained largely through companies’ financial reporting. Thus the private sector views project management skills as a necessity. The Centre for Monitoring of Indian Economy – Capex Data. especially for sectors like roads. viz. Data for 385 20 . Operate. In the basic search conducted to list the total number of projects announced by Indian companies in the year 2010. or 3) stalled for some reason. family welfare. Besides a significant number of large social development oriented schemes of Government such as in health. power and heavy engineering. 1. Own. 1) announcement stage. (BOOT).4 Key India Level Statistics Of Project Announcements By Indian Corporations Traditional industries credited with PM practices include: construction. the CMIE database was used. power and ports. nutrition. In order to find out the overall “projects” activity of Indian companies in the public and private sector. manufacturing. rural employment. public private infrastructure projects are being made monitorable and achievement oriented.the industry’s desire to be awarded projects that would fetch them high value and high visibility while conceptualising and executing complex projects. which has resulted in Build. Own. it was revealed that a total of 16. Operate and Transfer (BOT) model and other variants such as Build. Lease. resulting in future losses and hamper their business opportunities.145. The economic growth model adopted by the Indian government involves greater use of Public Private Participation in infrastructure and other development projects. 2) under implementation. Build. Added to these are the IT/ITES/ Telecom companies and service sector companies. projects had been listed in different stages of development. Therefore it was felt relevant to study the extent of the effort taken by these industries in preparing the personnel and staff through training to meet the above challenges and narrow the existing competency gaps. or Build. According to the Planning Commission’s targets. Operate and Maintain (BOOM) being increasingly adopted to award projects to companies. etc. Any delays in project completion could result in delayed revenue realisation for the companies. Inevitably this would be achieved only under conditions wherein the companies have developed prior capabilities in bidding and executing such complex projects.

malls. The second highest employment is seen in this sector with 73. shipyard expansion. hydro electric.096 1.695. due to the limitations faced in capturing the full data. though the project name and company were listed. iron products. SEZ. 21 . outlets.306. were to the tune of 1844. Project Announcements were to the tune of 7200 in the year 2010 alone. hotel and tourism. This sector consists of Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) projects. comprising electrical machinery.272 37. Power projects consist of activities in the area of thermal power projects. Though the data is by no means complete. In case of services.61. with the most projects being announced in the Services sector. plants installation. it serves as a good indicator of the current potential of the projects industry. coal based. etc. transmission lines. diesel engines etc. gas based. More than one hundred and sixty million persons are currently employed in this sector. The total projects in Services sector account for more than 50% of the projects announced.projects was ‘Not Available’. 3612 projects have been announced in the year 2010. 096 persons being employed in Service sector projects.390 1. Project Announcements in manufacturing sector.691 7. IT parks. 06. Exhibit 1 Project Announcements/Under Implementation/Employment Year 2010 Category Construction Power Manufacturing Mining Services Total Project Announcements 472 1050 1844 222 3612 7200 Projects Under Implementatio n 1372 827 1561 350 4112 8222 Projects Implementatio n Stalled 29 43 121 16 129 338 Total Employment Projects 1873 1920 3526 588 7853 15760* 7. Refer Exhibit 1. 2010 * Data for 385 projects appeared ‘Not Available’ in the database Exhibit 1 offers a quick view of the magnitude of the project industry in India as whole. exploration.380 53. and renewable power projects.077. 69.829 CMIE Capex Database.

Exhibit 2 A Number Of Projects Sector-Wise By Cost Year 2010. residential. in which the number of projects and their sector wise value (at cost) are shown in the select sectors of Construction. Refer Exhibit Nos. Construction projects included townships. numbering 9454. Mining and Services. 1001. due to time or cost would only result in direct losses to the national exchequer as well as retard planned economic growth. Any delays. processing and logistics. it is presented with a view to draw attention to the significance of this sector and its sensitivity to the investment and economic growth of the country.272 persons employed. Though the data is only indicative in nature.2000 crores. commercial. The majority of the projects by value were in the range of less than Rupees 1000 crores. Power. followed by project value in the range of Rs. The figures provide an idea of the enormous importance of these sectors to the national economy. etc. The data in both the Exhibits 2a and 2b suggests that over one hundred trillion rupees remains invested in 11. 2 a and 2 b. Manufacturing. ( Crore) Project Cost in Crores Less than 1000 1001 to 2000 2001 to 3000 3001 to 4000 4001 to 5000 above 5001 NA* Total G. 2010 *Data for 4958 projects appeared as ‘Not Available’ Construction 713 74 28 14 8 45 992 1874 Power 805 91 97 84 84 251 523 1935 Manufacturing 2363 133 60 27 16 125 1059 3783 16. Very few projects in construction were in the ‘stalled’ category.Announcements in the year 2010 were as high as 1050. The employment generated in this sector is the highest with almost 76. mentioned in the CMIE Capex Database. 145 Mining 291 27 9 8 5 15 237 592 Services 5282 272 87 39 38 96 2147 7961 Total 9454 597 281 172 151 532 4958 16145 22 . 95. industrial parks. SEZs construction.T.187 of the 16145 projects for the year 2010. CMIE Capex Database.

65.671 38. The Planning Commission has made project targets ‘monitorable’ to various ministries and departments of the government. In this chapter.21.65.00. the Planning Commission of India.78.03.402 1.1000 crs Rs. (PMI®).93.10.4001 to Rs.556 2.64.334 Mining 61.52.88. 5001 crs Total Grand Total Construction 1.22.472 65.1001 to Rs. to expedite the efforts in training and education of PM practices.757.708 1. Chapter 2. etc.785 2. 4000 crs Rs.863 8.73.47.399 18.Exhibit 2 b Sector – wise Project by Value (at cost) Category < Rs.26.32. International Project Management Association® (IPMA®) and the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI). 2000 crs Rs.3001 to Rs. Recent initiatives by the government include the expressed need by MOSPI to organise certification level programmes for persons working at lower and middle levels within the project industry.100 6.370 1.351 2.508 12. GoI).907 22.91.413 5.88.915 1.63.872 98.643 38. a need was felt to support the secondary data sources with primary studies covering academic institutions. In order to accurately gauge the current and future efforts made by stakeholders in the projects industry.014 3.69.163 50.74.20.378 Power 1. covers this is greater detail.63.74 3. as well as full time advanced project management courses in leading institutions.93.261 1.28. All the entities mentioned are actively involved with key government departments such as the Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation.5 Initiatives Of Indian Government And Industry.611 21.581 7. industry and the recipients of PM education.418 Total 15.03.33.251 1.531 73. Government of India (MOSPI.703 1.30 2.46.397 Year 2010.151.427 1.89.19.620 7. Rs ‘000 crs Services 7.93. and/or industry associations such as Project Management Institute®.111 71.308 27.092 4.236 29. the government’s desire and seriousness to play an active role in ensuring the contribution of the project sector in expediting national development goals was sought to be described. which are linked to the performance and future fund disbursements to the latter.916 38.963 2.825 Manufacturing 3.2001 to Rs3000 crs Rs. in the form of individual company led initiatives.514 27.172 11.98.38.53.5000 crs > Rs.51.60 26.437. The 23 . In The Promotion Of PM Education A series of initiatives to promote PM education have been undertaken by the government as well as industry.

The greater the research. the better the replication and standardisation of the process of learning so that Knowledge. organizations are found to be replacing their traditional management structures. CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT EDUCATION ON A GLOBAL SCALE 2. With the rapid growth of ‘projectised’ and project led companies.1 Introduction An indicator of the maturity of any profession is the availability of quality academic programmes that provide the advantages of research backed teaching and learning. This helps the recipient of training to perform and deliver much faster on the job. Skills and Attitude – the trinity of any learning are easily transferred to the student in a systematic manner. like the corporate divisional or departmental structures with those that are leaner and more objective oriented (Bergrenn and 24 .next chapter takes a closer view of the efforts made by Indian stakeholders and similar initiatives in other countries as well.

four major bodies are engaged in the provision of standardised instruction in project management namely PMI® in North America and other countries. As is seen.000 qualified Project Management Professionals® (PMPs®). The same report asserted that this was slated to increase in the coming years. The AMA quotes that this membership is growing at the rate of approximately 5000 per month indicating the ‘mainstreaming’ of the project manager’s role in the industry.000 members in 2010 (AMA Handbook 2005.. the Asia/Pacific region accounts for the second highest share of Registered Education Providers of PMI® next only to North America. (PMI. project management has grown as a deliberate choice of career.000 members in 1993 has well over 500.000 individuals participated in some form of PM training or education offered by the REPs and other educational institutions.P. in many countries. documented the widespread growth of project management and its rising interest amongst the top managements of companies (Soderlund. Distribution (2005) 25 . In 2010.Soderlund. thus reaffirming project management’s growing importance as a discipline. Also seen is the huge gap in the proportion of REPs® between the two regions. 2008). over 500. The Figure 1 below depicts the share of Registered Education Providers of PMI ® worldwide in the year 2005. a large scale survey of around 1000 Registered Education Providers (REPs) of PMI® worldwide revealed that in 2004 alone. client organizations call for certified project professionals. Globally. Earlier works based on a survey. This is reflected in the growth of the leading professional association of project management – Project Management Institute (PMI®). From being a mere ‘add-on’ to a system engineer’s or civil engineer’s role. the Project Management Association in England (PMA). USA which had less than 15. 2010). according to the PMI®.E. with over 9000 certified project managers). 2010) worldwide. 2004). there were over 500. PMI. apart from academic institutions. In 2004. the International Project Management Association (IPMA) representing over 24 countries in Europe and over 5000 certified project managers and lastly the Australian Institute of Project Management with over 1000 certified project managers (AMA Handbook. In formal bidding processes related to contractual services. Figure 1: Worldwide R. 2005).

The financial services sector in both countries is yet to fully utilise the importance of PM training. from a mere 10 in 1994 to over 185 in 2006 in the USA and Europe. In China. 2004). In contrast in India. Business Management. 2006 However there has been huge growth in degree programmes being offered in this area. etc (Michael Price et al. There are over 65 degree programmes in more than 25 academic institutions currently accredited by the Global Accreditation Centre for Project Management Programmes of the PMI® in North America. However the number of listed REP®s in India is merely 70 in all2. new frontiers like earth sciences. looks at newer applications of PM in such emerging and diversified fields like nanotechnology and future energy. The growth of PM education and training in Asia and Pacific regions suggests that it is spreading in newer geographies. Most of these programmes are tailored to suit the IT industry (73. extreme weather response and climate control. oil and gas.org/Search. one finds a huge demand for training in PM primarily for Information Technology as well as in Construction Industry. The status of PM education and skill building in these countries is further discussed later in this section. monitoring of planet.1%) as compared to sectors like Financial. Several other programmes are at various stages of the accreditation process (PMI®.aspx) (www. PM education is more widespread in sectors like construction.pmi. 2010). Construction. China.Source: Price et al. In fact PMI®’s own publication titled Project Management Circa 2025. Spain.pmi. It also gives an insight into the emerging countries where PM will take roots such as in India.org/PM2025) 3 26 .2 PM Education In America And Europe 2 (https://ccrs. Asia Pacific and Arabian regions3. it has also been spreading into newer areas of application. power and so on. 2.

it is observed that in the United Kingdom. Since the 1950s. there were 33 such programmes in USA and Canada alone. and a prerequisite in the procurement and management of large scale and complex projects either within the country or internationally. Dinsmore and Cabanis – Brewin (2006) have tried to find answers to the question of systematizing the study of project management to offer it as a preferred career option.Scientific PM education has its earliest origins in the well known discipline of Operations Management. 2. In 1993. New Zealand and Ireland. use of formal PM techniques to acquire and execute projects in an organised manner.3 PM In Academia – A Global Snapshot The introduction of project management courses in the universities and business schools in North America. Ten years later. Janice Thomas (2008). it is documented that there were only 5 universities that offered degree programmes in Project Management in North America. such as UK.40). revealed that around 10% of the universities offered Masters’ degrees in Project Management. especially in India and China. Bill Zwerman (2004). The extent and depth of PM education is witnessed more in these continents than in other parts of the world. leadership and technical skills. appears to have taken roots only over the last one and a half decade. the advances in PM as an organised discipline within management took root in these regions. In their research. as to be made mandatory. Kent Crawford (2006). PM as a discipline has grown from these roots and is now well entrenched in the business and research realms worldwide. a study of mature project management societies. Professors Thomas Mengel. For instance. Europe and leading Asian countries is on the rise. In case of developing countries and emerging economies. PM education has attained such recognition. Australia. PM education began ‘top down’ in case of United Kingdom. through existing Masters’ degree or Doctoral programmes in concerned disciplines. Therefore one can say that the bases of early development can be found in the works of Frederick Taylor and Henry Gantt. A survey of the relevant literature in international journals focussing on PM reveals relatively less work emanating from countries like India and efforts to initiate PM programmes in academics and research. the Master’s Programme 27 . According to Turner and Huemann (2001). The ultimate aim of the Project Management Programmes is to induce three major competencies in the student – project management skills. In these regions. Most of the literature records the systematic development of this discipline as experienced in these advanced regions. (1915 .

Vocational qualifications such as in the UK are not available in these countries. PM education began first with taught masters’ degrees. Unlike its European and American counterparts. 2. Switzerland has set a goal of becoming a quality competence centre in PM. or with project management as an essential component of wider programmes. Further. these ‘percolated’ down from higher level education into the secondary and even the primary level education.1 PM In Other European Countries In case of other countries in Europe. listing the number of approved institutions offering business engineering/administration/management courses in India. It also exists as a specialist degree like in Construction Project Management. there appears to be less focussed attention in this area of study as compared to Operations Management wherein Indian academic programmes and research are in an advanced state. it spread upwards and downwards to other levels.in Science or Business Administration exists with PM as a speciality. Austria has also embarked upon a project to popularise the use of PM in industries and then take it to the municipalities. no course by the name ‘Information Systems Project Management’ existed. In Austria. Turner and Huemann (2001) observe that in Austria. even though PM subjects are covered within courses such as Information Systems Management. The list is that of the All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE) which is an apex government body formed to 28 . 2. Also it was observed that in the case of degree courses in Information Technology.4 Indian PM Growth In India.3. students and families under the ‘Programme 1 Austria’ to raise awareness of project management as a profession. in the public domain. This study attempts to find out the current state of this emerging field in India. The scope is limited to the technical and management education institutions. different ways are being adopted to reach a common goal of making all these into ‘project oriented societies’. Given below is the state wise table. either as programmes specialising in project management. Later educational programmes emerged focusing on Project Management. From there. Certificates and Diplomas are offered by professional or other bodies. there does not appear to be any clear evidence of studies covering the growth of PM education and research. Austria and Germany also offer doctoral level programmes in PM. Switzerland and Germany.

point towards a rapid growth of technical and business schools in India. and also as a specialisation in the second year under the same head with more advanced exposure to the subject.057 results only for India4. upto 31. Site accessed on Aug. In case of business schools. One finds very few instances in the country wherein a course with the title “Project Management” is included or is taught in full time programmes of technical/business institutions.regulate technical. No. professional and management education providers. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 4 States/UTs Madhya Pradesh Chhatisgarh Gujarat Mizoram Sikkim Orissa West Bengal Tripura Meghalaya Arunachal Pradesh Andaman & Nicobar Assam Manipur Nagaland Jharkhand Engg & Tech. A total of 3904 AICTE approved institutions offer afore mentioned degrees in India. Table No. With the increase in such institutions. a subject matter that covers PERT/CPM techniques under a variety of nomenclatures. Table 3 : Statewise List Of Institutions Offering Management Degrees As On 31/08/2008 Sr.200 The data in Tables 3 & 4.12. 3). 2010) 29 .emagister.in. (Refer Table No. NITIE and SIOM is covered in the section below. diplomas and certificates in management and technical education. these techniques are included under the typical heading of Operations Management as a compulsory base course. State and ‘Deemed to be Universities’ as well as autonomous ones that offer degrees. there are many Central. PM education could be suitably emphasized to secure a better share of coverage with a rapid rate of growth. 161 41 55 1 1 68 71 3 1 1 0 7 1 1 13 MBA 56 7 51 0 1 29 27 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 4 PGDM 7 2 11 0 0 15 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 (www. A more detailed description obtained from the website of important and specific cases covering institutes such as IIMs. A general search on the Google search engine titled ‘project management courses in India’ showed up 12. 4 describes the Number of Proposals received for the establishment of New Technical Institutes for the Academic year 2009-2010. Almost all technical schools include within their syllabi. Apart from this.

50 10 43 53 9 0 0 0 23 0 2 1 0 1 1 83 13 12 0 1 38 11 0 16 49 144 4 PGDM 16 2 8 10 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 84 3 2 0 3 11 0 0 1 12 3 0 MBA 63 7 67 24 5 0 0 0 7 0 1 0 0 0 0 130 14 3 1 2 36 6 0 30 65 38 0 East North Chandigarh South 30 .htm Table 4 : Number Of Proposals Received By AICTE To Establish New Institutions Region Central State Madhya Pradesh Chhattisgarh Gujarat Orissa Assam Meghalaya Manipur Mizoram West Bengal Nagaland Jharkhand Sikkim Arunachal Pradesh Tripura Andaman & Nicobar Uttar Pradesh Uttranchal Bihar Chandigarh Delhi Haryana Himachal Pradesh J&K Punjab Rajasthan Tamil Nadu Pondicherry Engg. Tot Bihar Uttar Pradesh Uttaranchal Chandigarh Haryana Jammu & Kashmir New Delhi Punjab Rajasthan Himachal Pradesh Andhra Pradesh Pondicherry Tamil Nadu Karnataka Kerala Maharashtra Goa Daman & Diu.ernet.16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 Gr. Dadar.in/ApprovedInstitute.aicte. NH Total 15 241 19 5 116 7 19 70 81 9 527 9 352 157 94 239 3 0 2388 3904 11 125 23 0 56 9 13 55 49 8 231 1 154 109 37 168 1 0 1231 1 88 2 1 10 0 24 4 15 0 24 0 4 15 7 48 1 0 285 Source: www.

4th Edition 2008.ernet. Engineering and Technology and Information Technology. b) National Institute Of Construction Management And Research The National Institute of Construction Management and Research (NICMAR). PMI. usually in the form of a module. Only specialist courses cover a wider gamut of PM subject content and emphasis. MBA Institutions.1 Specific Cases in India a) Indian Institutes of Management. the institute’s Post Graduate Programme in Project Engineering and Management.htm 2. Behavioural Sciences.in/ApprovedInstitute. Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) programmes. Engineering Colleges Practically all the IIMs offer some elective courses either directly named “Project Management” or some other titles dedicated to the coverage of important themes in project management. General Management. However. especially those covering construction.South West West Andhra Pradesh Karnataka Kerala Maharashtra Goa Daman & Diu Total 176 32 29 85 0 0 886 1970 31 18 1 37 2 0 250 178 26 8 123 0 0 834 Grand Total Source: www. offers the Post Graduate Programmes in Advanced Construction Management and Real Estate and Urban Infrastructure that have a host of dedicated subjects covering the PM domain. 5 The PMBOK® includes 5 Process Groups and 12 Knowledge Areas that are covered in the domain of PM. Similarly almost all the courses covered in technical colleges. but do not always appear specifically in the form of full length courses. but these are not commonly found in MBA programmes. and combines subject matter from all the major domain areas i. yet the term ‘Project’ does not always appear distinctly in the nomenclature of the said programmes. PM related subjects are included in almost all curricula of management institutions. engineering and information technology include project management. 31 . cover selective subject matter from the PM domain.e. Usually the Operations Management courses. Project Management. has clear descriptions of subjects in project domain as defined in the Project Management Body of Knowledge® (PMBOK®)5.aicte. This two year full time programme is arguably India’s only course of its type. within their ambit at introductory level. In general management oriented.4.

though the curriculum adequately reflects to varying degrees the subject matter related to the same. 6 (www. and Post Graduate Diploma in Industrial Management (PGDIM)7. d) National Institute of Technology and Industrial Engineering The National Institute of Technology and Industrial Engineering (NITIE). 2.aspx Site accessed as on August 2010) (http://www. a specialist degree. Work System Design. wherein the entire ‘Project’ term is explicitly included in the title of the programme. measurement and improvement as well as its systematic planning and scheduling. Projects and Resource Planning6. The exception however. Mumbai. etc. most of the post graduate management courses covering the PM domain are seen sans the ‘Project’ term included in the title of the course. which covers subjects such as Operations. is noticed in the Post Graduate Programme in Project Engineering and Management offered by NICMAR. in addition to other subjects. Post Graduate Diploma in Industrial Safety and Environmental Management (PGDISEM). Systems Engineering. the Masters in Business Administration in Operations Management (MBA Operations Management) is offered.c) Symbiosis Institute of Operations Management In case of Symbiosis Institute of Operations Management (SIOM). The early evolution of the discipline could be attributed to the works of Frederick Taylor and Henry Gantt (1900s – 1920s) which emphasised the organisation of work in such a way that would be amenable for scientific analysis. In India.siom. as is observed in the United Kingdom.5 PM in Research Project Management (PM) has evolved since the sixties as an area of interest for researchers and academicians alike. Operations Research.. runs the Post Graduate Diploma in Industrial Engineering (PGDIE).in/mba_operations. Project Management. The PGDIE has such subjects that are of core importance to industrial operations such as Operations Planning and Control.edu Site accessed as on August 2010) 7 32 . and provides the most comprehensive coverage of all the relevant knowledge domains.nitie. Post Graduate Diploma in Information Technology Management (PGDITM). PM existed more in the realm of practice than as a pursuit of systematic study and research. Up until then.

2006). and electric power.In the decades following World War II. These associations collaborated with research scholars and launched publications dedicated to the theory and practice of PM. manpower and resources in a way that the financial resources committed by the governments could derive optimum leverage in the face of given constraints.pmforum. Thus PM emerged and was developed as a sub discipline of industrial engineering and operations management (Crawford et al. Journals such as the ‘International Journal of Project Management’ (IPMA). Obviously the mainstay of all such ventures was the proper deployment of technology. gave further impetus to the study and practice of PM. With the protracted success of PM as a useful discipline in implementing projects. businesses and organizations saw great opportunity to undertake projects which were complex. natural gas. From the early decades of the twentieth century. This was also the time for nations to prove their prowess over others by launching space flights. the ‘Project Management Journal’ of Soviet Russian Project Management Association -SOVNET8. 2008). the private sector had begun the widespread use of sophisticated means of deployment of resources to obtain high levels of productivity in their markets. unique and very large in scope. building dams and laying high altitude rail lines and roads. began the path of economic development. The growing use of energy.htm Site accessed as on August 2010) 33 . and transportation facilities increased dramatically. International Project Management Association (IPMA) in Europe and Australian Institute of Project Management (established in 1976). 8 (www. fed by growing economies everywhere. submarines. processing.org/library/journals. the ‘Project Management Journal ®’ (PMI®). The need for production. In this. It was in the 1960s that researchers commenced a systematic study of how projects are conceived and managed and an attempt began to be made to organise the practice as a discipline. New projects began getting bigger and more venturesome. there was interest amongst researchers to study projects and the processes adopted that made some projects successful while others failed to add to the return on investment (Thomas and Mullaly. in USA. massive reconstruction work had to be undertaken in the hugely affected areas of Europe and Japan. Simultaneously the newly independent countries especially in Asia. ‘Project Manager’ of Australian Institute of Project Management. In the 1960s. the formation of Project Management Institute® (PMI®). was on the rise. constructing high rise buildings. ‘Managing by Projects’ became a term that gained prominence at this time. fuelling strong demand for petroleum products. Empirical studies commenced either as research pursuits of doctoral students or commissioned research from these associations.

2. They also determined that research focus moved from large government defence projects to commercial applications in construction. In the same paper.1 PM Research In India 34 . Thus the study sought to define a research agenda aimed at enriching and extending the subject of project management beyond its current conceptual foundations (Crawford et al. Research in the area of PM has continued to evolve steadily over the past 30 decades. existing for multiple purposes instead of very narrow definitions of scope and purpose. They found that the emphasis has moved from development and use of automated project management software and tools to risk management. 2006). A study was commissioned by the UK government in 2003. Anbari and Young (2009) mention the work of Kloppenberg and Opfer whose research identified project management research published in articles. information systems. creation of value as the prime focus of its existence and a broader conceptualisation of projects to include multi disciplinary approach. as prescribed by PM methods and tools but to create ‘reflective practitioners’. Anbari and Young (2009) mention Bredillet’s conclusions that PM is becoming increasingly linked with the implementation of organizational strategy. (UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)) on “Rethinking Project Management”. and new product development.5. The fast developing Asian countries have to ‘catch up’ in this area. dissertations. 2) To develop Theory for practice which meant understanding projects as a social process. 3) To develop Theory in practice which meant the creation of training for PM in such a way as not to restrict the practitioners to merely following detailed procedures and techniques. They concluded that project management has extensive current opportunities and a bright future. papers. This meant the effort towards the development of new models and theories which recognise and illuminate the complexity of the project and PM at all levels.are some examples of the rapid growth and dissemination of PM related literature. It was a bid to extract PM research from mere theoretical paradigms and relate it to empirical practice. earned value management and then to human resource aspects. and government research reports since 1960. The objectives of this study were the following : 1) To research Theory about practice of PM.

The search has revealed that only 26 papers in the same period (1988-2010) have been published by academics and occasionally by industry practitioners in the journal from India. revealed that in 62 . The growth of PM training could be attributed to the formation of the PM associations that took great initiative to replicate the formal learning and training of practitioners to enhance as well as standardise project performance while ensuring favourable project outcomes (Soderlund. and on schedule performance (Michael Price et al. A search was run of the articles contained in this journal to develop an idea about the number of articles that included India-centric studies in the period ranging from 1988 – 2010. A study of the publications appearing in one of the most acclaimed journal showcasing PM dedicated studies and literature i. The Graph 1 shows that the search yielded a total of only 101 results. 2. Though the number is too small to be an indicator of the larger universe. 1988-2010). other statistics help to prove the point. Canada.91% of organizations.e. on the job performance.The quantum of research generated in India in relation to PM in its present state remains miniscule. (IJPM®. the International Journal of Project Management (IJPM®) was carried out. in which India features either in the main title of the article or at times in its contents too. Graph 1: Articles In IJPM Containing India – Centric Content An advanced search was done to arrive at the ‘affiliations’ data i. how many of these research papers originated from India.6 PM In Industry A study conducted by the Centre for Business Practices of 53 practitioners at Toronto. Through the formation of the Bodies of Knowledge along with their 35 . 2004). 2004).e. project management training resulted in moderate to extreme improvement in employee knowledge and skills.

Interest in Construction Sector grew. The interest in Program Management appeared in 1997 and Portfolio Management in 2007. Another decade wise bibliometric analysis following the one by Crawford (2006) by Turner in 2010. the most popular topics of research were engineering and construction. Bibliometric analyses of the type of research articles and papers published in leading PM journals such as International Journal of Project Management (IJPM). A study by Crawford et al (2006) revealed the trends in PM research and the emphasis of articles in the period 1993-2003 and found that these are changing. commensurate research in these areas is found wanting. 2. time management and risk management. The study helps to understand that the scope of PM study and research interests has become more diverse and now encompass many more areas that cover the field of enterprise management as a whole. revealed that in 1987. but a growing interest in partnerships and alliances. The duo has been credited with the ‘Diamond Framework’ for strategic project management. time. However in the same paper. these associations have tried to propagate PM education around the world. lament the depth and variety of research in this area. computer support. project management is regularly facing new challenges as a field of study. Soderland argues that the field of project management has a narrow focus and that though a number of teaching programmes have been developed.associated certification programmes.6. methods and approaches to management that comprise the discipline are applied to different areas. Operation and maintenance followed next in importance. Project Management Journal (PMI®) and a host of conference presentations etc. with the number of papers covering the subject going up to 36% of the article contribution. and in different cultures. for different ends. Topics such as life cycle cost. Other researchers have raised concerns regarding the level and quality of research that has been produced in the area of PM. execution and control. operation and maintenance were not covered in the next two decades till 1997 or 2007. According to her. Risk Management continued in importance in 2007. interest in human resource management and developing individual competence gained ground by 2007. The next most popular subjects in 1997 were in the area of computer support. as the tools.1 Training And Development Expenditure In Indian Projects Industry – A Bird’s Eye View 36 . Shenhar and Dvir (1996) continued in the same vein maintaining that PM suffers due to a limited theoretical basis and lack of concepts.

.42 crores were spent by 42 CMIE listed 31. railways etc. Reliance Industries. are consistently missing from the list. and so on. Some companies are known to spend up to five per cent of their turnover on training.. A closer look at the above tables reveals the anomalies wherein the typical industry leaders known for their training impetus like HCC Ltd. JP Group. there was an attempt to arrive at the magnitude of project industry by presenting a cross sectional data on the employment figures and amount of capital invested in this industry in the year 2010 alone. the search showed up only a total of 1761 companies who had a category named ‘staff training’ in their annual financial statements. From among the 16. An advanced search was conducted to find out whether the companies had budgets earmarked for ‘training and development’ or ‘staff training’ expenses so as to draw some meaningful conclusions about the size of training budgets of project based companies in India. In the previous chapter. This data is insufficient to arrive at any meaningful conclusion regarding the training budgets of project based companies related to PM training. CMIE Database – Annual Reports 2005-08 data was used to estimate the training and development budgets of project companies. In 2008. These companies have full fledged training departments and are known to conduct training at almost all levels of project activity. manufacturing.e. 145 companies. a. In the period between 2005. was made. Once again. c and d).The American Society for Training has estimated training spend to be in the range of 2-2.59 crores project companies on T&D. a moderate improvement over the 2005 spend of by 22 CMIE listed companies (Refer Annexure 2. petrochemicals. i. However the data helps to explain some of the difficulties in capturing T&D figures of project companies. power generation. a full search of the annual reports of project based companies. It is necessary to understand the industry’s efforts in capacity building and development of human resources. the overall record appears too minor to mention.2008. In order to find out the current state of affairs regarding the allocation of funds by companies to Training and Development (T&D) of its personnel. Simplex Ltd. L&T. Gammon. GVK. though there was a minor increase in the number of companies who had some allocation under the ‘Staff Training’ or ‘Training and Development’ (T & D) category. only around 59. construction.5 per cent of company turnover on employee skill development programmes (Rao. The objective was to obtain the budgetary allocations made by project based companies in PM related training. mining. 2009). GMR. 37 . b.

) grew from 4. the issue was followed up with a few human resources /training managers of these companies. in the form of a ratio (Annual Report. as most of the resource persons used are from within the organisation (Gammon. 2009). HCC) 2) Added to the overall project expenditure and billed within the ambit of Project related expenses (Gammon. HCC) In software project companies also. Simplex. The human resource value addition ratio was pegged at 0. The most training intensive software companies like Infosys and Wipro Technologies do not have ‘T&D’ or ‘Staff Training’ as heads of expenses in their financial statements (Refer Box No. under one roof at Bangalore. pp 139). Simplex) 3) Billed separately in case of in house training. Thus it is difficult to isolate the exact and actual budgets that are dedicated by project based companies to this activity (FICCI. apart from huge exclusive training facilities in every campus of the company.19 in 2009. A case in point is that of INFOSYS Ltd. Source: Infosys Annual Reports 2005-09 38 . reveals there is no separate category or head under which training is listed.1). However the company is known as the most training intensive company in the industry. A section in the annual report.To understand the reason behind the inadequate data. The company boasts of the best corporate training infrastructure in the country.9%. A study of Infosys annual reports from 2005-09. and an industry association expert using the personal discussion method (reference. with a capacity to train 13. containing ‘Human Resources Valuation’ attempts to list out the value addition made by the company’s human resource.7% to 5. Also the return on human value as a percentage of the cost of human resources (welfare/salaries/wages etc. the picture is similar. the largest software development transnational organisation in the country.1 INFOSYS TECHNOLOGIES LTD. It is a well known fact that Training and Development investment contributes to an improved quality of human resource which in turn contributes to customer satisfaction and improved Box No.. an increase from the earlier year (2008) of 0.500 software project personnel simultaneously. Most HR managers of project companies corroborated the point that T & D expenses of project based companies are not reflected in annual reports but are added primarily in the following ways : 1) Added to the general ‘staff welfare’ expenses and not listed separately under clear training and development head in the annual reports.15 as value addition to the company.

One hundred and forty educational institutions or training centres had been accredited by MOC as project management training providers up to the end of 1995. 2. One such monumental instance of this initiative was that of the Ministry of Construction (MOC). as it is strongly linked to international client requirements and is based almost entirely upon acquisition and execution of software projects. Other ministries in China such as Nuclear. According to PMI®. 2004). In the year 2010. as very often project terms and conditions mandate certified professionals. no dedicated training budgets appear in the financial statements of the companies. During the same period. This again is not surprising. in the year 2006. and Oil & Gas etc too have made mandatory. there were around 6000 PMPs® in India . as found in the former case. India Office). the effort to introduce PM was very systematic and ‘top-down’.000 PMPs® in management and technical fields (Source: PMI®.774 of them were certified by the MOC. followed suit.983 project managers took the training courses and 297. Other entities like IPMA® etc. In case of India. this number has grown to 20. Thus the need for a primary survey of HR managers was considered essential. the growth of PM education in the form of certifications is clearly rising. However. were certified by the MOC. Barring a few exceptions. leads to a high degree of customer satisfaction (Feuss et al. It began with the World Bank giving a grant for training followed by the PMI® stepping in. the PM certification even to apply for a job with them (Lu et al. which is the most active and vigorous organisation in this arena. 2004). Senior management’s role in providing sufficient resources including training. some literature is available for the Information Technology sector. 39 .financial performance. By 2004. Despite the fact that the literature related to the use of PM by the heavy engineering industry in India is very sparse. major and a host of medium sized projects to cover the historical gap in Infrastructure. Defence. In the case of China. it can be concluded that there is a lack of clear statistics in the public domain with respect to the training and development of PM competencies of the public and private sector.000 project managers in total.7 India and China: Comparison of PM Education India and China are considered important as the economic development plans in these two countries require the launch and successful completion of mega. 500. 321. in the early 1990s.

the BMMTEC International Education Group became the first subsidiary in China certified by PMI providing Project Management Professionals® (PMP®) certification training and examination services as well as other training and education on project management. the government has committed significant resources to this effort.Another initiative was undertaken in 1998 by the State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs along with the Project Management Institute®. academic institutions and associations in the developed nations like UK. 2008. modest efforts have begun in this direction. there were 46 REPs in China. scope and methodology adopted to collect primary data from the stakeholder respondents of PM education. PMI® has had a longer and stronger presence in China in promoting its project management standards and certifications with regional offices in both Beijing and Hong Kong. Australia and Canada. According to SCME. 4000 persons had been certified as PMPs® by the REPs®. The first REP® was established in 1999. manufacturing and aeronautics industries. The next chapter discusses the research design. USA. information technology. and about 70. By the year 2004. PMI® had signed a cooperative accord with the China National Steering Committee of Professional Education of Master of Engineering (SCME) on 7 March. In other nations such as Russia and China. The SCME oversees a national consortium of 103 higher education institutions that have been authorised by the Chinese government to offer Master of Engineering degree programmes in project management. it is seen that the growth of PM towards being recognised as a discipline has been systematically driven through the efforts of the government. In India. Due to the huge projects that China has launched in the construction. In this Chapter.000 students are enrolled in dedicated engineering master’s degree programmes in project management in China (Pells. Germany.000 people had participated in PMP® training. a lot of structured emphasis has been given to popularise PM education. 2009). 40 . more than 14.

1 Basic Approach To The Study The study is mostly based on primary data and the basic purpose is to find out the factors inhibiting the wide spread initiation of Project Management Education in Indian technical and business academic institutions and to suggest ways to broaden its present scope in India. 3. in fast tracking their career growth. human resource managers and the recipients of PM related training among active executives. 4.CHAPTER 3 RESEARCH DESIGN 3.2 Objectives Of The Study The main objectives of the research study are as follows: 1. To determine the nature and depth of PM education prevalent in technical and business schools in India. To understand the degree of importance assigned to PM subjects for overall competency development and employability in PM. and includes only leading technical/ business educational institutions. To find the awareness and current state of PM education in the country amongst the technical and business academic institutions. 3. we have covered a cross section of the select recruiters (Human Resource Managers) in our study sample and obtained their views on the efficacy of PM education in enhancing their executives’ ability to manage projects. It simultaneously includes active executives who at graduation. Lastly. and those that inhibit the acceptance of project management education in such academic institutions. It seeks to find the factors that aid. 41 . To determine the personal and professional gains obtained from undergoing formally taught courses in PM by practicing executives. had not undergone PM education but have subsequently done so in the course of their employment. The study is restricted to India. The aim is to obtain their views on the extent of the added benefits of PM training. 5. To investigate the subjects considered important by executives as essential to the practice of PM. 2.

42 .3 Scope Of The Study The study covers the whole of India except the North –East in case of academic institutions. 2) H0 = The necessity of PM education in engineering/technical schools in India is very high. To find out which factors are the most important to companies for allocating time and budgets for PM related training. 3. 7. 4) H0 = The necessity of PM education in architecture/planning schools in India is very high. To identify the type of training that is most preferred by the PM based companies. Working executives are also from different parts of India across project based companies. heavy engineering. 10. H1 = Overall the current status of PM education in India is not poor. 8. H1 = The necessity of PM education in management schools in India is not very high. 3.6. To determine the extent of existing institutional support for the growth of PM teaching and research.4 Hypotheses We formulate the following hypotheses: 1) H0 = Overall the current status of PM education in India is poor. IT and services sectors. H1 = The necessity of PM education in engineering/technical schools in India is not very high. 9. To investigate the nature of training imparted to employees in PM competencies by human resource departments of project based companies. To find out factors considered most important in inhibiting the growth of PM education in India. 3) H0 = The necessity of PM education in management schools in India is very high. Human resource managers were drawn from construction.

