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Surrey Transportation Plan

Surrey Transportation Plan

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Published by: Paul on Oct 21, 2008
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06/30/2011

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City of

North Vancouver
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3608 CHARLES ST
728 E KENT AVE SOUTH
1333 MCKEENAVE
11115 SILVERSMITH PL
11469 KINGSTON ST
5958 205A ST
Lighthouse
Cypress
Falls Park
CAPILANO
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Lions Gate
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Centennial
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Municipal
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Westview
Shopping
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Lucas Ed.
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Capilano
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Capilano
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Park Royal
Shopping
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Capilano
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Municipal Hall
TOGROUSE
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Park & Tilford
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Presentation House
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Museum
Canada
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Lost
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STANLEY
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Vancouver
Aquarium
Brockton
Oval
Lonsdale
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B.C. Place
Stadium
Science
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Maritime Museum
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Vancouver
General
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City
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City Square
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Hospital
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Anthropology
Nitobe
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Centre
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Elizabeth
Park
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Centre
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General
Hospital
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Mall
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Hall
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National Historic Site
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(George C Reifel
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Trenant
Park Square
Ladner
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Delta Museum
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Park
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Hall
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of Flight
Langley
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Hall
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Mall
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Shopping Centre
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POLYTECHNIC
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Riverport
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Complex
George
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Mall
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Hospital
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Bus Depot
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Hospital
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Hall
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Quay
Central
City Mall
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Park
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Art Gallery
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Gardens
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Hall
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Centre
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Centre
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City
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WIDGEON MARSH
REGIONAL PARK
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Mall
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CANYON
PARK
Ecology
Centre
Lynn
Canyon
Suspension
Bridge
Lynn Canyon
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Centre
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Village
Hall
CYPRESS
PROVINCIAL PARK
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REGIONAL PARK
Silvercity
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REGIONAL PARK
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TRINITY
WESTERN
UNIVERSITY
Cloverdale
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Park
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Park
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Park
South
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Park