H1 = There exist no faculty wise differences in the establishment of PM education in India. after undergoing PM related training. after undergoing PM related training. 8) H0 = There exists a difference in the understanding of the strategic role of projects in the overall business context. 10) H0 = There exists a difference in the level of remuneration. enhancement of work related responsibilities. 7) H0 =There exists a difference in the establishment of PM education in India at the under graduate and post graduate levels. H1 = There exists no difference in the overall understanding of the project context. 5) H0 = There exist regional differences in the establishment of PM education in India. . H1 = There exists no difference in the establishment of PM education in India at the under graduate and post graduate levels. H1= There exists no difference in the understanding of the strategic role of projects in the overall business context. 43 . H1 = There exist no regional differences in the establishment of PM education in India. H1 = There exists no difference in the level of remuneration. and conflict resolution ability of individuals. and conflict resolution ability of individuals. 9) H0 = There exists a difference in the overall understanding of the project context.H1 = The necessity of PM education in architecture/planning schools in India is not very high. 6) H0 =There exist faculty wise differences in the establishment of PM education in India. enhancement of work related responsibilities.

In sections Two and Three. 12) H0 = PM training results in greater accrual of benefits as against costs incurred on the training. The study is divided into three sections. have been discussed. In section One. is to find out the factors necessary to promote the wide spread initiation of Project Management (PM) Education in technical and business schools in India. (Refer Chp. HR managers and active executives of PM based companies. Cases of six institutions where PM is being taught are described separately in Chapter 4. H1 = PM training results in lesser accrual of benefits as against costs incurred on the training. 2010. 13) H0 = PM training offered by certified trainers is more efficacious than that of others. 3. This is followed by a primary research of academic institutions. the findings from the segments of practicing executives and human resource managers respectively. The study is based on cross sectional data and therefore has made use of the multiple regression analysis technique to arrive at conclusions. A case of an executive who has undergone PM training while in active service is included in Chapter 5.11) H0 = Training in Project Management helps to build the employee’s competencies. H1 = Training in Project Management does not help to build the employee’s competencies. we analyze and discuss the state of PM education in academic institutions offering technical and management education. a widely accepted technique of analysis for the purpose of the study. H1 = There is no difference in the efficacy of PM training offered by certified trainers and others. The period in which the survey and primary research work was carried out was March – May. Section A covering Academic Institutions’ Analysis. We have relied more on primary data.5 Methodology The research covers a comprehensive search of secondary literature available in the public domain to determine the efforts of all stakeholders in promoting PM education. The analysis is based on statistical tools and techniques. The main purpose of this technique in some cases. 4). 44 .

c) Data Collection Method . western and northern regions have a greater representation of the business institutions due to their density as well as the easy access of the researchers to the same. In the central and eastern zones. A total of 120 questionnaires were printed. Southern-26 and Central India-13. autonomous and ‘deemed to be university’ institutions.Schedules (Questionnaires) : A questionnaire was prepared as a research instrument and was administered by two means 1) personal in depth interviews 2) by correspondence (email/courier). Questionnaires were also sent via email and 2 questionnaires by courier. it was based on proportionate as well as convenience sampling technique.] d.6 Academic Institutions a) Sources of Data: The study uses primary sources of data obtained from academic institutions.2) Sample Size: 81 [Eastern India-05. Thus a total of 81 responses were received from a mix of government aided. Western India-21.1) Sampling Area: All India.3. b) Data Collection Instrument .Direct Interview Method : A total of 81 units of responses were obtained of which 5 were received by mail/courier. In the southern region. responses for 7 were received. a total of 25 institutions were approached and the responses received were 21. a total of 25 institutions were approached and 18 responses were received. 21 institutions were approached and 16 interview responses were received. 19 interview responses were obtained.3) Sample Unit: Academic Institutions d. d) Sampling Procedure: The key features of the sampling procedure are stated below. as per 5 Zones within India (given below) d. d. Northern India-16. In the northern region. Thus in the sample. In case of management institutions. In the western region. The bulk of the survey was conducted through the personal interviews administered to faculty employed in engineering and management institutions in India.4) Sampling Technique: The survey was conducted based on zone wise proportionate sampling of technical schools in India. of the 29 institutions approached. 45 . Of the 15 questionnaires sent by email.

The Multiple Regression Model is discussed below. Planning and Design. This was presented in the form of graphs. f) Analytical Software: The software used included MS . three models have been attempted. Bar Diagrams.Excel. bar diagrams wherever a simple descriptive data is being sought. Model 1:. In order to find out the extent of interrelationship within the factors. Column Diagrams.Multiple Regression Analysis of PM Education Ratings as Dependent Variable and Essentiality of PM education in Engineering. the essentiality of teaching PM in technical and management academic institutions. (2) the importance of PM education as rated by the faculty respondents and (3) the resource availability and management support within the institute.g. etc. g) Multiple Regression Model: The Multiple Regression Model as described in detail below has been used to find out the ratings given by the individual respondents to specific questions related to the subject matter of PM education. and such type of questions. the percentage share of respondents who opted for a particular rating was derived. in case of the type of academic institutions. impact on employability. Using the responses in selected areas such as experience of faculty. architectural and business management curricula. years of service of faculty respondents. the funding of PM related research in their institutions or whether the faculty has published papers in the same. Architecture. Correlation & Regression Analysis. Factor Analysis and Multiple Regression Analysis have been used. their ratings of subjects and levels to be included in the PM curricula. the multiple regression analysis was used to find out (1) the factors that are viewed by respondents from institutions as essential for introduction of PM courses in technical. their personal PM related research pursuits.e) Statistical Tools and Techniques: Pie Charts. In the study. Management. like in the case of subjects that are necessary to be included in PM curricula. For e. their perceptions of the state of PM education in India. Thereafter the numerical averages were calculated to arrive at the overall rating assigned by the respondents. and Infrastructure Management Institutions as Explanatory Variable (Independent Variable) 46 . the Correlation Matrix (Multi-Colinearity) was used. SPSS and EVIEWS The study uses descriptive statistics like pie charts. Another tool. the data have been presented using the above mentioned methods.

3=Good. RPME(Ins) = r1 REng + r2 RMgnt + r3 RArch + r4 RPND + r5 RInfra + C (I) Where. r2. 1=Poor. 1=Poor. Architecture (RArch). r5. Planning and Design (RPND). Management (RMgnt). r1. The explanatory variables are the same scaled ratings of the Institute Infrastructure Support.Here. Classrooms (RCR) and Qualified Faculty (RQF). r2. 2=Fair. 2=Fair. The explanatory variables are the same scaled ratings of the Essentiality of PM education in Engineering (REng). 47 .e. Classrooms. The important infrastructure is Availability of Library and e-resources (RLib). the dependent variable is the Overall Rating of PM Education in India (RPME Mgmt) and it is on 5-point scale. Course Material (RCM). Planning and Design (RPND). 3=Good. RPME(MNT) is the rating of PM Education and r1.. i. C is the Constant Term. Therefore. RPME Infra = r1 RLib +r2 RCM + r3 RCR + r4 RQF Where RPME Infra (II) is the PM Education rating. Therefore. r4 are the regression of the corresponding ratings of the Availability of Library and e-resources. and Qualified Faculty. Management (RMgnt). Model 3: Multiple Regression Analysis of PM Education Ratings as Dependent Variable and Management Support as Explanatory Variable (Independent Variable) Here. Course Material. Architecture (RArch).. C is the Constant Term. the dependent variable is the Overall Rating of PM Education in India (RPME Ins) and it is on a 5-point scale. Therefore. C is the Constant Term. are the regression coefficients of the corresponding ratings of the Essentiality of PM education in Engineering (REng). i. and Infrastructure Management (RInfra) Institutions. the regression equation for this part is follows. 4-Very Good and 5=Excellent. r3. Model 2: Multiple Regression Analysis of PM Education Ratings as Dependent Variable and Institute Infrastructure Support as Explanatory Variable (Independent Variable) The dependent variable is the overall Rating of PM Education in India (RPME Infra ). the regression equation for this part is follows. the regression equation for this part is follows.e. 4-Very Good and 5=Excellent. and Infrastructure Management (RInfra) academic institutions. r3.r4. The explanatory variables are the same scaled ratings of the Management Support for introducing Courses in PM in the Institute (RPMCourse) and Effect on Employability of PM (REPM).

Correlation & Regression Analysis. Column Diagrams. d) Sampling Procedure: The Judgment Sampling technique was used for the executives who have undergone the training as they were the best prospects to elicit accurate information. Northern India – 7. The research team member then went back to collect the filled out questionnaires. The sample size represented 12.1) Sampling Area: the sampling are encompassed all India d. Bar Diagrams. d. Factor Analysis and Multiple Regression Analysis.7 Practising Executives Of Project Based Companies a) Sources of Data: The study uses primary sources of data b) Data Collection Method . In the year 20092010.RPME(Mgmt) = r1 RPMCourse + r2 REPM + C Where.Indirect Method : Questionnaires were handed over to the respondents and they were asked to fill them out at their own convenience. C is the Constant Term.3) Sample Unit: The sample unit comprised executives from various large project based organizations who have undergone training in Project Management at NICMAR. d. a sample of 88 executives was selected. RPME (Mgmt) (III) is the rating of PM Education and r1.2) Sample Size: The total sample size is 88. Southern India – 20. c) Data Collection Instrument: Schedules (Questionnaires) were used for data collection. Eastern India – 4 and Western India fifty – 6 executives. NICMAR has trained a total of 721 executives from 30 different companies. 3. NICMAR is perhaps the only techno – management institute in the country in PM centric training with the most extensive PM training programmes being conducted through its School of Executive Education (SOEE). e) Statistical Tools and Techniques: Pie Charts. r2. 48 .2% of the population of executives trained by the SOEE. Out of the total executives trained by SOEE. The given sample has been drawn from the executives participating in NICMAR’s executive training programmes. Their distribution is as follows. are the regression coefficients of the corresponding ratings of the Management Support for introducing Courses in PM in the Institute (RPM Course) and Effect on Employability of PM (REPM).

only one respondent.8 Human Resource Managers Of Project Based Companies a) Sources of Data: The primary sources of data for the study are human resource managers working in project based companies. Thus the judgment and convenience method of sampling was used for the purpose. From the northern region. The researchers felt that a slightly smaller size is adequately representative of the whole. value of projects. d) Sampling Procedure: Judgment and Convenience sampling technique has been used. and lastly from the central region. From the southern region. responded to the survey. a human resource manager from DLF Ltd. A follow up via telephone and email was done. company wide. 2 managers. Thereafter the numerical averages were calculated to arrive at the overall rating assigned by the respondents. from the western region 9. in case of eastern region.. they asked for a copy of the questionnaire for prior viewing. their perceptions as to why PM education is not taking roots in India. gaining perspectives related to project strategy. In most of the cases.e. f) Analytical Software: Software used includes Excel. b) Data Collection Method: Direct Interview Method is used c) Data Collection Instrument: Schedules (Questionnaires) are used for data collection. Moreover the respondents chosen in this sample had considerable experience in the design of such training programmes around the year. the percentage share of respondents who opted for a particular rating was derived. 3 managers’ responses have been taken into consideration. It was felt that as a result of their continuous planning and monitoring of PM related training programmes. 3. 5 managers responded. major techniques that are used during the projects and other similar cases. Bar diagrams are used to show the total size of the projects. SPSS and EVIEWS The study uses pie charts to show the experience of the executives in organization. ratings of subjects and levels to be included in the PM curricula. Over 32 human resource managers had been approached through personal telephonic appointments for interview. i. 49 . they would be appropriate to offer views on the exact nature of PM training as “experts”. as this set of persons is responsible for the planning and deployment of PM related training. This was presented in the form of graphs.Using the responses in selected areas such as experience of executives.

2) Sample Size: A total sample of 20 was interviewed from all over India. Thereafter the numerical averages were calculated to arrive at the overall rating assigned by the respondents. training cost benefits. f) Analytical Software: The software used includes Excel. factors considered essential before planning PM training programmes. 50 . training efficacy.3) Sample Unit: The sample unit comprises human resource managers from leading PM companies in India. e) Statistical Tools and Techniques: Pie Charts. institutions. Column Diagrams. master database generated from the research study. and expenditure during the training as given by the respondents. drawn from project based companies. This was presented in the form of graphs.d. d. SPSS and EVIEWS The study uses pie charts to show the various types of training imported in the organizations and various bar diagrams and graphs to highlight the outcome of the training. Annexures 1 – 8 give all the details of questionnaires designed. the percentage share of respondents who opted for a particular rating was derived.1) Sampling Area: the sampling are includes all India. executives and companies responding to the survey. Using the responses in selected areas such as the inception of PM training in companies. Bar Diagrams. etc. d.

The third part aimed at identifying any distinguishing factors that characterize the specific PM curriculum development vis a vis the usual curriculum. Also covered were regulatory aspects that affect the institute’s decision in launching new curricula. the 51 . The fourth part dealt with finding out about the existing educational infrastructure available with institutions and also management support available to the institutions to establish new courses. actively serving in technical and business institutions on a wide range of issues surrounding PM education in the respondent’s institution as well as in his/her general opinion as an important stakeholder in this arena. The first part asked for the responding faculty’s background information. The second part aimed at discovering his/her general opinion on project management (PM) curricula in India.CHAPTER 4 DATA ANALYSIS OF SURVEY OF TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS INSTITUTIONS IN INDIA 4. The questionnaire was divided into four parts. For every question.1 Introduction The Questionnaire was designed for eliciting response from faculty.

respondent was asked to provide a tick/score as per his/her opinion. The Likert type 5 – point scale was included in order to be able to quantify the data. In case of rating of subjects, along with the simple percentage calculations, numerical average rating scores have been computed and shown in brackets in front of the ratings of subjects and levels. The average rating score contained in the brackets is to be interpreted as follows 0–1 1–2 2–3 3–4 4–5 : not important : somewhat important : important : very important : extremely important.

Using the responses in selected areas such as experience of faculty, their perceptions of the state of PM education in India and the essentiality of teaching PM in technical and management academic institutions, ratings of subjects and levels to be included in the PM curricula, impact on employability etc. the percentage share of respondents who opted for a particular rating was derived. This was presented in the form of graphs. Thereafter the numerical average rating scores were calculated to arrive at the overall rating assigned by the respondents. In subsequent sections, we discuss the data findings for the technical and business academic institutions from different zones in India. 4.2 PART I : Respondent’s Particulars And Details

Part I of the Questionnaire was to find out the details of the respondents chosen for the survey. The questions in this part were included with a view to elicit the description of the sample in terms of the region (Fig 3) in which the institution was located and the average experience of the respondents in academics. It was also necessary to know the ‘category’ of the institution (Fig 2). As seen in Fig 2, the majority of respondents represent private institutions vis a vis government sponsored institutions. Figure 2: Category of Institutions

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The sample chosen reflects the proportion of technical and business institutions zone wise (Tables 3 and 4, AICTE List, 08, Chp 2). As per AICTE data, the maximum number of Technical institutions are located in the Southern and Western regions of the country. In case of Management institutions, the highest number are found in the Northern and Western zone. Thus the combined sample reflects this in its coverage; South Zone followed by West, North, Central and finally the Eastern zone. In case of total academic experience, the majority of the sample falls in the range of between 16-20 yrs followed by 21-25 yrs. The respondents were highly experienced academicians (avg. experience 21.27 years, Fig 4). Figure 3: Graph Showing Region Wise Distribution Of The Academic Institutions

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Figure 4: Experience Of Responding Faculty

A separate question was asked to find out the experience of the sample in designing new types of courses. (Fig 5). Majority of the sample had a wide experience in curricula design. Majority of the respondents fell in the category of 11 -15 years. This is a welcome finding, as this indicates good experience in the introduction of new courses or reviewing existing ones. Figure 5: Experience In Curriculum Development

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4.3

PART II: General Opinion On Existing State Of PM Education In India

It was important to know the perception of the academics with respect to the current state of PM education in the country. Majority of the sample felt ( Fig 6 ) that the current state of PM education is only ‘fair’ (49.38%) and ‘good’ (25.93%). The average rating score of 2.05 reflects this perception. This implies that the respondents consider the current status of PM education as Fair. The next query was to elicit a response about the respondent’s own institution’s efforts to introduce PM curriculum. (Fig 7). A clear majority of the sample responded that there have been prior attempts in the past to introduce PM curricula in the courses offered by their institutions.

Figure 6: Perception Of The Current Status Of PM Education In India

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Figure 7 reflects the level at which a particular institution has introduced the course in their curricula. In the sample, in 85% of the cases, the courses related to PM were introduced at the undergraduate stage and the post graduate level. Only in around 15% cases, the courses exist at other levels like in research, advanced levels such as at the doctoral level programmes and certificate level courses. Figure 7 : Attempts At Introducing PM In The Curriculum

It was also important to know in which category, the course had been introduced, i.e. whether the institution preferred to include PM courses as electives or as a compulsory subject. As seen in Figure 8, the sample is equally distributed in its choice. This indicates that both options are made available. Around 5% of the sample did not respond to question.
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the levels are classifed as : elementary. Figure 9: Type of PM Related Course On the basis of built in rigour and intensity of the course. intermediate. followed by 29. advanced (Figure 10). They are designed in such a way as to match the required degree of competence necessary to be internalised by the student opting for that course. The institute may introduce these courses either as electives or compulsory subjects.67% of respondents opting for the same. Most of the respondents are teaching PM courses at Elementary and the Intermediate stages only. (Fig 9).Figure 8 : Level At Which PM Course Has Been Introduced Courses in academic institutions follow a certain rigour and intensity of teaching. Majority of the sample prefers PM to be taught at the Intermediate level with 47. 57 . Courses are designed to achieve this objective.07% opting for inclusion of PM at the ‘Elementary’ level.

Rating 4. infrastructure schools. The sample was asked to rate the essentiality of PM courses in Specialised Courses such as Architecture. Thus. Rating 4.. overall.31).47). 86. Planning. Refer Figure 11 A. 11B. Planning (avg.50) and Infrastructure (avg. 11Ciii describe the degree of essentiality as perceived by the respondents of various types of academic institutions viz. Figures 11Ci.34). This indicates that in management institutions PM educaion is absolutely essential. Each of the categories that include Architecture (avg. architecture /planning. Engineering/Technical and Business/Management. Rating 4.Figure 10: Intensity Of The Course In order to find out the importance the sample attaches to the inclusion of PM related courses in professional schools. However 17. it can be inferred that PM courses are deemed absolutely 58 .64%) was seen in the case of specialised courses. 11Ciii show the level of importance attributed to PM education in these three areas respectively.4% of the sample is pursuing PM at the advanced stages such as at the level of doctoral programmes. Figures 11 A. and Infrastructure. 11Ci.50) on its own has a response which is comparable to that seen in the engineering and managment courses on the essentiality factor. Rating 4. A similar response ranging from Very Essential to Absolutely Essential (a total of 88. 11Cii. This indicates that in engineering institutions PM educaion is absolutely essential. the respondents were asked to rate the inclusion of PM courses on a scale of ‘essentiality’ for various professional educational categories such as engineering. Similarly majority of the respondents (90%) felt that PM is a must in Management/Business institutions (avg.42% of the sample suggest that PM is Very Essential to Absolutely Essential in Engineering/Technical institutions (avg. management. 11Cii. Rating 4.

Management Course Figure 11 C: Essentiality Of PM In Various Types Of Institutions C. Engineering Course Figure 11 B: Essentiality Of PM In Various Types Of Institutions B.essential inclusions in academic curricula of all such institutions falling in the ‘Professional Education’ category. Figure 11 A: Essentiality Of PM In Various Types Of Institutions A. Architecture Course 59 .Specialised Courses Figure 11 C i.

4 Part III: Curriculum Development In this section. The objective was to find out which subject areas as 60 .Figure 11 C ii. Infrastructure Development 4. Planning And Design Figure 11 C iii. a detailed subject wise rating was sought to be obtained using a dual rating scale namely ‘Importance Rating’ and ‘Level Rating’ (Refer Annexure 3 for copy of Questionnaire to Academic Institutions).

are important to be included in the curriculum of PM. Scheduling. AR11-Project Site and Equipment (3. Along with this. but Sector Specific. if the subject was Operations Management within the Management and Technology Area. AR14Process Design/Engineering/Testing/Commissioning (3. the level of learning exposure considered necessary by the respondents was included in the choice. AR12-Project Procurement & /Materials Management (3. Figures 12 A and 12 B depict the importance ascribed by respondents to each subject area on a rating scale ranging from ‘Not Important’ to ‘Extremely Important’. This area sought to determine the degree of importance of teaching PM in the specified sectors. AR3-Statistical Methods for Projects Analysis (3.87). Technology And Management Area The Technology and Management Area comprised a total of 20 subject areas.79). namely : A – Technology and Management Area B – Strategy.81). AR9-Quality Surveying and Estimation (3. Monitoring and Control Techniques (3. Economics and Finance Area C – Behavioural Sciences Area D – Information Technology Area A fifth major area was not subject. The two parameters were the ‘degree of importance’ that was being assigned by the respondent to a particular subject and the second was the ‘level’ at which this subject was found important to be taught.40).26). the respondent had to assign a dual rating which would indicate 1) How important he/she felt the subject was for inclusion in the teaching curriculum? and 2) At what level of sophistication (Certificate/undergraduate/post graduate/advanced/applied research) was the subject required to be taught?. The average ratings assigned to various subjects in this area are as follows : AR1-Operations Management for Projects (3. AR6Health/Safety/Environment in Projects (3.60).40).31).98).93).well as individual subjects contained within the subject area. AR13-Contract Management (3. This is described as ‘E’. AR8-Accounting and Control Systems (3.48).43). AR7-Cost Estimation and Budgeting (3.74).30). AR5-Project Quality Management (3. Both the parameters were on a 5-point scale. AR15-Facilities Engineering 61 . AR4Operations Research for Projects (3. AR2-Planning. The findings of PART III are discussed below. So for example. AR10-Projects Marketing (3. All subject areas included in this section were consolidated into four major areas.

Scheduling. AR16-Logistics & Supply Chain Management (3. AR19-Project Formulation and Appraisal ( 3. Some respondents (3. Project Procurement and Materials Management (avg.16%) would like Operations Research for Projects (avg. Project Quality Management.37). Statistical methods. Contract Management (avg. Monitoring and Control Techniques. Some respondents are aware of the importance of research in areas like Operations Research for Projects.78) and have opted for this.46).46).46). Cost Estimation and Budgeting.and Management (3.12).83).37%) and Post Graduate (44. Rating 2. Project Formulation and Appraisal (avg. Rating 2.72).12). Technology and Engineering Management (avg. AR18-Technology and Engineering Management (3. Operation research techniques. However importance assigned is higher for certain subjects including Operations Management. Thus it can be inferred that the academics are well aware and understand the importance of subjects and the levels at which they should be included in PM curricula related to the area of Technology and Management. and Project Engineering (avg.73). Rating 2. Rating 2. Safety and Environment Management. Rating 2. It was important to know the Level at which the above mentioned subjects could be taught. Figure 12 B describes the same.21%) level. it can be inferred that these subjects are very important and necessary to be included in the curricula.76). Planning. Rating 2. Health. On the basis of average rating scores. AR17Transportation Management (3. Figure 12 A: Ratings Of Subjects In Management And Technology 62 . Majority of the respondents want the courses to be taught at Undergraduate (47. AR20-Project Engineering (3.84) to be included in the Post Graduate and Advanced teaching also.

AR19-Project Formulation and Appraisal. AL12-Project Procurement & Materials Management. Scheduling. AL11-Project Site and Equipment. AL19-Project formulation and Appraisal and AL20-Project Engineering. AR14Process Design/Engineering/Testing/Commissioning. AR7-Cost Estimation and budgeting. AR12-Project Procurement & /Materials Management. AR11-Project Site and Equipment. AL13-Contract Management. AR18-Technology and Engineering Management. Figure 12 B: Level Of Teaching Of Subjects In Management And Technology AL1-Operations management for Projects. AR17-Transportation Management. AL5-Project Quality Management.AR1-Operations Management for Projects. Scheduling. AR8-Accounting and Control Systems. AR2-Planning. AL14Process Design/Engineering/Testing/Commissioning. AL7-Cost Estimation and budgeting. AR20-Project Engineering. AL15-Facilities Engineering and Management. AL9-Quality Surveying and Estimation. Monitoring and Control Techniques. AL16-Logistics & Supply Chain Management. AR3-Statistical Methods for Projects Analysis. AL3-Statistical Methods for Projects Analysis. Monitoring and Control Techniques. AL4-Operations Research for Projects. AL2-Planning. AR6-Health/Safety/Environment in Projects. AR5-Project Quality Management. AR9-Quality Surveying and Estimation. AL8-Accounting and Control Systems. AL6-Health/Safety/Environment in Projects. AR13-Contract Management. AL18-Technology and Engineering Management. AR15-Facilities Engineering and Management. Strategy. AR10-Projects Marketing. AL17-Transportation Management. Economics and Finance Area 63 . AL10-Projects Marketing. AR4-Operations Research for Projects. AR16-Logistics & Supply Chain Management.

51). Figure 13 A: Ratings Of B Group Subject Areas In Strategy. Strategic Alliances. SPVs. Rating 3. BR2. BR7-Legal. BR5-Project Financing.Project Strategy (avg. these subjects also fall in the very important category.Macro Economic Policy (avg. Rating 3. BR4-Financial Management. BR3 – Social Cost Benefit Analysis (avg. None of the respondents opted for the ‘Not Important’ option in case of these subjects (avg.27). Economics and Finance Area.60).46). BR3-Social Cost Benefit Analysis. BR2-Project Strategy. However going by their average rating scores. Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects. Rating 3. BR6-Risk and Insurance Management. Rating 2. Figures 13 A and 13 B depict the opinions of respondents regarding the subjects to be included in PM curriculum from this area. All subjects in this area were considered to be in the range of Very Important to Extremely Important. BR6 – Risk and Insurance Management (avg. Only in the case of BR 7 -Legal.68%) and PG (44. deals with the Strategy.62).55). Majority of the respondents considered that most of the subjects included in this section should be ideally at the Post Graduate Level with an exception of BL1 . Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects and BR8-Project Joint Ventures/ Strategic Alliances/ Special Purpose Vehicles. The inference is that the subjects should be preferably taught at the Post Graduate level. Rating 3.52). 64 . Rating 3. wherein the respondents have given almost equal weights to the subject to be taught at UG (43. Rating 3.The next Section B. Figures 13 A and Figure 13 B depict the level at which the subject knowledge is considered important by the respondents. Economics And Finance BR1-Macro-Economic Policy.83%) . The following subjects are considered very important : BR1 – Macro Economic Policy (3. BR5 – Project Financing (avg. Rating 3. close to 20% of the respondents felt it was only ‘Somewhat Important’ (avg.58).30) followed by around 18% of the respondents expressing the same opinion about BR -8 Project Joint Ventures. BR4 – Financial Management (avg.

all subjects in the category are found to be very important. CR3 – Human Resource Management in Projects (3. BL8-Project Joint Ventures. BL3-Social Cost Benefit Analysis. BL4-Financial Management. BL2-Project Strategy. The average ratings for the subjects grouped in this Area are : CR 1 – Project Organization and Structure ( 3. BL7-Legal. The majority of the respondents rated this area ranging from ‘Important’ to ‘Very Important’.63 ). Less than 10% of the sample considered some of the subjects in this area ‘Not Important’ or ‘Extremely Important’. with slightly less importance for Conflict Management and Diversity Management. CR5 – Conflict Management ( 3.80). Strategic Alliances. Figures 14 A and 14 B below depict the same. Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects. On the average.46). BL5-Project Financing. CR4 – Industrial / Labour Relations (3. Figure 14 A: Ratings Of Subject Areas In Group C Behavioural Sciences Area 65 . BL6-Risk and Insurance Management. Special Purpose Vehicles Behavioural Sciences Area Section C attempts to find out the opinion of the respondents regarding the importance of the subjects in the Behavioural Sciences Area as necessary to be included in the PM courses. Economics And Finance BL1-Macro-Economic Policy. CR 2 – Managerial Skills (3.44 ). CR6 – Diversity Management (3.33 ).Figure 13 B: Levels Of B Group Subject Areas In Strategy.87) .

88). CR2-Managerial Skills for Projects (Communication.86 ). Clearly most of the respondents preferred that the subjects in Behavioural Sciences Area should be included at the Post Graduate level.73).CR1-Project Organization and Structure. 66 . (Refer Figure 14 B). Team Building. CR3 – Human Resource Management in Projects (2.98 ). no respondents opted for the subject to be included for teaching at the Advanced level.73 ). CR4 – Industrial / Labour Relations (2. CR5-Conflict Management. CR 2 – Managerial Skills (2. However the same subject had a section of the respondents wanting it to be included at the level of Applied Research. CR5 – Conflict Management ( 2. Leadership. CR6 – Diversity Management (2. In case of Conflict Management subject. the average ratings for levels are : CR 1 – Project Organization and Structure ( 2. CR4-Industrial / Labour Relations.89) . other soft skills). Negotiation. CR6Diversity Management As regards of the level at which these should be taught. followed by Undergraduate. CR3-Human Resource Management in Projects.

DR5-Excel / SPSS / DBMS (2. DR5-Excel / SPSS / DBMS (4.e-Business Applications (3. DR2-Enterprise Resource Planning (2. ERP and e – Buainess Applications are rated very important.77).Figure 14 B: Levels Of Subject Areas In Group C Behavioural Sciences Area CL1-Project Organization and Structure. Negotiation. CL4-Industrial / Labour Relations. Team Building. Majority of the sample want IT Area to be included in primarily at the Post Graduate level followed by Undergaduate level courses of academic institutions.70). other soft skills). MSP.61).64).20). CL6Diversity Management Information Technology Area The next Section D deals with subjects to be included in the Information Technology area as essential to be taught to students of PM. DR3. DR2-Enterprise Resource Planning (3. The average ratings for the Level at which these subjects should be covered are : DR1-PM SoftwarePrimavera. MSP.e-Business Applications (2.10). Clearly the respondents strongly endorse the importance of teaching IT related subjects. CL2-Managerial Skills for Projects (Communication. DR4-Engineering Software (2.59). Three subjects.18). CL5-Conflict Management. GIS / GPS for Project Management (4.70). DR4-Engineering Software (4. Engineering Software and Excel/SPSS/DBMS are rated as extremely important. namely PM Software. GIS / GPS for Project Management (2. CL3-Human Resource Management in Projects.78). Leadership. DR3. 67 . The average importance ratings for the subjects included in the area are : DR1-PM Software-Primavera.

DL5-Excel / SPSS / DBMS Sector Specific Area 68 . Auto-Revit. Ansys. MSP. Calquan). GIS / GPS for Project Management. DL4-Engineering Software (Auto-Cad. GIS / GPS for Project Management. Auto-Revit. DR3-e-Business Applications. DR5-Excel / SPSS / DBMS Figure 15 B: Level Of Subject Areas In Group D Information Technology DL1-PM software-Primavera. Estm8. 3D-Max. Staadpro. Estm8. Staadpro. 3D-Max. DR4-Engineering Software (Auto-Cad. MSP. Calquan). DL3-e-Business Applications.Figure 15 A: Ratings Of Subject Areas In Group D Information Technology DR1-PM Software-Primavera. Ansys. DL2-Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). DR2-Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP).

ER12-Urban Infrastructure (3. it was felt necessary to find out which sectors within the industry require and would benefit from PM education.46).43). ER5-Technology (3. ER17-Services. ER16-Oil and Gas Exploration (3. ER14-Petrochemicals.23).61). ER15-Chemical Engineering. ER2-Telecom (3. ER7-Roadways. ER8-Railways. ER14-Petrochemicals (3.65). It is observed that PM is rated as very important across all the sectors covered with slightly lesser importance assigned to ICT and Telecom sectors.72).57). ER16-Oil and Gas Exploration. how important and essential PM training is in particular sectors. ER13-Mega Property Developments (3. ER2-Telecom.5). as also.61). ER11-Shipbuilding. ER4-Space Exploration (3. ER7-Roadways 69 .85). ER3-Research and Development (3. ER17-Services (3. ER6-Defense (3.76). ER3-Research and Development (3. This was with a view to know.66).56). Figure 16 A and B below depicts the findings for the same.58). ER12-Urban Infrastructure. ER5-Technology (3. ER2-Telecom (3.68).5).83).77).55). ER15-Chemical Engineering (3. 3.49). ER3-Research and Development. The specific average Level ratings for various sectors are : ER1-Information Communication Technology (ICT. ER18-International Project Management (3. ER5Technology.56). ER4-Space Exploration. ER11-Shipbuilding (3.52). ER4Space Exploration (3. ER6-Defense. This section deals with the importance of PM in various sectors.With the rise of PM in almost all aspects of industry. the level of academic input to be given to the students to improve PM proficiency. ER6-Defense (3. ER13-Mega Property Developments. ER9-Civil Aviation (3. ER18-International Project Management The specific average importance ratings for various sectors are : ER1-Information Communication Technology (ICT. 3. ER9-Civil Aviation. ER7-Roadways (3. Figure 16 A: Ratings Of Group E Sector Specific Importance Of PM ER1-Information Communication Technology (ICT). ER8-Railways (3.39). ER10-Ports (3. ER10-Ports.46).

namely Operations Management for Projects. EL15-Chemical Engineering. ER8-Railways (4. EL4-Space Exploration. Scheduling Monitoring and Control Techniques. ER14-Petrochemicals (4. EL3-Research and Development. EL12-Urban Infrastructure. EL14-Petrochemicals. A correlation matrix was generated for this subject (factor) vis a vis other subjects (factors) in that area such as Planning. Results were obtained on the degree of correlation observed amongst the subjects. 70 . ER13-Mega Property Developments (4.93). EL8-Railways. there is a subject included. For e. EL13-Mega Property Developments.92). the sample opted for Applied Research followed by Advanced level teaching as the most appropriate levels for sector specific coverage of PM in teaching curriculum. ER17-Services (3. ER12-Urban Infrastructure (4.05). Management and Technology Area. EL11-Shipbuilding. EL10-Ports. EL9-Civil Aviation.00).(3. in the area of A. ER10-Ports (3. EL7-Roadways. It can be inferred that as per the respondents’ view sector specific issues in PM are intensely practice driven and therefore teaching should reflect the study of this practice more closely.04). ER11Shipbuilding (3.14). ER15-Chemical Engineering (4.92). ER9-Civil Aviation (3. EL2-Telecom. EL6-Defense.09). It is very interesting to note that across all sectors.97). ER18-International Project Management (4.06). and so on for 20 subjects in that area. EL16-Oil and Gas Exploration. EL17-Services. a Correlation Analysis was carried out for every subject (factor) with other subjects in that Area.98). Statistical Methods for Project Analysis. EL5Technology. Figure 16 B: Levels of Group E Sector Specific Teaching Focus EL1-Information Communication Technology (ICT).g.02). EL18-International Project Management Findings From Correlation Analysis In order to find out whether each and every subject included within the overall subject domain was of significance or not. ER16-Oil and Gas Exploration (4.

D. If there is no linear relationship between the predicted values and the actual values the correlation coefficient is 0 or very low (the predicted values are no better than random numbers). The salient findings using SPSS software are reproduced below9. 10 As the strength of the relationship between the predicted values and actual values increases so does the correlation coefficient. Values between 0..8. For any factor to be closely related with another factor. Projects Marketing AR10 – Facilities Engineering and Management AR15 (0. The correlation coefficient is a number between 0 and 1. Management and Technology. The statistical correlation analysis is used because it helps in arriving at the strength of relationships between two factors. Project Quality Management AR5 – Health/Safety/Environment in Projects AR6 (0. A correlation analysis for this section would therefore be meaningless. Part A.In the same way.. the Correlation Coefficient should have values tending towards 1.7 (0.7 and 0.7) indicate a moderate positive (negative) linear relationship via a fuzzy-firm linear rule. Thus close relationships tend towards 1 while weak relationships tend towards 0.7 or more in this group are as follows : Operations Management for Projects AR3 – Operations Research for Projects AR 4 (0. The Correlation Coefficient is the measure of the covariance of the actual and predicted values of factors. The subjects having correlation values of 0.. indicate that the Correlation Coefficient lies in the range of 0. each one of the subjects was run for correlation with each of the other subjects.3 to 0. A perfect fit gives a coefficient of 1. was with to understand the uniqueness of each of the subjects contained within the generalised Area (A.7 would have significantly strong relationship.3 and 0. Most of the values in the Table 5.7). Finance and Strategy.3 and -0. Values between 0 and 0. Economics. thus indicating weak to moderate positive relationships (Refer foot note10). If it is above 0. IT Area were put through a similar correlation analysis. Behavioural Sciences Area.7). B. Project Site and Equipment Management AR11 – Project Procurement & /Materials Management AR 12 9 Correlation Analysis generates the Correlation Coefficient. to find out whether the subjects are similar or there is considerable overlap in their content. A detailed list of the subjects within this area is contained in Figure 12 A.. 71 .0.9 indicates highly positive linear relationship.. Refer Annexure 4 for a complete result for all areas. Annexure 4.3 (0 and -0. Economics. Management and Technology Area: This subject area included in a total of 20 subjects which were considered to have a direct bearing on the operations and technical aspects of the project business or project organisation.9 then the two factors can be treated as one and the same because they cannot be distinguished clearly. Annex 3) under which it has been included.3) indicate a weak positive (negative) linear relationship. 0. Section E has not been included for correlation analysis as it is Sector Specific and as such has an in built uniqueness (randomness). However subjects with correlation coefficients greater than 0. The idea in doing this for all the subjects. all individual subjects in the remaining areas like B. The correlation coefficients showed a value less than 0. Based on ratings obtained from the sample.90. C.7).

Thus the correlation analysis results strongly validate our belief that many issues arising during project execution need to be addressed in an integrated coordinated away.7). Project Procurement & /Materials Management AR12 – Contract Management AR13 (0.7). Similarly correlation among the subject areas Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Facilities Engineering and Management AR15 – Transportation Management AR17 (0. Contract Management AR13 – Facilities Engineering and Management AR15 (0.7). Similarly Operations Management and 72 . the precise differences among these subject areas are not very clear.8). Project Formulation and Appraisal AR19 – Project Engineering AR20 (0. A direct outcome of the correlation analysis is that in institutions and curricula where it is difficult to introduce several execution oriented courses. Contract Management AR13 – Process Design/Engineering/Testing/Commissioning AR14 (0. it will be quite adequate if a single course emphasizing project execution is included.7).7). The correlation between subject areas Operations Management and Operations Research.8). Project Site and Equipment Management AR11 – Facilities Engineering and Management AR15 (0.8). Facilities Engineering and Management and Process Design / Engineering / Testing / Commissioning are correlated. This is expected since the issues dealt with in these subject areas arise primarily during project execution and often times have to be dealt with in a coordinated manner.7).7). Project Procurement and Materials Management. appraisal and engineering need to be taken up in an integrated coordinated manner. Project Site and Equipment Management AR11 – Contract Management AR13 (0. It is not surprising that in the project management fraternity. There is also good correlation between Quality Management and HSE subjects and therefore combining these into a single course would be quite appropriate. Similarly many techniques and methods adopted during the project formulation.(0. Logistics & Supply Chain Management AR16 – Transportation Management AR17 (0. and also between Project Formulation and Appraisal and Project Engineering are also along expected lines. these would be dealt with together. the subjects Project Site and Equipment Management. Facilities Engineering and Management AR15 – Logistics & Supply Chain Management AR 16 (0. Facilities Engineering and Management are also quite expected and in most projects. The results indicate that as a group. Contract Management. Transportation Management.

Project Strategy BL2 . Refer Table 5. Commercial & Taxation Aspects and Project Joint Ventures.86). Strategy. Project Strategy BL2 . and courses Legal. Part A for complete results.71). The subjects having correlation values of 0. Social Cost Benefit Analysis BL3 . Therefore it can be concluded that subjects in this 73 . There is a case for combining the courses Project Financial Management and Project Financing. The results indicate that nearly half of the subjects included in this area are fairly unique and have their own individual importance and therefore need to be included in the curriculum. Project Strategy. courses Project Strategy and Macroeconomic Policy. Strategic Alliances & Special Purpose Vehicles. Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects BL7 (0. Annex 4. The subject Social Cost benefit Analysis is most heavily correlated with other subjects including Macroeconomic Policy.8). Here too. Special Purpose Vehicles BL8 (0.Legal.76).90. . Project Formulation and Appraisal and Project Engineering could also be combined into a single course.Financial Management BL4(0. subjects with correlation coefficient greater than 0. if other courses reflect the content. Commercial and Taxation Aspects.Social Cost Benefit Analysis BL3 (0.7 or more in this group are as follows : Macro Economic Policy BL1 . care must be taken to ensure that the content is not duplicated in other courses.71). Strategic Alliances.Project Financing BL5 (0. Macro Economic Policy BL1 Social Cost Benefit Analysis BL3 (0.Project Strategy BL2( 0. Behavioural Sciences Area: In this Area too.7 would have strong significant relationship. Alternately the course need not be included. Project Financing. when there is difficulty in all of the courses contained in this subject area. There is scope for combining course contents of other courses as suggested above. Financial Management BL4 Project Financing BL5 (0.72). Therefore it can be concluded that subjects in this section too are fairly unique (refer Table 5. Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects BL7 Project Joint Ventures.72). Annexure 4. it was observed that all subjects had a correlation coefficient less than 0. Legal. Social Cost Benefit Analysis BL3 . Thus if this course is included as a separate course. Part B).90. Economics and Finance Area: In this Area too. it was observed that all subjects had a correlation coefficient less than 0.73). Legal.Operations Research could be combined into a single course. The correlation analysis provides very good guidelines on the way courses in this subject area could be grouped and introduced in the PM curriculum.

Also. Similarly Specialized Engineering Software and Common Software such as Excel. Three subjects are correlated to each other.7 have strong significant relationship. Conflict Management and Diversity Management.81).79). namely Industrial/ Labour Relations. SPSS. Conflict Management CR5 (0.90. Industrial / Labour Relations CR4 .Conflict Management CR5 (0. Refer Table 5. So from the point of view of the respondents. Part C. For instance. these subjects reflect some common issues and concerns and there is a case for combining these together to achieve an integrated approach to deal with these issues and concerns. in case there is difficulty in offering these as separate courses. Engineering Software DR4 . 4.7 have strong significant relationship. The correlation analysis results provide an useful way of structuring courses in IT area in the PM curriculum. it was also necessary to find out the extent of departmental and individual interests of the faculty in this area. Refer Table 5.72). and Part D.Diversity Management CR6 (0.78). the average time taken by institution managements to introduce new curricula needs to be studied in order to assess the 74 .5 PART IV – Infrastructure. The other courses may be taught independently.79) Diversity Management CR6 (0. Only Project Management Software needs to be taught as a separate course.7 or more in this group are as follows : Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) DR2 . ERP and e – Business Applications courses could combined into a single course. Information Technology Area: In this Area also.section too are fairly unique. Subjects with correlation coefficient greater than 0.7 or more in this group are as follows : Industrial / Labour Relations CR4 . DBMS could also be structured as a single course. it was observed that all subjects had a correlation coefficient less than 0. The subjects having correlation values of 0. Regulatory Factors And Current Status Of PM Research In Institute This section of the study was dedicated to finding out the nature of curriculum development and research that is currently being supported by the management of institutions in the area of PM.e-Business Applications DR3 (0. Subjects with correlation coefficient greater than 0.Excel / SPSS / DBMS DR5 ( 0. Annexure 4. Annexure 4. The subjects having correlation values of 0. Along with this.81). Therefore it can be concluded that subjects in this section too are fairly unique. Management Support.

IR3-Class Rooms (4. IR3-Class Rooms.03). management support.03) to support PM endeavours. The first question dealt with finding out the extent of availability of existing infrastructure that was at the disposal of the institute (See Figure 17). 75 . IR5-Computer Labs (3. IR8-Management Vision (4. IR7-Avalability of Research Facilities (3.69). It is noticed that majority of the sample (64%) have made earlier attempts at introducing PM courses in their institutes. IR4-Laboratories (3. IR5-Computer Labs. IR6-Qualified Faculties.‘responsiveness’ factor of managements to new ideas and curriculum development.03). IR8-Management Vision The next question centred on understanding the institute’s prior attempts to starting PM courses with a view to knowing whether such an attempt was successful or not. course materials. computer labs.74). Around 8% of the sample felt that management vision was lacking and hence PM education was not very popular in their institutions. rating 4. qualified faculty and availability of research facilities. IR2-Course Material (3. The following section analyses the same. laboratories. classrooms. IR7-Avalability of Research Facilities.80). IR2-Course Material. Part IV was again divided into sub sections covering factors like the availability of infrastructure.96).87). The findings of the analysis are presented below. Figure 17: Ratings Of Institute’s Infrastructure IR1-Avalability of Library and e-resources. The respondents also strongly endorsed the existence of management vision (avg. IR6-Qualified Faculties (3. regulatory issues and the current position of PM research in the respondent’s institute.90). IR4-Laboratories. Majority of the sample felt that resources were generally easily available in the institute in terms of library. The average ratings obtained from the survey are : IR1-Avalability of Library and e-resources (3. Figure 18 shows that majority of the institutions have made attempts earlier to start PM courses.

The following graph (Figure 19) shows the same.Merely knowing whether earlier attempts had been made was not considered enough. The avg. progress made is considerable. Figure 18: Earlier Attempts Of Institutions To Introduce PM Courses Among those who had attempted to introduce PM courses in the past. rating of 2. in their respective institutions. for 29. around 40% of the sample suggest that there is reasonable effort in introducing PM courses. Combining the two. For 11% of the sample. it was necessary to know how far they have succeeded in their efforts to launch these courses. Figure 19 shows the extent of progress made by those institutions that attempted to introduce PM courses. the progress made has been considerable. that barring only 17% of the institutes. 27% of the sample refrained from answering this question.47 indicates that overall. considerable degree of advance has been made by the majority of technical and business schools in launching courses related to PM. the progress was in advanced stage.63% of the sample. Figure 19: Progress Of Introduction Of PM Courses Introduction 76 . It was important to find out in case of those who had made such attempts. to what degree progress had been made in their introduction. It may be noticed.

majority of the sample said that the companies did look for considerably high levels of 77 .93% of the sample rated this as ‘Good’ (Fig 20). As seen in the graph. The avg.79 indicates that the employability potential of the students undergoing PM training is considerably high. A direct and pointed question was included to find out whether the companies.43%) rated the impact on employability of the students as ‘Considerably High’ and ‘Immensely High’. courses are chosen and introduced with the twin objectives of developing competencies as well improving employability of the students.In almost all professional institutions. And if they did. The result showed that majority of the sample (65. specifically ask for PM competencies in the students. at the time of recruitment. Figure 20: Impact Of PM Courses On Employability Of Students The study also sought to establish whether there exists any link between PM’s employment potential and the requirement of the industry as a whole. what was the level of competence that they expected in the students? The results are given below in Figure 21. Another 25. The respondents were asked to rate the effect of introducing PM courses and its effects on the employment potential of the students. rating of 3.

sanctioning of budgets.competency in PM amongst the students (avg. etc. the apex government accreditation body. The following section deals with the responses generated. Figure 21: Company Specifically Looking For PM Competency In Students Part C of the institutional questionnaire focussed on eliciting response on whether the institution faced challenges with respect to regulatory issues.11% of the sample felt that PM competency was not a criterion for selection. Figure 22 shows the category of the institution that the respondent belonged to. and Figure 23 shows the average time taken by the institute to introduce new courses. The respondents were asked to comment on the time frame required to sort out issues like introduction of new courses. Figure 22: Category Of Institutions Majority of the institutions (43. building library resources. This section was added with the intention of finding out whether regulatory ‘red tape’ acts as a barrier in the establishment of PM in the institution. rating 2. 24. Only 11. training of faculty.68).27%) were affiliated to the All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE). while introducing PM related courses.04% of the institutions 78 .

16% said that it took around 6-12 months to do so. rating 3. Only a small percentage (12. It may be noted that Academic Council approvals are internal ‘in principle’ sanctions at the institutional level.7% of the sample took 2.57 % ) responded that regulatory approvals took between 6-12 months. Combining the two results.2 years.2 years in introducing PM courses. This indicates that regulatory approval requires one to two years. Around 12. 13.3 years. Figure 23 throws up a very interesting statistic.5 months.04). 20. with an average of around 16. Another 27. Figure 24: Regulatory Approval 79 .99% sample took 1. These approvals are therefore ‘external’ in nature to the academic institution. As seen in Figure 24. Approx 51% of the sample took more than a year to get the approvals in starting new courses (avg. These require the institution to apply and wait for the sanctions from these statutory agencies.75). it is quite surprising that the average time taken internally to introduce a course is higher than the time taken for regulatory approval. rating 2. This indicates that most of the institutions have to take into account a considerable time lag of up to 1. The average time taken is little over 19 months.35%) responded that it requires only up to 6 months to get an academic approval for a new course. majority of the sample ( 34. Figure 23: Academic Council Approval The respondents were asked to rate the time taken to receive approvals from government and other external bodies for commencement of such courses.interviewed were university affiliated. These are statutory bodies which give final permissions.35 % of the sample took more than 2-3 years to receive approvals to start new courses from statutory bodies (avg.

etc in the area of PM. This indicates that it takes on average about a year to build the resources.74 % took 1 – 2 years.7 months. 10. 14. Figure 25: Resource Building Majority of the sample i.e.47 % took more than 2 years (avg. 19. See Figure 26. 26.67% opted for a period of more than 2-3 years to complete this activity.47% took 6-12 months. Figure 26: Recruitment And Training Of Faculty 80 . while 8% said it took over 3 years for the same.Figure 25 shows the average time taken by the institutions in building resources such as library and publications.32% of the sample said that it took up to 6 months to build the resources. time 13. 39. the faculty recruitment and training process takes an average of 14. around 80% said that it took anywhere up to 2 years to complete the process of recruitment and training the faculty in PM curriculum.9 months). On average.

Only 20. The purpose was to find out to what extent the institution was engaged in actively encouraging and funding PM research among the institute’s faculty members. majority of the sample (65.99% accepted that funded research was being carried out in the institute while 4. Questions on the state of existing PM research as well as funding opportunities within the institutions yielded interesting details.43%) was not involved in PM research. Figure 27: Involvement In Project Management Research When asked whether the institution had either its own funding or undertook sponsored research in PM.57% felt that they are engaged in PM related research. As seen in Figure 27. A modest 34.Part D of this questionnaire was devoted to finding out the current status of research related to PM in these institutions. majority of the sample did not answer the question. Figure 28: Funded Research 81 .94% said that there was no funded research happening in the area of PM in their institute.

In the Behavioural Sciences Area. This would enable the institutions to build strong PM skills amongst the students. Monitoring and Control Techniques. all the subjects were rated as very important and the subject rated most important was Managerial Skills. Health. Scheduling. post graduate and in some cases even at doctoral levels. Planning. Most of the subjects in the Strategy. Safety and Environment Management. Economics and Finance Area were considered to be very important at the post graduate level with the exception of Macroeconomic Policy which could be taught at undergraduate level. All the subjects included in the Management and Technology Area were found to be very important. On the basis of average rating scores. In the 82 .Conclusion This chapter aimed at presenting the perceptions of the faculty employed in technical and management academic institutions running courses at undergraduate. Majority of the respondents want the courses to be taught at Undergraduate and Post Graduate levels. it can be inferred that these subjects are very important and necessary to be included in the curricula. Statistical methods. However importance assigned is higher for certain subjects including Operations Management. In summary. Cost Estimation and Budgeting. They admit that PM education definitely improves employability and therefore academic institutions of the professional kind must make effort in teaching PM. Operation research techniques. it was found that the respondent sample perceived the current state of PM education to be ‘fair’ implying there is much further scope for improvement. Project Quality Management.

Project Strategy. Contract Management. There is also strong preferrence for thse sibjects to be covered at the post graduate level. Project Procurement and Materials Management. The correlation analysis provides very good basis for structuring courses in all the subject areas considered in the study. Transportation Management. Faculty agreed that the effect of PM education on the employability of the students was very positive and therefore PM should be strongly encouraged. the precise differences among these subject areas are not very clear. This is expected since these issues arise during project execution and have to be dealt with in a coordinated manner. it will be quite adequate if a single course emphasizing project execution is included. and also between Project Formulation and Appraisal and Project Engineering are also along expected lines. Coverage of sector specific issues in PM curriculum was considered very important across all the sectors included in the study but the respondents strongly emphasized that such sector specific issues are best addressed at applied research level or in advanced courses. Facilities Engineering and Management and Process Design / Engineering / Testing / Commissioning are correlated. ERP and e – Buainess Applications are rated very important. there is a case for combining some of these together. Engineering Software and Excel/SPSS/DBMS are rated as extremely important. A direct outcome of the correlation analysis is that in institutions and curricula where it is difficult to introduce several execution oriented courses. Project 83 . There is also good correlation between Quality Management and HSE subjects and therefore combining these into a single course would be quite appropriate. Similarly correlation among the subject areas Logistics and Supply Chain Management. In the technology and Management area. namely PM Software. In the Economics and Strategy area. the results indicate that the subjects Project Site and Equipment Management. in order to emphasize the importance of managing projects in a coordinated and integrated manner.Information Technology Area. the subject Social Cost benefit Analysis is most heavily correlated with other subjects including Macroeconomic Policy. While most of the subjects grouped in these subject areas are found to be very important. three subjects. It is not surprising that in the project management fraternity. The correlation between subject areas Operations Management and Operations Research. Facilities Engineering and Management are also quite expected and in most projects. these would be dealt with together. Clearly the respondents strongly endorse the importance of teaching IT related subjects.

The research involvement of the institutions is found to be quite low and only about 20% institutions reported funded research. Majority of the sample felt that resources were generally easily available in the institute in terms of library. The average internal lead time is little over 19 months. three subjects are correlated to each other. So from the point of view of the respondents. Similarly Specialized Engineering Software and Common Software such as Excel. There is a case for combining the courses Project Financial Management and Project Financing. Legal. Conflict Management and Diversity Management. Only Project Management Software needs to be taught as a separate course. namely Industrial/ Labour Relations. if other courses reflect the content. The correlation analysis results provide a useful way of structuring courses in IT area in the PM curriculum. The respondents also strongly endorsed the existence of management vision to support PM endeavours. laboratories. In the Behavioural Sciences area. The regulatory approval 84 . The other courses may be taught independently. ERP and e – Business Applications courses could be combined into a single course.7 months. Commercial and Taxation Aspects. care must be taken to ensure that the content is not duplicated in other courses. courses Project Strategy and Macroeconomic Policy. computer labs. The academic institutions consider the employability potential of the students undergoing PM training to be considerably high. Alternately the course need not be included. For instance. Strategic Alliances & Special Purpose Vehicles. SPSS. the faculty recruitment and training process takes 14. It takes on average about a year to build the necessary physical resources. Most of the institutions have to take into account a considerable time lag of up to 1-2 years in introducing PM courses. classrooms. Thus if this course is included as a separate course. At present appreciable time is required to obtain internal as well external regulatory approvals for introducing new courses. and courses Legal.Financing. course materials. qualified faculty and availability of research facilities. DBMS could also be structured as a single course. They said that the companies did look for considerably high levels of competency in PM amongst the students. these subjects reflect some common issues and concerns and there is a case for combining these together to achieve an integrated approach to deal with these issues and concerns. The correlation analysis provides very good guidelines on the way courses in this subject area could be grouped and introduced in the PM curriculum. On average. Commercial & Taxation Aspects and Project Joint Ventures. in case there is difficulty in offering these as separate courses.

requires 1-2 years, with an average of around 16.5 months. It is quite surprising that the average time taken internally to introduce a course is higher than the time taken for regulatory approval. There is a general agreement that much of the PM curriculum should be preferrably introduced at the Post Graduate level, followed by Undergraduate level. On the question of introducing sector specific coursework in PM curriculum, there is a strong preference for introducing such curriculum, but the overwhelming suggestion is that such curriculum is best introduced at applied research level or in advanced courses. The present emphasis on research and publications, in particular sponsored research, is rather low and as a consequence, PM research and publications are few and sporadic.

Box 2: Project Management Courses In Indian Institute Of Management, Ahmedabad, (IIM A) Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad was established by Government of India, Government of Gujarat and Indian industry as an autonomous institution under the Act XXI of 1860 for the Registration of literary, scientific and charitable societies. The Institute functions under the overall administrative control of Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India. IIMA has evolved from being India's premier management institute to a notable international school of management in just five decades.
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The Institute had initial collaboration with Harvard Business School. This collaboration greatly influenced the Institute's approach to education and teaching methods. Gradually, it emerged as a confluence of the best of Eastern and Western values. The institute offers Post Graduate Programmes in Management in which Project Management is offered as an advanced level elective subject. The Institute assigns high level of importance to PM related coursework. The Institute has already made attempts in the past, and runs elective courses in the area of Project Management since the last few years. The IIMA’s faculty believes that the introduction of Project Management courses helps improve the employability of the students to a good extent. At an individual level, faculty have research interests in the area of PM. Many faculty members have published research papers and addressed seminars and conferences in the area of PM. The Institute also conducts regularly executive development programmes/workshops in PM. The Institute has also provided consultancy services in PM to a variety of organisations in government, public and private sectors as well as some international agencies. A few of the research theses have been written on issues related to PM in the Institute’s Fellow Programme in Management (FPM). Source: NICMAR Survey Data, 2010

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Box 3: Project Management Courses In Indian Institute Of Management, Calcutta, (IIM C) The Indian Institute of Management Calcutta (IIMC) was established as the first National Institute for Post Graduate Studies and Research in Management by the Government of India in November 1961 in collaboration with Alfred P. Sloan School of Management (MIT), the Government of West Bengal, The Ford Foundation and Indian industry. Over the years, IIMC has grown into a mature institution with global reputation, imparting high quality management education. It has been playing a pioneering role in professionalising Indian management through its Post Graduate and Doctoral level programmes, executive training programmes, research and consulting activities. Today, the institute serves as an autonomous body, continually evolving to meet its goals in an ever changing business environment. The vision of the Institute is to emerge as an International Centre of Excellence in all facets of management education. Over the past four decades, IIM Calcutta has blossomed into one of Asia's finest business schools. The Institute offers various post graduate programmes in management in which Project Management is offered as an intermediate level elective subject. One of the biggest strengths of the Institute is its world renowned faculty. The faculty members have distinguished academic achievements in different areas of management and the related basic disciplines and are actively involved in teaching, training, and research and consulting. According to the opinion of IIMC faculty, Project Management courses are very essential for Engineering and B-Schools and they believe that the introduction of Project Management courses improves the employability of the students to good extent. The Institute offers executive development programmes in PM, undertakes consulting projects in PM and of the research areas in the FPM programme.

Source: NICMAR Survey Data -2010

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Box No.4 Project Management Courses In Indian Institute Of Technology, Kharagpur, The history of the IIT system dates back to 1946 when a committee was set up by Hon'ble Sir Jogendra Singh, Member of the Viceroy's Executive Council, Department of Education, Health and Agriculture to consider the setting up of Higher Technical Institutions for post war industrial development in India. The 22 member committee headed by Sri N.R. Sarkar, in its report, recommended the establishment of four Higher Technical Institutions in the Eastern, Western, Northern and Southern regions, possibly on the lines of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, with a number of secondary institutions affiliated to it. On Sept. 15, 1956, the Parliament of India passed an Act known as the Indian Institute of Technology (Kharagpur) Act declaring this Institute as an Institute of National Importance. The Institute was also given the status of an autonomous University. IIT Kharagpur runs both Graduate and Post Graduate Programmes in which Project Management related subjects are taught as compulsory as well as elective courses. The levels of subjects vary from Intermediate to Advanced. According to the Project Management faculty, PM courses are very essential for the Engineering as well as Management Schools and they believe that introduction of Project Management courses improves the employability of the students to a great extent. Several faculty members have interests in the area of Project Management and PM related research. They have published research papers and presented seminars papers in PM and guided in Bachelor’s, Master’s and Ph. D level project work/thesis work in PM. The overall thrust of PM is however more at the research level than training and education. Source: NICMAR Survey Data -2010

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Box 5: Project Management Courses In National Institute Of Industrial Engineering: (NITIE), Mumbai The National Institute of Industrial Engineering, popularly known as NITIE established by the Government of India in the year 1963, is located in Mumbai, India. The institute, which started off as an Industrial Engineering institute, now offers full time Post Graduate programmes in both, Industrial Engineering and Industrial Management. In addition, the institute also offers Fellow Programme, and Executive Education Programmes. It is considered by the Government of India as an apex institution on the lines of IITs, IIMs & IISc. It has been recognized as one of the 15 Centres of Excellence along with the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs), Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) and Indian Institute of Science (IISc) by the Ministry of HRD, Govt. of India. NITIE has decided to act as a driving force not only in the manufacturing sector but all sectors of the Indian economy such as infrastructure and services. It has been offering Project Management as one of the compulsory as well as elective courses at the post graduate as well as the research level for a very long time. The management feels that the introduction of the PM related courses in the academic curriculum will definitely provide the students better employability options and thus they continue to support PM courses. They also rework the courses and from time to time, revise and bring changes in the course curriculum. Being an institution dedicated to manufacturing operations and management, the management has laid emphasis on PM related courses. The respondent from NITIE feels that the ‘Management and Technology’ subjects are more important in the field of Project Management when compared to the subjects of the Strategy, Economics and Finance, and the Behavioural Sciences areas. The subjects related to the Information and Technology like the Primavera, MSP, ERP and other e business applications were considered of less importance in the context of Project Management. The faculty is also involved in contributing towards research and publications in this area and are encouraged to attend various training programmes and conferences related to PM. Source: NICMAR -Survey data, 2010

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planning. operations research. Likewise he felt that subjects like project organisation and structure. monitoring and control. as compared to the other subjects like operations management. conflict management and diversity management under the Behavioural Sciences area also have less importance in the PM subject areas.Box 6: Project Management Courses In Shailesh J. founded in 1958. scheduling. IIT Bombay (SJSOM) IIT Bombay. that the School assigned importance to PM albeit more so in select subjects and has some coursework. quality. The faculty also guides research work in PM related Ph. The School of Management already leads the way in preparing its graduates to respond to the new challenges by drawing on the varied intellectual resources of IIT Bombay. 2010 90 . The introduction of such courses in the MDPs is aimed towards developing and maintaining a strong interface with industry. a distinguished alumnus of IIT Bombay. SJSOM has some PM courses included in the Managerial Development Programmes (MDP) for the executives. The pre eminence of the Institute is evident from its varied and effective academic programmes for manpower development to meet the rapidly changing needs of the organizations. in honour of Dr. has established itself as a premier world class teaching and research institution in technology and interdisciplinary programmes. Source: NICMAR -Survey data. Mehta School Of Management. In the year 2000. etc. he rated ‘very low’ subjects like accounting and control systems. Overall it was observed. all other subjects were rated ‘important’ by the faculty member. They also enable the School to identify the current trends in business processes. To promote interdisciplinary learning and to keep up with the changing environment. project procurement & materials management. Mehta School of Management. Mehta. D theses. quantity surveying. the school was renamed as Shailesh J. The School’s faculty members are actively contributing publications and are encouraged to attend various training programmes and conferences in the area of PM. About twenty percent of its alumni are entrepreneurs .many of them first generation. The faculty member responding to our survey was asked to rate the subjects in the 5 areas listed in the questionnaire. Shailesh J. IIT Bombay established its management school in 1995 with the objective of transforming professionals with technological background to "Renaissance Leaders" of tomorrow. training and research experience in PM. Except the ones mentioned above. In the Management and Technology Area.

Finance and Strategy was omitted.CHAPTER 5 DATA ANALYSIS OF SURVEY OF WORKING EXECUTIVES EMPLOYED IN PROJECT BASED COMPANIES IN INDIA 5. The specific 91 . The typical sample chosen comprised graduates in engineering and /or management who have been working with project based organisations after their graduation.1 Introduction A separate questionnaire was designed to elicit the gains derived from PM education and training by practising executives. who are currently employed in project based organisations. and for the major part of their working life. The subjects contained herein were the same as those that were included in the questionnaire administered to the Academic Institutions. II. Three subject areas and individual subject contained within these areas in the questionnaire for practising executives were the same as those covered in the Academic Institutions’ Questionnaire. III and IV. Thus the subject areas included were: A. the value of the project. The study sought to find out whether they had received any formal PM related training and the extent of time they were with PM in general. in terms of their active involvement. Behavioural Sciences Area C. the particular role of each one of them in various projects. have been working on a variety of projects (Refer Annexure 5). Management and Technology Area B. The questionnaire consisted of four parts: PART I. etc. The first part (PART I A & B) covers the executives’ professional details such as the number of years that they have been in service. the number of projects in which they have had experience. The idea was to determine the ‘before and after’ effects of undergoing PM training. in the 3 subject areas listed above. PART II covered the subjects that needed to be included as learning modules in PM. Information Technology Area The respondents were asked to rate the importance of particular subjects on a 5 point scale. The objective was to find out the efficacy of PM learning in relation to performance on the projects. The subject Area of Economics.

objective for this part was to find out the perception amongst the working executives about the subjects that were important to them in PM careers. This was to gain an insight into what the respondents viewed as necessary knowledge inputs in their project related jobs. The findings of the study are discussed later in this chapter. Section D, was Sector Specific, wherein they were asked to rate whether teaching PM skills through prior education or training were important for the variety of sectors listed such as Oil & Gas, Roads, Petrochemicals, Aerospace, Mega Property Development, etc. PART III of the questionnaire was included, to find out the extent of gains perceived by the respondents after completing the PM related training. The candidates were asked whether they had undergone any prior PM related training during their student graduation as part of their engineering curriculum. For those who had not, it was necessary to find out whether the PM related training they had received while in service, has benefitted them on parameters like improvement of efficiency and effectiveness at work, career enhancement, monetary benefits, changed roles and responsibilities, etc. Questions were also asked to glean information about the knowledge accrued to the respondents regarding the strategic perspective of projects as well the project itself. The last part, PART IV asked the executives to rate the current state of PM education in India. Respondents were asked to rate on a scale of 1-5 the importance of individual parameters that were hindering the progress of PM education and training base in India. The five factors/parameters identified were : (i) The general lack of awareness amongst students and educators about PM in general, (ii) Lack of trained instructors at the undergraduate and postgraduate level, (iii) Because PM is a practical field, it cannot be ‘taught’ in the classroom, (iv) Mastery in PM comes only from practical experience, and (v) The feeling that prior knowledge is not essential for working in this field. In rating the importance and the level of teaching the subjects, along with the simple average percentages of respondents opting for a particular choice, the numerical average rating scores have been computed and shown in brackets in front of the corresponding subjects. The average rating value contained in the brackets is to be interpreted as follows 0–1 1–2 2–3 3–4 : Not important : Somewhat important : Important : Very important
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4–5

: Extremely important

Using the responses in selected areas such as experience of executives, value of projects, subject ratings and levels to be included in the PM curricula, gaining perspectives related to project strategy, their perceptions as to why PM education is not taking roots in India, ratings of subjects and levels to be included in the PM curricula, impact on employability etc. the percentage share of respondents who opted for a particular rating was derived. This was presented in the form of graphs. Thereafter the numerical average rating scores were calculated to arrive at the overall rating assigned by the respondents. In subsequent sections, we discuss the data findings for the technical and business academic institutions from different zones in India. 5.2 5.2.1 PART I – A & B : Respondents’ Particulars And Project Details PART I – A

The findings of this part, dealing with the details such as years of working experience and PM training, etc. are presented herein. Figure 29 represents the average experience of the executives in project environments. Most of the respondents (37.84%) had an experience of less than five years, followed by 25.68% who had an experience between 6-10 years. 16.22% of the sample had a work experience of 11-15 years. Around 9% of the sample had experience of over 20 years. The average work experience of the group was 9.12 years. Figure 29: Years Of Experience Of The Working Executives

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Figure 30 depicts whether the academic institutions from where the respondent graduated, offered PM teaching as part of the curriculum. Surprisingly 75% of the sample replied in the negative. Figure 30: Institutes Teaching PM Related Curriculum

Further the respondents were asked whether they have at any time earlier either on their own or by other means, undergone training in PM. Figure 31 describes the same. A huge majority (89%) of the respondents admitted to not having undergone prior training in PM. Figure 31: Executives With Prior PM Related Training

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5.2.2

PART I – B

PART I-B elicits details from the respondents on the value of the projects in which they have served and the techniques employed on projects to improve project efficiency. Figures 32 and 33, show the average value of the projects and the tools and techniques used to make projects more efficient. The single largest majority of respondents (37.29 %) had worked on projects ranging between. than 100-200 crores. However taken together, the combined majority 200 crs to more 211 crores. of the sample (39%) had worked on projects whose value ranged between 400 crs. The average value of projects worked is

Figure 32: Value Of Projects In Rupees

The next question was to find out the extent of the use of software and statistical techniques by the executives during the project. The most predominant techniques used on projects were the very basic ones such as PERT and CPM techniques, (65.31%), which are regularly taught in technical as well as business schools. Modern techniques such as the industry wide accepted PM software packages like Prima Vera and Microsoft Projects are hardly popular and generally not used by the executives on projects. Arrow Diagrams and Fishbone Diagrams came a distant second and third respectively with 20.41% and 6.41% of the sample indicating the use of these techniques. Refer Figure 33.

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Figure 33: Tools And Techniques Used On Projects

5.3

Part II: Project Management Curricula

This part deals with the subject wise importance accorded by respondents on a rating scale similar to that of the academic institutions. The scale ranges from 1-5 with 1 being ‘Not Important’ to 5 being ‘Extremely Important’. Findings for the same are presented below.
A. Management and Technology Area: Figure 34 shows the ratings accorded by the

respondents to each subject in this area. All ratings, ranged from ‘Important’ to ‘Extremely Important’. The average rating scores assigned to various subjects in this area are as follows : A1: Operation Management for Projects (3.85), A2: Planning, Scheduling, Monitoring and Control Techniques (4.60), A3: Statistical Methods for Project Analysis (3.66), A4: Operation Research for Projects (3.37), A5: Project Quality Management (4.09), A6: Health/Safety/Environment in Projects (4.19), A7: Cost Estimation and Budgeting (4.46), A8: Accounting and Control Systems (4.00), A9: Quantity Surveying and Estimation (4.26), A10: Projects Marketing (3.52), A11: Project Site and Equipment Management (4.10), A12: Project Procurement and Materials Management (4.11), A13: Contract Management (4.16), A14: Process Design/Engineering/Testing/Commissioning (3.96), A15: Facilities Engineering and Management (3.41), A16: Logistics and Supply Chain Management (3.63), A17: Transportation Management (3.50), A18: Technology and Engineering Management (3.83), A19: Project Formulation and Appraisal (3.82) and A20: Project Engineering (3.95).
96

Contract Management. Monitoring and Control Techniques. These are: Contract Management. A14: Process Design/Engineering/Testing/Commissioning. The rest of the subjects have been rated on average as “very important”. Scheduling. A5: Project Quality Management. Furthermore. Cost estimation and Budgeting. A8: Accounting and Control Systems. Health. Naturally executives seem to realize their importance far more than the institutions. Figure 34: Subjectwise Ratings For Management And Technology Area A1: Operation Management for Projects. Safety and Environment Management. A7: Cost Estimation and Budgeting. Quantity Surveying and Estimation. Project Quality Management. A17: Transportation Management. A18: Technology and Engineering Management. A3: Statistical Methods for Project Analysis. Project Site and Equipment Management. Quantity Surveying and Estimation. Monitoring and Control Techniques. some courses are considered far more important by executives compared to the institutions. Project Procurement and Materials Management. A10: Projects Marketing. A4: Operation Research for Projects. These include Planning. One possible explanation is that these courses have a strong ‘execution’ and therefore ‘practical’ bias. A13: Contract Management. Safety and Environment Management.It is interesting to note that ratings assigned to practically all the subjects by executives are higher than the corresponding ratings assigned by the institutions. A12: Project Procurement and Materials Management. A15: Facilities Engineering and Management. A19: Project Formulation and Appraisal and A20: Project Engineering. 97 . Scheduling. A2: Planning. Several courses have on the average been rated as “extremely important”. Cost Estimation and Budgeting. A6: Health/Safety/Environment in Projects. A11: Project Site and Equipment Management. A9: Quantity Surveying and Estimation. Project procurement and Materials Management. A16: Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Health.

Conflict Management (avg. C4: Engineering Software (3.Project Organisation Structure (avg. C3: e-Business Application (3. B4: Industrial/ labour Relations. B2: Managerial Skills for Projects. although executives have assigned slightly lower ratings to Engg Software. Figure 36 describes the same.0). rating 3. rating 4.95 ).4 ) were considered ‘Very Important’. rating 3. C. Overall all the subjects in the IT area were rated in the range of ‘very important’ to ‘Extremely Important’. All other subjects like B1 .18). 98 . the other subject ratings in this area are comparable to those assigned by the institutions. 4. rating 3.60) and B6 . B5: Conflict Management and B6: Diversity Management. ERP and Excel/DBMS/SPSS are viewed as ‘extremely important’ and the other two subjects are in the ‘very important’ category. The overall ratings for all subjects in this area ranged from ‘Important’ to ‘Very Important’. rating 3.08).B.07).80 ).Diversity Management (avg. Information Technology Area: C1 . MSP. Behavioural Sciences Area: Figure 35 shows the ratings given for subjects in this area. Except for Managerial Skills subject which is rated much higher by the executives. The ratings assigned to these subjects are very comparable to those assigned by institutions. PM Software. Significant exception is the subject B2 – Managerial Skills for Projects in which majority of the sample (54%) rated it as ‘Extremely Important’ (avg. B4 .Industrial Relations (avg.53). Figure 35: Subject-Wise Ratings For Behavioural Sciences Area B1: Project Organisation and Structure. GIS/GPS for Project Management (4. B3 .Human Resource Management (avg. B3: Human Resource Management in Projects. B5 .77) and C5: Excel/SPSS/DBMS (4.42). C2: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP. rating 4.The average ratings for the subjects grouped in this area are as follows: C1: PM Software – Primavera.