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Park
Serpentine Fen
BirdSanctuary
Watershed
Park
BOUNDARY BAY
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BOUNDARY BAY
REGIONAL PARK
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Park
Delta
Nature
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Ladner
Harbour
Park
Garry
Point
Park
McDonald
Beach Park
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REGIONAL PARK
Fraser
River Park
Musqueam
Park
Fraser
Foreshore
Park
Everett
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Park
John
Hendry
Park
Jericho
Beach Park
Marine Drive
Foreshore Park
Nelson
CanyonPark
Princess
Park
McKay
Creek
Park
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Creek
Park
Murdo Fraser
Park
Mahon
Park
Ferry
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2
S
T
E V A 4 6
E V A 8 6
E V A 0 6
E V A 7 5
K
IN
G
G
E
O
R
G
E
H
W
Y
1
4
2
S
T
1
4
4
S
T
1
5
2
S
T
E V A 2 7
E V A 4 6
1
6
8
S
T
1
5
2
S
T
E V A 8 5
1
7
7
B
S
T
E V A 0 6
1
8
0
S
T
1
9
2
S
T
1
8
4
S
T
1
7
6
S
T
FR
A
SE
R
H
W
Y
) E V A 6 5 ( 0 1 Y W H
FR
A
SE
R
H
W
Y
1
4
8
S
T
E V A 4 8
E V A 2 7
E V A 6 9
H
W
Y
9
1
LADNER TRUNK ROAD
HWY 99
H
W
Y
9
9
K
IN
G
G
E
O
R
G
E
H
W
Y
A 2 3 VE
C
R
E
S
C
E
N
T
R
D
MARINE DR
1
2
4
S
T
24AVE
20AVE
1
2
8
S
T
NORTH BLUFF
SU
LLIV
A
N
BEECHER
M
c
B
R
ID
E
24AVE
O
X
F
O
R
D
THRIFT
F
IR CO
LUM
BIA
1
4
8
S
T
1
5
6
S
T
20AVE
1
6
0
S
T
C
R
A
N
L
E
Y
1
5
2
S
T
22 AVE
29AVE
N
O
O
T
K
A
W
ELLIN
G
TO
N
B
O
U
N
D
A
R
Y
BURKE
S
M
I
T
H
P
A
T
T
E
R
S
O
N
MOSCROP
W
I
L
L
I
N
G
D
O
N
BOND
N
E
L
S
O
N
M
c
K
A
Y
C
EN
TR
A
L B
LV
D
KIN
G
SW
AY
R
O
Y
A
L
O
A
K
GRANGE (OAKLAND)
B
U
R
R
IS
S
A
L
I
S
B
U
R
Y
C
A
N
A
D
A
W
A
Y
E
D
M
O
N
D
S
1
6
A
V
E A
R
M
S
T
R
O
N
G
1
S
T
O
V
E
N
S
8
A
V
E
BRAID
6
A
V
E
M
c
B
R
ID
E
C
O
L
U
M
B
I A
R
O
Y
A
L
2
S
T
6
S
T
8
S
T
1
2
S
T
QUAYSI DE
8
A
V
E
1
4
A
V
E
PA
T
T
U
L
L
O
B
R
ID
G
E
P
O
R
T
M
A
N
N
B
R
ID
G
E
S
C
O
T
T
R
D
E V A 0 1 1
1
2
8
S
T
E V A 8 0 1
1
3
2
S
T
E V A 2 0 1
E V A 4 0 1
E V A 8 0 1
E V A 0 0 1
1
5
2
S
T
1
5
6
S
T
1
6
0
S
T
E V A 1 9
F
L
E
E
T
W
O
O
D
W
A
Y
1
5
0
S
T
E V A 8 0 1
E V A 4 0 1
1
6
8
S
T
F
R
A
S
E
R
G
L
E
N
D
R
1
5
6
S
T
1
4
8
S
T
E V A A 6 1 1 S
U
R
R
E
Y
W
A
L
L
A
C
E
H
A
N
S
E
N
E V A 4 1 1
E V A 3 1 1
E V A 2 1 1
G
R
O
S
V
E
N
O
R
E V A 6 1 1
E V A 4 1 1
IN
D
U
S
T
R
IA
L
1
2
8
S
T
1
4
8
S
T
E V A 8 8
1
7
6
S
T
BARNSTON
6 9 A VE
1
9
2
S
T
D N O M M A H
H
A
R
R
I
S
R
D
LO
U
G
H
E
E
D
H
W
Y
McLEAN
K
IN
G
S
W
A
Y
B
R
O
A
D
W
A
Y
K
E
B
E
T
S
H
A
U
G
H
N
E
S
S
Y
G
O
L
D
E
N
U
N
IT
E
D
B
L
V
D
WOOLRIDGE
UNITED BLVD
B
R
U
N
E
T
T
E
BRUNETTE
S
C
H
O
O
L
H
O
U
S
E
L
I
N
T
O
N
R E T S O F
W O L S N I W
H
I
L
L
C
R
E
S
T
N I T S U A
N I T S U A N I T S U A
R E T S E H C O R
G
U
I
L
B
Y
S
T
COTTONWOOD
R E T S O F
R E T S E H C O R
M
A
R
M
O
N
T
N O S R E D L A
L
E
B
L
E
U
L
A
U
R
E
N
T
I
A
N
M
U
N
D
Y
LOUGHEED HWY
K
I
N
G
E
D
W
A
R
D
H C I K Y E
M
A
R
I
N
E
R
W
A
Y
C
H
IL
K
O
R
A
N
C
H
P
A
R
K
W
E
S
T
W
O
O
D
LO
U
G
H
E
E
D
H
W
Y
K
IN
G
SW
A
Y
W O S L I N
R
E
E
V
E
M
A
R
Y
H
I
L
L
P
I
T
T
R
I
V
E
R
P
O
I
R
I
E
R
N
O
R
T
H
R
D
E K A L O M O C
S ’ N H O J . T S E K R A L C
C
E
C
I
L
E
G
L
E
N
A
Y
R
E
P
R
I
N
C
E
T
O
N
W
A
S
H
IN
G
T
O
N
R D N E L G
G
UILDFORD WAY
B
ARNET HWY
I
O
C
O
LINCOLN
P
I
P
E
L
I
N
E
P
IN
E
T
R
E
E
W
A
Y
HARWOOD
DUNKIRK
DAVID
O
X
F
O
R
D
MASON
V C I TOR A I
GREENMOUNT
W
E
L
L
I
N
G
T
O
N
L N I COLN
PRA R I E I
C
E
D
A
R
COQU T I LAM
O
X
F
O
R
D
C
O
A
S
T
M
E
R
I
D
I
A
N
S
H
A
U
G
H
N
E
S
S
Y
R
O
BSON
P
A
N
O
RAMA
J
O
H
N
S
O
N
LA
N
SD
O
W
N
E D
R
N
O
O
N
’S
C
R
E
E
K
RAVINE
T
U
R
N
E
R
C
R
H
E
R
IT
A
G
E
M
T
N
IOCO RD
O I CO
SUNNYSI D
E
R
D
2
A
V
E
T S 1
M
IDDEN
B
E
D
W
E
L
L
B
A
Y
R
D
C
L
A
R
K
E
HWY 1
ampeak
periods ) (
S
M
I
T
H
G
I
L
M
O
R
E
N
E
L
S
O
N
S
E
Y
M
O
U
R
G
R
A
N
V
IL
L
E
H
O
W
E
B
U
R
R
A
R
D
L
IO
N
S
G
A
T
E
B
R
ID
G
E
3
1
S
T
2
7
S
T
2
5
S
T
1
5
S
T
1 T S 5
1 S T
W
. B
O
U
L
E
V
A
R
D
B
L
A
N
C
A
5 AVE
W
I
L
L
O
W
KING EDWARD
SANDERSON
WAY
LAUREL CANADA WAY
B
O
U
N
D
A
R
Y
G
I
L
M
O
R
E
D
I V
GILPIN
D
E
ER LAKE PKWY
SPROTT
N
O
R
L
A
N
D
K
E
N
S
I
N
G
T
O
N
R
O
Y
A
L
O
A
K
W
A
Y
B
U
R
N
E
D
R
D
O
U
G
L
A
S
F
E
R
R
Y
R
D
C
O
M
M
O
D
O
R
E
DR
E V A 2 5
C
R
E
S
C
E
N
T
5
7
S
T
W
E
S
T
M
IN
S
T
E
R
A
V
E
C
E
N
T
R
A
L
E V A 8 4
E
L
L
IO
T
T
E V A A 7 4
4
6
A
S
T
E V A 5 4
E V A 4 4
H
A
R
V
E
S
T
A
R
T
H
U
R
D R K N U R T R E N D A L
HWY 99
L L I H C R U H C
7
2
S
T
8
0
S
T
H
W
Y
1
7
A
R
T
H
U
R
D
R
E V A 8 2
H
W
Y
1
7
E V A 6 1
B
E
A
C
H
G
R
O
V
E
E V A 2 1
E V A A 8
5
3
A
S
T
5
6
S
T
5
2
S
T
E V A 6
E V A 2
E V A 1
5
4
S
T
E
N
G
L
I
S
H
B
L
U
F
F
R
D
E V A A 1
6
6
A
S
T
6
7
S
T
E V A 3
B
O
U
N
D
A
R
Y
B
A
Y
R
D
6
2
B
S
T
RIVER RD
7
2
S
T
PROGRESS W
AY
8
0
S
T
B
E
S
T
S
T
F
IN
L
A
Y
M
A
P
L
E
S
T
A
Y
T
E
RUSSELL
BUENAVISTA
11AVE
16AVE
O
L
D
Y
A
LE
R
D
N
O
R
D
E
L
W
A
Y
MARINE
WAY
N
W
MARINE
DRIVE
B
U
R
N
A
B
Y
M
O
U
N
T
A
IN
PKW
Y
IN
L
E
T
D
R
G
A
G
L
A
R
D
I
W
AY
BROADWAY
BON
N
Y
M
U
I
R
S
T
.
A
N
D
R
E
W
S
M
A
R
IN
ER
WAY
E V A 2 9
8AVE
1
3
0
S
T
17AVE
1
4
4
S
T
16AVE
16AVE
DEWDNEY TRUNK RD
2
2
5