3. D12: Urban Infrastructure (3. On the average. coverage of all the specific sectors is considered ‘very important’. Urban Infrastructure. Auto-Revit. Chemical Engineering and Defence sectors have received relatively lower ratings. However the executives have assigned somewhat higher ratings to the Technology. D10: Ports (3. D3: Research and Development (3.85). D16: Oil and Gas Exploration (3. Urban Infrastructure sectors. Interestingly no particular sector was rated with an ‘Extremely Important’ option.64).70). D7: Roadways (3. C2: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP).65) and D18: International Project Management (3. the respondents were asked to rate the importance of PM education in specific sectors. D17: Services (3. Sector Specific Area: In this section.56). C3: e-Business Application.84).71). 3D-Max and CalQuan) and C5: Excel/SPSS/DBMS. D6: Defence (3. Staadpro. The average ratings assigned to the coverage of various sectors are as follows : D1: Information Communication Technology (ICT. All the sectors ranged from ‘Important’ to ‘Very Important’.60). D15: Chemical Engineering (3. Sectors like Roadways. D11: Shipbuilding (3. Figure 37: Ratings For Importance Of PM Education In Sector Specific Areas 99 .55).41).91).50). D14: Petrochemicals (3. Civil Aviation and Mega Property Developments are considered relatively more important than others. Ansys.52). GIS/GPS for Project Management. The executives’ ratings are generally similar to the institutions’ ratings. D9: Civil Aviation (3.78). D4: Space Exploration (3. Railways.29). D5: Technology (3. Civil Aviation. D2: Telecom (3.26). D. MSP. C4: Engineering Software (Auto-CAD. Railways.Figure 36: Subjectwise Ratings For Information Technology Area C1: PM Software – Primavera.28). D8: Railways (3.98). Roadways. Estm8. D13: Mega Property Developments (3.

D7: Roadways.Helped Substantially. D14: Petrochemicals. Responses to Part III were analysed and the findings are discussed in the subsequent sections.Not Helped. 4. D10: Ports. D9: Civil Aviation. almost all the respondents have recorded their gains to be in the range of ‘Helped’ to ‘Helped Immensely’. D13: Mega Property Developments. D11: Shipbuilding.e. The part was divided into 2 sections A & B. enhancement in remuneration. Respondents were asked to rate the various factors on a scale of 1-5 ranging from 1. 3. D17: Services and D18: International Project Management.Somewhat Helped. D8: Railways. 5. Section B. D6: Defence. D15: Chemical Engineering. due to the skill based training to improve project level performance. The respondents were asked to rate to what extent they gained in their careers in terms of the job content. The first Section A. their improved understanding of the project within the larger context of the organisation and its strategic fit. The average ratings assigned for gains in different areas of strategic overview included in the questionnaire are as follows : 100 . D4: Space Exploration. As seen in the Figure 38. The second section. 5. 2.Helped Immensely. D5: Technology. D16: Oil and Gas Exploration. etc. D12: Urban Infrastructure. D3: Research and Development. dealt with the strategic overview gain for the executives i. promotion. in order to differentiate the extent to which PM education/ training has helped in their careers.D1: Information Communication Technology (ICT). sought to identify the gains experienced at the project level. D2: Telecom.Helped.4 PART III: Changes And Work Performance After Completion Of PM Programme This part of the questionnaire was designed to find out the individual professional gains that the executives experienced after undergoing training in PM.

71) and A8: Management vision (3.01) B5-Costing (4. B2 –Importance of Monitoring and Control (4.Importance of Project Planning and Scheduling (4.1). A6: Understanding project profitability (3. the gains are rated ‘ helped substantially’. Here too.39).01). B6 –HSE (3. A7: Importance of Human relations and Conflict management in project success and A8: Management vision. Section B of this part aimed at finding out the direct project related gains to the respondents with reference to the direct project management skills. A highly significant majority opted in favour of ‘Helped Substantially’ to ‘Helped Immensely’ on almost all parameters. A7: Importance of Human relations and Conflict management in project success (3. The average ratings assigned are : B1 . respondents were near unanimous in ascribing gains by way of direct improvement of their project based skills after undergoing training.97) and B8 101 .02). B4 . A5: Importance of Earned Value of a project to the company. A4: Understanding the exact placement of a project in the overall corporate strategy. A2: Role clarity (3.A1: To get an integrated view of the project (3. Figure 39 shows the response.(4. A3: Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility mapping. A5: Importance of Earned Value of a project to the company (3. A6: Understanding project profitability.92).59).74).87). In all the remaining areas. B7 -Quality Management (3. A4: Understanding the exact placement of a project in the overall corporate strategy (3. Gain in the area of Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility Mapping is rated ‘ helped immensely. A3: Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility mapping (4.75). B3 – Project Contract Management (4.86). Clearly the training in PM helped executives very substantially in gaining a better strategic overview of the projects. A2: Role clarity. Figure 38: Gaining Perspectives Related To The Strategic Context Of Projects A1: To get an integrated view of the project.91).20).

The gains derived in Project Planning. On the whole there appears to be a huge gain in terms of the enrichment and enlargement aspects of the job Figure 40: Gains In The Individual’s Career 102 . B4: Project Risk Management. Interestingly.e. Figure 39: Understanding Of Project Context B1: Importance of Project Planning/Scheduling/Execution. B2: Importance of Monitoring & Control. and interpersonal relations and conflict resolution. namely decision making power. B5: Project Costing. B6: Importance of Health/Safety/Environment. they were asked to assess the gains that they perceive to have received in their individual careers after undergoing PM training. namely improvement in decision making ability (33%) in their project setting and an improved understanding of human related factors i. Very clear gains were attributed by the respondents on two factors. 25% of the respondents in the sample claimed that they experienced higher responsibility coming their way after completion of PM training. Figure 40 shows the gains accrued to an individual in his/her career range in almost all areas of personal development. interpersonal relations and conflict resolution (30%). B3: Importance of Contract Management. B7: Quality Management. Monitoring and Control are particularly noteworthy. B8: Communication and Soft Skills After assessing the gains that executives derived from understanding the Strategic and Projects contexts.89).Communication Skills (3. Scheduling.

are preventing PM education from taking firm roots in India.62). 3 – Important.70).29). The respondents were asked to rate the importance of different factors on scale of 1-5 with 1 – Not Important. lack of trained teachers. Q4 .The Lack Of Awareness Amongst Students And Educators ( 3. Figure 41 summarises the perceptions of these executives in the form of a bar diagram. greater practice orientation of PM are the key factors emerging as the main inhibiting factors affecting the growth of PM education. The average ratings assigned to the factors considered in this analysis are : Q1. This was thought to be necessary since it would enable us to study the executives’ viewpoints regarding the set of factors they think. Figure 41: Factors In Order Of Importance Affecting Growth Of PM Education 103 . Q5 – Importance Of Prior Knowledge In This Field (3.43). From the responses of the executives. lack of awareness of PM among students and educators. Q2 -The Importance Of Trained Instructors At Undergraduate And Post Graduate Levels ( 3. 5 – Extremely Important.Being A Practical Field It Cannot Be ‘Taught’ In The Classroom (3.69).5 PART IV: Current Position Of Project Management In India This Section attempts to find out the perceptions of the executives regarding the factors that matter the most in the systematic establishment of PM education.Mastery In PM Is Acquired Only Through Practice (3.5. Q3 . 4 – Very Important. 2 – Somewhat Important.

Quantity Surveying and Estimation. Q2. Safety and Environment Management. Cost Estimation and Budgeting.Q1. One possible explanation is that these courses have a strong ‘execution’ and therefore 200–300 crores using very elementary 104 . These are : Contract Management. Health. Conclusion Majority of the practising executives responding to the questionnaire were from the middlemanagement cadre. Contract Management. Cost estimation and Budgeting. Furthermore. Health. Quantity Surveying and Estimation. Project Procurement and Materials Management.Q 5. some courses are considered far more important by executives compared to the institutions. The rest of the subjects have been rated on average as “ very important”. Q4.It is more practical so practical training is required. Project Site and Equipment Management. from technical institutions with no prior exposure to PM training.Importance of prior knowledge in the field of PM.Mastery only comes through practical experience. It is interesting to note that ratings assigned to practically all the subjects in the Management and Technology area by executives are higher than the corresponding ratings assigned by the institutions. Most of these were working on projects with value between PM techniques such as PERT/CPM. Scheduling. Monitoring and Control Techniques. Project Quality Management. These include Planning.Importance of awareness amongst students and educators. Safety and Environment Management. Q3.Importance of trained instructors at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Several courses have on the average been rated as “ extremely important”. Project procurement and Materials Management.

105 . HSE. Some experienced higher responsibility coming their way after completion of PM training. This subject w is rated much higher by the executives. At the direct project level. interpersonal relations and conflict resolution. Monitoring and Control. PM training ‘ helped immensely’ in the area of Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility Mapping. ERP and Excel/DBMS/SPSS are rated ‘ extremely important’ and the other subjects are rated ‘very important’. Naturally executives seem to realize their importance far more than the institutions. although executives have assigned slightly lower ratings to Engg Software. Civil Aviation and Mega Property Developments are considered relatively more important than others. Training ‘ helped substantially’ in other areas including Contract Management. training ‘helped immensely’ in Project Planning. Railways. coverage of all the specific sectors is considered ‘very important’. Urban Infrastructure.e. Urban Infrastructure sectors. Sectors like Roadways. namely improved decision making ability and improved understanding of human related factors i. In the Behavioural Sciences area. except for Managerial Skills subject rated ‘extremely important’. executives saw improvement on two factors. In individual career enhancement. The executives’ ratings are generally similar to the institutions’ ratings. On the average. the overall ratings for all subjects in this area averaged ‘Very Important’. The gains derived in Project Planning. Civil Aviation. Railways. Scheduling. On the whole there appear to be a significant gains in terms of the enrichment and enlargement aspects of the job. Costing. In terms of gains derived in developing a better strategic overview of projects. Training ‘ helped substantially’ in all the remaining areas listed. Clearly the training in PM helped executives very substantially in gaining a better strategic overview of the projects. Monitoring and Control are particularly noteworthy. Overall all the subjects in the IT area were rated in the range of ‘very important’ to ‘Extremely Important’. However the executives have assigned somewhat higher ratings to the Technology. The ratings assigned to these subjects are very comparable to those assigned by institutions. while the other subject ratings in this area are comparable to those assigned by the institutions.‘practical’ bias. Chemical Engineering and Defence sectors have received relatively lower ratings. Quality Management and Communication Skills. Scheduling. PM Software. Roadways.

Asst. lack of trained teachers and greater practice orientation of PM are the key factors emerging as the main inhibiting factors affecting the growth of PM education.7 Mr. Box No. A. lack of awareness of PM among students and educators. Afcons Ltd. Asthana. General Manager.From the responses of the executives.K. 106 .

Mr. execution. After the completion of the course at NICMAR. conducted at intervals. project management. He learnt time management and cultivated a systematic working style which has overall led him to work efficiently and also achieve a work life balance. Asthana enrolled in the Executive Post Graduate Project Management (EPGPM) Programme at the National Institute of Construction Management (NICMAR). Further Mr. contract management. Asthana admits that the training exposed him to the concept of continuous improvement and working in a systematic way. Another important component of this is the enhancement of their communication skills and soft skills for better interpersonal relations and leadership abilities. conflict resolution. Mr. Approximately 270 hours of teaching is imparted to the participants. in a timely manner.K. training system for skills development. He admitted that having adapted the learning in his own way at the workplace. Lastly Asthana now. This programme aims at enhancing the skills in project planning. judges the probable conflict points and steps in to remove them. Asthana recounts the positive changes that he experienced in his professional career. leads his teams in a way that all members are provided a platform to perform to the best of their ability. and regular examinations on the curriculum. Asthana was immediately promoted to Senior Manager and thereafter he is currently designated Assistant General Manager in a space of approximately four years at AFCONS. in all areas such as contract management. A. after undergoing the course at NICMAR. it also helped to achieve recognition in his career. working in the junior and middle management levels especially at the project sites. he became more confident and therefore. The EPGPM is designed for Working Executives. quality. According to him. CHAPTER 6 107 . the course made a difference in two major ways a) It changed his perceptions and attitude in looking at the issues in his professional work life. safety and technology. Source: Email to NICMAR faculty. monitoring. Pune in the year 2005-06 batch for a period of one year. better communication vertically as well as laterally and b) The tremendous confidence that he experienced after ‘coming out of the process of training’. Mr. He provides result oriented support.

Part II (B) of the questionnaire. Part II. It was decided to seek responses from the Human Resource Departments of project based organisations. It also covers information on current and past initiatives undertaken for training and development of project related skills and the cadre/s of employees that the company trains in this area. a cross section of human resource managers were approached from heavy engineering industries. also has questions on the preferred training methods and the training outcomes considered by the human resource managers. in project based organisations. Part II (G) is based on the opinions of the efficacy of PM training in PM imparted by the various training entities. Part II (C) deals with the level of training and the grades of the employees for whom PM related training is directed. PART I seeks details about the general information and opinions of the HR executives and officers on PM training within their organisations. So. (Refer Annex 6). All questions within the various parts of this questionnaire were to be rated on a scale of 1-5 with 1 indicating the least score accorded to the specific question and 5 being the highest. deals with the set of factors that are considered important by the organisations for imparting PM training and develop PM competencies amongst their executives. Part II (F) deals with the set of Project Management (PM) related fields essential to develop PM competencies. Part II (D) deals with the perceptions of the managers on the extent of costs incurred on the training. by the respondent. as human resource managers are directly involved in the design and deployment of PM training and development activities within their organisations. Part II (E) focuses on the perceived benefits that accrue from the training in PM.DATA ANALYSIS OF SURVEY OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGERS EMPLOYED IN PROJECT-BASED COMPANIES IN INDIA 6. Presented below are the findings from the survey. 108 . Part II (H) attempts to find out if the company values international accreditation extended to executives undergoing PM training as an added benefit. information technology and banking services.1 Introduction It was considered necessary to incorporate the views of the industry on Project Management (PM) education and training. The questionnaire is divided into two Parts. construction.

Respondents were asked whether their respective companies have in the past trained their executives in PM. 5. Figure 43: Inception Of PM Training In Companies 109 . majority of the companies have taken to specialised PM related training less than 5 years ago (63%). the respondents have taken steps to initiate PM training in the past five years. the numerical average rating scores have been computed and shown in brackets in front of the corresponding subjects.2 PART I : Respondents’ Particulars The questions in this section dealt with issues regarding the earlier training effort of the companies. training cost benefits.In rating the response on various issues like the period of inception of PM training in companies. along with the simple average percentages of respondents opting for a particular choice presented graphically. training efficacy.13 years). 6. etc. This indicates that on the average. Refer Figure 43 Figure 42: Companies With Prior PM Training Record As seen in Figure 43. This is a very encouraging finding. followed by companies that have begun the process between 510 yrs ago (27%). factors considered essential before planning PM training programmes. An overwhelming 95% of the respondents answered affirmatively. Only 5% each of the respondents have been organising training for executives for longer periods (avg. while only 5% replied in the negative.

followed by the technical and non technical category (30%). seniority of the executives was given the highest consideration by the company The most frequently chosen employees were drawn from the middle level manager group (34%). the employee category of purely technical personnel was the least frequently selected for PM based training.e. Clearly most training effort is directed at middle and senior levels of management. Refer Figure 44. and operational staff (25%) Surprisingly. Figure 44: Category Of Employees Sent For PM Training As for the ‘level’ or grade of managers that were chosen for training. the level i. it is observed that the majority of executives sent for training were drawn from the managerial cadre (39%). 110 .As regards the most frequently deputed cadre/s of personnel for PM related training by project based companies. closely followed by the senior level managers (32%). junior level managers ( 22%) and supervisory personnel ( 12%). Refer Figure 45.

Understanding Global projects (3. to project skill related. execute. The average ratings assigned to various factors are as follows: M1-Stipulation in the contract (3. M4. These range from mandatory ones e. Within this section of employees.95). M3.Figure 45: Level/ Grade Of Managers Chosen For PM Training In summary. The respondents were asked to rate on a scale of 1-5. like employee’s ability to plan.6). Part I shows that companies in the sample have embarked on PM related training fairly recently and prefer to deploy employees in the managerial cadre for training.85). monitor and control projects or HR considerations like employee retention. career development of individuals in the organisation and so on. the most frequently chosen are the middle and senior managers for receiving PM training. how essential a particular factor was while considering PM training for the company’s executives. Essentiality Of Factors For Executives In Developing PM Competencies Part II of the Human Resource Managers questionnaire aimed at finding out the factors that are considered essential by the company for developing PM competencies. Fifteen different factors were listed out for consideration. 6.g. Figure 46 presents the findings.3 PART II: Dimensions Of Project Management Training Design A.Improving the effectiveness of project operations (3.Percieved Gains from PM training 111 . M2. like ‘stipulation in the contract’.

They emphasize particularly factors like project planning. M 8.Employee retention.Improves ability to monitor and control projects.20). M 7.Human Resource Development for better performance. M 7. M5. Ability to deliver projects in right time. M3. Figure 47 shows the type of training most preferred in the organisation. employee career development and retention. M10.10).Improves ability to manage contracts in projects.Career development.Understanding Global projects.Improves ability to deliver projects in right time.Improving the effectiveness of project operations. M 11.00). execution of complex projects. M9-Improves ability to bid for complex projects (4. contract management and project delivery. M8. Several factors are rated as ‘extremely high essentiality’ factors. M13.Employee retention (4. This Section contained questions to elicit information regarding the most preferred type of training method preferred by HR managers and the most significant outcomes of the training that were desired before designing the training. The HR managers are seen to strongly endorse all the factors listed in the study.00). Ability to execute complex projects. Career development. M 12.Improves ability to plan projects (4. M13.20). costs and quality (4. M4. It was found that 41% of the 112 . M9-Improves ability to bid for complex projects.20). Figure 46: Factors Considered On A Scale Of Essentiality In PM Training M1-Stipulation in the contract.Prerequisite for project based organisation (4.Human Resource Development for better performance (3. B.(4.30). Ability to plan projects.40). Ability to manage contracts in projects. M11. monitoring & control.Percieved Gains from PM training. costs and quality.Improves ability to monitor and control projects (4.Improves ability to execute complex projects (4.85). Ability to monitor and control projects.Improves ability to deliver projects in right time.Career development (4. M2. M14. All the other factors are rated as ‘very high essentiality’ factors.Improves ability to execute complex projects.Improves ability to manage contracts in projects (4. M14. Employee retention. M12.20).20). M5.Prerequisite for project based organisation. These include : Perceived gains from PM training. M6.Improves ability to plan projects. M6. M10. costs and quality.

are shown in Figure 48. knowledge and competencies of executives from PM training. In summary HR managers look to improve skills. Figure 48: Predominant Outcome Of The Training 113 . Interestingly the ‘soft’ skill. Only 3% of the sample sent employees to obtain a comprehensive formal diploma/degree qualification offered by academic institutions. training must clearly aim at improving skills and knowledgebase of executives. Given that both skills and knowledge are key components of competencies. The most prominent outcome was the improvement of the skills of the executives. The next preferred options (28% each) were ‘On the Job’ and ‘On the Job with Classroom Training’. Figure 47: Type Of Training The outcomes considered most important by the HR Managers before planning the training of executives. such as building the ‘right’ attitude has not been considered a dominant outcome (13%). The next key outcome is the building of the knowledge base of the executives (28%) followed by competencies (26%).sample laid emphasis on the ‘In house Training’ method.

and highlight a 114 . Middle level managers : Advanced training planned approach for PM training.C. The training levels most preferred for various grades of executives are as follows : Operatives : Elementary training (48%). Figure 49 represents the preferences given by the HR managers for the same. Supervisory : Basic training (47%). This Section deals with the level of training (Elementary/Basic/Advanced/Strategic) imparted to a particular grade of executives (Operatives/ Supervisory/Middle level/Senior level). These findings are along expected lines. Figure 49: Type Of Training And Level Of Executives Sent For PM Based Training (47%). Senior Level executives : Strategic training (61%). to comprehend the ‘depth’ of PM based training offered in companies.

Trainee’s salary and time.Materials for training. etc.5). are ‘Quite Expensive’. Cost of facilities and equipment (3. the HR managers’ view was that the training of trainer. less supervision.6). Expenses for trainees (3. However it is very encouraging to note the lowest rating assigned to the factor N7 – Lost Productivity of executives. Figure 50: Ratings Of Training Costs Of PM Training N1. materials.7). Figure 50 depicts the same. Overall the perception amongst the respondents is that PM training is quite expensive. course material. N4-Expenses for trainers. This section deals with the costs of PM based training covering items like training costs. which implies that HR managers do not regard the loss of productivity of executives during their absence to be as expensive as other factors. Materials for training (3.45). The average ratings assigned to the various factors considered are as follows : Trainees’ salaries and time (3.Cost of facilities and equipment. N6. expenses of trainees. Expenses for trainers (3. costs of facilities and equipment etc. considered expensive by the HR managers. trainees’ salary and loss of productivity during the training period. N5.Trainer’s salary and time. attitudinal changes and growth in 115 . N3. Lost productivity (3.05). which they are quite willing to accept in anticipation of the large scale benefits expected from training E. reduction of errors. This Section attempts to find out the benefits of PM based training to companies.Expenses for trainees.D. Benefits included were: increase in production. employee retention. ability to use new skills.45).Lost productivity. N7. N2. On almost all factors.

60). The average ratings assigned to various factors considered are as follows : K1.Employee retention. An HR manager has various options to choose from while designing and deploying training within the company. K2. K3. K4. is not viewed as benefitial as other factors.Employee retention (3.Improved delivery performance in terms of cost.Attitude changes (3. Figure 51 shows the results for this section.52).Less supervision necessary.Increase in production/ performance.68). ‘Quite Beneficial’ and ‘Highly Beneficial’.Growth of business oportunities. with 1 being the rating of least beneficial to 5 being highly beneficial.Ability to use new skills and capabilities (3.Ability to use new skills and capabilities. K3.68). Technical and business institutions offer training to companies in the form 116 . One factor . K8. Figure 51: Ratings Of Benefits Of Training K1.Reduction in errors and improvement of safety standards (3.Improved delivery performance in terms of cost.Less supervision necessary (3. quality and time (3. K4. K2. all factors are rated ‘Quite benefitial’ which is very encouraging. K8Growth of business oportunities (3.Reduction in errors and improvement of safety standards. K7. The overall ratings on all factors were in the range of ‘Beneficial’.68). K6.Increase in production/ performance (3.business/revenue. K7.15). This Section deals with the efficacy of PM based training. The findings in this section were quite satisfactory.Attitude changes. Respondents were asked to rate on a 5 point scale.57). K5. One interpreation of the findings is that the HR view direct benefits from training to be more discernible in ‘process improvement’ rather than ‘output improvement’.K5. F.Increase in production / performance. It is quite interesting to note that HR managers strongly endorse benefits derived from Attitude changes. K6. quality and time.47). On the average.

international certified trainers and independent trainers may be attributed to the flexibility and highly focussed approach of these trainers in imparting PM based training as per the requirements of the company.40).Self Training (2.In house trainers (3. U6. The high ratings for certified franchisee trainers. implying that even HR managers do not prefer to leave PM training to the individuals per se. U5. It could be inferred that because such institutions have a good concentration of highly qualified faculty. customised Company based Programmes or medium/long duration Executive Education Programmes. a fair degree of specialised competence available and research being carried out in institutions. The average ratings obtained by various options are as follows : U1-Technical/ Business Institute (3. Companies may also exercise the option of employing its own senior and experienced executives to impart in house training in specific PM areas. The highest average rating is for Certified Franchisee Trainers. U2. with 20% of the respondents indicating that Academic Institutions are the ‘Most Efficacious’ medium of imparting training in PM. However the downside could be that academic institutions may not always be able to effectively deliver purely custom designed training programmes.of open Executive Development Programmes. and Internationally Certified Trainers who offer PM based training. Figure 52 shows the 117 . Independent Trainers and Academic institutions. Thus most of the options are rated ‘Quite efficacious’ except the Self training Method which is rated just ‘efficacious’.Independent trainer (3. Also the reasonable cost of such institutions is an added advantage in favour of academic institutions. However it is important to mention that the highest percentage preference in the ‘Most Efficacious’ category was assigned to academic institutions.80).60). Certified Franchisee Trainers. Also available are Independent Trainers.70). followed by Internationally Certified Trainers.65). Figure 52 shows the ratings accorded by the respondents to the same. the training content may reflect the same.Certified franchisee trainer (3. The company may encourage the executives to undergo training at the executives’ own expense and effort. U3.Internationally certified trainer (3. U4. Self training Method had the least overall preference. In house trainers are not rated as high on efficacy. Therefore it was necessary to find out the perception of the efficacy that HR managers attribute to each of the above mentioned training providers.75).

In this Section. followed by in house trainers and NICMAR.43% in PM training is most enviable by comparable industry standards.Self Training. Considering that NICMAR is a single entity.Certified franchisee trainer. its share of 11. the respondents were asked to list the top five training institutions where they regularly sent their executives for PM training.Independent trainer.Internationally certified trainer. U5. U6.In house trainers. G. Figure 53: Most Preferred Training Options Of HR Managers 118 . U2.14%). U3. The most frequent institutions of PM related training appeared to be the IITs/IIMs/ Indian Institute of Planning and Management together (57. U4.distribution of scores amongst the various Trainer Options and Efficacy ratings attributed to each by the respondents. Figure 52: Efficacy Ratings Of Various Types Of Trainer Options U1-Technical/ Business Institute. Most of the organisations adopt in house training techniques and therefore were not able to respond effectively to this question.

Within this section of employees. It is reassuring to know that a clear 47% of the respondents consider it to be of value. The companies generally prefer to deploy employees in the managerial cadre for training. Figure 54 shows the preferences of the sample. Of the 53% who opted for ‘Maybe’. the most frequently chosen are the middle and senior managers for receiving PM training. Figure 54: Value Of An International Accreditation Accompanying PM Training By Organisations Conclusion: On the average. This Section sought to find out whether an international accreditation accompanying the training was considered of value and had potential benefits to their organisations. 119 . the reason could be because the managers may not be fully aware of the benefits of international accreditation with respect to their organisation.H. most of the companies have taken steps to initiate PM training in the past five years.

These findings highlight a planned approach for PM training. costs and quality. Employee retention.For deputing executives for training. Middle level managers : Advanced training. Certified Franchisee Trainers are considered most efficacious training providers. ‘On the Job Training’ and ‘On the Job with Classroom Training’ are the most preferred methods of training. Thus project planning. Independent Trainers and Academic institutions. One interpreation is that they look for direct benefits from training in ‘process improvement’ rather than ‘output improvement’. Ability to monitor and control projects. Expenses for trainees. Improved delivery performance. HR managers view training to be ‘quite benefitial’ on all the factors considered including : Increase in production/ performance. Ability to manage contracts in projects. However it is important to mention that the highest percentage preference in the ‘Most Efficacious’ 120 . Ability to execute complex projects. Supervisory : Basic training. the companies particularly emphasize the following factors : Perceived gains from PM training. is not viewed as benefitial as other factors. Ability to use new skills and capabilities. Ability to plan projects. Ability to deliver projects in right time. Given that both skills and knowledge are key components of competencies. training must clearly aim at improving skills and knowledge base of executives. ‘In house Training’. which they feel will be more than compensated by the large scale benefits expected from training. Overall the perception amongst the HR managers is that PM training is quite expensive vis a vis majority of the factors such as : Trainees’ salaries and time. Materials for training. Lesser supervision. The training levels most preferred for various grades of executives are : Operatives : Elementary training. execution of complex projects and employee retention & career development emerge as the key areas for seeking training inputs. Career development.Increase in production / performance. This may be attributed to the flexibility and highly focussed approach of these trainers. Employee retention. One factor . Senior Level executives : Strategic training. Attitude changes. and Growth of business oportunities. HR managers strongly endorse the benefits derived from Attitude changes. Lost productivity. Cost of facilities and equipment. Expenses for trainers. Reduction in errors and improvement of safety standards. monitoring & control. followed by Internationally Certified Trainers. However the lowest cost rating assigned to the factor ‘Lost Productivity of executives’ implies that HR managers do not mind the loss of productivity of executives during their absence.

followed by in house trainers and NICMAR. its share of 11. a fair degree of specialised competence and research experience are a great advantage for developing good training content.43% in PM training is most enviable by comparable industry standards. Considering that NICMAR is a single entity. Their good concentration of highly qualified faculty. But the managers may not be fully aware of the benefits of international accreditation with respect to their organisation. However the downside is that they may not always be able to effectively deliver purely custom designed training programmes. 121 .category was assigned to academic institutions. It is reassuring to know that the HR managers consider international accreditation to be of value. The most frequent academic institutions for PM related training appear to be the management institutions together as group. The reasonable cost of such institutions is an added advantage.

is a statistical analysis of some important areas that would help highlight some key findings on PM education in India. it is seen that PM as a discipline has emerged slowly and steadily from such established disciplines like Operations Management. training and research. On a global scale. covering the field of PM provides the overall status of PM education and research in India. namely ‘International Journal of Project Management®’ and ‘Project 122 . A literature review in Chapter 2. with a view to facilitate the procurement and execution of large sized projects in core. This chapter presents the analysis and inferences drawn from the findings of the secondary literature as well as the primary survey. India appears to be lagging considerably behind. with the government and industry sponsoring serious initiatives in this area. The scenario in China appears overwhelmingly in favour of following a systems driven approach to PM propagation among the stakeholders. the latter appears far ahead in the widespread promotion of PM education. using Multiple Regression and Factor Analysis techniques.CHAPTER 7 INTERPRETATIONS OF DATA ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS OF PMI SURVEY 7. when compared to the global levels and standards. While India’s western counterparts have established the formal growth and systematic study of PM and created for it a formal Body of Knowledge (BoK) to stimulate applied and theoretical research.1 Introduction All the previous chapters have covered the various aspects of research study and the findings on PMI education in India. Also included. long impacting the manufacturing sector for over a century. Drawing a comparison with her closest neighbour China. Bibliometric studies presented in the form of research papers in leading journals. key and heavy sectors as well as manufacturing.

Project Organisation Structure. As seen in Figure 55. (p. However. The X axis shows the ‘extent of PM’ education and practice prevalent in the country in terms of the widespread adherence of the discipline amongst academic institutions and civil society in general (project oriented society). a sustained quantum of original research and innovation need to be undertaken and findings disseminated through forums such as paper publications. which shows the position of India compared to other countries vis a vis PM education and research. for any discipline. On the backdrop of the huge investments in project works by the public and private sectors. Monitoring and Control. Team building in cross cultural project settings. Australia and New Zealand are far ahead in the penetration of PM as a taught discipline in academic institutions. such as Project Planning. In fact in India. This construct has been arrived at based upon the secondary literature available and contained in Chapter 2. reveal the steady transition of PM research from very limited focus areas of research interests. etc into more universal subject matters such as Risk Management.Management Journal®’ dedicated solely to PM. The earlier search contained in Chapter 2 (p. issues and problems surrounding PM are very sparsely researched and published by the academic community of technical and business schools in India. and/or conferences.1. Partnerships and Alliances. to acquire the status of a formal academic discipline. the discipline of Operations Management remains in greater focus and enjoys considerable popularity and familiarity with steady amount of research being published on the application of Operations Management techniques in manufacturing and services sectors. In India. and so on. Programme Management. As is well known. Scheduling. 123 Commentary On The Extent And Depth Of PM Education And Research In . etc. 35) points to a very low generation of international research work emanating directly from India. the USA. A construct to describe this phenomenon is represented in Figure 55. 35) 7. as signified by the evolution of the discipline of PM due to sustained research in the area. The Y axis shows the ‘depth of PM’. 26 articles in a span of over 22 years is an issue of grave concern. with the exceptions like the NICMAR Journal of Construction Management which supports empirical and applied research in this area. Contract Management. certain West European countries. UK.2 India The general awareness of project management research is not only modest amongst the educational institutions but also further exacerbated by the general lack of public or private funding to carry out research in this area. very few offer such avenues. Leadership.

IIM (Indore). (Refer AICTE data on Page Nos. NITIE and IBS respectively. Also in case of ‘depth of PM’. the number of schools offering either dedicated courses in PM or courses with this nomenclature within a wider discipline. there is almost negligible research taking place in the country as mentioned earlier in this chapter. the industry practitioners and one each from NIT.16 and 17 and Table No.970 institutions were awaiting approval with the apex AICTE approving body as in 2008. Considering the number of academic institutions engaged in education in technical and business areas. However at the moment they may appear slightly behind in PM research as compared to the developed nations but are catching up very fast. http://www. Figure 55: Mapping PM Penetration In Across The World 11 Search of all IJPM issues between 1988 -2010.388 in all. India has a total of 1. In the category of Business Schools. offer technical engineering education at the undergraduate and post graduate levels.com/science? _ob=ArticleListURL&_method=list&_ArticleListID=1472440278&_sort=r&_st=13&view=c&_acct=C000072695&_version=1&_urlVersi on=0&_userid=7735364&md5=398b1a5fbe7252198a37055d9198832e&searchtype=a 124 . conducted on 18th September 2010. 3 & 4 respectively).516 institutions that offer Masters in Business Administration and Post Graduate Diploma in Management programmes. India is yet to catch up in terms of widespread teaching and use of PM principles and techniques by industry and society. appear few and far between. Russia and China are moving forward quite rapidly to catch up and close the advantage of these nations. This indicates a very high rate of growth in technical and management education in the Indian polity.in research and practice amongst industry as well as in society at large. These countries are encouraged by the formal agencies in the government as well as professional associations that support and encourage the growth of PM education. Another 1. Most of the 2611 research papers contained in the IJPM® are contributed by the Indian Institutes of Technology. A sizeable number of institutions.sciencedirect. the rate of publications is too low. However. (Delhi/Madras/Kharagpur) followed by scientists from the Indian defence establishments. 2.

Additionally. Most of these institutions are private. The respondents who took part in the survey were highly experienced. 7. In contrast. In this chapter we attempt to draw statistical inferences from the data obtained. the working executives serving in project based companies in India and the human resource managers who are engaged in designing and deploying training related to PM yielded data which has been presented and analysed using descriptive statistics in the previous chapters viz.The survey of all three stakeholders namely. Chapters 4. government run institutions are perceived as more ‘rule bound’. b) These courses improve the employability of the students. experience 21.73%) falling in the category of 16-30 years experience (avg. an in depth analysis of key issues that require to be treated using advanced statistical analysis was found necessary to bring out a more precise and meaningful understanding. self funded ones.2 Institutional Data Analysis And Inferences The survey coverage was well dispersed geographically and included fair representation of government run as well as private academic technical and management institutions. c) PM education and training have wide global acceptance and mobility. due their immediate applicability and contemporary nature. with the maximum (61. These individuals are most likely to have witnessed the radical changes that have taken place in the economy post liberalisation of 1991.27 years). The technical institutions are mostly found in the southern parts of India and similarly it is reflected in the proportion of the sample chosen by the researchers. 5 and 6. The inclusion of private institutions in the sample was because a) These are generally known for their flexibility and responsiveness in introduction of new courses because it is perceived as offering a competitive advantage to them. the academic institutions imparting PM related education. as well as the 125 . The private institutions tend to use this as an effective ‘leverage’ to attract industry users.

Finance and Economics Area. (ii) Planning. A) Management and Technology Area. Our survey rules in favour of PM education to be made mandatory in engineering. Thus the classification of subject matter that could be deemed essential for inclusion in PM curricula was drawn up and presented for response. architecture. (iv) Operations Research for Projects. (v) Projects Quality Management and (vi)Health. the academics did not rate the subject area of as much importance as the executives did. Economics and Finance Area. It can be inferred that the respondents possessed appropriate experience and credibility to do justice to the questionnaire. most of the respondents preferred that it be taught at post graduate levels. In case of the Information Technology Area. (vii) Cost Estimation & Budgeting and (viii) Accounting and Control Systems are most favoured among other subjects in this area. Pursuit of PM at doctoral level programmes was reported by only 17% of the sample. 126 . One can infer that due to its limited penetration amongst academic institutions and mostly at undergraduate and graduate levels. A very small fraction of the respondents had introduced these at advanced levels. B) Strategy. infrastructure and planning schools as perceived by the experienced faculty. management. it appears that the respondents consider the current state of PM education in India to be at best. PM in India continues to remain understated. Monitoring and Control (iii) Statistical Methods for Project Analysis. A Factor Analysis (FA) carried out on all the subjects to obtain the most important subjects. ‘fair’. Safety and Environment in Projects. Scheduling. Clearly the perception of the academics regarding this subject area differs greatly from those of the practising executives. ports and shipping. In case of Strategy. The subjects to be included in the Management and Technology Area are highly favoured by the academics for inclusion in the syllabus at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. IT and telecom. C) Behavioural Sciences Area and D) Information Technology Area. Almost all the institutions covered had earlier introduced courses in PM at the undergraduate or the postgraduate levels. The courses were grouped into four Areas namely. From the findings. is described further on in this chapter. and a closer analysis reveals that these were offered only by India’s elite institutes of technology and management. Subjects such as: (i) Operations Management.burgeoning growth of infrastructure projects. In the Behavioural Sciences Area. PM educational curricula must necessarily draw from established theoretical knowledge as well as focus on generating new knowledge after researching real time practice. railways and urban development projects.

Diversity Management are found to be very important. They require systematic understanding and treatment because project scenarios have distinct characteristics. It is well known in the industry that the following are crucial areas in projects: Conflicts (at departmental. with slightly less importance for Conflict Management and Diversity Management.the responding faculty unanimously voiced its importance for inclusion in the curriculum. Human Resource Management in Project. The average ratings for the subjects grouped in this Area are : On the average. The same was true for the practicing executives in this area. The data obtained points to interesting responses. all subjects in the category namely : Project Organization and Structure. all of the hypotheses have been accepted as null hypotheses and have been proved. The majority of the respondents rated this area ranging from ‘Important’ to ‘Very Important’. A small proportion of the sample (20%) gave lower importance to subjects like Legal. It could be inferred that the academics were not sure whether the above subjects required to be assigned the status of a full course or whether they could be taught as such within an existing discipline like Legal Aspects in Projects or International Project Management. 43). behavioural processes & systems). project. It can be inferred that there is already a high potential existing in India for PM education to grow substantially in the coming years. Commercial & Taxation Aspects of Projects. Data shows that the alternative hypothesis requires to be accepted. Industrial / Labour Relations. or interpersonal levels) and Diversity (of cultures. resource allocation. The academics voted unequivocally in support of inclusion of the subjects in the Management and Technology Area at the postgraduate level and even at the undergraduate level. and SPVs. In case of the Strategy. Thus in Hypothesis No. another related issue pertinent to PM education was the ‘Level’ at which the Areas and the individual subjects should be taught. Economics and Finance Area. contexts and compulsions as compared to traditional organisational establishments. almost all subjects were rated very high in importance. Conflict Management. Strategic Alliances. backgrounds. Project Joint Ventures. except Hypothesis 1 which refers to the overall status of PM education in India ‘being poor’. Continuing the discussion on the data obtained on importance of various Subject Areas. it can be said that the overall status of PM education in India was found to be ‘not poor’ (p.1. Managerial Skills. A section of the academics even wanted conflict management to be taught at the Applied Research level and majority at the 127 . Based on the data obtained in the study.