S
T
HANEY BYPASS
T
A
M
A
R
A
C
K
R
IV
E
R
R
D
2
4
0

S
T
2
4
8

S
T
2
5
6

S
T
SMITH
2
5
0

S
T
M
c
N
U
T
T
R
D
128 AVE
S
AY
E
R
S
C
R
E
S
DEWDNEY TRUNK RD
116 AVE
G
A
R
I
B
A
L
D
I
2
7
2

S
T
2
6
8

S
T
2
8
0

S
T
2
8
4

S
T
100 AVE
LOUGHEED HWY
2
6
6
S
T
IN
D
U
S
T
R
IA
L
J
A
C
K
S
O
N
98 AVE
104 AVE
105 A
V
E
124 AVE
RIVER RD
2
3
2


S
T
128 AVE
2
2
7

S
T
2
1
6

S
T
2
0
7

S
T
117 AVE
L
O
R
N
E
D
IT
T
O
N
2
0
3

S
T
P
R
IN
C
E
S
S
123 AVE
132 AVE
96 AVE
88 AVE
HW
Y 1
2
0
4

S
T
2
1
6

S
T
2
1
2

S
T
2
1
0

S
T
2
1
3

S
T
L I A R T H P A R G E L E T
W
A
L
N
U
T
G
ROVE
9
6
A
V
E
2
0
0

S
T
2
0
0

S
T
G
L
O
V
E
R
R
D
80 AVE
72 AVE
2
0
2
A

S
T
2
0
0

S
T 2
0
8

S
T
FRA
SER H
W
Y
48 AVE
52 AVE
1
9
7

S
T
GRADE CRES
64 AVE
2
4
0

S
T
2
1
6
S
T
2
2
1
A

S
T
53 AVE
40 AVE
42 AVE
2
2
2

S
T
50 AVE
2
0
4

S
T
WILLOWBROOK DR
46 AVE
2
7
2

S
T
29 AVE
32 AVE
28 AVE
2
7
6

S
T
2
6
4

S
T
56 AVE
2
4
8

S
T
36 AVE
2
0
0

S
T
2
0
8

S
T
24 AVE
20 AVE
1
9
8

S
T
L
O
U
G
H
E
E
D
H
W
Y
CA
P
E
H
O
R
N
SW MARI N
E
D
R
RIVER RD
66 AVE
2
0
2

S
T
2
0
3

S
T
2
0
4
S
T
LANGLEY BYPASS
2
0
6

S
T
2
0
3

S
T
HA B R OUR E D I S
F
E
L
L
W
H
ISK
EY
C
O
V
E LA
N
E
B
E
L
C
A
R
R
A
B
A
Y
R
D
DAVID
F
O
R
E
ST
PARK WAY
E
A
S
T
R
D
D
A
V
ID
P
I N
E
T
R
E
E
W
A
Y
P
A
D
D
O
C
K
P
L
A
T
E
A
U
B
L
V
D
P
A
R
K
W
A
Y
B
L
V
D
PARKWAY
N
E
S
T
O
R
F
R
E
M
O
N
T
O
T
T
A
W
A
R
I V
E
R
S
ID
E DR
LAUR E I R
O
X
F
O
R
D
M
A
R
I
N
E
D
R
I
V
E
N
E
L
S
O
N
R
O
Y
A
L
DEWDNEY TRUNK RD
S
W
M
A
R
I N
E
D
R
25AVE
26AVE
H
W
Y
9
9
H
W
Y
9
9
G
IL
L
E
Y
T
R
A
T
T
L
E
S
T
OXFORD CONNECTOR
S
C
H
O
O
N
E
R
B
R
IG
A
N
T
IN
E
HARTLEY
F
I
R
G
O
L
D
E
N
T
R
U
T
C
H
ASPENW
O
O
D
2
0
2

S
T
91A AVE
G
R
IF
F
IT
H
S
1
0
A
V
E
S
H
E
L
L
T
E
M
P
L
E
T
O
N
H
IL
T
O
N
K
IN
D
ERSLEY
G
LADSTONE
M
c
B
R
ID
E
1
3
2
S
T
1
3
6
S
T
E V A 0 1 1
1
5
2
S
T
C
U
M
BERLAND
7
6
S
T
V
A
N
TA
GE
W
AY
102 AVE
2
8
4

S
T
116 AVE
116 AVE
2
3
8

S
T
2
3
6

S
T
112 AVE
KANAKA
WAY
L
A
I
T
Y
2
0
3

S
T
128 AVE
DEWDNEY TRUNK RD
2
2
4

S
T
6 3 A VE
4 A 0 VE
2 3 A VE
W L E H C S T
T S 3 1
E C R E M M O C
J
A
C
O
M
B
S
McNEE
LY
JACK
B
E
L
L
S S E L E R I W
PARKER
K
E
N
S
I N
G
T
O
N
HWY 1
HARRISON
GR
EYS
TONE
S
PU
R AW
A
Y
EASTERN
W
E
S
T
E
R
N
CITA
D
E
L
M
ARY
HI LL
BYPASS
E V A 0 6
1
2
4
S
T
56 AVE
M
A
P
L
E
M
E
A
D
O
W
S
W
AY
2
5
2

S
T
1
7
6
A
S
T
6
4
S
T
2 AVE
G
T
N
ORTHERN WAY
E V A 5 6
E V A 5 6
6
2
S
T
6
6
S
T
HOLLY PARK
G
R
E
E
N
A
L
L
A P K R
D R O F
1
8
9
A
S
T
B
O
N
S
O
N
Q
U
E
S
N
E
L
KING
ED
W
A
R
D
E V A 2 2 1
1
6
8
S
T
28AVE
32 AVE
1
4
0
S
T
W
E
S
T
M
A
L
L
S
W
M
A
R
I
N
E
A
C
A
D
IA
HAMPTON
F
O
R
B
E
S
MATHESON
R
O
S
E
B
E
R
R
Y
KEITH
L
O
N
S
D
A
L
E
28 AVE
1
9
6

S
T
MARINE DR
RIVER WAY
M
I
N
O
R
U
NORTH SERVICE RD
M
A
R
Y
H
IL
L
B
Y
P
A
S
S
summer
only
ALBERT
E V A 7 5
1
8
8
S
T
1
8
4
S
T
56 AVE
72 AVE
1
2
4
S
T
E V A 5 1 1
B
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9
6
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S
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16 AVE
33 AVE
M
ID
L
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H
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41 AVE
S
O
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H
F
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HOLDOM
129.136. N9*
GILMORE
28. 129.N9*
BROADWAY
9.20.99.N9.N20
RUPERT
27
BOUNDARY
LOOP
9. N9
7. 25
NANAIMO
RENFREW
16. N16
16. N16
26.29.33
29th AVE
BRENTWOOD
TOWNCENTRE
25.123.130.134.136
SPERLING-
BURNABY LAKE
110. 134. 144
PRODUCTIONWAY
-UNIVERSITY
110.136.145
N9*
97. 101. 110. 112. 136
151. 152. 156. 157. C24. N9
LOUGHEED TOWN CENTRE
106. 112
116. 129
C5.C7
METROTOWN
19. 49. 106. 110
112.116. 129. 130
144. 430. C6. C7
COMMERCIAL DR
WATERFRONT
WCE. 44. 50. 98
135.160.190
SUBURBANBUSES ON
HASTINGS STREET
STANLEY
PARKLOOP
GRANVILLE
BURRARD
19
100. 101. 104. 154
155. 340. 410.C98
EDMONDS
22ndSTREET
395. 502
SAPPERTON
ROYAL OAK
C5
PATTERSON
129
JOYCE-COLLINGWOOD
26. 27. 28. 41. 43
3. 8. 19. 22
C21.C23.N8. N19
MAINSTREET-
SCIENCEWORLD
STADIUM-
CHINATOWN
10 . 135
C1. 10. 27. 28
130.135.160. 190. N35
28.130. 210. 211. 212
214. 229. 232. 239. C15
321. 345. 351. 354. 375
394.C50. C51. C52. C53
WHITE ROCK CENTRE
321. 351
352. 354. 394
SOUTH SURREY
PARK & RIDE
153.154.155.156
159.169. 177.791
BRAID
311. 351. C76
MATTHEWS EXCHANGE
PITT MEADOWS
WCE. 701.791.C41
SFU EXCHANGE
135.143.144.145.N35
KOOTENAYLOOP
PNE PARK&RIDE
PHIBBS EXCHANGE
228. 229. 230. 236
239. 242. 246. N24
LONSDALE QUAY
239. 246. 250. 251. 252
253. 254. 255. 257. 258
PARKROYAL
S
E
A
B
U
S
232. 246
EDGEMONTVILLAGE
4. 9. 17. 25. 33
41. 43. 44. 49. 84
99. 258. 480
C19. C20.C22.N17
UNIVERSITYLOOP
7. 22. 32. 41
43. 49. 480.N22
DUNBARLOOP
98.100.491.496.N10
TOAIRPORT STATION
10. 17. 100
MARPOLE LOOP
98. 100. 424. 491
496. 620. C90. C92. N10
AIRPORT STATION
407. 430. 480
488. 492.C95
SEXSMITH
PARK&RIDE
100. 311. 351. 352. 354
480. 490. 601. 602. 603. 604
HUDSON&MARINE
LADNEREXCHANGE
404. 601. 606. 608
620. 640
C76.C86.C87.C88
98. 301. 401. 402. 403
404. 405. 407. 410
430. 480. 488. 492
C95.C96. N10
RICHMONDCENTRE
SOUTHDELTA
EXCHANGE
601. 602. 603. 604
C84.C89
22. 100. 405. 407
KNIGHT &MARINE
COQUITLAMRECCENTRE
151.153.156.157
250A Dundarave
trips operate to
Marine & 25th.
258 operates to UBC when
UBC is in winter session.
MAPLE MEADOWS
WCE. 701. C41.C43. C44
701.791.C43.C44.C45
C46.C47.C48.C49
HANEY PLACE
PORT HANEY
WCE. C43
C45. C46. C47
WALNUT GROVE
PARK & RIDE
501. 509.590. C62
SCOTT ROAD
312. 314. 319. 321
391. 640. C71. N19
COLUMBIA
112. C3. C4
106. 112. 123. 321
N19. C3. C4
NEWWESTMINSTER
COQUITLAM
WCE.97.143.150(summer only)
151.152.160.169.177.179
189.190. 701
C27.C28. C29.C30. C38.N9
PORT MOODY
WCE.160. C24
C25. C26. C27. C28
PORT COQUITLAM
WCE.159.160
C36.C37.C38.C40
PORT COQUITLAM
CENTRE
159.160. C37.C38
LANGLEY CENTRE
320.341.501.502.590
C60. C61. C62. C63. C64
LAKE CITY
WAY
CAULFEILD
253. C12
HORSESHOE BAY
250. 257. 259. C12
VCC-CLARK
84
MEADOWTOWN
C41. C43. C44
CAPILANO
UNIVERSITY
28.130. 239
9.20.99.N9.N20
Deep Cove
B
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Lake
Lighthouse
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Harbour
E
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B
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District of
North Vancouver
Belcarra
Anmore
B
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reck Beach
Brockton Point
Sea Island
N
o
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A
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F
r
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r
R
iv
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r
Annacis Island
Lulu Island
Steveston
VANCOUVER
INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
S
o
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A
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m
F
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R
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N
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Crescent
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White Rock
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B
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R
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Barnston Island
M
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Coquitlam
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R
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Iona Island
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Island
Tilbury Island
Westham Island
S
T
R
A
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F
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Vancouver
Richmond
Burnaby
Ladner
BOUNDARY BAY
AIRPORT
Tsawwassen
R
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b
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Bank
DELTAPORT
New
Westminster
Point Atkinso
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C
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p
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Island
Whonnock
Lake
Whonnock
Walnut Grove
Port Kells
Murrayville
Fernridge
Milner
Haney
Brookswood
Fort
Langley
Ruskin
Webster's
Corners
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F
r
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R i v e r
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REGIONAL PARK
Salmon
River
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Maple Ridge
Langley
PITT MEADOWS
AIRPORT
Deer Lake
P
i
t
t
L
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A
l
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t
t
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L
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k
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Whytecliff
Park
Horseshoe
Bay
BURNABY LAKE
REGIONAL PARK
Robert
Burnaby
Park
To Lions Bay
and Whistler
to Snug Cove
t
o
N
a
n
a
im
o
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L
a
n
g
d
a
l
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MINNEKHADA
REGIONAL PARK
A
louette
R
iv
er
Pitt Addington
Marsh Wildlife Area
Brae
Island
Fort Langley
National Historic
Site
City
Hall
(am peak only)
SEE DOWNTOWN INSET MAP
SEE INSET MAP
SEE SURREY INSET MAP
SEE LANGLEY INSET MAP
SEE HANEY PLACE INSET MAP
Lions Bay
H
W
Y
9
9
C
E
N
T
R
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RD
O
C
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A
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V
IEW
R
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B
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A
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ROAD
VILLAGE
BEACH
PARK
TO HORSESHOE BAY
2
5
9
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C
1
2
Horseshoe Bay
N
M
A
RI NE DR
BC FERRIES TERMINAL
Horseshoe Bay
(To Bowen Island, Langdale
and Nanaimo) H
W
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9
9
N
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L
S