In the Information Technology Area. In the next section we discuss some findings obtained from Factor Analysis for the Subjects to be included in the curriculum. accepted the huge importance of IT software to enhance overall project performance. The next question was to find out the importance of teaching PM to select sectors in the economy. the sample opted for Applied Research followed by Advanced level teaching as the most appropriate levels for sector specific coverage of PM in teaching curriculum. The executives assign high ratings to these areas. the practicing managers. The implication is that the academic institutions strongly endorse the importance of learning and using sophisticated techniques that would help efficient performance on projects. Often. The academics considered the coverage of all the sectors included to be either very important or extremely important. sector specific issues in PM are intensely practice driven and therefore teaching should reflect the study of this practice more closely. Academics therfore strongly endorse the coverage of sector specific issues in PM curriculum but would rather like these issues to be dealt with at advanced teaching level or at the level of applied research. It can be inferred that as per the respondents’ view. they also endorse the teaching of software at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. From this it can be inferred that there exists a gap between the academics and the practicising managers’ views with respect to the importance of conflict management and diversity.1 Results And Interpretation Of Factor Analysis For Subjects Rated By Faculty From Academic Institutions 128 . It is very interesting to note that across all sectors. almost the whole of the respondent group in academic institutions (both technical and management oriented). 7.post graduate level.2. at their level have to face the consequences of conflicts on projects and would therefore like to learn how to deal with them. Therefore as a consequence. The executives feel that these subjects are ‘Very Important’. A very small section wanted the courses to continue in the advanced and research programme levels. A very small percentage opted for Conflict Management to be included at the undergraduate level or at a certificate level.

67). (v) Project Quality Management.40). These results are included in the Table No. AR9-Quality Surveying and Estimation (3.12).43). along with cumulative percentages. AR10-Projects Marketing (3. 1992). AR6-Health/Safety/Environment in Projects (3.. 5. AR16-Logistics & Supply Chain Management (3. Scheduling.48). 74%). The sum of all eigenvalues = total number of variables.74).93). AR7-Cost Estimation and Budgeting (3.A Factor Analysis12 was carried out on the subjects rated as most necessary to be included in the curriculum involving PM. their average ratings are reproduced below. AR11-Project Site and Equipment (3.79). only four subject areas. AR3-Statistical Methods for Projects Analysis (3. The statistical approach involving finding a way of condensing the information contained in a number of original variables into a smaller set of dimensions (factors) with a minimum loss of information (hair et al.60). (vi) Health Safety and Environment in Projects account for the highest proportion of the subjects (factors) that are absolutely essential to be included in PM curricula (i. from individual subjects in the 4 areas and their associated Eigenvalues13. AR5-Project Quality Management (3. 129 .12). This means that all factors (subjects) that were included in the questionnaire were rated by the respondents to be important for inclusion in PM curriculum. a list of 31 subjects was chosen for analysis. AR13-Contract Management (3. Therefore in effect. It is found that the Eigenvalues of six ‘components’’ are greater than one and after they are ‘extracted’. The correlation analysis carried out earlier helped establish that Operation management and Operations Research.81). AR12-Project Procurement & /Materials Management (3. Out of the four subject Areas mentioned (p. For ready reference.40). (iii) Statistical Methods for Project Analysis. suitably combined account for the courses that are ‘absolutely essential’.87).e.31).30).26). Factor Analysis (FA) was carried out after determining the factors. Monitoring and Control Techniques (3. they can explain the variation upto 74%. 13 Eigenvalues explain the Total variance accounted by each factor. AR17-Transportation Management (3. 12 Factor analysis is used to analyze interrelationships among a large number of variables and to explain these variables in terms of their common underlying dimensions (factors). AR14-Process Design/Engineering/Testing/Commissioning (3. and the percentage of variance determined.98). AR4-Operations Research for Projects (3. Quality Management and HSE are strongly correlated. (iv) Operations Research for Projects.37). AR2-Planning. AR8-Accounting and Control Systems (3. (ii) Planning/ Scheduling/ Monitoring and Control Techniques. AR15-Facilities Engineering and Management (3. AR18Technology and Engineering Management However the analysis reveals that only 6 subjects (factors) included in the Management and Technology Area namely (i) Operations Management for Projects. Refer Table No. AR1-Operations Management for Projects (3. 5 and 6.

Viewed with the actual ratings awarded by the respondents to the Strategy. It may also imply that except in the well recognized Management and Technology Area. are considered most crucial for inclusion in PM curriculum by the academics. Figure 56: Composite Importance Rating On Percentage Basis For Strategy.62) individual subjects ratings). BR4-Financial Management. Economics And Finance Area By Academics BR1-Macro-Economic Policy. BR3-Social Cost Benefit Analysis. BR6-Risk and Insurance Management. Therefore for the sake of simplification. Economics and Finance Area. An intriguing fact is that only a limited number of subjects (factors) continue to describe the whole scope of PM curricula amongst academics in institutions. in which the above subjects have been grouped. This could be attributed to Indian institutions being in the early development stages of PM. 130 . and IT. other subject Areas (and individual subjects contained therein) such as Behavioural Sciences. are not yet considered pivotal to PM education in the Indian technical and management education system. it shows that almost the whole sample has rated subjects in this Area as ‘Extremely Important’ and ‘Very Important’ (p. BR2-Project Strategy. Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects and BR8-Project Joint Ventures/ Strategic Alliances/ Special Purpose Vehicles. BR7-Legal.Alternatively this means that the balance 25 subjects account for only a small fraction of the total PM curricula (26%). BR5-Project Financing. Figure 56 below represents the same in graphical format. this can be interpreted to mean that the top six subjects (four combined) that emerge from the analysis of academic institutions.

35225 7.11402 98.89143 100 14.6988 99.951679 3.033656 46.23814 60.906904 3.29169 5.109208 0.23814 60.0916 77.58407 8.94764 0.31501 44.52983 65.130994 0.5743 3.5743 3.10383 90.65286 94.156518 0.18657 97.35225 7.352284 0.7638 70.316435 0.Table No.753498 46.435307 0.843646 0.580143 0.950545 0.631873 0.857209 16.885889 6.04029 96.402854 0.885889 6.374019 0.504897 0.3692 2.324673 0.46959 99.071055 0.950424 1.901062 2.56816 95.32067 2.69146 98.444626 1.590639 0.088039 0.555641 0.3381 74.418033 1.915298 0.495776 0.33519 96.60292 12.42256 0. 5 Total Variation Explained Of Factors (Subjects) Included In Institutional Questionnaire Component Initial Eigenvalues Total % of Variance Cumulative % Extraction Sums of Squared Loadings Total % of Variance Cumulative % Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings Total % of Variance Cumulative % 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 14.283742 0.3381 74.233969 4.206514 1.047334 0.344637 1.34185 32.7638 70.233969 4.44847 91.732392 7.444626 1.0916 5.599277 1.721438 2.34185 15.124885 0.86916 99.065974 4.29169 5.65498 92.35225 54.950424 1.237781 0.038301 1.183098 0.098095 0.435735 16.3692 2.0916 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.22891 86.192631 0.059716 0.1485 79.10034 87.51688 98.163584 0.63093 97.69961 89.753498 3.62253 1.97316 12.229208 0.283998 0.294669 0.108566 46.163584 46.35225 54.70232 93.19061 84.871429 1.218579 0.86994 82.1856 99.62253 1.719408 0.23439 74.416837 0.418033 1.502 66.056904 2.91793 57.172249 0.707042 2.404217 1.705092 0. 131 .52983 65.767036 0.

3.The Scree Plot 14describes the distribution of Eigenvalues amongst the different subjects. 132 . No more than the number of factors to the left of this point should be retained.1 Findings From Multiple Regression Analysis Of Significance Of PM Education In Technical/ Business/ Specialised Academic Institutions 14 Scree Plot – the eigenvalues for successive factors can be displayed in a simple line plot. Thus by combining some of the relevant data obtained from the respondents. Figure 57: Scree Plot Representing The Eigenvalues For Each Factor (Subject) And The Predominant Factors 7. it was necessary to find out exactly which factors have a bearing on the Institution’s decision to introduce courses in PM. Analysis and findings from these studies are presented in the next section. This scree plot can be used to graphically determine the optimal number of factors to retain. 7. Also a Multiple Regression test was carried out to find out the extent to which PM education ratings are corroborated by their ratings for Management Support to introduce or continue PM courses. using the extent of infrastructure and other relevant support ratings given by the respondents.3 Multiple Regression Analysis Of The Factors Affecting Introduction Of PM Course Apart from the Factor Analysis on subjects. a Multiple Regression Analysis was carried out on variables defining significance of PM education to particular genres of academic institutions.

238485 -1. of regression Mean dependent var S. Error 0.049383 0.05* RPND .643552 Prob. Architecture.310069 REng RMgnt RArch RPND RInfra C R-squared Adjusted R-squared S.237744 3. Management.273605 0.Multiple Regression Analysis Of PM Education Ratings As Dependent Variable And Significance Of PM Education In Engineering.240309 0.674533 2.27…… (I) Dependent Variable: RPME(Ins) Method: Least Squares Included observations: 81 Variable Coefficient 0. and Infrastructure Management Institutions as Explanatory Variables (Independent Variables).1965 0. Planning And Design.262704 0.050762 -0.D. Management (RMgnt).8127 0. These are discussed below. Some models were formulated to carry out the multiple regression analysis.459362 -0.2778 0.124024 0.26*RArch + 0.08* RInfra + 2.741191 Std. Architecture. And Infrastructure Management Institutions As Explanatory Variable (Independent Variable) The dependent variable in this model.739953 2. ‘PM Education Ratings’ was taken as the Dependent Variable and Significance of PM education in Engineering.0020 0.E. Therefore. Planning and Design. and Infrastructure Management (RInfra) Institutions.388730 0.074853 2. the regression equation for this part is as follows : RPME(Ins) = r1 REng + r2 RMgnt + r3 RArch + r4 RPND + r5 RInfra + C Estimated Equation is : PMIOR = 0. dependent var Akaike info criterion 133 .15*RMgnt .079*REng + 0.153601 -0.0.0. Architecture (RArch). 0.624008 t-Statistic 2. is the Overall Rating of PM Education in India (RPME Ins ). Model 1:. Planning and Design (RPND).0194 0.078773 0. The explanatory variables are the same scaled ratings of the Significance of PM education in Engineering (REng).0005 2.003347 0.093194 1130584 -0.116781 0. Management.314845 0.In this analysis.

Model 2: Multiple Regression Analysis Of PM Education Ratings As Dependent Variable And Institute Infrastructure Support As Explanatory Variable (Independent Variable) The dependent variable is the overall Rating of PM Education in India (RPME Infra ).946625 0. the regression equation for this part is as follows : RPME(Infra) = r1 RLib + r2 RCM + r3 RCR + r4 RQF + C 134 . the explanatory variable Rating on Planning & Design is also significant at 10 % level (Two Tailed Test). Similarly there is probably lack of critical mass of institutions in infrastructure management capable of providing full fledged. and Planning and Design (RPND). which indicates that they have positive impact on the dependent variable. Course Material (RCM). are not known to emphasize PM in their curriculum. Management and Planning & Design are positive.Sum squared resid Log likelihood Durbin-Watson stat 41. Therefore.487436 0. as their t-statistics are high and p values are near 0. The explanatory variable Ratings on Engineering and Management are highly significant at 1% level (Two Tailed Test). Classroom (RCR) and Qualified Faculty (RQF). comprehensive curriculum with enough emphasis on PM.926252 Schwarz criterion F-statistic Prob (F-statistic) 2. Management (RMgnt).20226 -87. Explanation: The 3 types of institutions wherein PM education is essential are Technical (REng). The Durbin-Watson statistics is 1. The important infrastructure considered is Availability of Library and e-resources (RLib).456114 Most of the explanatory variables are individually significant.93. Generally Architectural institutions.46 indicates that the explanatory variables are able to explain the variation of dependent variable to the extent of 46 %. barring a feqw exceptions. which indicates that there is no autocorrelation among explanatory variables. The remaining two namely Architecture and Infrastructure Management were not explained by the available data and may require some other data. The R-squared value of 0. Similarly. The coefficients of three explanatory variables named Ratings on Engineering.55780 1. The explanatory variables are the same scaled ratings of the Institute Infrastructure Support.

808134* RQF + 1..0190 0.922669 2.451835 2..0000 2.0592 0. Classroom (RCR) and Qualified Faculty (RQF) are positive.127446 0.302105 0. Error t 0.117306 0.747424 2. most of the explanatory variables are individually significant (Highly significant in this model).527748. of regression Sum squared resid Log likelihood Durbin-Watson stat Mean dependent var S.527748 0.224866* RCR + 0.0130 0.160170 0.135332 0.997851 1.. Similarly. the explanatory variable rating on Course Material (RCM) and Classroom (RCR) are also significant at 5 % level (Two Tailed Test).688903 4.D. Course Material (RCM).188618*RLib + 0.713400 37.. The coefficients of all explanatory variables namely Availability of Library and e-resources (RLib). dependent var Akaike info criterion Schwarz criterion F-statistic Prob (F-statistic) In this modified case. 0.417297 0.91874 1.E. as their tstatistics are high and p values are near 0..224866 0.( ) Dependent Variable: RPME(Infra) Method: Least Squares Sample: 001 081 Included observations: 81 Variable Coefficien Std.66156 -83. The explanatory variable Ratings on Availability of Library and e-resources (RLib) and Qualified Faculty (RQF) are highly significant at 1% level (Two Tailed Test).043055 RLib RCM RCR RQF C R-squared Adjusted R-squared S..244907 2.175842* RCM + 0.RPME(Infra) = 0.188618 0.388969 0.695339 1..808134 1. which indicates that they have positive impact on the dependent variable.332415 t-Statistic 2.906860 0. 135 .595901 Prob.175842 0.061728 0.1008 0.

..(III) In this case. which indicates that they have a positive impact on the dependent variable. which indicates that there is no autocorrelation among explanatory variables..... availability of course material.... Therefore....07* REPM + 1.91. Therefore the type of the infrastructure currently prevailing is more dictated by the regulatory requirements rather than the targeted requirements of PM education........ Model 3:.. The latter are bound by structured processes of approval which may take protracted periods of time from government agencies in the form of receiving sanctions to introduce courses....... Such factors along with the limited data size may be the reason why the equation is explained to the extent of 42%.The R-square value of 0. The explanatory variable Ratings on Effect on Employability of PM (REPM) is also significant at 5 % level (Two Tailed Test)..15% were AICTE..... The coefficients of the explanatory variables namely. 87.Multiple Regression Analysis Of PM Education Ratings As Dependent Variable And Management Support As Explanatory Variable (Independent Variable) The dependent variable is the overall Rating of PM Education in India (RPME Mgmt ). The Durbin-Watson statistics is 1..54% of the respondents were autonomous institutions.. University Affiliated and Accredited Institutions.. The explanatory variables are the same scaled ratings of the Management Support for introducing Courses in PM in the Institute (RPMCourse) and Effect on Employability of PM (REPM). both the explanatory variables are individually significant. 136 ....26* RPMCourse + 0... This means that some other factors are required to explain the relationship of PM education and the institutes’ infrastructure. Explanation: The infrastructure related to library.42 indicates that the explanatory variables are able to explain the variation of dependent variable to the extent of 42 %.. the regression equation for this part is follows......... These results could be seen along with the results of the Type of Institutions (p.58) of which only 11..... classrooms and qualified faculty are important variables which explain the variation in the dependent variable to the extent of 42 % .13……….. Management Support for introducing Courses in PM in the Institute (RPMCourse) and Effect on Employability of PM (REPM) are positive..... RPME(Mgmt) = r1 RPMCourse + r2 REPM + C RPME(Mgmt) = 0...

as their tstatistics are high and p values are near 0. which indicates that there is no autocorrelation among explanatory variables.89.747424 2.068224 1.008549 Mean dependent var S.26 indicates that the explanatory variables are able to explain the variation of dependent variable only to the extent of 26 %. Only good employability. Dependent Variable: RPME(Mgmt) Method: Least Squares Included observations: 81 Variable RPM Course REPM C R-squared Adjusted R-squared S.E.90478 1.D.363748 t-Statistic 2.55444 -85.061728 0. The R-squared value of 0.4 The Practising Executives Data Analysis And Inferences 137 .887506 Std.092248 0.254942 0.064917 0. nature and extent of infrastructure support provided by the institutions have considerable impact on the PM education ratings.0941 0.925887 1. 7.712115 39. Some other variables like awareness and importance of PM education amongst the institutes’ faculty and management.087833 0. Error 0.099288 Prob. management support and introduction of PM courses in Technical and Management Institutes will not therefore improve the overall rating of PM Education.0027 2.127361 0.079605 0. dependent var Akaike info criterion Schwarz criterion F-statistic Prob(F-statistic) Explanation: This implies that apart from the two factors namely introduction of PM courses (RPMC) and effect of Employability (REPM). 0.195180 2. the academic and physical infrastructure of the institutions will also be equally important. For example our previous results already indicate that the variation in emphasis on PM education across various types of institutions.857033 3. of regression Sum squared resid Log likelihood Durbin-Watson stat Coefficient 0. there are other factors that are obviously affecting the rating of PM education in India.283863 5.0045 0.The explanatory variable Ratings on Management Support for introducing Courses in PM in the Institute (RPMCourse) is highly significant at 1% level (Two Tailed Test). The Durbin-Watson statistics is 1.256991 0.

The next set of responses was drawn from practising executives. Project Procurement and Materials Management. Contract Management. Furthermore. while the other subject ratings in this area are comparable to those assigned by the institutions. This subject is rated much higher by the executives. According to the respondents. Quantity Surveying and Estimation. These courses have a strong ‘execution’ and therefore ‘practical’ bias. This assumes significance against the backdrop that India has been riding on a high growth path. These include Planning. but are employed with PM based organisations and particularly deployed on projects. with Arrow and Fishbone techniques coming in a distant second and third respectively. Health. except for Managerial Skills subject rated ‘extremely important’. Dedicated project management softwares like Primavera and Microsoft Projects came last. Safety and Environment Management. The ratings assigned to these 138 . Overall all the subjects in the IT area were rated in the range of ‘very important’ to ‘Extremely Important’. Safety and Environment Management. Monitoring and Control Techniques. The ratings assigned to practically all the subjects in the Management and Technology area by executives are higher than the corresponding ratings assigned by the institutions. Project Site and Equipment Management. Quantity Surveying and Estimation. the skills learnt in the technical institutions were limited to PERT/CPM techniques. The practising executives responding to the questionnaire were from the middle management cadre. the overall ratings for all subjects averaged ‘Very Important’. The executives claim that academic institutions have not provided them with PM competencies at graduation level before they entered the world of employment. In the Behavioural Sciences area. they are young and have very few years working in the field. This also corroborates the data obtained from faculty respondents regarding their perception of overall PM education in India which was rated as only ‘Fair’. Most of these were working on projects with value between 200–300 crores. Project Quality Management. so as to find out their views and perceptions regarding project management learning. Several courses have on the average been rated as “ extremely important”. Health. Cost estimation and Budgeting. some courses are considered far more important by executives compared to the institutions. Scheduling. These are : Contract Management. Cost Estimation and Budgeting. The sample consisted of executives who had not undergone prior training in PM before joining the course at NICMAR. Majority of the executives had upto 10 years of experience. Naturally executives seem to realize their importance far more than the institutions. with enormous public and private funds riding on the back of the projects industry. Project procurement and Materials Management.

Railways. Data collected on both counts point to the fact that there appears to be a clear gap in the present curriculum of technical and business schools and the actual skill requirements of the industry. Sectors like Roadways. as well as in the educational system. the efforts of the Indian technical and business educational institutions remains far short of the ideal. Monitoring and Control. From the responses of the executives. although executives have assigned slightly lower ratings to Engg Software. Initial and Considerable.e. Scheduling. Some experienced higher responsibility coming their way after completion of PM training. interpersonal relations and conflict resolution. is considered. Training helped executives in improved decision making ability and improved understanding of human related factors i. When faculty respondents were asked to evaluate their progress in introducing PM related courses in India. lack of trained teachers and greater practice orientation of PM are the key factors emerging as the main inhibiting factors affecting the growth of PM education. Railways. At the direct project level. Furthermore when viewed with the systematic efforts taken by the Chinese government within the government ministries.subjects are very comparable to those assigned by institutions. When so much finance and 139 . However the executives have assigned somewhat higher ratings to the Technology. Civil Aviation and Mega Property Developments are considered relatively more important than others. The executives’ ratings are generally similar to the institutions’ ratings. Civil Aviation. majority of the responses were in the category of Negligible. The executives consider the coverage of all the specific sectors to be ‘very important’. lack of awareness of PM among students and educators. Urban Infrastructure. training ‘helped immensely’ in Project Planning. This appears to be even more acute when the average quantum of project value that the executives have served in the past or are currently serving in. Also the multiple regression results point to factors like institute infrastructure in terms of library. Roadways. Urban Infrastructure sectors. On the whole there appear to be a significant gains in terms of the enrichment and enlargement aspects of the job. course materials. PM training ‘ helped immensely’ in the area of Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility Mapping. Only 11% of the sample admitted to the efforts being in the ‘Advanced’ stage. In terms of gains derived in developing a better strategic overview of projects. and existence of management vision and lastly management support as crucial to the introduction of the PM courses in the institutes.

Telecom and Research and Development. The Space Exploration Sector follows very closely with 0.scarce resources are at stake. It is found that the Eigenvalues of ‘components’ are greater than one and when extracted. (vii) Cost Estimation and Budgeting and (viii)Accounting and Control Systems.949 (almost 1). Table 6 shows the Eigenvalues and Total Variance explained. These three sectors are: Information & Communication Technology. In order to maintain parity with the Institutional Factor Analysis. Once again the Factor Analysis (FA) method was used to extract subjects (factors) that they consider important for inclusion. the same factors contained in the former are selected for analysis in the case of executives. namely (i) Operations Management for Projects. A further analysis was conducted to find out in which of the sectors the executives perceive that prior education in PM is necessary to build PM competencies. However 8 subjects included in the Management and Technology Area. Obviously executives consider the issues related to cost management and control to be of much greater importance than the academics. the percentage of variance was determined. Alternatively this means that the balance 23 subjects form a small component of only 29% of the total PM curricula. The top 8 subjects that emerge from the analysis are considered most crucial for inclusion in PM curriculum by the executives. and can explain the variation upto 69%. This means that all factors (subjects) that were included in the questionnaire are rated by the respondents to be important for inclusion in PM curriculum.e. for the Sector –International Project Management. (iv) Operations Research for Projects. explain the variation up to 71%. Surprisingly. formed the highest proportion of the factors (i. In Table 6. (iii) Statistical Methods for Project Analysis. It is found that the Eigenvalues of 3 ‘components’’ are greater than one when extracted. (vi) Health Safety and Environment in Projects. the performance of the operational and project human resource does assume strategic importance. which implies even this sector is considered very important for PM education. After determining the factors and their associated Eigenvalues. Two of the top 8 subjects not figuring among the top 6 subjects rated by the academics are : Cost Estimation and Budgeting and Accounting & Control Systems. In fact existence of project skills and competencies can turn the fortunes in favour of the business and industry as a whole. 71%). all the estimated parameters are presented. eigenvalue was as 140 . (ii) Planning / Scheduling / Monitoring and Control Techniques. (v) Project Quality Management. alongwith cumulative percentages.

513 45 15.8170 2 10.087.173 28 32.817 02 32.5134 5 141 . Table No.817 02 32. 6 Total Variation Explained Of Factors (Subjects) Included In Practising Executives Questionnaire Total Variance Explained Initial Eigenvalues % of Total Varianc Cumulati e ve % Extraction Sums of Squared Loadings % of Total Varianc Cumulati e ve % Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings % of Total Varianc Cumulati e ve % Component 1 10.8091 69 15.8170 2 4.low as 0.173 28 32. which shows the general lack of awareness among practicing executives of the importance of building project management competencies to handle international projects at the degree level and perhaps even after.

9571 6 4.5307 5 81.0239 6 65.7956 85.1373 91 8.8734 85 0.5367 2 1.9560 7 59.2042 59 7.2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 2.1665 92 0.9845 4 67.6324 42 1.4273 67 3.6000 1 59.8913 1 7.3479 1 142 .4971 06 1.3639 79 1.2051 42 1.3724 84 1.6594 7 93.4412 92.8913 1 7.9212 37 7.2323 01 0.4273 67 3.4342 73 1.3289 3 0.8875 56 3.1397 24 1.7563 06 2.2103 9 77.1869 56 0.2659 42 4.7758 28 0.7143 86 10.5593 82 1.5367 2 1.8721 71.0678 98 6.7723 6 83.2051 42 1.8583 86 0.7190 5 90.3479 1 74.5302 78 25.6324 42 1.0232 44 1.6948 98 0.1060 39 1.6257 39 5.5571 7 63.4834 09 0.7655 83 2.3400 7 98.8176 92 2.5026 71 2.2182 69 1.082 19 8.6272 06 0.3724 84 1.1254 78 2.4758 19 2.8305 7 44.7083 3 49.8026 7 98.7083 3 49.6257 39 5.7518 1 51.1995 9 97.2878 77 1.8873 66 0.2659 42 4.2661 0.3776 63 0.7936 73 5.7493 58 0.0610 65 0.3340 7 54.5571 7 63.7832 6 2.3533 14 0.8875 56 3.1728 3 3.3479 1 3.7483 8 35.1910 48 2.6000 1 59.3992 42 0.8721 71.7315 88 0.8624 72 2.4641 03 0.0775 04 8.8602 5 95.4431 97 41.4446 25 0.0775 04 0.5373 94 0.9571 6 4.2219 4 88.3340 7 54.2416 07 2.468 97.3639 79 1.1533 2 91.5787 56 0.6030 85 0.2267 92 0.8176 4 71.9845 4 67.6625 6 87.8669 56 1.2333 2 2.7563 06 2.7186 4 96.4758 19 41.7991 9 94.234 93 10.0280 8 79.

Two factors emerged with Eigenvalues more than 1.28 29 30 31 0.1983 51 99.0614 89 0. These 2 factors were (1) Lack of Awareness (eigenvalue 1.161).4373 96 0.2573 46 0.8016 5 100 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis. 7 The Distribution Of Eigenvalues And Subject (Factors) Initial Eigenvalues Extraction Sums of Squared Loadings Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings 143 . Table No. The executives believe that PM education received early would help them perform better in the project environment.2206 6 99.1355 93 0.3236 45 0.515) and (2) Lack of Trained Instructors ( eigenvalue 1.5443 99.1003 3 0.0797 77 0. These two factors explained 54% of the variation. Figure 58: Scree Plot That Represents Graphically The Distribution Of Eigenvalues And Subjects (Factors) Another set of factors that merit some attention and analysis are the views of the executives in relation to the perceptions as to why PM education has not taken adequate roots in India.

Component 1 2 3 4 5 % of % of % of Total Var Cum % Total Var Cum % Total Var Cum % 1.7659 15. Within this section of employees.516 1. the most frequently chosen are the middle and senior managers for receiving PM training.192 30.293 30. The companies emphasize the following factors : Perceived gains from PM training.571 73.293 30.319 88.293 1.592 34 68 100 Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.5 Human Resource Managers’ Data Analysis And Interpretation On the average.192 62 24 24 62 24 24 28 56 56 1.1611 23. 144 . Figure 59: Scree Plot That Represents Graphically The Distribution Of Eigenvalues And Subjects (Factors) 7.1611 23. Ability to monitor and control projects. Employee retention.9785 19. Ability to plan projects. Ability to execute complex projects.407 58 16 32 0.5096 30.516 67 33 58 67 33 58 01 01 58 0. The companies generally prefer to deploy employees in the managerial cadre for training.516 1.223 53.293 1.324 53.1662 23. Career development.5796 11.088 79 59 17 0.5146 30.223 53.5146 30. most of the companies have taken steps to initiate PM training in the past five years.

Also majority of the executives interviewed have work experience ranging from less than 5 years up to 10 years. HR managers are seen to keep this in mind when importing PM training. Overall the perception amongst the HR managers is that PM training is quite expensive vis a vis majority of the factors such as : Trainees’ salaries and time. Ability to deliver projects in right time. The companies believe that the direct benefits from training accrue to middle and senior managerial cadres the most. Advanced for Middle level managers. This was also confirmed by the top training and HR managers (See Refer ref no. companies preferred this method. Lost productivity. The training levels most preferred for various grades of executives are : Elementary for Operatives. The findings highlight a planned approach for PM training. taking decisions and overall project responsibility. a clear majority have answered in the negative. ‘In house’ may be preferred as it is considered more cost effective compared to the residential training programmes. Strategic for Senior Level executives. 48. Expenses for trainers. because it formed an integral component of a very large ongoing project. as executives in these two categories are directly involved in driving projects. execute and control projects better as the most important objective of planning training and deploying personnel for PM training. Therefore the HR managers have to arrange PM related training in order to make the executives ‘project ready’ and ensure a certain degree of parity with other project personnel such as project managers. Basic for Supervisors. it is apparent that the objectives of the HR managers has been fulfilled since the executives feel that their most direct gains are in their improved ability to plan. When this data is matched with the data obtained from executives on whether they had received instruction in PM related subjects while in college. Materials for training. Bib) when they stated that most of the times. The high training costs can be attributed to the fact that PM training penetration 145 . purchase managers. From the responses of the executives. ‘On the Job Training’ and ‘On the Job with Classroom Training’ are the most preferred methods of training. and therefore training of the executives had to be completed within available timeframes. costs and quality. The scope and complexity of training content must match the grades and responsibilities at various levels in the organisational hierarchy. monitor and control projects better. operations executives. HR managers assign the highest importance to executives’ improved ability to plan. etc. ‘In house Training’. execute.Ability to manage contracts in projects. Expenses for trainees. Cost of facilities and equipment.

It is reassuring to know that the HR managers consider international accreditation to be of value. They look for direct benefits from training in ‘process improvement’ rather than ‘output improvement’. research experience and reasonable cost are a great advantage for developing good training content. The training is predominantly designed to develop the project skill base followed by the knowledge and competency base. Independent Trainers and Academic institutions. are still very low and less ubiquitous compared to other training themes in technical and management arena. followed by Internationally Certified Trainers. 2010). there are only 70 PMI® accredited REP®s (PMI. Thus the relatively lower awareness combined with very low penetration of PM training accreditation and its benefits among the HR community of project based organisations could be the most plausible causes why HR managers are not clear about the value from International accreditation. This may be attributed to the flexibility and highly focussed approach of these trainers. Particularly in India. Improved delivery performance. This could be due to the fact that soft skills competence is built into the normal PM training 146 . HR managers do not mind the loss of productivity of executives during their absence. its share of 11. Certified Franchisee Trainers are considered most efficacious training providers. HR managers view training to be ‘quite benefitial’ on all the factors considered including : Increase in production/ performance. Attitude changes. Reduction in errors and improvement of safety standards. followed by in house trainers and NICMAR. Employee retention. Considering that NICMAR is a single entity. The share of Registered Education Providers® (REP®s) in the Asia – Pacific region is very low at 16 percent compared to North America. But the managers may not be fully aware of the benefits of international accreditation with respect to their organisation. Their good concentration of highly qualified faculty. Ability to use new skills and capabilities. which they feel will be more than compensated by the large scale benefits expected from training. a fair degree of specialised competence. Lesser supervision.and availability of specialist PM trainers in India. However it is important to mention that the highest percentage preference in the ‘Most Efficacious’ category was assigned to academic institutions.43% in PM training is most enviable by comparable industry standards. and Growth of business oportunities. Building the right attitude is not a clearly defined outcome. However they may not always be able to deliver purely custom designed training programmes. The most frequent academic institutions for PM related training are the management institutions together as group.

remains understated and relatively low.design. the executives have assigned high importance to subjects like Project Organisation Structure. IITs. the academic community. Research And Training In PM And Its Effects On National Economy 147 . Figure 60: The Cycle Of Education. SPJIMR. Practising Executives And Industry Synthesizing the data obtained from all three interest groups.6 Synthesis Of Stakeholders Of PM Education – Academic Institutions. The origins can be traced to the limited inclination of academic institutions to introduce and attract students to the area of PM as a whole. NITIE and Symbiosis appear to have taken conscious and concerted steps in this direction. Industrial Relations. i. This matches with the responses of the executives on their improved understanding of human related factors especially. it is apparent that there exists a supply capacity gap in PM training in country. Only a handful of institutions like the NICMAR. Conflict Management and Diversity Management.e. This limitation carries through into the real world of project based organisations. IIMs. Moreover. the practising executives and the HR managers (representing the industry fraternity). Human Resource Management. 7. interpersonal relations and conflict resolution as the second highest area of gain next only to improved decision making ability. Thus there remains a much greater and direct emphasis on the development of ‘hard’ skills. In fact the efforts of the academic institutions to garner for PM the status of a ‘discipline’ with a built in academic rigour and requisite supporting research effort to provide a theoretical and applied bulwark to PM. Therefore it is inferred that attitude competency can be viewed as an essential subset of the overall ‘hard’ skills that are required on projects.

the training costs increase considerably. etc. the distinct requirements of operating in project based organisations.Executives working in project based companies enter with little or no prior orientation of project requirements that are special and unique to their industry. private etc and their academic rankings as appearing in leading media were taken into consideration to arrive at the best possible sample mix. 148 .7 Limitations Of The Research This research is one of the few studies of its kind in India. Therefore as is common with such early efforts. The net loser in this is the industry and eventually the country as a whole which pays for the delayed projects and higher costs to the National Exchequer. Figure 60 depicts the above as a construct. and REP ®s. Questions regarding the ideal size and type of institutions i. HR managers are then charged with the responsibility of designing dedicated PM training modules that would bring direct gains to the project and company. government run. The first challenge lay in determining the sample size as well as the type. Only those institutions offering technical and management programmes at undergraduate and post graduate levels have been included in the study. With very limited tools such as PERT/CPM. in academic institutions. At the same time the benefits of PM training are not fully utilised. With very few options to choose experts due to the general paucity of experts and recognised PM trainers.e. autonomous. 7. they find it difficult to comprehend holistically. They are therefore required to be trained to bring out their best potential while in employment. A few of these are described here. the challenges faced are commensurate with the advantages.

with support from the Ministry. especially against the backdrop of increased Public Private Participation mode of investment.8 Scope For Future Research The future scope of study could include awareness in other types of institutions such as Industrial Training Institutes. No such elaborate data is available at the State Government level. Thirdly the industry perspective could have been further researched for the type and depth of PM training. Furthermore. there is no data on training activity undertaken as part of execution of projects. Roads. and in house corporate training centres. the government’s role in initiating and advancing the PM approach through systematic top down channels such as Ministry of HRD. but were unable to devote much time due to the academic year closure constraints. The views of the government with regard to PM. Space. However budgetary constraints did not make this feasible. Irrigation. Rural Development.May) in order to avoid the closure of institutions for annual vacation. Future studies should address this issue in greater depth. Airports. Ports. 7.The second limitation is that of time availability. need to be researched more to understand their perspectives on PM in general. Housing. such as Urban Development. Lastly the existing awareness and view of students as stakeholders and investors will be a good study on PM education and its effects on their career prospects. in either its user departments or its education arm. Science and Technology. as data had to be collected just before the close of annual academic year (months of April . At the Central Government level. Fourthly the government though a major stakeholder as well as promoter of new educational initiatives. they were curious to know more about PM education. It should be relatively easy to undertake separate study on training and developmental activities in projects being monitored by MOSPI. 149 . Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation also needs to be studied. graduate business management colleges. have not been researched to obtain a wider understanding of PM and its benefits. in house trainers and their approach to PM training etc. Healthcare. The governmental departments that initiate new projects as Clients. The next chapter derives conclusions and recommendations for improving PM education in India. has not been directly approached in this study. In case of executives. Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation (MOSPI) provides detailed and voluminous data on projects executed in the Central Sector. etc. Defence. In both cases. Education. Railways.

These were • • Why is project management as a profession not yet adequately recognized in India? Is India still found wanting in being classified as a ‘project oriented society’? Why have the technical institutes.CHAPTER 8 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS The study began by asking a few pertinent questions regarding the status of PM education in India especially compared to its global counterparts in more advanced ‘projectised’ societies. not introduced PM modules in their curricula? What inhibits leading business schools from introducing a PM curriculum in their course offerings? Should the PM education in technical/business schools be knowledge based or competency based. which leads to the problem of availability and competence of the faculty and instructors required for teaching the discipline? • • • 150 . some of which are many decades old.