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A
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5
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9.16.17. 99. N17
4. 7. 84
2
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8
4
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4
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1
5
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4. 7. 84
9
8
50
N
1
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1
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N
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8.N8.10.16. 20. N20
3
.
8
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9
.
2
2
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8
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1
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4 8 . 0 5 5
0
50
4
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0
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6
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7
4
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0
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6
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7
5
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0
6
5
0
5
0
N
9
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1
0
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1
7 N
9
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1
0
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1
7
5
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5
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0
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0
N
8
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0
5
N
6
5
0
5
0
N
2
2
N
2
2
N
2
4
N
2
4
N
6
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8
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9
N
1
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1
5
N
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N
2
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3
5
E V A 2
3 AVE
E V A 4
E V A 5
B
U
R
R
A
R
D
G
R
A
N
V
I
L
L
E
Y A W D A O R B
W
I
L
L
O
W
TERMINAL
C
A
M
B
I
E
Y A W D A O R B M
A
I
N
Q
U
E
B
E
C
4 AVE
6 AVE
PRIOR ST
M
A
I
N
G
O
R
E
L L E W O P
KEEFER
HASTINGS
C
A
R
R
A
L
L
WATER
A
B
B
O
T
T
B
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A
T
T
Y
G
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R
G
IA
R
O
B
S
O
N
N
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L
S
O
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C
A
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B
IE
G
E
O
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G
IA
C
H
IL
C
O
C
A
R
D
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R
O
B
R
O
U
G
H
T
O
N
B
U
T
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P
A
C
IF
IC
B
U
R
R
A
R
D
H
O
W
E
D
R
A
K
E
B
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A
C
H
D
A
V
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D
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N
M
A
N
PEN
D
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B
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C
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A
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IC
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R
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H
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B
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N
A
B
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C
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M
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B
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A
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B
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N
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P
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N
D
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L
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B
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W
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L
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W
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HASTINGS
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B
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S
M
IT
H
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H
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M
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R
H
A
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IL
T
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S
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M
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A
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D
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N
V
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H
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W
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P
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BLV
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LAGOON DR
D V L B C I F I C A P
O
N
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A
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M
A
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B
A
C
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L
U
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B
IA
A
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B
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T
A
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U
K
O
N
7 AVE
8 AVE
3 AVE
1 AVE
E V A 5
A
S
H
H
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A
T
H
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R
L
A
U
R
IE
L
O
A
K
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C
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IA
B
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N
S
W
IC
K
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G
T
N
O
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T
H
E
R
N
E V A 6
G
T
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
E V A 2
S
P
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C
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A
L
D
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B
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C
H
H
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M
L
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C
K
F
I
R
P
IN
E
F
I
R
B
U
R
R
A
R
D
6 AVE
7 AVE
1 AVE
E V A 4
C
H
E
S
T
N
U
T
H
O
R
N
B
Y
H
A
M
IL
T
O
N
C
O
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U
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B
I
A
D
U
N
S
M
U
IR
BURRARD
MAIN STREET -
SCIENCE WORLD
SEABUS TERMINAL
STANLEY PARK
LOOP
19
WATERFRONT
GRANVILLE
WALKWAY
Stanley Park
Deadmans
Island
S
E
A
B
U
S
T
o
N
o
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V
a
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c
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a
n
d
L
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s
d
a
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Q
u
a
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S
ta
n
le
y
P
ark Shuttle (seasonal)
S
tan
ley Park Shuttle
Lost Lagoon
E
n
g
l
i
s
h
B
a
y
Coal Harbou
r
False Creek
H.R.MacMillan
Space Centre
& Vancouver Museum
Vanier
Park
Vancouver
Academy of
Music
Gordon
Southam
Observatory
Granville
Island Market
Arts Club
Theatre
Waterfront
Theatre
Emily Carr University
of Art + Design
B
U
R
R
A
R
D
B
R
ID
G
E
C
A
M
B
I
E





B
R
I
D
G
E
G.M.
Place
B.C. Place
Stadium
Science
World
Chinatown
Vancouver
Convention
& Exhibition
Centre
CN IMAX
Theatre
Vancouver
Tourist
InfoCentre
Sinclair
Centre
Harbour
Centre/SFU
Canada
Post
Vancouver
Library
Robson
Square
UBC
Downtown
Royal
Centre
Dr Sun Yat Sen
Chinese
Gardens
Robson
Market
A
q
u
a
b
u
s
False Creek Ferry
False Creek
Fe
rry
Aquabus
VCC
Devonian
Harbour
Park
0 500
METRES
T
H
U
R
L
O
W
d n E t s e W
G
IL
F
O
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D
English Bay
Beach
Park
Alexandra
Park
Morton
Park Barclay
Heritage
Square
Coal
Harbour
Park
Harbour Green
Park
t n u o M
t n a s a e l P
R 09.08
w e i v r i a F
Sutcliffe
Park
Sunset
Beach
Park
George
Wainborn
Park
Yaletown
Coopers’
Park
David Lam
Park
Charleson Park
Andy Livingstone
Park
Creekside
Park
Thornton Park
Plaza of
Nations
Gastown
Portside
Park
Pacific
Centre
Nelson
Park
Vancouver
Art Gallery
Orpheum
Theatre
Queen
Elizabeth
Theatre
G
R
A
N
V
IL
L
E
B
R
ID
G
E
West End
Community
Centre
4
4
R E D N E P
CORDOVA
C
2
1
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2
3
Thornton Park
3 2 C
C21.C23
Pacific
Central
Station
(Bus &
Railway)
NATIONAL
Q
U
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B
E
C
C
2
1
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C
2
3
C21.C23
P
A
C
IF
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B
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D
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X
P
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B
L
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C
2
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C
2
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STADIUM-
CHINATOWN
C21.C23
7 1
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4
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P
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D
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3
3
PA
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B
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SKYBRIDGE
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B
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6
TRANSPORTATION STRATEGIC PLAN
Transportation Working For Everyone
TRANSPORTATION STRATEGIC PLAN
Transportation Working For Everyone
ForEWard ............................................................................................................................... 4
ExEcuTivE Summary ........................................................................................................... 6
PART 1 DEVELOPING A VISION .......................................................................................... 19
Planning for the Future ........................................................................................... 30
Participation and input ........................................................................................... 24
The Surrey vision .................................................................................................... 26
PART 2 STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS ....................................................................................... 31
meeting the challenge ........................................................................................... 32
Effective & Effcient Network management ....................................................... 38
improved accessibility ........................................................................................... 42
community Safety and Health .............................................................................. 48
Effcient Economy .................................................................................................... 56
Protection of the Environment .............................................................................. 66
integration of Transportation ................................................................................ 72
PART 3 MEASURING PERFORMANCE .............................................................................. 79
identifying indicators and Setting Targets .......................................................... 80
PART 4 MOVING FORWARD ................................................................................................ 87
Taking action ........................................................................................................... 88
coNTENTS
have taken a fresh look at how we plan, fund and deliver
transportation and importantly, we have introduced a
performance and monitoring component to demonstrate
best value and to gauge the success of the Strategy and its
supporting plans.
This Strategic Plan is also different in that it clearly identifes
the fundamental relationship between the planning and
development of our communities and how this can be done in
a way that supports and enhances all modes of transportation.
The Principles of this Strategic Plan emphasize the need for
transportation choice and the full integration of transportation
with land use. How we plan our City is probably the most
important factor infuencing transportation and it is expected
to play the dominant role in determining how far it will be
possible to achieving our Vision.
We also have the responsibility of operating and preserving
the transportation infrastructure which is the backbone for
any successful transportation system. The assets the City is
tasked with looking after are enormous and require constant
work and investment. Getting these fundamentals right will
allow us to promote our policies for the convenient, safe and
effcient movement of people, goods and services.
This Strategic Plan has been produced with the assistance of
public and stakeholder input but consultation does not stop
here. As particular projects and initiatives are promoted we
will continue to seek the input of our communities to help
ensure what we do is the best for our City.
Dianne Watts – Mayor
We are pleased to introduce the Surrey Transportation
Strategic Plan. It has been developed from the successful
foundations of the previous Surrey Transportation Plan and
sets out our proposals and strategies to deliver a quality,
sustainable and integrated transportation system for our
City. Transportation planning is a vital and essential public
service that we at the City are responsible for. It is a service
not just about solving problems but as a means of delivering
opportunity for all and enhancing everyone’s quality of life.
Surrey is a great place to live and work and as we look to
the future as one of Canada’s leading cities, we will work to
make our transportation system ft for the challenges ahead.
The Plan has given us the opportunity to critically examine
Surrey’s transport needs, providing for business, industry,
transit, car, pedestrians and bicycle users. We have focused
our attention on a number of key priorities which we
believe will make it easier for people to make choices in
the way they travel, increasing mobility and accessibility
and thereby helping to address the health, social and
environmental problems of car dependence.
Surrey is a City that is looking to the future and this
Strategic Plan refects what we want to achieve, not
just for transportation itself but also in terms of our
environmental, health, community safety and economic
future. How we deliver our transportation services is key to
our success. This Plan is therefore different in a number of
ways. It is the frst major policy statement to be produced
by the City since adopting our Sustainability Charter. We
F ORE WORD