PM is yet to be understood as a subject of such universal application and versatility that encompasses all types of businesses and organisations and across almost all sectors of the economy. It is obvious from the study. PM training has resulted in direct gains to both. Based on them. India needs to initiate and sustain greater effort in propagating the benefits of PM to all stakeholders. in its current state. 8. 151 . However. It appears that in its current state. we conclude that. the companies as well as the executives. executives and organisations realising the need for the same. However there exists a huge untapped potential for the widespread establishment of PM in India with a section of the faculty. government and even by the majority of the academic world. Against the backdrop of the enormous amount of money invested in projects and the quantum of upcoming investments in public as well as private initiatives. Viewed from the perspective of the global standards. implementation and control is of utmost significance. it appears from the study that the significance does not appear to have been completely absorbed by the decision makers from the industry. India’s efforts in propagating the PM mindset and methodology of accomplishing organisational and national goals remain substantially behind compared to other developed countries. we make some recommendations. the entrenchment of PM principles in project procurement. that PM training is considered directly beneficial to the practitioners as well as the organisations in terms of better project planning and implementation. the questions above were answered in a number of ways that helped the researchers to arrive at some key conclusions. Compared to our immediate neighbour China.1 Conclusions From the analysis of the secondary literature on the state of PM in India as compared to global standards. All this is reflected in the current status of PM education in India being assessed as ‘below par’ especially when compared against existing global standards. planning.• • What is the role played by professional associations/societies in promoting PM education amongst the industry and government? To what extent is the regulatory authority’s role conducive or insidious in the promulgation of PM education? In the course of the study. India appears far behind what can be considered as an acceptable threshold level of practice of PM.

to build institutional capacity in terms of qualified faculty.1. the limiting factors are the lack of awareness. • Though working executives are clearly in favour of gaining PM competencies at the time of graduation. IITs. NICMAR. it is more as a consequence of their individual interest and not so much arising out of an institutional vision to encourage these pursuits (except in the cases of a handful of the institutions such as. library and other infrastructure.8. IIMs.5 months to introduce new curriculum. 152 . with only the leading institutions of national repute producing limited original research in the area of PM. The average internal lead time is found to be even higher at 19 months. training and instruction material in the technical and business schools as well as in the Indian system as a whole. NITIE.1 Barriers The most prominent barriers to the propagation of PM education in India are found to be the following • There exists a lack of awareness amongst the managements of technical and management institutions. • • The lack of trained instructors in the educational institutions. Thus institutions should take active steps to cover this need gap. about the importance and relevance of teaching PM for capacity building of the technical and professional graduates. • In majority of the cases. Symbiosis etc). Viewed against the response time of a year or more. • Systematic curriculum development with a focussed view to develop PM competencies is found quite absent at graduate and post graduate levels of technical and management schools. it was found that if at all PM interests are pursued by faculty. the response time in introducing PM courses on the part of the institution assumes utmost importance due to the ‘employability’ enhancement feature of PM education. S. • Regulatory approvals took anywhere from more than a year upto 3 years with average of 16. When most of the faculty have admitted that the companies that come for recruitment do look specifically for PM competencies amongst the students. Jain. the overall delays have tended to magnify. inadequate availability of faculty. Lack of research and publications.P.

academia and government needs to be understood as an essential component of organisational success Based on the research study. we recommend model curricula covering introductory level project management courses in general management programmes. 8. in a phased manner to cover a wider net of institutions that are also regionally distributed all over India. Industry and Academic Institutions • Academic institutions should patronise and encourage research in PM at the faculty and students level. government officials and industry • Sustained advocacy of PM in different forums such as industry.2 Recommendations Curriculum development related to PM requires to be more competency focused rather than just knowledge based. This will be an important area for joint academia-industry initiative • Arrange seminars and symposia to deliberate on PM at the national. Sustained efforts are needed on the part of academic institutions to obtain research funding support from national funding agencies and the private sector • PM research pursuits have to be more broad based and penetrate all fields where its benefits are palpable • There is an urgent need to improve awareness through mass media coverage about the PM and the application of PM techniques to business. Curricula in Strategy. Overall it is recommended that Project Management and Technology Area subjects should be taught to develop project level competencies. training in PM is still considered more expensive as compared to training in other fields by the HR departments of project organisations. and undergraduate 153 .• Though efficacious. covering academic institutions. Economics & Finance Area and Behavioural Sciences area should focus on generic knowledge and skill based competencies. Our specific recommendations stemming from the detailed research findings are as follows: • Train the Trainers initiatives and the accreditation of Registered Education Providers®s (REP®s) like PMI need to be pursued vigorously. state and local levels. by all major stakeholders: Government.

Soderlund J. ‘Toward a Typological Theory of Project Management’. You Jie. Wang. and Thomas.7 suggests the Model Course Curricula for the courses mentioned above in longer duration as well short duration modes. Project Management in China. Janice L. Research Policy... 2004. Bill L. Zwerman. Southeast Asia Construction. 2. 2004. Qing S. 25. 5. BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. 154 .. Project Management Institute. ‘Professionalization of Project Management: Exploring the Past to Map the Future’. et al. 3. Issue Sept/Oct 2004. Shenhar A. pp.engineering programmes that can be offered to students in their final year. Shorter duration courses suited for middle management and senior management professionals and finally a course specially designed for Project Leaders would be helpful. 607-632. and Heumann M.. Annexure No. Project Management – International Project Management Journal. Turner R. Lu. International Journal of Project Management 26. 4. ‘On the broadening scope of the research on projects: a review and a model for analysis’. ‘Project Management Education in Project-oriented Societies’. 158-163. and Dvir D. 1996. 2001. pp.

Warsaw. 12. Cable J.How Modern Program & Project Management can Strengthen Organizations. Thomas J. 7. ‘Rethinking project management education: Social twists and knowledge co-production’. Thomas J. Pells D. Berggren C.. 10. 2010. 9. Kumar M. Poland. Zerby J. 304-315. 17.. Published on Thursday. 2006. Industries and Economies. 15.. Warsaw. Morris P. Anbari F. Eleventh on June 25. Oct 29.in/plans/planrel/fiveyr/welcome.. Accessed 155 . Winter M. Conference Paper.. Practitioner development: from trained technicians to reflective practitioners. January 26.6. PM Global Congress Toronto.html. PM World Today March 2009.. 2006. 286-296. 13.. The Global State of Project Management Education and Training. Crawford L. pp.. International Journal of Project Management 26. 2008. Young H. Vol XI. ‘Preparing Project Managers to deal with Complexity – Advanced Project Management Education’. Researching the Value of Project Management Project Management. 2008. and Mengel T. 2008. 2006. 11. Dinsmore P. 14. Mullaly M. Conference Paper. Mullaly M. Project Management as a National Competence. http://www.. Crawford K. Cabanis – Brewin J. Handbook of Project Management.nic. 2 nd Edition. International Journal of Project Management. Researching the Value of Project Management Project Management. Deguire M.. Issue III.. Five Year Plan Document Chapter-wise 2007-12. Analyzing project management research: Perspectives from Top Management Journals. 8.. 2008. July 14.. July 14. ‘The Importance of Project Management in Organizations’. Thomas J. AMA. 27 (2009) 435–446.. Price M.. 16. 2006. pp. Poland. Center for Business Practice. International Journal of Project Management 26. Project Management Maturity Model. and Soderlund J. Vol. Thomas J.planningcommission. 2007. International Journal of Project Management.

accessed on 12/6/2010. 2010 20. 21.. 2009. 23. http://www. May 7.php? op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=1479&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0 28. Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation http://mospi.in/programme/uwss/Guideline_Scheme_IIPDF. 29 Mar 2010 http://economictimes.aspx 24..html 27.org/AboutUs/Pages/FactSheet.in/mospi_pi_status_report.pdf http://www. The Advantages of the Project Management Process. Private Sector to contribute $ 500 billion for infra in 12 th Plan. Accessed on September 2010. PMI to Focus on India and Develop Education Programmes suited to Indian Industry. http://www.projectsmart. Guidelines for India Infrastructure Project Development Fund. http://www.asp Continuing Certification Requirements System. Government of India (Ministry of Statistics & Program Implementation) is organizing a National Consultative Meet on Wednesday.com/news.pmi.pmi.co.urbanindia. accessed on 12/6/2010 25.. PMI.htm 19.com/leadership-articles/the-importance-of-project-management-inorganizations-246928. 22. June 23.uk/the-importance-of-project-management. The Importance of Project Management. Project Implementation Status Report. ISBN: 978-1- 933890-96-8 2009.indiatimes.org/PDF/PM2025_TOCPreface_FINAL. Accessed on June 25. Project Management Circa 2025.projectsmart. http://www.18. http://www.html. GoI.articlesbase. Project Smart. and Bopaya B. 2010.gov.pdf 26.pdf 156 . 11th March.pminorthindia. https://ccrs.uk/the-corporate-advantages-of-a-project-managementprocess.org/PDF/PM2025_TOCPreface_FINAL.pmi.pmi. Cleland D. at Vigyan Bhavan. Wheatley M.aspx. http://www. 2006.org/newsRoom_default.org/Search. Thom W.co.html. http://www. 2008. MOSPI Press Release.com/modules. New Delhi.allpm..nic. 4/4/2005 http://www.

northwestern..nic.asp?FacultyGroupID=11 37. PMP.ndtv. Government mulls new panel on infrastructure 43191?cp 32. Ministry of Labour and Employment. Santosh Kumar.in/lisdapp/Trade/syllabus/pdf/TTMEP.oitcinterfor. Greater London http://iif2010.29. 2004 (M..spjimr.profit.aicte.projectsmart. Michael Hatfield. 2010 08:17 EDT http://www. 2010 from 9:00 AM .in/data/dataf. Govt mulls new panel on infra funding.htm Unni Krishnan. http://www. 35.com/ http://planningcommission. 2010 1:21 PM http://blogs. February 02.htm 33. March 28.pdf 34.uk/pdf/brief-history-of-project-management.E/M.nic.c2clive.org/public/english/region/ampro/cinterfor/news/gasskov.scs.wikipedia. http://www.org/wiki/Industrial_training_institute Gasskov. 2007 North Western University – Distance Learning Course in PM. Syllabus spending.ernet. http://www.pdf. May 13. India Plans $11 Billion Road Fund to Narrow China Gap May 14. website accessed on 8th Jun. GoI.co. New Delhi.bloomberg. Project Managers Surge. http://beta. http://www. in Number and Stature" Baseline.7:00 PM (GMT) London.com/news/show/govt-mulls-new-panel-on-infra-funding- for the Trade of Mechanical (Electrical Power Drives). M.in/faculty/courses.eventbrite.com/apps/news? pid=20601087&sid=aH5i3F2s4wb4 31. under Apprencticeship Training Scheme.org/blog/voices_on_project_management/project-failure/ 36.nic. ILO Report.edu/pdp/npdp/projectmanagement/ 30.Tech) http://www.iimcal.org/ List of Approved Post Graduate Education and Research institutions upto 30th September. DG E&T.in/plans/planrel/plansf.htm http://planningcommission. http://dget. India Infrastructure Forum 2010 Tuesday. 2010. http://www. on March 3. http://en. 2010.php?id=803 157 .pdf Pemberton-Pigott J.pmi. http://www. Sinha O.ac.in/ApprovedInstitute.com/latestnewsdetail. Virzi A.

and Sustaining Economic Growth. Prayag A. January/February 2004.30 am to 1.. Simplex. 45. India emerging to surging Report.com/Economic_Studies/Country_ReportsTD 44.pdf 42. Training India Inc Copyright © 2006. TD d) Mr. Manager HR & Training.infosys.30 pm.1 www.pdf 39. PD b) Alok Kesari Sr. Archives http://www.com/.com/investors/reports-filings/annual- report/annual/Documents/AR-2005/start. 2010). Report Copyright McKinsey and Company® 2010.. Vol. (July 16..00 pm. Wides J. 2010). Key Aspects of Project Management.com/uploads/Linkagespart1. McKinsey Quarterly Country Reports. Wirtenberg J. The Journal of Cost Management. TD (July 21.38. Presentation delivered to Students and Faculty of NICMAR..mckinseyquarterly. Assistant Director. Andrews E. Pune./reports-filings/annual-report/annual/./Infosys-AR-09.. India’s Urban Awakening: Building Inclusive Cities. 2010).. Jayachandran. (June 12..45 pm. Harmon J. Personal Discussions (PD) / Telephonic Discussion (TD) a) Purandare Hemant DGM Training. Gammon India (July 21. The Hindu Business Line http://www. Sr. 43.18. 158 . www..com/manager/2006/10/09/stories/200610090077100 0. Feuss W.thehindubusinessline. General Manager HR.. Time: 2.jeanawirtenbergandassoc. 10. 2010). Pramod Mishra. on 2/12/09.htm 41.htm 40.10 pm PD c) Mr. 10.infosys. http://www. 3.. 6. No.30 am.

of Management Studies. D. Professor & Group Chair 159 . ME Dept. Arora Dr. A.ANNEXURE 1 A. Professor Professor & Head. List Of Respondents Participating In Institutional Survey Sr. Akshay Dvivedi Prof. Vodera Dr. Professor & Head. A. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Name of The Institute Jaypee Institute of Information Technology JBS. S. No. ME Dept. N. IIT-Delhi City Noida Noida Ghaziabad Ghaziabad Ghaziabad Ghaziabad Delhi Respondents Details Samir Dev Gupta Prof. Gupta Prof. ME Dept. K. Banwet / Jain / Gupta / Shankar Designation Associate Dean Professor Professor & Head. Jaypee University ABES Engineering College AKG Engineering College IMS Engineering College Inderprastha Engineering College Dept. Ganguli Dr. K.

Lucknow Dr. Deshmukh Dr. Padma Iyer Sr. A. V S S Kumar Prof. of Chemical Engineering. Shipra Maitra Dr. M. N. Sanjeev Bansal Prof. Mir Iqbal Faheem Prof. MBA Dept. Syed Yousufuddin Prof. College of Engg. M.P. Saroha/Konda/Gupta Dr. A. No. Sanjeev Tandon Associate Professor Director & Head Ph. J. Professor & Head. M.8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Dept.D. M. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Name of The Institute Institute of Environment and Management Deccan College of Engg & Tech Vasavi College of Engg M. K. Swamy Prof. C L N Sastry Designation Associate Prof. Raju G Lucknow Dr. Bhasker Prof. Sunil Kumar Director Professor & Director Professor & Director Noida Anwari.R. Prof & Head of Business Mgmt Head Water Resource Dept 160 . Amity University Army Institute of Management and Technology Galgotias College of Engineering and Technology Galgotias College of Engineering and Technology Lal Bhadur Shastri Institute of Management and Development Studies ACCF. & Head Principal/Professor Prof & Head Civil Engg deptt Prof & Head Civil Engg deptt Prof & Head Civil Engg deptt Prof & Head Transporatation Engg Deptt. Ambedkar Open University Engg Staff College of India City Lucknow Hyderabad Hyderabad Hyderabad Hyderabad Hyderabad Hyderabad Hyderabad Respondents Details Chandan Ghosh Dr. & Technology University College of Engg JNTU Hyderabad Dr. IITDelhi ABS. Dr. ME Dept. Lakshmana Rao Prof. & Area Chairperson Marketing Professor & Head. B. Malik/Dr. Amity University IEM Management College Delhi Noida Greater Noida Greater Noida Greater Noida Dr. K .

Prof & Head Civil Engg deptt Prof & Head Civil Engg deptt Asso. Sohail Bux Prof. M.Kumaraswamy Asst.R 40 Bangalore Ms.K. Reader & Head Mechanical Engg Deptt Asst. N. S.Venugopal K.24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 Sr. Prof. Abir Bandyopadhyay Dr. Shrikrishna Dhale Dr. Bharat Gupta Dr. Deshpande Dr. R.L. Lapalikar Dr.Prabhakaran 161 .s. Prof & Head Civil Engg Deptt. Ganesan Dr.N. Deepak Killedar Dr. Tiwari Prof. V. 34 35 36 YCCE G. Patil Dr. N. Director R & D Professor & Professor I/C Academics Designation Prof & Dean Student Welfare Principal Principal and Professor Principal Vice Principal Principal Professor and academic coordinator Professor 37 38 39 Bangalore Bangalore Bangalore Dr.S.Nethaji S.G. N.Purnima K. Prof & Head Civil Engg Deptt. C. Deptt.P 41 Bangalore Dr. Bhopal RKDFCT & R Shree Institute of Science & Tech MANIT Name of The Institute Shree G. Kanhe Prof. Raisoni College of Engg Priyadarshni College of Engg SRKNEC VNIT NIT Raipur UIT RGPV. Prof & Head Civil Engg deptt Asst. V. A. Institute of Tech & Science Indore Institute of Science & Tech Dayanand Sagar School of Management studies Dayanand Sagar College of Engineering BMS College of Engineering University OF Viswesvariya College of Engineering Institute of Businness Management nad Research (IBMR) Alliance Bussiness Academy Nagpur Nagpur Nagpur Nagpur Nagpur Raipur Bhopal Bhopal Bhopal Bhopal City Indore Indore Bangalore Prof A.Sekhar Dr. Prof & Head Civil Engg Deptt. Rajesh Gupta Dr. & Head Arch. No.H.D. Mittal Respondents Details Dr.

Chandraswamy T.Mech Deptt Professor Professor Professor Dy.Josephs College of Engineering Name of The Institute St.Institute of Management AMC College of Management Community Institute of Management and Sciences AMC College of Engineering Jeppiar Engineering College Jeppiar School of Management St.V.MBA deptt Professor and Head. V.MBA deptt Director and Professor Director and Principal Principal Head.Balaji Dr. D.V.P DR.K.B.42 43 Christ University Oxford College of Bussiness Management R.Joshi 58 Pune 59 Pune Prof.A. Head & Professor Professor 162 44 45 46 Bangalore Bangalore Bangalore 47 48 49 50 Sr.Vekateswaran Associate PRO and Lecturer Professor Professor and Head.Jayakumar Dr. Hiraben Nanavati Institute of Management Abhinav Education Society's College of Architecture Bangalore Bangalore Prof.P.S.Alex Joseph Dr. Rajan Rawal Prof. MBA Deptt Professor and Director Princpal Professor and Programme manager. Mechanical deptt Designation Professor and HOD.V. M.R.Josephs College of Management Sai Ram Institute of Management studies Sai Ram College of Engineering Vellore Institute of Technology Indian Institute of Management CEPT Indera Institute of Management MKSSS's Smt.Prakash Dr.Tanve Prof Muthukumar Respondents Details Prof.Mohanram Dr.C. Satish Yashwant Deodhar Prof.Kuppan Prof.Jayanthi Patil Dr.Maran Dr.S.Krishnan Ramanathan Prof. Sujata Deshmukh .MBA Deptt Professor.R. 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 Bangalore Chennai Chennai Chennai City Chennai Chennai Chennai Vellore Ahmedabad Ahmedabad Pune Dr. No.P.Sushil Lal Das Dr.Gopal/ Ms.K.S.

P. Chandawarkar Prof. Hemachandra Dr. Sanjeev D.Easow Prof. R.60 61 62 MKSSS's Cummins College of Engineering for Women Genba Sopanrao Moze College of Engineering International School Of Business and Media College Of Engineering. Kolkata IES College of Architecture NIT. T. Bombay Sardar Patel College Of Engineering Rajiv Gandhi Institute Of Technology Name of The Institute Pune Prof. P.R.Bhostekar Respondents Details Professor Professor Professor Principal Designation IIM . G. Rourkela VJSOM.M. S. Bombay NITIE IES College of Engineering KJ Somaiya Institute of Engineering & Information Technology Institute of Chemical Kolkata Prof.De Executive Director 63 64 65 66 Sr.Kumar Professor Pune Dr.Divekar Professor Pune Prof. IIT. 67 Pune Mumbai Mumbai Mumbai City Dr.Shaikh 75 76 Mumbai Mumbai Prof.Bhosale Prof. N. Baliarsingh Prof. M. IIT Kharagpur Padma Bhushan Vasant Dada Patil Institute of Technology IIT . No.Mhaske.Shankar Murthy Prof.Kiran Kumar Momaya Prof. Bagchi Prof. Indrajeet Jain Prof. Vrinda P.N.K.N.T . udhav Bhosale / Prof. pune SOM.S.W. Vaidya Professor Principal InCharge Professor Professor Principal Professor Professor Professor & Programme Coordinator HOD & Professor Professor 163 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 Mumbai Rourkela Kharagpur Pune Mumbai Mumbai Mumbai Prof. Ullas Prof. Sukhanand.P.

Weginwar HOD & Professor 80 81 Chandrapur Bhubaneswar Dr. Mr. Junior Engr. No.Kalambe Dr. Asst.Main Prof. Rohit Bansal Mr. Site Engr.Vijay Waragade Head & Professor Head & Professor 79 Chandrapur Dr. Site Engr. Amit Poddar Mr. Sahil Sadashiv Kave Mr. Hemat Ratnakar Mr.C.J. TATA Consulting Engineers Ltd Technip KT India Ltd. Ravindra U. Vineet Kumar Mr. List Of Respondents Participating In Working Executives Survey Sr.77 78 Technology VJTI Indira College of Engineering & Management Rajiv Gandhi College of engineering and Technology Government College of Engineering KIIT.Bhagat Mr. Mahadev Ashok Mohite Mr. Prakash S. Ltd Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Respondents Details Mr.Engineer Project Manager Asst. Professor B. Amol Shashikant Bidwai Mr.Project Management Project Control Engineer Sr. Nokia Siemens Networks Pvt. 164 . Sector Engr. Bhushan Pramod Joshi Site Engr.P.S. Site Engr. Nitin N Shah Mr. Bari Mohit Kamlakar Designation Field Manager -TI Group Leader. Ajay Vishwakarma Mr. Site Engr. Kamran Ganai Mr. Anand V. Sector Engr. Sector Engr. Management School Mumbai Mumbai Prof. Rahul Chavan Mr. Keni Mr. Vijaya Bandyopadhyay Professor Asst. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Name of The Organisation NSN Technip KT India Ltd. Kulkarni Mr. Manager-Projects Project Engr. Rajiv G.

Contract Manager . Miskin Mr.Contract Engineer . Sr. Sachin Tiwari Mr. P. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Suraj T.Saha Mr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Durgaprasad Pandey Mr. Virendra Kumar Singh Manager – Civil Mr.Contracts Engineer . Designation Trainee Engr. Sector Engr.Contracts 165 . Sector Engr. Amar Raghunath Putta Mr.Anbu Ganapathy Respondents Details Mr. Devendra Singh Mr.Contracts Engineer .Engr.Ltd Rourkela Steel Plant Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Lodha Group Vijay Infrastructure Ltd DLF Projects Ltd TATA Projects Ltd Name of The Organisation Ramky Infrastructure DLF Projects Ltd Miskin & Associates Ramky Infrastructure Ltd Motherson Group of Companies Systematic Cons Com Ltd Structwel Designers & Consultants Pvt. Site Engr. Engr.M. Mahendra Jayant Dhanve Mr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Manager Mr. Dhananjay K. – Projects Manager . Site Engr. Shweta Phansalkar Mr. Site Engr.-Planning Asst. Site Engr. P. Sandeep Kodandapani Mr. Manager (Audit & MIS) Asst. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Nivrutti Davekar Mr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Harikrishna V S Mr.Contract Manager . Ravi Chandra Mr. – Project A. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Prashant Ashokrao Shrisath Mr. Ashish Khaparde Mr. Site Engr.G. Ravindra Lande Site Engr. No.17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Sr. Sri Devajit Das Mr. Mr. Amol Kesarkar Mr. Ravindra Bhagat Mr. Asst. Prattipati Mallikarjun Rao Ms. Mr. Pandurang Chopade Mr. Jitendra Yadav Mr. Mahapatra Mr. Madhav Nizalapur Sr. Vijay Ashok Bhore Mr. Manager – Civil Cons. Manasa Rayabhari Mr.Contracts Engineer .Contract Manager . Manager-Projects Trainee Engr. D. Jegonathan N. Engr. Site Engr.

Suvidha Aherkar Mr. M. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.Contract Engineer . Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. . Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd. Murugaiah Mr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd.Projects Trainee Engr. Udhayakumar Mr. Manikandan Mr. Name of The Organisation No. A.M.Planning Manager .Contract Manager . Erode Mr.G. C. A. Sachin Jadhav Mr. . Prakash Hiremath Mr. M.Projects Manager . . Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. A. Ashutosh Mukherjee Ms. Navaneetha Krishnan Mr. Nikhil Solanki Mr. R. Neelabh Mr. Engineer D.Projects Designation A.G. C. A.M. Sr.M. Vijayakumar Mr. & Engineer Contracts Engineer .G.M. A.Projects Sr.Projects D.S.Contract Management Trainee Q.Projects Manager . Avinash Momle Mr. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd. Ezra Praveen.M. Krishnan Mr.Projects Asst.M.M. Srinivasan Respondents Details Mr.G. S. A. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.Projects Engineer . Vetrivel Mr.Planning Engineer . Loganathan Mr. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.Projects A. Chakrapani Mr. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd. Sagar Kanade Mr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Muthu Rathinam Mr. . . . Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.Projects A. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd. R.Planning Engineer . E. V.Projects A.G. 54 URC Construction (P) Ltd. URC Construction (P) Ltd.Contracts Sr. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.Planning 166 53 URC Construction (P) Ltd.G.Projects D. Kandasamy Mr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. S.G. Erode 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 URC Construction (P) Ltd.M. .Projects A. Rajaguru Mr. Thamil Nathan Mr. N. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Manager . Vishal Fiske Mr. Sushanta Kumar Guha Engineer .M.M. Erode Sr.G. P Mr. A. Siva Shanmugam Mr.G. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.G. Erode Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. .(B & E) Manager . Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. .45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Saravanan Mr.G. Neelakandan Mr. Manager . Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.M. . Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd. Erode URC Construction (P) Ltd.

Sandeep Mr.Planning Manager . Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd.Planning Engineer . Rituraj Mr. Mr. Anand D.Planning Engineer . Y. M. Karunakar Mr.Planning Engineer . Mahesh Somvanshi Mr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Bhaskar Ganesh Mr. C.73 74 75 76 77 78 79 Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd.Planning Engineer .Planning 167 . Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd.Planning Engineer . Ketan Shah Mr. T V N S S Sri Charan Engineer .

80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 Name of The Organisation Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd.2005) 168 .Planning Sr. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. Rajesh Sharma Mr.Planning Manager . Ltd Shapoorji Pallonji & Co. Siddhartha Nath Designation Engineer . Manager . Ltd Respondents Details Mr.Construction ANNEXURE 2 a (DEC . P. Manager D. . Nitin Krishnaji Pathak Mr. Tushar Hire Mr.Sr. Virupakshaiah Mr. Manager .Planning Engineer .M.Planning Engineer . Soumya Roy Mr.Construction Dy. Ltd Shapoorji Pallonji & Co. Ltd Shapoorji Pallonji & Co. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd.G. Hindustan Construction Comapany Ltd. No. Ltd Shapoorji Pallonji & Co.Construction Sr. Shapoorji Pallonji & Co.Projects Sr. Vinod Ramrao Surve Mr. Manager . Winner Mattoo Mr. Shashank Pitale Ms.

Ltd. Gujarat Industries Power Co.56 0. 5. S J V N Ltd. 8.49 0. Ltd. North Eastern Electric Power Corpn. of Andhra Pradesh Ltd. Ltd. N T P C Ltd. Neyveli Lignite Corpn. Mecon Ltd. 3. 18 . 12 . O N G C Videsh Ltd.04 0. 6. Bhagheeratha Engineering Ltd. 13 . Engineers India Ltd. 15 . Ltd.S. 10 . Jindal Drilling & Inds.31 0. . Geo Connect Ltd. H L S Asia Ltd.03 0.1 0. 9.01 0.2 0. N P D C Co.02 26 2 0.57 169 1. Bhoruka Power Corpn. 16 . 4. Company Name Staff training Annual (Rs. A P Power Generation Corpn. Ircon International Ltd. N T P C Hydro Ltd. 2. 14 .15 0.22 0. 11 . 7. 17 . Engineering Projects (India) Ltd.03 0.05 0.34 0. No. Crore) 0. Ltd.12 0. Ltd.

Total CMIE Database.29 0. 22 . Ltd. 4. Engineering Projects (India) Ltd. Company Name Staff training Annual(Rs. 6.01 31. Utility Powertech Ltd. Ltd.19 . Crore) 0. Sunil Hitech Engineers Ltd.06 0. Tata Projects Ltd. 21 .04 0.02 0. 3.24 0. 2010 0. Engineers India Ltd. 20 . Andhra Pradesh Power Generation Corpn. Dakshin Haryana Bijli Vitran Nigam Ltd.2006) S. 5.08 0. 2. Bhoruka Power Corpn. No.01 0. Brigade Enterprises Ltd.47 170 1.59 ANNEXURE 2 b (DEC . . Ltd. Tamil Nadu Police Housing Corpn.68 0.

Promac Engineering Inds. Ltd.61 171 .01 0. Ltd. 16. 10. Ltd.01 2. 23.22 0. 13. Orissa Power Generation Corpn. Lodha Developers Ltd. Ltd. 22.13 0.14 40.88 0.7.05 30. 8. 14. N T P C Ltd.02 0. 25. Corpn.53 1. Ltd. 18. Ltd.68 0.03 0.01 0.02 0. Pvt. 9. Tamil Nadu Police Housing Corpn. N T P C Hydro Ltd.55 0. Lurgi India Co.07 0. Neyveli Lignite Corpn. Of Andhra Pradesh Ltd. Ltd. Tamil Nadu Electricity Board 24. Gujarat Industries Power Co. North Eastern Electric Power Corpn. H L S Asia Ltd.7 1. 15. Ircon International Ltd. Ltd. 20. S J V N Ltd. Total CMIE Database. Gujarat Energy Transmission Corpn. Geo Connect Ltd. 12.36 0. 17.47 0.18 0. Lanco Infratech Ltd. Tamilnadu Adidravidar Housing & Devp. Ltd. 11. 21. 2010 0. 19. Northern Power Distribution Co.

15 .35 0. D L F Laing O'Rourke (India) Ltd.04 0. 0.2007) Sr. 11 .18 . Ltd.17 0. 9. 4. H L S Asia Ltd.4 0.26 0. Crore) Andhra Pradesh Power Generation Corpn. 7.01 0. Lanco Infratech Ltd. Brigade Enterprises Ltd. 3.32 0. D L F Commercial Developers Ltd. 1. Ltd. 5.79 0. 10 . 13 .47 0.ANNEXURE NO. Engineers India Ltd. Jindal Drilling & Inds. No. Ircon International Ltd. 12 .19 0. 16 . 2. Dakshin Haryana Bijli Vitran Nigam Ltd. 17 .51 0. Ltd. 6. Ltd. 14 . Geo Connect Ltd. K Raheja Corp Pvt. J M C Projects (India) Ltd. Gujarat Energy Transmission Corpn. 0. 8.64 0.09 0. D L F Home Developers Ltd.36 0.13 172 Company Name Staff training Annual (Rs. Engineering Projects (India) Ltd.2 c (DEC .

173 . 2010 0.6 0. Ltd.03 0. North Eastern Electric Power Corpn. 21 . 22 .09 0. Ltd.52 Northern Power Distribution Co. Tamil Nadu Police Housing Corpn. Ltd. Neyveli Lignite Corpn. 29 .2 1. Total Total CMIE Database.31 0.04 0. R N S Infrastructure Ltd. Of Andhra Pradesh Ltd. 27 . Corpn. 25 . 20 .26 0.1 0.18 . 30 .02 29.69 42. 31 . Ltd. N T P C Hydro Ltd.07 1. S J V N Ltd.26 1. Uttar Haryana Bijli Vitran Nigam Ltd. Tamilnadu Adidravidar Housing & Devp. 23 . N T P C Ltd.4 0. 24 . Tata Projects Ltd. Orissa Power Generation Corpn. Tamil Nadu Electricity Board 28 . Mahindra Water Utilities Ltd. Ltd.54 2. 19 . 26 .

Jindal Drilling & Inds.01 0. Ltd. Gujarat Energy Transmission Corpn. Mahindra Water Utilities Ltd. Hinduja Properties Ltd. D L F Laing O'Rourke (India) Ltd. 18.09 0. 9.01 1.16 0. 3. 22. 19.03 0. Ircon International Ltd. D L F Home Developers Ltd.45 0. 4.92 1.89 0. 6. D L F Commercial Developers Ltd. H L S Asia Ltd. Engineers India Ltd. Kirloskar Constructions & Engineers Ltd. 10.83 0.35 1. 21. Kei-Rsos Maritime Ltd. Ganesh Housing Corpn. 23. Brigade Enterprises Ltd.01 0.47 0. 13. Ltd.62 Annual (Rs.01 1. J M C Projects (India) Ltd. Ltd. 16.33 0.07 0.02 0. Bhoruka Power Corpn. Company Name 1.37 0. 0. Kanti Bijlee Utpadan Nigam Ltd. 20. Ltd. Ltd. 24. 8.31 0. 5. Jubilant Infrastructure Ltd. 17. No. Dakshin Haryana Bijli Vitran Nigam Ltd. 12. Engineering Projects (India) Ltd. Lanco Infratech Ltd. 11.84 0. 2.3 0.84 0.2008) S. Andhra Pradesh Power Generation Corpn.02 0. 14. 15. Ltd. Crore) Staff training . Lodha Developers Ltd.ANNEXURE 2 d (DEC . 7. K Raheja Corp Pvt.06 174 1.

42.08 34. 32.44 0. 34. Neyveli Lignite Corpn. Based on secondary research of developed countries. 39. Tata Projects Ltd.19 0. Ltd.1 0.96 ANNEXURE 3 QUESTIONNAIRE FOR INSTITUTIONS This is a pioneering effort being carried out for the first time in India to find out the factors that are aiding or hindering the establishment of project management curricula in our technical and business management institutions. 35. Ltd. 29. 37. U Tech Developers Ltd.03 0. Marg Ltd. S J V N Ltd.06 0. Uttar Haryana Bijli Vitran Nigam Ltd. Omaxe Buildwell Pvt. 36.04 0. Northern Power Distribution Co. 28. Shipra Estate Ltd. Mecon Ltd. 41. Total CMIE Database. 2010 4. as also amongst popular psyche thus earning them an appellation of being 175 . Ltd.6 0. Of Andhra Pradesh Ltd. Tamil Nadu Electricity Board 38. Ltd.51 0. 27.54 0. a major finding that emerges is that project management as a scientific discipline is deeply entrenched in the educational fabric of these countries. Ltd. Ltd.27 0.42 0. Promac Engineering Inds. N T P C Ltd. Ltd. North Eastern Electric Power Corpn. 43.11 0.25. 31.11 0. Sheth Developers Pvt.19 59. 33. Corpn.13 1. Tamilnadu Adidravidar Housing & Devp. Orissa Power Generation Corpn. Utility Powertech Ltd. 30. 26. Ltd.02 2 0.03 1. Tamil Nadu Police Housing Corpn. 40.

governments. please contact Dr. The information provided will be kept strictly confidential and will be used solely for the purposes of this research. knowledge and opinion alone. It is designed to gather information based on your personal experience. Mona N. The study from the point of view of educational institutions is to determine the factors that affect the inclusion of project management curricula. Thank you for your interest. Universally. The third part aims to identify any distinguishing factors that characterize the specific PM curriculum development. Shah at mnshah@nicmar. For every question. If you have any comments or enquiries. It will not be taken to represent or reflect your institution’s view-points. The fourth part deals with finding out about the existing educational infrastructure available with institutions and also management support available to the institutions to establish new courses. Also covered are regulatory aspects that affect the decision-making and launch of new curricula.ac. This research does not involve any sensitive issues. and non-governmental organizations practice the ‘projects’ approach to fulfill their targets and goals. Survey Instructions The survey is divided into four parts. The second part aims at discovering your general opinion on project management (PM) curricula. The first part asks for your background information. 176 . A major reason for this may be attributed to project management being included as necessary curricula in all streams of education. project management as a discipline would have had a much higher acceptance by the industry and Project Management (PM) courses would have been taught in India’s technical and business schools. you are asked to provide a tick/score as per your opinion. If so be the case. large private corporations.in or 020 27291342/ 65102745.‘project-oriented societies’.

PART I RESPONDENT'S PARTICULARS Name Name of Institution Designation Address of institution Tel (O): Mobile No. kindly give Years: Years: Personal name: Organization’s name: Please indicate whether Yes: 177 . Fax (O): Email Office Personal How many years of work/research experience do you have in academics? How many years of experience do you have in curriculum/syllabus development? Would you agree if we acknowledge you in our report for your contribution and assistance in the survey? If yes.

you would like to receive a summary of the report upon completion of this research No: 178 .

PART II GENERAL OPINION ON EXISTING STATE OF PM EDUCATION IN INDIA 1. Has your institute considered introducing PM in curricula of any programme ? 3. What in your opinion is the current status of PM education in India? 2. at what level has this been considered? Please also mention the name of the programme 4. Which type of PM related courses do you run? Please also mention the name of the course Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent Yes: No: Under Graduate: PostGraduate: Advanced Level: Research Level: Certificate Elective Course: Compulsory Course: 179 . If yes.

Specialized institutions : .5.Any other Elementary: Intermediate: Advanced: Somewhat Essential Fairly Essential Essential Very Essential Absolutely Essential 180 .Architecture .Planning and design . Engineering Colleges? 2. In your opinion how essential is it to teach PM in 1. Of what intensity is the course? 6.Infrastructure management . Management Institutions 3.

Scales: 1-Not Important. 4-Very Important. Scheduling. Health/Safety/Environment in Projects 7. 2. Cost Estimation and budgeting 8. Planning. 4-Advanced (Doctoral / Post Doctoral). 5– Applied Research A: MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY Ratings 1-5 1. in the box marked ‘Level’. Project Site and Equipment Management. 1 2 Levels 3 4 5 181 . Rate them according to the following scale and write the corresponding scale number in the box given below. Projects Marketing 11. 2-Somewhat Important. Monitoring and Control Techniques 3. 3-Post-Graduate. Also. Project Quality Management 6. Operations Research for Projects 5. 2-Under-Graduate.PART III CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Given below are the set of subject areas essential to develop PM competencies among students. Statistical Methods for Project Analysis 4. Quantity Surveying and Estimation 10. 3-Important. please tick the level / levels at which these competencies should be covered. Course-Levels: 1-Certificate. 5Extremely Important.Accounting and Control Systems 9. Operations management for Projects.

Facilities Engineering and Management 16. Financial Management 5. Special Purpose Vehicles 9. Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects 8. Any other ( Please specify ) B: STRATEGY. Process Design. Social Cost Benefit Analysis 4. Any other ( Please specify ) 1 2 Levels 3 4 5 182 .12. Risk and Insurance Management 7. Logistics & Supply Chain Management 17. Contract Management 14. Project Procurement & Materials Management 13. Project Financing 6. Transportation Management 18. Project Formulation and Appraisal 20. Strategic Alliances. ECONOMICS AND FINANCE Ratings 1-5 1. Legal. Project Joint Ventures. Project Engineering 21. Technology and Engineering Management 19. Macro-Economic Policy 2./Engineering/Testing/Commissioning 15. Project Strategy 3.

Estm8. PM software-Primavera. Team Building. Industrial/Labour Relations 5. Engineering Software (Auto-Cad. Ansys. Enterprise Resource Planning ( ERP ) 3. Excel / SPSS / DBMS 6. Any other ( Please specify ) 183 Levels 2 3 4 5 . Diversity Management 7. Project Organization and Structure 2. Staadpro. Calquan) 5. Auto-Revit. 3D-Max. Leadership. Conflict Management 6. MSP. other soft skills) 3. Managerial Skills for Projects (Communication. GIS / GPS for Project Management 2. Human Resources Management in Projects 4.B: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES AREA Ratings 1 1. e-Business Applications 4. Negotiation. Any other ( Please specify ) 2 Levels 3 4 5 C: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Ratings 1 1.

Oil and Gas Exploration 17. Civil Aviation 10. Roadways 8. Shipbuilding 12. Ports 11. Mega Property Developments 14. Telecom 3. Services 18. Information Communication Technology (ICT) 2. Defense 7. International Project Management 19. Petrochemicals 15. Railways 9. Space Exploration 5. Any other ( Please specify ) 2 3 4 5 Level 184 . Technology 6. Research and Development 4. Chemical Engineering 16. Urban Infrastructure 13.D: SECTOR SPECIFIC Score 1 1.

Available. Management vision 9. Computer Labs 6. Rate them according to the following scale and write the corresponding scale number in the box given below. The last part deals with the regulatory environment and the extent to which it affects the institution’s management in taking decisions for the same. Any other ( Please specify ) 2 3 4 5 B : MANAGEMENT SUPPORT 1. REGULATORY FACTORS AND CURRENT STATUS OF PM RESEARCH IN INSTITUTE This section deals with the existing issues faced by institutions’ management in setting up courses related to the PM area. 4-Easily Available.PART IV INFRASRUCTURE. Classrooms 4. Have there been attempts in the past to introduce 185 Yes: No: . 5Very Easily Available. MANAGEMENT SUPPORT. 2-Somewhat Available. Course Material 3. Scales: 1-Not Available. A : INSTITUTE INFRASTRUCTURE Ratings 1 1. These issues are internal in nature. Availability of research facilities 8. 3. Qualified faculty 7. Laboratories 5. Availability of library and eresources 2.

186 . will the introduction of PM courses improve the employability of the students? 5.To some extent .To considerable extent . If interested.courses/more courses in PM in your institute? 2. The latter part of the questionnaire revolves around how institution's management overcomes regulatory limitations. do companies specifically ask for PM competencies in the students? If so to what extent ? . If yes tick the degree to which the progress was made in their introduction. 3. when are you planning to introduce PM courses in the institute? 4. During recruitment.To great extent Yes: No: Somewhat Fairly Good Considera bly Immensely 0 to 6 Mths >6 Mths to 1yr >1 to 2 yrs > 2yrs to 3yrs > 3 yrs Negligible Initial Considerable Advanced Established C : REGULATORY FACTORS You are required to respond to the extent of regulatory challenges that are faced by engineering/business institutes in the introduction of new courses. In your opinion.

1. Have you personally been involved in project management related research? Yes: No: If the answer is Yes. Tick the category in which your institution exists (There may be more than one simultaneous category) 2. availability of resources and funding for the same. Regulatory approvals 4. Own Professional Interest If the answer is No. Department AICTE International Accredited ( Please specify ) D : CURRENT POSITION OF RESEARCH IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT AREA This section deals with the current position of PM related research in the Institution. Which of the above activities takes place simultaneously 0 to 6 mths >6m to 1yr 0 to 6 mths >6m to 1yr 0 to 6 mths >6m to 1yr >6m to 1yr 0 to 6 mths >6m to 1yr >1 to 2 yrs >1 to 2 yrs >1 to 2 yrs >1 to 2 yrs >1 to 2 yrs > 2yrs to 3yrs > 3 yrs > 2yrs to 3yrs > 3 yrs > 2yrs to 3yrs > 3 yrs > 2yrs to 3yrs > 3 yrs > 2yrs to 3yrs > 3 yrs Autonomous Unaffiliated.This section deals with the approximate time period in which new courses may be introduced. 1. Recruitment and training of faculty 5. Academic Council / BoS approval 0 to 6 mths 3. non AICTE Univ. Affiliated /Univ. Resource building (library/journals etc) 6. after the course design is ready. please specify the funding source ) 1b. then tick the following option/s 1a. Funded Research ( If yes. It also covers the factors that impede the research / publications in PM area. then tick the following option/s to state which of the following 187 .

Conference/Seminar Papers 2d. Articles 2b.factors impede the research in PM area in your Institute 1c. Lack of awareness of PM as a systematic academic and research discipline 1d. Inadequate information regarding sources of funding for PM Research 2. Books 3. Availability of Literature Books Journals E-Resources Others 1f. Research Papers 2c. please specify Yes for Program: Yes for Certificate: No: No: INTERVIEWER’S DETAILS Name: Signature: Date: Time: 188 . Have you/any other member of faculty undergone a programme / certification in PM area? 4. Would you like to state anything else ? If yes. Do you/any member of the faculty have Yes: any published work in this area? If the answer is Yes. Level of Courses Offered 1e. then tick the following option/s 2a.

4 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.4 The correlation matrix gives the correlation coefficient of each and every subject (factor) with rest of the subjects (factors).5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.6 0.3 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.5 0. 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.8 189 0.6 0.6 Part III A.3 0.2 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.5 ANNEXURE 4 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.8 1 .7 0.3 0. MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.7 0.3 0.5 0. Here.4 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.6 1 0.5 CORRELATION MATRIX OF FACTORS (SUBJECTS) CONTAINED IN QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS (Part III A) 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.6 0.6 1 0.4 0.6 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 1 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.5 0. If the correlation coefficient between two subjects is very high.7 0. we check the same for selected different groups of subjects. 0.6 0.4 0.e.5 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.6 0. then both the subjects (factors) are to be treated as single factor.3 0.6 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.7 1 0.4 0.6 0. i.4 0.6 1 0.6 0.7 1 0.5 0.6 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.3 0..5 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.A14 A15 A16 A17 A18 A19 A20 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.3 0.5 0.90 or above.5 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.

5 0.4 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.3 0.71 0.3 0.4 0.58 0.5 0.3 0.65 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.7 1 0.5 0.00 0.17 1.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.52 A10 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.76 0.5 0. Therefore.4 0.6 0.73 1.3 0.64 0.3 0.6 0. all the selected subjects in this group is significant of their own capacity.5 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.2 0.5 0.5 0.71 0.3 0.2 0.64 0.5 0.3 0.58 A12 0.18 1.4 0.3 0.65 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.6 0.7 1 A14 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.56 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.67 0.5 0.4 0.61 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.38 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.21 0.5 A18 0.6 0.76 1.64 B3 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.5 0. In the group of Management and Technology.5 0.7 A16 0.72 0.72 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.55 0.5 0.23 0.5 0.4 0. BEHAVIOURIAL SCIENCES AREA B8 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.65 0.4 0.4 0.6 B7 0.73 0.6 0.3 0.6 A17 0.00 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.3 1 A11 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.6 0.7 A15 0.27 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.86 Part III B.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.14 0.6 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.5 1 A3 0.4 A19 0.5 0.2 0.67 1. STRATEGY.90.3 0.6 0.4 0.6 1 A8 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.55 B2 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.72 0.60 0.86 1.3 0.7 0.72 0.80 0.4 1 A4 0.3 0. Part III C.00 0.65 0.38 A13 0.5 0.14 0.6 A20 0.5 0.6 0.65 0.6 1 B4 0. So.3 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.7 1 A5 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.8 0.5 0. the correlation coefficient of each subject/factor with rest of the subject is below 0.4 0.21 0.5 0.61 0.4 0.68 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.00 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.3 0. ECONOMICS AND FINANCE Similarly.3 0.5 0.3 0.2 0. here also the correlation coefficients of each subject/factor with rest are not more than 0.00 190 .5 0.5 0.8 0.5 0.5 0.56 0.18 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.6 1 B5 0.00 0.71 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.6 0.5 0.27 0.4 0.6 0.00 0.5 0.68 A9 0.52 0.5 0.3 0.6 0.4 0.8 1 B6 0.3 0.4 0.2 0.3 0.6 0. all the subjects in this group is significant.64 0.80 1.4 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.60 0.6 1 A6 0.5 0.7 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 A7 0.4 0.17 0.A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 A9 A10 A11 A12 A13 A1 1 A2 0.5 1 B1 1.6 0.5 0.23 0.00 0.71 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.90.3 0.7 0.5 0.65 0.3 0.

6 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.72 0.8 D3 0.9 0.54 0.35 1.8 0.8 0.9 1 0.9 0.35 0.54 0.45 0.9 1 1 0.64 0.9 0.9 0.6 0.68 0.9 0.50 0.9 0.9 0.8 0.43 0.9 0.7 0.9 0.6 0.9 0.9 1 0.8 0.6 0.8 0.7 0.58 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.6 0.9 0.39 0.9 1 .49 0.8 0.8 0.35 0.59 0.9 0.49 0.9 1 0.8 0.9 0.46 0.8 0.7 D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.00 Part III D.38 0.53 0.9 0.9 0.8 0.9 1 1 1 0.7 0.00 0.8 0. all the subjects included in this group is significant.00 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.81 1.8 0.66 0.64 1.9 0.38 0.39 0.6 0.00 0.7 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.47 0.8 0.6 0.9 0.E) 0.7 0. CORRELATION MATRIX OF FACTORS (SUBJECTS) IN THE SECTOR SPECIFIC AREAS (Part III.9 0.9 0.6 0.6 0.9 0.9 1 0.9 0.00 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.81 0.00 0.78 0.9 0.9 0.81 1.9 0.E7 E8 E9 E10 E11 E12 E13 E14 E15 E16 E17 E18 0.7 0.9 0.6 0.90.9 0.9 0.53 0.9 0.7 0.9 0.9 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.9 0.00 0.6 0.9 0.7 0.7 0.9 0.79 1.66 1.8 0.8 0.8 D4 0.9 0.9 0.66 0.9 1 In this group also all the coefficients is less then 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.7 0.9 0.8 0.9 D5 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.66 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.35 0.9 D1 1.68 1.9 0.8 0.9 0.7 0.9 D2 0.54 0.9 0.9 0. the correlation coefficients of each subject/factor with rest factors are below 0.9 0.7 0. 0.6 0.00 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.78 0.46 0.47 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9 1 According to the results given above.54 0.8 0.7 0.9 0.8 0.43 0.50 0.9 0.9 1 0.9 0.9 0.90 and they show their importance for including this group. Therefore.9 0.6 0.9 0.8 0.57 0.58 1.8 0.9 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0.9 0.72 1.8 0.8 0.7 0.9 0.9 0.00 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.9 0.8 0.59 0.9 0.00 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 1.00 0.7 0.9 0.9 1 0.9 0.6 0.9 0.8 0.9 0.81 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.9 1 191 0.8 0.9 0.6 0.9 0.9 0.8 0. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 0.45 0.57 0.9 0.8 0.79 0.8 0.

0.7 0.6 0.9 E6 E6 0.7 0. large private corporations.6 0. If so be the case. Survey Instructions The survey is divided into four parts.7 0.6 0. The study from the point of view of educational institutions is to determine the factors that affect the inclusion of project management curricula. The first part asks for your background information.6 0. There are so many similar results in this correlation matrix.92.7 0. as also amongst popular psyche thus earning them an appellation of being ‘project-oriented societies’. project management as a discipline would have had a much higher acceptance by the industry and Project Management (PM) courses would have been taught in India’s technical and business schools.8 E14 0.9 0.8 0. The third part aims to identify any distinguishing factors that characterize the E18 0. the correlation coefficient of the sector Oil & Gas and Telecom is 0.6 0.8 E13 0.6 0.7 0.7 0. which means that they are highly correlated and for the further analysis we can not treat them as different sectors.8 0.9 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.8 0.7 0.7 1 E4 E4 0.6 0.8 0. A major reason for this may be attributed to project management being included as necessary curricula in all streams of education.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0. we included 18 sectors.6 0. Based on secondary research of developed countries.7 0.7 0.90.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 E9 0.7 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.8 192 In this Sector Specific Group.8 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.6 0. and non-governmental organizations practice the ‘projects’ approach to fulfill their targets and goals.8 E11 0. Universally.8 0.9 E16 0.8 0.6 0.8 1 E1 E1 1 .8 0. For example.7 0.8 0.7 0.9 E17 0. ANNEXURE 5 QUESTIONNAIRE FOR EXECUTIVES This is a pioneering effort being carried out for the first time in India to find out the factors that are aiding or hindering the establishment of project management curricula in our technical and business management institutions.6 0.9 E12 0.5 0.9 E7 0.6 0.6 0.9 E15 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 0. a major finding that emerges is that project management as a scientific discipline is deeply entrenched in the educational fabric of these countries.7 0.7 0.9 1 E5 E5 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 1 E3 E3 0.8 0.7 0. show that the correlation coefficients of so many sectors with other sectors are greater than 0. governments. but the results given above.7 0.8 E8 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.6 1 E2 E2 0. The second part aims at discovering your general opinion on project management (PM) curricula.9 E10 0.7 0.

It is designed to gather information based on your personal experience.ac. Shah at mnshah@nicmar. Mona N. It will not be taken to represent or reflect your institution’s view-points. This research does not involve any sensitive issues. knowledge and opinion alone. If you have any comments or enquiries. you are asked to provide a tick/score as per your opinion.in or 020 27291342/ 65102745. Also covered are regulatory aspects that affect the decision-making and launch of new curricula. For every question. 193 . please contact Dr. The information provided will be kept strictly confidential and will be used solely for the purposes of this research. The fourth part deals with finding out about the existing educational infrastructure available with institutions and also management support available to the institutions to establish new courses. Thank you for your interest.specific PM curriculum development.

PART I A RESPONDENT'S PARTICULARS Name Name of Institution Designation Address of institution Tel (O): Mobile No. kindly give Years: Personal name: Organization’s name: When did you complete your graduation/post graduation course? At that time were there any courses that were offered in your institution related to Degree earned Year Univ/ Institute Yes No Some topics taught (please mention) 194 . Fax (O): Email Office Personal How many years of work experience do you have? Would you agree if we acknowledge you in our report for your contribution and assistance in the survey? If yes.

If so.PM? Did you undergo any formal certification in PM. PART IC Have you been invited to teach Project Management by any college /institute /Inhouse management training centre If so. please mention 1) Course/ Module taught: 2) College/Institute/In-house MDP centre: 3) Class for which taught: Please state the 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) name of project size in rupees year of starting year of completion client your role in the project team period of involvement in project major techniques you used for e.g. Name of certification Certifying Agency Year Name of the training programme Institute/Agency conducting the programme Duration Year PART IB Have you been involved as a project team member/leader in a project in any of the following areas? (Tick the appropriate choice) Conceptualisation Design Planning Engineering Execution Commissioning For more than one project. PERT/CPM/Decision tree/ Fish bone/Arrow Diagram 9) major skills you found useful 195 . please fill out the rest of the details in the space provided at the end of the form. please mention Did you receive any formal training in PM related areas? If so please mention.

196 .4) Year of teaching: 5) No. of sessions taught: 6) If any test/evaluation was conducted after teaching: For more than one institution/module/course. please fill out the rest of the details in the space provided at the end of the form.

2. 3-Important. Rate them according to the following scale and write the corresponding scale number in the box given below. 12. Process Design. Health/Safety/Environment in Projects 7. Scheduling. Project Procurement & Materials Management 13. Cost Estimation and budgeting 8. Contract Management 14. Projects Marketing 11.Accounting and Control Systems 9. A : MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY Ratings 1 1. Monitoring and Control Techniques 3. Project Site and Equipment Management. Quantity Surveying and Estimation 10. Scales: 1-Not Important. Operations Research for Projects 5. Planning. Operations Management for Projects. 4-Very Important.PART II PROJECT MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM Given below are the set of subject areas essential to develop PM competencies among management executives. 2-Somewhat Important. 5Extremely Important. Statistical Methods for Project Analysis 4. Project Quality Management 6./Engineering/Testing/Commissioning 197 2 3 4 5 .

Industrial/Labour Relations 5. Any other ( Please specify ) 2 3 4 5 C : INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Ratings 1 1. Facilities Engineering and Management 16. Team Building. Any other ( Please specify ) B: BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES AREA Ratings 1 1. Technology and Engineering Management 19. Leadership. Logistics & Supply Chain Management 17. Project Engineering 21. Transportation Management 18. Human Resources Management in Projects 4. Managerial Skills for Projects (Communication. PM software-Primavera. Negotiation. GIS / GPS for Project Management 198 2 3 4 5 . MSP. Diversity Management 7.15. Project Formulation and Appraisal 20. Project Organization and Structure 2. Conflict Management 6. other soft skills) 3.

Technology 6. Telecom 3. Space Exploration 5. Research and Development 4. Any other ( Please specify ) D : SECTOR SPECIFIC Score 1 1. Ports 11. Civil Aviation 10. Mega Property Developments 14. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) 3. Roadways 8. Defense 7. Petrochemicals 15. Estm8. Ansys. 3D-Max. Information Communication Technology (ICT) 2. Railways 9.2. Excel / SPSS / DBMS 6. Chemical Engineering 16. Auto-Revit. e-Business Applications 4. Calquan) 5. Shipbuilding 12. Oil and Gas Exploration 199 2 3 4 5 . Staadpro. Urban Infrastructure 13. Engineering Software (Auto-Cad.

Services 18. Any other ( Please specify ) 200 .17. International Project Management 19.

2. 5Helped Immensely. A : STRATEGIC PROJECT OVERVIEW Ratings 1 1. Importance of Earned Value of a project to the company 6. Role clarity 3. Understanding project profitability 7. Importance of Human relations and Conflict management in project success 8. This part deals with the extent of difference PM training has made to you in your workplace. Any other ( Please specify ) 2 3 4 5 B : PROJECT SKILLS OVERVIEW 201 .Helped. Scales: 1-Not Helped. Rate the factors listed below according to the following scale and write the corresponding scale number in the box given below. To get an integrated view of the project 2. Management vision 9. 4-Helped Substantially.Somewhat Helped. Understanding the exact placement of a project in the overall corporate strategy 5. 3.PART III CHANGES IN WORK PERFORMANCE AFTER COMPLETION OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME These issues are internal in nature. Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility mapping 4.

Project Risk Management 5. 202 .1. Communication and Soft Skills Please Tick In The Appropriate Box/S 1. Importance of Health/Safety/Environment 7. Quality Management 8. How did PM Training help in your profession? Remuneration Incentive Responsibility Promotion Decisionmaking Power Better Interpersonalrelation & conflict resolutions.Importance of Project Planning/Scheduling/Execution 2. Importance of Monitoring & Control 3. Project Costing 6. Importance of Contract Management 4.

4-Very Important. To what extent in your opinion are the factors given below affecting PM education from taking root in India. 4. 5Extremely Important. 5. Mastery comes only from practical experience. Prior knowledge not essential in working in this field.PART IV CURRENT POSITION OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN INDIA This section deals with your opinion regarding the current position of PM related education offered in the academic institutions. 2 3 4 5 INTERVIEWER’S DETAILS Name: Signature: Date: Time: 203 . 3. Ratings 1 1. Scales: 1-Not Important. Being a practical field it cannot be ‘taught’ in the classroom. 2-Somewhat Important. Lack of awareness amongst students and educators. Rate them according to the following scale and write the corresponding scale number in the box given below. 3-Important. 2. Lack of trained instructors at the undergraduate and postgraduate level.

g. PERT/CPM/Decision tree/ Fish bone/Arrow Diagram 9) major skills you found useful 204 .PART IB Have you been involved as a project team member/leader in a project in any of the following areas? (Tick the appropriate choice) Conceptualisation Design Planning Engineering Execution Commissioning Please state the 1) name of project 2) size in rupees 3) year of starting 4) year of completion 5) client 6) your role in the project team 7) period of involvement in project 8) major techniques you used for e.

If so.PART IC Have you been invited to teach Project Management by any college /institute /Inhouse management training centre. of sessions taught: 6) If any test/evaluation was conducted after teaching: ANNEXURE 6 205 . please mention 1) Course/ Module taught: 2) College/Institute/In house MDP centre: 3) Class for which taught: 4) Year of teaching: 5) No.

This research does not involve any sensitive issues.in or 020 27291342/ 65102745. The second part aims at discovering your general opinion on project management (PM) curricula. governments. The third part aims to identify any distinguishing factors that characterize the specific PM curriculum development. a major finding that emerges is that project management as a scientific discipline is deeply entrenched in the educational fabric of these countries. If you have any comments or enquiries. Survey Instructions The survey is divided into four parts. Shah at mnshah@nicmar. Thank you for your interest. It will not be taken to represent or reflect your institution’s view-points. and non-governmental organizations practice the ‘projects’ approach to fulfill their targets and goals. If so be the case.QUESTIONNAIRE FOR HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGERS This is a pioneering effort being carried out for the first time in India to find out the factors that are aiding or hindering the establishment of project management curricula in our technical and business management institutions. Based on secondary research of developed countries. as also amongst popular psyche thus earning them an appellation of being ‘project-oriented societies’. The first part asks for your background information. The study from the point of view of educational institutions is to determine the factors that affect the inclusion of project management curricula. 206 . The fourth part deals with finding out about the existing educational infrastructure available with institutions and also management support available to the institutions to establish new courses. you are asked to provide a tick/score as per your opinion. A major reason for this may be attributed to project management being included as necessary curricula in all streams of education. project management as a discipline would have had a much higher acceptance by the industry and Project Management (PM) courses would have been taught in India’s technical and business schools. Universally. knowledge and opinion alone. Also covered are regulatory aspects that affect the decision-making and launch of new curricula. It is designed to gather information based on your personal experience. please contact Dr. For every question. large private corporations. The information provided will be kept strictly confidential and will be used solely for the purposes of this research.ac. Mona N.

since when has this been done? What is the nature of the employees sent for this training? 0. Fax (O): Email Office Personal Has your organization in the past Yes: sent employees for PM related training? If yes.PART I RESPONDENT'S PARTICULARS Name Name of Organization Designation Address of institution Tel (O): Mobile No. 4-Very High. 3-High. 2-Somewhat High. Scales: 1-Not High. 5-Extremely High. 207 .5 years >5-10 years >10-15 years Only Technical Technical and Nontechnical Operational staff No: >15 years Managerial Of what level are these? Supervisory Junior managers Middle level managers Senior level PART II Given below are the set of Project Management (PM) related fields essential to develop PM competencies. Rate them according to the following scale and write the corresponding scale number in the box given below.

Understanding Global Projects 4. Improves Ability To Deliver Projects In Right Time. Improves Ability To Manage Contracts In Projects 14. Career Development 8. Perceived Gains From Such Training 5. Prerequisite For Project Based Organizations Such As Yours 9. Improves Ability To Execute Complete Projects 11. Please Specify B: 1. Which type of training method is preferred by your organization? (Tick in the 208 1 2 3 4 5 On the job training In class training (for e. Improves Ability To Plan Projects 13. Improves Ability To Bid For Complex Projects 10. Improves Any Other Ability. Human Resource Development For Better Performance 6. Improves Ability To Monitor And Control Projects 12. Improving Effectiveness Of Project Operations 3. Right Costs And Right Quality 15.g.A: What is the need for PM related fields in the company? 1. in house training sessions) In class training with on the job projects Comprehensive Degree / Diploma level training . Employee Retention 7. Stipulation In The Contract 2.

3.expensive. 5 – highly expensive Type of Cost 1. 2. What predominant outcome is sought after the training? (Tick in the space provided) Building knowledge base of trainees Building Building a Building the right attitudes of skills set of the employees towards their base competencies jobs C: Which Of The Levels Of PM Training Is Most Preferred In Your Organization? Level of training/ Level of employee 1. Advanced 4. 4 – quite expensive. Basic 3. Elementary 2.space provided) 2.Least expensive. Trainees’ salaries and 209 1 2 3 4 5 . Strategic 5.fairly expensive. Any other (specify) Operatives Supervisory Middle level managers Junior managers Senior level D: Rate The Costs Of PM Related Training In India On A Scale Of 1-5. 1. Trainer’s salary and time 2.

time and quality 7. Attitude changes 8. Expenses for trainers 5. Increase in production/performance 2. Expenses for trainees 6. 3. 2.efficacious.fairly efficacious. 4. 5 – highly beneficial Benefits 1.fairly beneficial.Least efficacious. Improved delivery performance in terms of cost.beneficial. Growth of business opportunities F: Express Your Opinion On The Efficacy Of Training Imparted By The Following Training Entities On Scale Of 1-5. Cost of facilities and equipment 7. Employee Retention 4. 1. 1.time 3.. Materials for training 4. Ability to use new skills and capabilities 6.Least beneficial. 3. 2. 5 – most efficacious Training entity 1.quite efficacious. Independent trainer 210 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 . Reduction in errors and improvement of safety standards 3. Less supervision necessary 5. Lost productivity E: Rate The Benefits Of PM Related Training In India On A Scale Of 1-5. Technical/business institute 2. 4 – quite beneficial.

3. Certified franchisee trainer 4. Internationally certified trainers 5. In-house trainers 6. Self-training

G: Please Mention The Names Of Upto 5 Training Institutes Where You Regularly Send Employees For Training. Sr. No. Name of institute Name/area of Training Programme Workmen Training for Duration

(Tick in the space provided) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Supervisors Middle mgt.

Sr. mgrs

H: If PM Training Of Your Employees Was Accompanied By An International Accreditation Would It Be More Valuable And Beneficial To Your Organization? □ Yes □ No □ Maybe

INTERVIEWER’S DETAILS Name: Signature:
211

Date: Time:

ANNEXURE 7 MODEL COURSE CURRICULUM DESIGNS IN UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES OF TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SCHOOLS

In this section some suggested outlines and curricula for offering PM courses at various levels like Basic, Advanced and Proficiency, for engineering, general management and working executives have been described. Various degrees of experience and prior exposure to PM of the students have been considered to arrive at the model course outlines.
1. PROJECT MANAGEMENT ESSENTIALS IN ENGINEERING •

Course Objective: To introduce the engineering students to the discipline of PM in industry and application of PM skills to improve performance on projects.
212

Student Profile: This is suggested as an Introductory (Level 1) course and the target audience is students undergoing engineering courses having no formal background in project management

Course Mix: All compulsory with a total of 10 subjects to be covered over an annual academic calendar S. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Subject Description Role of PM Department in Engineering Companies Project Planning, Network Scheduling, and Monitoring Techniques Introduction to Project Management Software Basics in Procurement, Tendering, Bidding, Contracting Project Equipment Purchase, Stores and Inventory Management Project Quality Project Safety, Health and Environment Project Site Management and Control Basics of Project Cost Accounting Integrated Project Workshop - Assignments Tests and assessments

Course Duration: One academic calendar year. 2. PROJECT MANAGEMENT ESSENTIALS IN GENERAL MANAGEMENT

Course Objective: The objective of this course is to provide all students with essential PM skills that can be applied across all sectors to plan, schedule, implement and control projects.

Student Profile: This is suggested as an Introductory (Level 1) course, and the target audience is students undergoing General Management Programmes with some or no prior work experience.

Course Mix: A mix of compulsory and electives subjects with a total of 10 courses based upon the educational background of the student i.e. non-technical and technical. S. No. 1 2 Subject Description Key People Skills for Project Managers Role of PM in Organisations
213

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10* 11* 12* 13 14 15

Project Costing & Funds Management Project Planning, Scheduling, Monitoring and Controlling Introduction to Project Management Software Organising for Project Management Project Safety Management Project Quality Management Basics of Tendering, Bidding, Contracting, Procurement and Claims Management Project Site Management and Control Equipment Management Role of PM Department in Engineering Companies Legal and Taxation Aspects of Projects Innovation and Managing Project Life Cycle Project Portfolio Management

16 Tests and Assessments- Assignments *(may be offered only to students with technical background)

Course Duration: Spread over one to two academic terms.

MODEL COURSE CURRICULUM DESIGNS PROGRAMMES FOR WORKING EXECUTIVES 1. PROGRAMME FOR PRACTISING EXECUTIVES (MIDDLE LEVEL)
• •

Course Objective: The objective of this course is to provide the participants with essential PM skills to plan, implement and control projects efficiently. Participant Profile: This is suggested as a Level 2 course and the target audience is project personnel with 3 – 6 years of experience and having no formal qualification in project management.

Course Mix: An integrated mix of subjects for all participants

214

S. No. 1. 2. 3. 4 . 5. 6 . 7 . 8 . 9 . 1 0 . 1 1 . 1 2 . 1 3 .

Subject Description Project Design, Scope and Engineering Project Procurement Project Planning, Scheduling and Monitoring Techniques Project Cost Accounting and Control Basics of Project Finance Project Risk Management

Contracts and Claims Management in Projects

Project Safety Management

Project Quality Management

Project Equipment and Materials Management

Project HR and People Skills

Project Site, Documentation and Close Out Management

Case Analyses

215

Impacted schedules and CPM after Crashing. Environment ( HSE ) Management Project Finance Management Legal. Project Operations (II). 216 . Complex Multi Location Projects Tests Assessments – Case Analysis • Course Duration: Spread over 2 weeks with 15 sessions per week. 6. Health. PROGRAMME FOR PROJECT LEADERS (MID TO SENIOR LEVEL) • Course Objective: The objective of this course is to provide participants with essential PM skills to independently lead projects of large and complex magnitude. Taxation and Claims Issues in Contract Management Conflict Resolution Strategic Management of Projects Business Leadership Role in Integrated Management of Multiple. 5. Tests and Assessments • Course Duration: Spread over 2 weeks with 15 sessions per week.1 4 . 12. No. Safety. Project Organization and Human Resource Issues Project Procurement and Negotiation Skills Project Operations (I) -Advanced PM Integration – WBS.Advanced PM Integration WBS. Impacted Monitoring for Productivity and CTC Project Risk Management Project Quality. 7. Subjects 1. 2. 3. 11. 2. • Course Mix: An integrated mix of subjects for all participants. 4. Large. 10. S. 8. • Participant Profile: This is suggested as a Level 3 course and the target audience is project personnel with 6 – 10 years of experience and having no formal qualification in project management. 9.

1. 7.3. PROGRAMME FOR SENIOR LEVEL EXECUTIVES OF PROJECT COMPANIES • Course Objective: To enable participants to appreciate the strategic business contexts of projects and formulate plans for growth. • Course Mix: An integrated mix of subjects for all participants. 11. No. 9. 8. 10. 3. 4. Subject Description Leadership in Project Organisations Public Policy and Macro-Economic Environment Advanced Project Operations Management International Project Management – Issues in multicountry projects Project Risk Management Global Procurement. • Participant Profile: This is suggested as a Level 4 course and the target audience is project personnel with more than 6 – 10 years of experience and having no formal qualification in project management. SCM and Technology Management for Projects Project Finance Management Conflict Resolution Project Portfolio Analysis Innovation and New Project Development Case Analysis Course Duration: Spread over 4 weeks with extensive case analysis and discussions 217 . S. 2. 5. 6. expansion and diversification for project based companies.

52 3.46 19.ANNEXURE 8 MASTER DATABASE FILE OF PRIMARY DATA Chapter 4 Data Analysis Of Survey Of Technical And Business Institutions In India Table 2: Category Of Institutions (Fig 2) Type of Colleges Government Private Frequency 21 60 Percentage 25.58 23.93 74.75 32.05 Table 4: Experience Of Responding Faculty (Fig 4) Total Experience in Years upto 5 years 06 to 10 11 to 15 16 to 20 21 to 25 26 to 30 31 to 35 36 to 40 Above 40 Frequency 0 9 11 19 16 15 3 5 3 Percentage 0.11 13.70 6.75 18.70 218 .00 11.17 25.10 6.93 16.07 Table 3: Graph Showing Region Wise Distribution Of The Academic Institutions (Fig 3) Region wise Distribution of the Institutions North South East West Central Frequency 16 26 5 21 13 Percentage 19.17 3.

23 Table 7: Attempts At Introducing PM In The Curriculum (Fig 7) Yes No Frequency 66 15 Percentage 81.09 6.25 5 6.00 Table 10: Intensity Of The Course (Fig 10) 219 .00 25 31.93 1.Table 5: Experience In Curriculum Development (Fig 5) Total Experience in Years in curriculum development upto 5 years 06 to 10 11 to 15 16 to 20 21 to 25 26 to 30 Frequency Percentage 19 23.52 39.46 49.19 1.50 Table 6: Perception Of The Current Status Of PM Education In India (Fig 6) Level Poor Fair Good Very good Frequency 19 40 21 1 Percentage 23.38 25.75 20 25.52 Table 8: Level At Which PM Courses Have Been Introduced (Fig 8) Level Under graduate Post graduate Advanced Level Research Level Certificate Frequency 49 38 3 6 1 Percentage 50.48 18.25 2 2.03 Table 9: Type Of PM Related Course (Fig 9) Type of Course Elective Compulsory Frequency 49 49 Percentage 50.18 3.00 50.25 9 11.

76 E.Intensity Elementary Intermediate Advanced Frequency 25 41 15 Percentage 30.52 Table 11A: Essentiality Of PM In Various Types Of Institutions (Fig 11) C. Specialised Courses Ci: Architecture Course (Fig 11 Ci) Architecture Somewhat Fairly Essential Very Absolute Frequency 0 1 12 25 41 Percentage 0.90 Cii: Planning And Design (Fig 11 Cii) Planning and design Frequency Percentage 220 .62 18. Management Course (B) Management Somewhat Fairly Essential Very Absolute Frequency 2 0 5 24 48 Percentage 2.27 15.38 D.00 6.19 31.00 1.33 30.86 50.53 0.65 51.04 49. Engineering Course (A) Somewhat Fairly Essential Very Absolutely Frequency 2 0 9 30 40 Percentage 2.47 0.11 37.00 11.38 60.

00 10.00 0.49 60.49 60.00 10.Somewhat Fairly Essential Very Absolute 0 0 8 23 47 0.26 Ciii: Infrastructure Development (Fig 11 Ciii) Essential Somewhat Fairly Essential Very Absolute Frequency 0 0 8 23 47 Percentage 0.26 29.26 29.00 0.26 221 .

Table 12B: Level Of Teaching Of Subject In Management And Technology (Fig 12B) AL1 AL2 AL3 AL4 AL5 AL6 AL7 AL8 AL9 AL10 AL11 AL12 AL13 AL14 AL15 AL16 AL17 AL18 AL19 AL20 2 1 0 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 0 1 1 38 35 30 28 24 32 34 26 31 23 30 23 21 21 28 29 26 22 20 24 53 50 57 49 56 53 50 59 54 57 54 57 60 57 57 51 61 59 59 56 5 8 8 13 11 10 10 7 7 12 12 17 14 13 6 10 6 9 13 9 2 6 4 7 8 2 4 6 6 6 2 2 4 7 6 8 6 10 7 10 Certificate UG PG Advanced App Research 222 . Table 12A: Ratings Of Subject Areas In Management And Technology (Fig 12A) Revised AR1 AR2 AR3 AR4 AR5 AR6 AR7 AR8 AR9 AR10 AR11 AR12 AR13 AR14 AR15 AR16 AR17 AR18 AR19 AR20 Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Extremely Important 0 1 31 39 29 0 1 17 48 33 0 4 23 40 33 1 2 20 42 36 1 2 18 37 42 0 6 24 46 23 0 7 20 39 34 2 7 38 31 21 1 8 31 40 20 2 7 34 41 15 1 9 29 33 28 1 10 27 36 26 2 11 25 37 25 2 8 23 34 33 1 13 43 36 8 1 7 35 36 21 2 14 35 31 18 2 6 25 45 22 1 6 30 45 18 1 9 22 42 26 A.A.