Surrey is a
city that is
looking to the
future and this
Strategic Plan
refects what
we want to
achieve …
[4]
An InTroDuCTIon To THe STrATeGIC PlAn | The
Transportation Strategic Plan is the City’s long range planning
document that sets out the vision, objectives, proposals
and priorities for transportation in Surrey in the future. It
also shows how transport, in its widest sense, has a part to
play in key policy areas such as the environment, land use,
economy, safety and health.
ISSueS, CHAllenGeS AnD oPPorTunITIeS
|
There are
very many, but fundamentally, there is an over-reliance on
the car that is having serious implications for congestion
and the environment, particularly climate change, safety
and health. Peak oil forecasts and escalating fuel costs will
impact all aspects of transportation and affect people’s
transportation decisions and travel patterns. For those who
do not have access to a car, or who want to use their car less,
getting around can be diffcult. The Strategic Plan examines
how we can provide a transport system that caters to all
mobility needs including the movement of goods and services
associated with a successful economy.
A transportation system that improves choice is not anti-
motorist. Indeed, growth and development of our road system
network will remain a signifcant component of our Strategy and
future budgets. By implication, the operation and maintenance
of the road system will also remain a major and growing part
of our planning. The Strategic Plan is made up of strategies and
objectives to manage, maintain and fnance the transportation
system in ways that are responsive to local needs, are
innovative, provide value for money and which are sustainable.
The Strategic Plan aims to promote a balanced transport system
that gives sustainable choices in the way we travel to, from
and within Surrey and which integrates with other policy areas
associated with the environment, health and safety, economic
well-being and land development.
Transportation has a part to play in all aspects of people’s lives and a
good system responds to many and varying needs and priorities. This
Strategic Plan takes a holistic approach to transportation by:
Seeking to increase the accessibility and mobility options 1.
available to people including the elderly and those with special
needs
Identifying where strategic investments will be needed to 2.
complete key networks and support a major shift to lower
impact modes of transportation.
Increasing the safety and security of the system for both 3.
motorized and non-motorized users
Promoting the effcient management and operation of the 4.
system for all modes
Ensuring that the system infrastructure is well maintained and 5.
preserved
Recognizing the funding implications of providing new 6.
infrastructure
Supporting the economic vitality of the City, allowing 7.
competitiveness, effciency and job creation
Protecting and enhancing the environment by promoting 8.
sustainability, effciency, and energy conservation
Establishing land use patterns, densities and mixes that reduce 9.
the need to travel and that support walking, cycling and transit
Examining and implementing Transportation Demand strategies 10.
Measuring performance 11.
E XECUT I VE SUMMARY

The Strategic Plan
examines how
we can provide a
transport system
that caters
to all mobility
needs including
the movement
of goods
and services
associated with
a successful
economy.
[6]
Our Vision
The transportation system is fundamentally linked with the
nature, where and how much growth and development takes
place. The Strategic Plan explains the important relationship
between land use and transportation and makes broad
recommendations for sustainable growth. This theme will be
developed further and become an important component of the
future offcial Community Plan review and update.
THe TrAnSPorTATIon PrInCIPleS | We believe that
transportation cannot be thought of as just a means to an end
but as a key infuence on very many aspects of our lives. Surrey
is a diverse, vibrant and growing City and we are working
hard on making it an even better place to live and work by
tackling crime, incorporating sustainability principles in our
decision making, providing the right conditions for employment,
enhancing the environment in which we live and improving the
liveability of our neighbourhoods and town centres. How the
transportation system is planned, improved and operated is
fundamental to making these changes happen. To refect the
importance transportation has in delivering these goals, we
developed 6 Principles that we believed represented what a
good transportation system should achieve.
These principles are integral to the Strategic Plan and
by adopting them it will help Surrey move towards a
sustainable, effcient, cost effective, affordable, accessible
and environmentally sound transportation system. They also
allow us to properly examine the issues around transportation,
develop strategies to deal with these and provide a framework
for monitoring and communicating our progress.
our TrAnSPorTATIon VISIon | The Transportation Vision
refects Surrey’s social, environmental, sustainability and
economic aspirations that are all key parts of our overall
community objectives and which are described within the 6
guiding principles and shaped by our consultation. It seeks
to establish important directions and outcomes explaining
what we will achieve and why. The detailed how, who,
when and where will be addressed through the various
policies, programs, funding systems and targets contained
in the Strategic Plan.
It is the Year 2031 and Surrey is a vibrant community of 680,000 persons forming the activity centre of
the Fraser Valley. Multi-use town centres are high density with mixed use along connecting corridors and
transit has operating priority within these corridors. Compact, mixed use communities emphasizing a sense
of place, have pedestrian, cycling and transit friendly design. Transit, highways, arterials, the effcient
movement of goods and services and parking are planned and co-ordinated throughout the City. The
percentage of trips made by walking, cycling, transit and high occupancy autos continues to increase while
the percentage of trips made by single occupant autos continues to decrease. The average distance and
travel time for peak hour commuter travel within Surrey continues to decline. The citizens, regardless of age,
income or disability, enjoy universal access to transportation and the services, educational and recreational
opportunities it provides. Transportation infrastructure is in a good state of repair and is adequately funded
from stable and sustainable revenue sources. Surrey’s elected representatives have the support of a well
informed public in making decisions on urban development and the supporting transportation systems.
Effective And Effcient Network Management 1.
More Travel Choice 2.
Safer, Healthier Communities 3.
Successful Local Economies 4.
Protection Of Our Built And Natural Environment 5.
Transportation Integration 6.