89 CL3 1 24 63 10 2 2.87 CR3 1 4 29 46 20 3.63 CR2 1 4 18 61 16 3. Economics And Finance (Fig 13A) BR1 Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Extremely Important 1 7 26 35 31 BR2 2 6 25 47 20 BR3 1 6 27 35 31 BR4 1 6 24 38 30 BR5 1 6 24 35 34 BR6 1 8 22 32 38 BR7 1 12 30 34 23 BR8 2 11 27 33 26 B.B.44 C. Economics And Finance (Fig 13B) BL1 Certificate UG PG Advanced App Research 2 35 53 7 2 BL2 2 24 64 8 2 BL3 0 24 64 7 5 BL4 1 25 63 7 4 BL5 2 20 69 4 5 BL6 1 24 66 4 5 BL7 1 25 63 9 2 BL8 0 23 63 9 4 C.46 CR5 2 8 43 46 0 3.86 223 .73 CL2 1 27 60 11 2 2.33 CR6 3 11 36 44 7 3. Table 13B: Levels Of Subject Areas In Strategy.73 CL5 1 24 63 0 12 2.80 CR4 2 5 40 51 2 3. Table 14 B: Levels Of Subject Areas In Behavioural Sciences Area (Fig 14B) CL1 Certificate UG PG Advanced App Research Average 1 31 62 6 0 2. Table 14 A: Ratings Of Subject Areas In Behavioural Sciences Area (Fig 14A) CR1 Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Extremely Important Average 1 6 31 53 9 3.88 CL4 2 30 59 6 2 2.98 CL6 1 26 57 13 2 2. Table 13A: Ratings Of Subject Areas In Strategy.

Table 15 A: Ratings Of Subject Areas In Information Technology (Fig 15A) DR1 Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Extremely Important Average 1 1 22 39 37 4.70 DR3 2 8 32 50 9 3.10 DR2 1 6 27 49 16 3.64 DL2 1 33 55 9 2 2. Table 15b: Level Of Subject Areas In Information Technology (Fig 15b) DL1 Certificate UG PG Advanced App Research Average 2 38 52 5 2 2.70 224 .77 DL4 2 39 55 4 0 2.61 DL5 1 38 49 9 2 2.18 DR5 0 4 20 28 48 4.20 D.59 DR4 1 3 20 29 47 4.78 DL3 1 33 57 6 3 2.

23 3.55 3.92 4.8 3.0 3.14 225 .56 4 18 30 21 27 3.98 3.00 3.9 4.56 4 19 26 25 26 3.72 3 13 33 17 34 3.97 4.43 5 15 31 23 26 3.46 3.5 2 17 31 12 39 3.46 3.57 2 13 35 18 32 3. Table 16A: Ratings Of Sector Specific Importance Of PM (Fig 16A) ER1 ER2 ER3 ER4 ER5 ER6 ER7 ER8 ER9 ER10 ER11 ER12 ER13 ER14 ER15 ER16 ER17 ER18 Not Important 1 4 2 4 3 3 3 4 Somewhat Important 19 22 16 13 16 18 18 16 Important 35 40 36 39 27 33 31 32 Very Important 30 15 21 26 30 16 22 16 Extremely Important 15 19 24 19 25 30 27 32 Averagwe 3.6 3.52 3.65 E.7 3.66 4 16 31 18 31 3.61 3.09 4.06 4.02 4.39 3.05 4.7 3.9 Average 1 8 6 3 5 7 3 4 2 3.58 4 17 30 21 29 3. Table 16B: Levels Of Sector Specific (Fig 16b) EL1 EL2 EL3 EL4 EL5 EL6 EL7 EL8 EL9 EL10 EL11 EL12 EL13 EL14 EL15 EL16 EL17 EL18 Certificate 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 UG 18 16 13 15 11 14 12 11 12 12 14 10 12 12 13 13 10 10 PG 28 26 25 22 25 24 19 16 23 21 21 15 17 17 18 19 24 15 EL1 EL2 EL3 EL4 EL5 EL6 EL7 EL8 EL9 EL10 EL11 EL12 EL13 EL14 EL15 EL16 EL17 EL18 Advanced 26 33 31 24 28 24 24 27 27 20 15 26 20 17 19 19 22 22 App Research 27 25 30 38 35 36 43 45 38 46 49 47 50 53 49 48 42 52 3.5 5 19 32 21 24 3.D.49 4 15 29 18 33 3.8 3.6 3.

73 20.74 IR3 0 7 21 34 38 4.34 40.68 15.25 0.69 IR8 2 11 13 30 44 4.03 Table 18: Earlier Attempts Of Institutions To Introduce PM Courses (Fig 18) Yes 52 No 29 Table 19: Progress Of Introduction Of PM Courses (Fig 19) Ratings Negligible Initial Considerable Advanced Established Percentage 23.Table 17: Ratings Of Institute’s Infrastructure (Fig 17) IR1 Not Available Somewhat Available Available Easy Available Very Easily Available Average 3 11 20 28 38 3.03 IR4 1 9 26 37 27 3.87 IR2 2 15 18 37 28 3.80 IR5 1 6 27 39 28 3.90 IR6 3 12 17 27 42 3.00 Table 20: Impact Of PM Courses On Employability Of Students (Fig 20) Somewhat 3 Fairly 4 Good 21 Considerably Immensely 32 21 Table 21: Company Specifically Looking For PM Competency In Students (Fig 21) Some Extent 19 Considerable 38 Great 13 No Impact 9 226 .96 IR7 2 17 26 20 35 3.

32 39.47 19.58 227 .27 0.70 12.33 24.54 24.Table 22: Category Of Institutions (Fig 22) Category Autonomous University Affiliated AICTE International Affiliation Accredited frequency 12 25 45 1 21 Percentage 11.96 20.12 Months > 1 .2 Years > 2 .12 Months >1-2 Years >2-3 Years > 3 Years Percentage 26.3 Years > 3 Years Percentage 13.04 43.29 13.18 12.2 Years > 2 .36 23.14 19.3 Years > 3 Years Percentage 12.12 Months > 1 .33 38.70 30.89 6.74 7.33 Table 25: Resources Building (Fig 25) Years Upto 6 Months > 6 .66 Table 24: Regulatory Approval (Fig 24) Years Upto 6 Months > 6 .19 Table 23: Academic Council Approval (Fig 23) Years Upto 6 Months > 6 .

33 37.67 10.33 26.2 Years > 2 .Table 26: Recruitment And Training Of Faculty (Fig 26) Years Upto 6 Months > 6 .67 8.12 Months > 1 .00 Table 27: Involvement In Project Management Research (Fig 27) Yes 28 No 53 Table 28: Funded Research (Fig 28) YES 17 NO 60 NA 4 Chapter 5 228 .3 Years > 3 Years Percentage 17.

81 5.29 8.47 15.73 37.41 4.25 15.05 Table 30: Institutes Teaching PM Related Curriculum (Fig 30) PM training being offered Yes No Frequency 15 45 Percentage 25 75 Table 31: Executives With Prior PM Related Training (Fig 31) PM Training Yes No Frequency 10 78 Percentage 11 89 Table 32: Value Of Projects In Rupees (Fig 32) Total size of the Project in Rs Less than 100 crores 100-200 crores 200-300 crores 300-400 crores Above 400 crores Frequency 14 22 5 9 9 Percentage 23.68 16.22 10.Data Analysis Of Survey Of Working Executives Employed In Project-Based Companies In India Table 29: Years Of Experience Of The Working Executives (Fig 29) Total Experience Less than 5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years 16-20 years 21-25 years more than 25 years Frequency 28 19 12 8 4 3 Percentage 37.25 Table 33: Tools And Techniques Used On Projects (Fig 33) Major Techniques Used Freque Percentage 229 .84 25.

During Projects Primavera CPM/ PERT Arrow Diagram Fish Bone Diagram MS Projects ncy 2 32 10 3 2 4.08 65.41 6.12 4.08 230 .31 20.

2 6 A10 A11 A12 A13 A14 A15 A16 A17 A18 A19 A20 1 6 29 35 29 3.4 6 A8 0 2 17 44 38 4.3 7 A5 0 1 14 45 40 4.8 5 A2 0 0 5 22 73 4.9 6 0 9 35 42 14 3.8 3 0 2 25 44 29 3.6 3 0 7 31 40 21 3.95 Table 35: Subject Wise Ratings For Behavioural Sciences Area (Fig 35) B1 Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Extremely Important 0 0 17 55 28 4 B2 0 0 8 32 61 4.Table 34: Subject wise Ratings For Management And Technology Area (Fig 34) A1 Not Important Somewha t Important Important Very Important Extremely Important 0 1 26 38 35 3.1 6 0 1 21 37 41 3.5 2 0 1 13 46 40 4.8 B5 0 5 27 44 B6 0 8 32 47 24 13 3.0 9 A6 0 1 15 34 50 4.425 B3 0 1 19 52 28 3.95 B4 0 3 26 42 30 3.67088 3.6 6 A4 0 10 34 43 13 3.1 1 0 0 14 42 44 4.443038 231 .0 0 A9 0 1 10 36 53 4.6 0 A3 0 3 33 42 22 3.1 0 0 1 14 46 40 4.8 2 0 1 19 48 32 3.4 1 0 4 26 50 19 3.1 9 A7 0 0 5 35 60 4.5 0 0 2 25 43 29 3.

7 1 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D16 D17 D18 0 6 26 39 30 3.5 3 D4 1 12 28 42 16 3.6 Table 36: Subject Wise Ratings For Information Technology Area (Fig 36) C1 Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Extremely Important 0 1 14 36 49 4.6 5 1 7 38 33 22 3.7 0 0 6 29 42 23 3.6 3.9 2 D9 1 5 18 49 28 3.2 8 D5 0 1 27 36 35 3.8 5 0 5 28 34 33 3.2 7 0 5 34 39 21 3.5 6 0 5 27 43 24 0 4 26 33 37 3.5 6 1 12 31 36 19 3.77215 2 4.075 C3 0 7 29 38 25 3.53846 2 C4 1 3 26 34 C5 0 1 17 36 37 46 3.6 1 D2 0 8 25 52 15 3.088608 Table 37: Ratings For Importance Of PM Education In Sector Specific Areas (Fig 37) D1 Not Important Somewhat Important Important Very Important Extremely Important 0 4 30 44 22 3.5 1 D3 0 5 35 37 22 3.79 6 232 .9 9 D8 0 3 17 43 37 3.8 5 D6 1 11 35 34 19 3.1875 C2 0 2 17 29 51 4.4 2 0 3 21 42 34 3.3 0 D7 0 2 16 47 35 3.

233 .

68 34.63 5.80 30.49 Lack of trained instructors at undergraduate and postgraduate levels 0.57 35.01 3.63 33.01 4.71 A8 0 2 18 49 31 3.21 234 Never Somewhat Important Very Imp Extremely .57 8.04 30.92 A7 0 3 26 45 25 3.3 9 B2 0 1 8 39 51 B3 0 2 19 33 46 B4 1 0 13 45 41 B5 0 3 13 47 37 B6 1 2 21 41 36 B7 0 1 20 45 34 B8 0 1 19 53 27 4.97 3.94 prior knowledge not essential in the field of PM 8.74 A6 0 1 25 38 36 3.03 4.29 49.29 Mastery only comes through practical experience 5.71 14.86 35.91 Table 39: Understanding Of Project Context (Fig 39) Not Helped Somewhat Helped Helped Helped Substantially Helped Immensely B1 0 1 6 36 58 4.75 A5 0 1 25 56 17 3.99 23.59 A2 0 1 20 53 26 3.21 4.87 3.99 46.00 8.87 A3 0 0 10 54 35 4.70 37.48 15.71 45.1 A4 0 1 28 54 17 3.29 8.78 18.Table 38: Gaining Perspectives Related To The Strategic Context Of Projects (Fig 38) Not Helped Somewhat Helped Helped Helped Substantially Helped Immensely A1 0 4 30 52 14 3.84 It is more practical so practical training is required 8.57 32.89 Table 40: Gains In The Individual’s Career (Fig 40) Benefits Remuneration Incentive Responsibility Promotion Decision Making Power Better Interpersonal-relation & conflict resolutions Frequency Percentage 5 5 1 1 28 25 7 6 37 33 33 30 Table 41: Factors In Order Of Importance Affecting Growth Of PM Education (Fig 41) Importance of awareness amongst students and educators 0.00 7.

Chapter 6 Data Analysis Of Survey Of Human Resource Managers Employed In Project-Based Companies In India Table 42: Companies With Prior PM Training Record (Fig 42) Yes No 95 5 Table 43: Inception Of PM Training In Companies (Fig 43) 0-5 Yrs 63 5-10 Yrs 26 10-15 Yrs 5 >15 Yrs 5 Table 44: Category Of Employees Sent For PM Training (Fig 44) Only Technical Technical & Non Technical Operational Staff Managerial 7 30 24 39 Table 45: Level/ Grade Of Managers Chosen For PM Training (Fig 45) Supervisory Junior Managers 12 22 Middle Level Managers 34 Senior Level 32 Table 46: Factors Considered On A Scale Of Essentiality In PM Training (Fig 46) 1 Not High Somewhat High High Very High Extremely High 5 5 30 45 15 2 0 5 25 50 20 3 5 5 15 40 35 4 0 5 15 45 35 5 0 15 10 50 25 6 0 5 7 0 0 8 0 0 20 40 40 9 0 5 30 25 40 1 0 0 0 2 5 3 0 4 5 1 1 0 0 1 5 5 5 3 0 1 13 2 0 0 0 5 6 5 3 0 5 15 40 40 1 15 4 0 0 0 0 1 0 12 4 0 41 5 0 47 10 20 50 40 35 40 235 .

Table 47: Type Of Training (Fig 47) Training Method On Job In House Training In Class Training with on Job Projects Comprehensive Degree/ Diploma level Training Percentages 28 41 28 3 Table 48: Predominant Outcome Of The Training (Fig 48) Predominant Outcome Building Knowledge Building Skills Base Building a Set of Competencies Building the Right Attitude Percentages 28 34 26 13 Table 49: Type Of Training And Level Of Executives Sent For PM Based Training (Fig 49) Operatives Supervisor y Middle Level Senior Level Elementary 48 34 17 0 Basic 10 47 37 7 Advanced Strategic 0 0 25 47 28 6 32 61 Any Other 0 0 0 100 236 .

Table 50: Ratings Of Training Costs Of PM Training (Fig 50) Trainer's Salary and Time Least Expensive Fairly Expensive Expensive Quite Expensive Highly Expensive 0 20 20 55 5 Trainees Salary and Time 0 20 20 40 20 Material for Training 5 15 25 40 15 Expenses Expenses For Trainees For Trainees 0 10 40 40 10 5 5 30 60 0 Cost of facilities and equipment 0 5 35 45 15 Lost Productivity 0 20 55 25 0 Table 51: Ratings Of Benefits Of Training (Fig 51) Increase in Production Least Beneficial Fairly Beneficial Beneficial Quite Beneficial Highly Beneficial 5 16 37 42 0 Reduction in Employee Less Ability to Improved Errors Retention supervision use new delivery necessary skills 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 11 11 0 47 32 26 32 47 42 53 58 53 37 5 11 5 5 16 Attitude Changes 0 0 58 32 16 Growth of Business 0 0 37 58 5 237 .

Least Efficacious Fairly Efficacious Efficacious Quite Efficacious Most Efficacious 0 10 40 30 20 Independent Certified Internationally Trainer Franchisee Certified trainer trainers 0 5 35 50 10 0 10 15 60 15 0 10 25 50 15 Inhouse Trainer 0 10 50 30 10 Self Training 5 35 40 20 0 Table 53: Most Preferred Training Options Of HR Managers (Fig 53) Type of training Inhouse training Other Technical / Management Institutes NICMAR. Pune IIT / IIM / IIPM Frequency Percentage 7 20.00 20 4 4 57.Table 52: Efficacy Ratings Of Various Types Of Trainer Options (Fig 52) Technical Business Ins.14 11.43 Table 54: Value Of An International Accreditation Accompanying PM Training By Organisations (Fig 54) Validity of International Accreditation Percentages Yes 47 No 0 May Be 53 238 .43 11.

Chapter 7 Interpretations From Of Data Analysis And Findings Of Pmi Survey (Annexure For Table 5.FFFFFFFFFF.FFA01 A02 A03 A04 A05 A06 A07 A08 A09 A10 A11 A12 A13 A14 A15 A16 A17 A18 A19 A20 A21 A22 A23 A24 A2 4 4 2 2 4 5 5 3 3 3 5 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 5 4 3 4 3 5 5 4 5 5 5 4 4 3 5 5 5 2 2 2 1 2 5 4 5 5 3 3 5 2 5 4 2 4 4 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 3 3 5 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 2 5 4 2 3 4 5 3 2 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 4 5 3 3 5 4 5 4 5 3 4 5 5 5 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 5 3 3 3 5 4 3 5 5 3 4 3 4 3 4 5 3 5 4 4 5 3 3 3 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 4 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 4 4 5 5 4 3 1 4 4 2 5 5 5 3 5 1 5 3 5 4 3 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 3 2 5 5 5 4 5 4 5 4 5 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 3 4 2 4 2 5 5 3 3 2 1 2 2 3 3 4 3 3 2 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 5 5 5 5 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 5 3 5 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 5 5 4 3 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFA01 A02 A03 A04 A05 A06 A07 A08 A09 A10 A11 A12 A13 A14 A15 A16 A17 A18 A19 A20 A21 A22 A23 A24 A2 239 . Figure 56) FFFFFFFFFFFFF.

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Table No.6 Total Explained Of Factors (Subjects) Included In Practicing Executives F01 F02 F03 F04 F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15 F16 F17 F18 F19 F20 F21 F22 F23 F24 F25 F26 3 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 5 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 5 5 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 3 2 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 5 4 5 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 2 2 3 5 5 3 4 4 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 3 2 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 3 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 3 3 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 3 3 3 5 4 3 3 3 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 5 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 3 4 3 5 5 4 5 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 3 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 4 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 5 4 4 4 4 5 3 3 4 3 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 5 3 4 3 4 2 5 5 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 3 2 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 2 F01 F02 F03 F04 F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15 F16 F17 F18 F19 F20 F21 F22 F23 F24 F25 F26 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 3 3 2 3 5 3 1 2 3 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 243 .

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3 3 3 4 4 2 2 3 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 4 4 2 2 1 1 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 4 4 3 3 2 3 3 4 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 2 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 4 3 1 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 2 2 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 4 3 3 4 5 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 3 4 4 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 2 2 3 4 5 3 4 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 3 3 4 3 4 2 2 4 3 2 4 2 2 3 2 3 4 4 2 4 5 3 2 2 3 4 2 4 5 3 5 4 3 2 3 4 3 5 3 4 2 5 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 5 5 5 4 5 5 3 3 3 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 1 2 2 2 2 4 3 2 3 2 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 F01 F02 F03 F04 F05 F06 F07 F08 F09 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15 F16 F17 F18 F19 F20 F21 F22 F23 F24 F25 F26 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 2 4 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 2 4 3 3 2 4 3 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 5 4 5 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 245 .

4 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 5 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 5 5 4 3 4 3 2 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 2 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 246 .

FIGURE 58) F01 4 4 5 3 5 3 3 3 5 4 4 3 3 2 4 5 3 3 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 5 2 5 4 3 4 4 3 5 3 F02 5 3 5 3 5 4 3 2 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 5 3 5 5 4 4 2 3 4 3 5 F03 3 1 1 1 2 5 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 5 5 3 4 3 3 4 3 2 4 4 5 2 4 5 4 4 5 1 5 4 3 1 4 3 3 F04 3 5 1 1 3 4 5 4 4 5 5 4 4 2 4 5 3 3 4 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 3 4 2 4 4 3 5 4 3 1 F05 4 5 1 1 4 3 5 3 4 4 4 5 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 5 2 5 3 1 3 4 4 4 1 5 5 1 5 5 1 4 3 1 4 3 2 247 .General Factor Ratings (Factor Analysis) (ANNEXURE FOR TABLE 7.

1 2 5 5 4 4 4 248 . 1 Questionnaire PMIOR PMENG PMMGM PMARCH PMPND PMINFRA Sl. No.3 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 5 4 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 2 3 4 4 4 4 2 3 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 2 3 4 3 3 3 5 4 5 5 4 3 4 3 5 3 3 4 2 3 5 5 3 3 4 2 3 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 4 5 2 4 5 4 3 4 5 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 5 4 3 2 5 1 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 2 3 5 1 5 3 4 3 5 3 4 3 3 3 4 4 3 5 5 3 3 4 5 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 5 3 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 5 4 3 2 3 3 2 4 3 4 3 3 3 1 3 4 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 Rating Of Different Disciplines (Multiple Regression Analysis) For Model No.

41 2 4 1 4 4 4 43 2 5 5 5 5 5 44 1 4 4 4 4 4 45 1 5 5 5 5 5 46 2 5 5 5 5 5 249 .2 2 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 5 5 3 4 4 4 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 1 5 5 5 5 5 6 1 5 5 5 5 5 7 3 5 5 5 5 5 8 3 5 5 5 5 5 9 2 5 5 4 5 5 10 2 4 4 4 4 4 11 2 4 5 5 5 5 12 3 5 5 5 5 5 13 2 5 5 5 5 5 14 3 4 5 5 5 4 15 2 5 5 5 5 5 16 2 5 5 5 5 5 17 2 4 4 4 4 4 18 1 5 5 5 5 5 19 2 4 4 4 4 4 20 3 4 4 4 4 4 21 1 5 5 5 5 5 22 1 5 1 5 5 5 23 3 3 3 4 4 5 24 2 4 4 4 4 4 25 2 3 4 4 5 5 26 2 4 4 4 4 4 27 2 3 4 4 5 5 28 2 4 4 4 5 5 29 3 4 4 3 3 3 30 1 1 4 4 4 4 31 1 1 4 3 4 4 32 1 4 4 4 4 4 33 2 4 4 4 4 4 34 2 3 3 3 3 3 35 2 4 4 4 4 4 36 1 5 5 5 5 5 37 2 5 5 5 5 5 38 2 4 4 4 4 4 39 1 5 4 4 4 4 40 1 5 5 5 5 5 Questionnaire PMIOR PMENG PMMGM PMARCH PMPND PMINFRA Sl. No.

2 Questionnaire PMIOR LSER CM CR LAB COMLAB QFAC RFACI MVISION EIPM EEM Sl.47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 2 3 1 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 1 3 3 2 2 4 1 1 2 3 3 2 2 2 5 5 5 5 5 3 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 4 3 4 5 3 5 5 5 4 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 3 5 5 4 5 5 3 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 3 5 5 2 5 4 3 4 3 3 5 3 5 5 3 4 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 4 5 5 3 5 5 3 4 3 4 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 4 4 4 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 5 Ratings Of Infrastructure & Other Related Facilities (Master File For Multiple Regression Analysis) For Model No. No. 1 2 3 3 4 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 4 5 5 5 5 3 4 5 3 2 3 3 5 2 4 3 2 4 2 3 4 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 3 5 5 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 250 .

40 1 1 2 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 4 41 2 2 2 3 3 4 2 2 3 2 5 42 1 2 2 2 3 3 2 3 1 1 5 43 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 4 44 1 2 2 4 1 1 3 3 2 2 3 45 1 1 1 3 3 4 2 2 4 4 4 46 2 1 2 2 3 3 2 2 2 1 3 47 2 2 2 2 1 1 3 3 1 2 3 48 3 2 2 3 2 2 1 3 2 3 4 49 1 1 1 2 2 3 2 1 1 1 3 251 .4 6 1 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 7 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 8 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 9 2 5 5 5 4 5 4 3 5 3 5 10 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 1 3 3 4 11 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 2 5 12 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 3 5 13 2 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 4 14 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 5 15 2 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 5 16 2 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 3 4 17 2 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 2 5 18 1 5 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 3 4 19 2 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 3 4 20 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 5 5 4 2 21 1 3 2 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 3 22 1 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 23 3 4 4 3 2 3 4 2 3 3 4 24 2 4 3 4 2 4 2 2 4 3 4 25 2 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 3 3 3 26 2 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 5 3 2 27 2 2 2 5 2 5 5 3 5 3 4 28 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 5 29 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 30 1 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 31 1 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 1 32 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 5 3 4 33 2 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 34 2 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 5 35 2 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 3 4 36 1 2 3 4 4 5 2 2 2 1 3 37 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 2 1 3 3 38 2 2 2 3 3 3 1 2 2 1 3 39 1 2 2 4 3 4 1 2 2 3 5 Questionnaire PMIOR LSER CM CR LAB COMLAB QFAC RFACI MVISION EIPM EEM Sl. No.

50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 2 1 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 1 3 3 2 2 4 1 1 2 3 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 5 1 3 3 3 3 3 5 4 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 4 2 3 5 4 4 4 4 5 2 1 2 1 2 4 3 3 3 2 3 2 5 4 4 4 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 4 2 2 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 5 4 3 4 2 3 2 5 5 3 3 5 5 3 5 5 4 5 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 4 4 3 4 3 2 3 5 5 4 3 5 2 3 5 5 3 4 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 3 5 4 2 4 3 3 3 5 5 2 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 4 5 1 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 2 1 2 1 3 5 4 3 3 2 2 2 5 4 5 4 5 5 1 5 5 4 5 5 1 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 2 2 5 2 3 3 2 3 2 4 4 4 3 5 5 1 5 5 2 5 5 2 3 5 3 3 3 4 4 3 1 2 2 2 5 4 2 2 2 2 1 5 4 4 4 5 4 2 5 5 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 2 3 2 1 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 1 3 4 2 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 5 4 3 2 3 1 4 3 3 3 3 5 5 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 5 2 5 4 4 4 4 4 252 .

Operations Research for Projects 5. Contract Management 14. Project Formulation and Appraisal 20.67 AL4 – 2.31 AR14 – 3. Cost Estimation and budgeting 8.30 AR11 – 3./Engineering/Testing/Commissioning 15.60 AR7 – 3. Quantity Surveying and Estimation 10. Process Design.74 AR8 – 3. Technology and Engineering Management 19. 12.46 AR19 – 3.Institutions A. 2.76 AL11 – 2.71 AL18 – 2.59 AL10 – 2. Project Procurement & Materials Management 13. Scheduling.73 AL13 – 2. Facilities Engineering and Management 16.67 AL17 – 2. Statistical Methods for Project Analysis 4. Transportation Management 18.93 AR6 – 3. Logistics & Supply Chain Management 17. Planning. Projects Marketing 11.49 AL2 – 2. Macro-Economic Policy Ratings Numerical Average BR1 – 3.79 AL15 – 2.12 AR16 – 3.56 AL7 – 2. Operations management for Projects. Project Quality Management 6.52 Levels Numerical Average BL1 – 2.81 AR4 – 3.12 AR18 – 3.87 AR5 – 3.43 AR10 – 3.48 AR15 – 3.65 AL9 – 2. Project Engineering Management and Technology Ratings Numerical Average AR1 – 3. Project Site and Equipment Management.72 AL5 – 2.26 AR9 – 3.Accounting and Control Systems 9. Health/Safety/Environment in Projects 7.37 AR17 – 3.83 AL19 – 2.84 AL20 – 2.40 AR12 – 3. Subject 1. Economics And Finance Subject 1.46 AR20 – 3.List of Average Ratings .73 AL6 – 2. Monitoring and Control Techniques 3.62 AL16 – 2.46 Levels Numerical Average AL1 – 2. Strategy.78 B.51 253 .61 AL12 – 2.59 AL3 – 2.76 AL14 – 2.79 AR2 – 3.59 AL8 – 2.98 AR3 – 3.40 AR13 – 3.

Project Joint Ventures. Legal. Diversity Management CR3 – 3. Negotiation. Leadership. Team Building.95 DL5 – 2. Industrial/Labour Relations 5.58 CR4 – 3.67 BL7 – 2.60 BR7 – 3.77 BL4 – 2. Commercial and Taxation Aspects of Projects 8.67 C.64 (Communication. Special Purpose Vehicles BR2 – 3.39 2. Conflict Management 6.72 CL6 – 2.2. Auto-Revit.47 DL2 – 2.3. Project Financing 6. Estm8. Staadpro.68 E. PM software-Primavera.53 254 Ratings Numerical Average DR1 – 3.58 CL2 – 2.55 BR4 – 3.70 BL6 – 2. Calquan) 5.58 BR5 – 3. Subject Ratings Numerical Average 1. Project Strategy 3.83 DR2 – 3.44 . Risk and Insurance Management 7. Strategic Alliances. GIS / GPS for Project Management 2. Engineering Software (Auto-Cad. Human Resources Management in Projects 4. Financial Management 5. 3D-Max. Excel / SPSS / DBMS DR5 – 3.47 DR3 – 3.09 Levels Numerical Average CL1 – 2. Information Technology Subject 1.08 CR6 – 3.25 DR4 . other soft skills) 3.22 CR5 – 3.45 BR3 – 3.27 BL2 – 2.30 BR8 – 3.69 CL3 – 2.91 Levels Numerical Average DL1 – 2. MSP. Social Cost Benefit Analysis 4.60 DL3 – 2.72 CL4 – 2. e-Business Applications 4.65 BL3 – 2.61 DL4 – 2. Behavioural Sciences Area D. Project Organization and Structure CR1 – 3. Ansys.70 BL5 – 2.55 CL5 – 2. Managerial Skills for Projects CR2 – 3.62 BR6 – 3. Enterprise Resource Planning ( ERP ) 3.70 BL8 – 2.

43 AR7 – 3. Sector Specific Subject 1.03 ER2 – 2.95 ER10 – 2.F.40 EL5 – 3.06 ER17 – 3. Information Communication Technology (ICT) 2.52 EL10 – 3. Urban Infrastructure 13. Technology 6.31 AR3 – 3.78 AR4 – 3. Services 18. Course Material 3.36 EL7 – 3. Research and Development 4. Chemical Engineering 16. Oil and Gas Exploration 17. International Project Management Ratings Numerical Average ER1 – 3.19 PART IV Levels Numerical Average EL1 – 3. Civil Aviation 10.94 ER12 – 3.88 ER11 – 2. Space Exploration 5.80 ER3 – 3.55 EL17 – 3.05 ER15 – 2.65 EL9 – 3.62 EL15 – 3.17 EL2 – 3.04 ER8 – 3.03 ER18 – 3. Institute Infrastructure Subject 1. Mega Property Developments 14.39 EL4 – 3. Defense 7.59 EL14 – 3. Laboratories 5.03 ER7 – 3.21 AR8 – 3.56 EL8 – 3. Qualified faculty 7.17 ER13 – 3.53 EL11 – 3. Shipbuilding 12.49 EL12 – 3. Availability of research facilities 8.55 AR6 – 3.00 ER9 – 2. Ports 11.15 ER14 – 3. Management vision Ratings Numerical Average AR1 – 3.56 EL16 – 3. Classrooms 4. Telecom 3.07 ER4 – 2.67 EL13 – 3.51 255 . Computer Labs 6.37 AR2 – 3. Availability of library and e-resources 2.50 EL18 – 3.72 A.49 AR5 – 3.98 ER16 – 3.97 ER5 – 3.27 EL3 – 3. Petrochemicals 15. Roadways 8.08 ER6 – 3. Railways 9.49 EL6 – 3.

37 AR5 – 4. Process Ratings Numerical Average AR1 – 3.Accounting and Control Systems 9.51 AR11 – 4. Projects Marketing 11. Project Quality Management 6. Contract Management 14.19 AR7 – 4. Operations management for Projects.96 Design. Quantity Surveying and Estimation 10. Project Procurement & Materials Management 13. Health/Safety/Environment in Projects 7. Scheduling. 2.Chapter V List of Average Ratings . Operations Research for Projects 5.84 AR2 – 4.26 AR10 – 3.66 AR4 – 3. Management and Technology Subject 1.11 AR13 – 4.08 AR6 – 4. Planning. 12.00 AR9 – 4. Project Site and Equipment Management. Cost Estimation and budgeting 8.10 AR12 – 4.60 AR3 – 3. Monitoring and Control Techniques 3. Statistical Methods for Project Analysis 4.40 256 .46 AR8 – 4.Executives A.16 AR14 – 3. Facilities Engineering and Management AR15 – 3./Engineering/Testing/Commissioning 15.

50 AR18 – 3. Engineering Software (Auto-Cad. Project Formulation and Appraisal 20. Human Resources Management in Projects 4. Ansys.67 B6 – 3. Project Engineering AR16 – 3. Project Organization and Structure 2. Transportation Management 18. MSP.42 C. Auto-Revit.53 C4 – 3.80 B5 – 3. Conflict Management 6. Team Building. 3D-Max.63 AR17 – 3.18 C2 – 4. Staadpro. Calquan) 5. Technology and Engineering Management 19.07 C3 – 3. e-Business Applications 4. GIS / GPS for Project Management 2. Diversity Management B3 – 3.82 AR19 – 3.90 B. Excel / SPSS / DBMS C5 – 4. PM software-Primavera.44 Ratings Numerical Average B1 – 4. other soft skills) 3. Managerial Skills for Projects (Communication.82 AR20 – 3.77 257 .08 Ratings Numerical Average C1 – 4. Negotiation. Leadership. Information Technology Subject 1. Estm8. Logistics & Supply Chain Management 17.16. Enterprise Resource Planning ( ERP ) 3.95 B4 – 3. Behavioural Sciences Area Subject 1. Industrial/Labour Relations 5.00 B2 – 4.

Sector Specific Subject 1.50 D3 – 3.64 D11 – 3.26 D16 – 3. Roadways 8.65 D18 – 3.D. Shipbuilding 12.91 D9 – 3. Oil and Gas Exploration 17. Railways 9. Petrochemicals 15. Technology 6.56 D15 – 3.41 D12 – 3.29 D7 – 3. Telecom 3.85 D6 – 3.78 258 .52 D4 – 3.98 D8 – 3. Urban Infrastructure 13.70 D14 – 3. Information Communication Technology (ICT) 2.71 D10 – 3.28 D5 – 3. Space Exploration 5. Research and Development 4. Mega Property Developments 14. International Project Management Ratings Numerical Average D1 – 3. Ports 11.55 D17 – 3. Defence 7. Chemical Engineering 16. Services 18.60 D2 – 3. Civil Aviation 10.84 D13 – 3.

92 A7 – 3.75 A5 – 3.86 B7 – 3.91 B.97 B8 – 3. Strategic Project Overview Subject 1.74 A6 – 3.PART III A. Work Breakdown Structure and Responsibility mapping 4. Project Risk Management 5. Role clarity 3. Management vision Ratings Numerical Average A1 – 3. Importance of Monitoring & Control 3.Importance of Project Planning/Scheduling/Execution 2. Importance of Human relations and Conflict management in project success 8. Communication and Soft Skills PART IV Ratings Numerical Average B1 – 4. Understanding the exact placement of a project in the overall corporate strategy 5.71 A8 – 3.89 Current Position of Project Management System (Factors in Order of Importance Affecting Growth of PM Education) Subject Ratings Numerical 259 . Importance of Contract Management 4. Project Skills Overview Subject 1.01 B5 – 4. Importance of Health/Safety/Environment 7.02 B4 – 4.01 B6 – 3.10 A4 – 3. To get an integrated view of the project 2. Quality Management 8.87 A3 – 4. Project Costing 6.59 A2 – 3. Importance of Earned Value of a project to the company 6.39 B2 – 4.20 B3 – 4. Understanding project profitability 7.

62 experience. 2. Lack of trained instructors at the Q2 – 3. Chapter VI List of Average Ratings – Human Resources Management PART II A. 4. Factors Considered on a Scale of Essentiality in PM Training 260 . Prior knowledge not essential in Q5 – 3.Average 1. 3.43 ‘taught’ in the classroom.70 and educators. Mastery comes only from practical Q4 – 3. Being a practical field it cannot be Q3 – 3. Lack of awareness amongst students Q1 – 3. 5.29 working in this field.69 undergraduate and postgraduate level.

00 M9 – 4. Perceived Gains From Such Training 5. 2.50 261 .60 N3 – 3. Prerequisite For Project Based Organizations Such As Yours 9.20 M14 – 4.20 M8 – 4. Employee Retention 7.30 M13 – 4. Right Costs And Right Quality Ratings Numerical Average M1 – 3.Subject 1. Human Resource Development For Better Performance 6. 4. Trainer’s salary and time Trainees’ salaries and time Materials for training Expenses for trainers Ratings Numerical Average N1 – 3. Improves Ability To Deliver Projects In Right Time. Improves Ability To Monitor And Control Projects 12.20 M12 – 4.10 M5 – 3.60 M2 – 3. Stipulation In The Contract 2.95 M4 – 4.40 D.85 M6 – 4.20 M11 – 4.20 M7 – 4. 3.45 N2 – 3. Improves Ability To Bid For Complex Projects 10. Career Development 8.45 N4 – 3.00 M10 – 4. Improves Ability To Plan Projects 13. Improves Ability To Manage Contracts In Projects 14. Ratings of Training Costs of PM Training Subject 1.85 M3 – 3. Improves Ability To Execute Complete Projects 11. Understanding Global Projects 4. Improving Effectiveness Of Project Operations 3.

Expenses for trainees 6.60 U2 – 3.57 K5 – 3.5.75 262 .80 U4 – 3.60 K8 – 3. Efficacy Ratings of Various Types of Trainer Options Subject 1. 5.68 K4 – 3. Reduction in errors and improvement of safety standards 3.40 U6 – 2. time and quality 7. Ratings of Benefits of Training Subject 1. Growth of business opportunities Ratings Numerical Average K1 – 3. Less supervision necessary 5.70 N7 – 3. Cost of facilities and equipment 7. 2. Employee Retention 4.70 U5 – 3.45 N6 – 3. Lost productivity N5 – 3.68 K7 – 3.05 D. 3. 6.65 U3 – 3. Technical/business institute Independent trainer Certified franchisee trainer Internationally certified trainers In-house trainers Self-training Ratings Numerical Average U1 – 3.52 K6 – 3.15 K2 – 3. Attitude changes 8.68 E. Ability to use new skills and capabilities 6. Increase in production/performance 2.47 K3 – 3. Improved delivery performance in terms of cost. 4.

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