The transportation
system is
fundamentally
linked with the
nature, where and
how much growth
and development
takes place.
[8]
To help emphasize that transportation cannot be considered in
isolation and that it is a means to an end this Strategic Plan
summarizes the Vision in the following way:
STrATeGy PrePArATIon AnD DeVeloPMenT
|
The Strategic
Plan has been produced by the City of Surrey, with meaningful
input from Surrey residents, those doing business in Surrey as well
as other agencies and organizations. This process of participation
has infuenced all aspects of the Strategy. Although produced by
the City, it is important that it has wider ownership, refecting the
common interests of all who will be affected by its outcomes.
ConSulTATIon
|
Transportation has always been a hot topic
for people. We all have our views on what is good and bad
about our transportation system and it is guaranteed to generate
strong opinions and argument. This is because mobility is
such an important part of our lives. The City recognizes that
consultation is a fundamental part of the planning of the Strategic
Plan. In undertaking our consultation some key principles were
established as minimum requirements as to how we wanted
our consultation to take place:
Involve a wide group of opinions and views X
Ensure that all members of the community with different X
transportation needs are given opportunity to contribute
including youth, seniors, women, people with mobility
diffculties and families
Establish local issues and priorities X
Employ a range of consultation methods so that we X
receive broad and representative public comment and
feedback
PrIorITIeS IDenTIFIeD DurInG ConSulTATIon
|
Need for improved Transit X
Traffc congestion and intersection delay X
Impacts of trucks X
Sidewalk provision X
Road maintenance X
Completing the planned strategic road network and X
improving neighbourhood connectivity
Better integration between land use and transportation X
ConTexT AnD InTeGrATIon oF PolICy
|
The Strategic
Plan has been infuenced by the direction given in the
offcial Community Plan (oCP) and the recently developed
Sustainability Charter. Although a local “Made in Surrey”
Strategy, it has not been developed in isolation and alignment
with other regional plans has been promoted. It is one of a
number of City Plans and it will complement other City planning
efforts including the Parks Master Plan, the Social Plan, the
employment lands Strategy, the Sustainability Charter and the
livability Accord between high growth municipalities.
The Surrey Transportation System is effcient, equitable, safe and sustainable. X
There is more choice and better access to transportation, land uses that emphasize X
compact and complete communities and a modern and well funded infrastructure.
Our transportation planning will support safe, livable and healthy communities with good X
access to local jobs, education, services and recreation.
We continue to move our transportation system forward by having an informed and X
engaged public, strong partnerships with others, supportive elected representatives and
sustainable investment.
“Transportation Working
For Everyone”
oTHer InFluenCeS
|
The Strategic Plan also:
Recognizes evolving and changing priorities and increasing X
complexity of the transportation system
Provides fexibility to respond to external policy infuences X
Identifes a more active City role in “soft” engineering X
Gives attention to maximizing the sphere of infuence of the X
City and working in partnership with other agencies
Emphasizes the need for a well maintained and effciently X
managed transportation asset to support delivery of the Strategy
Introduces a performance component with ambitious but X
achievable targets
Identifes the need for a number of new policies and existing X
policy updates

The Strategic Plan has been
produced by the city of Surrey,
with meaningful input from Surrey
residents, those doing business in
Surrey as well as other agencies
and organizations.
THe STrATeGIC AnD SerVICe oBjeCTIVeS
|
The Vision was
infuenced by our consultation. It was undertaken using the 6
principles as a framework to organize the issues and priorities we
were told about by the public and stakeholders. In response, the
City developed a range of 6 Strategic objectives which provide
the high level direction for how we want transportation to move
forward in the City. For each of these, there are specifc Service
objectives which describe in more detail how we plan to turn our
Vision into a range of policies and actions.
Effective and effcient
network management
It is important that there is a clear appreciation of the fundamental importance that a well operated and maintained
transportation infrastructure has in the delivery of the City’s Transportation Vision and the increasing demands of keeping
assets working effciently, serviceable and preserved for the future. As public expectations rise, the amount of infrastructure
that is in place expands and the use and demands placed upon it rise. The proportion of budgetary demands from the total
“transportation pot” will likely have to increase if the City is to avoid a deteriorating transportation infrastructure in the
future.
Consultation feedback, priorities and issues
Need for increased expenditure on maintenance to deal with potholes and rough road surfaces X
Improved winter maintenance X
Deterioration of road pavements after periods of extreme winter weather X
A perception of a “piecemeal” approach to road maintenance X
Strong public support for completion of the planned road network X
Noise caused by truck traffc on uneven and potholed roads X
Rutting of some traffc lanes where high truck volumes exist X
Increasing complexity of the transportation system and the need for new and innovative engineering approaches X
Concerns about a potential growing infrastructure defcit in the future without investment now X
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: Effciently manage, maintain and improve the transportation system for all modes
SerVICe oBjeCTIVeS
Maintain and improve the transportation asset and promote best value in asset maintenance and rehabilitation 1.
Establish sustainable and predictable funding streams 2.

PRINCIPLE 1
Effective and
effcient network
management
[10]
More travel choice

PRINCIPLE 2
More travel
choice
The main purpose of the transportation system is to provide access for people to services, recreation, jobs, food and to other people.
Surrey has a diverse population with diverse needs. not everyone in Surrey is being fully served by the transportation system. A poor
transportation system disproportionately affects the young, the elderly, low waged or recent immigrants. Demographic trends suggest
that up to one third of the population will not have access to a car as a driver by 2031 by virtue of being too old, too young or having
mobility or perceptual challenges. Having safe, convenient and affordable transportation helps ensure that everyone can participate
fully and equally. Mobility is important and relevant to everyone.
Consultation feedback, priorities and issues
Poor transit service identifed as the number 1 issue during public consultation X
88% of public agreed that “Transit should be as convenient and attractive as driving a car on City roads” X
About 12% (about 50,000) of Surrey’s citizens do not have unhindered access to a car. X
High level of public priority given to improved sidewalk provision X
Over 50% of the Greenways’ network completed X
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: Promote alternative and sustainable travel choice and provide better accessibility to jobs,
education, health and recreation for all
SerVICe oBjeCTIVeS
Promote alternatives to the car by improving walking and cycling opportunities 1.
Promote alternatives to the car by improving transit 2.
Protect and improve transportation infrastructure in support of strategic transit expansion and upgrades 3.
Integrate behavioural change initiatives with transportation improvements 4.

PRINCIPLE 3
Safer, healthier
communities
Promoting safer communities is a key element of the Transportation Strategy. It looks at safety in terms of the risk of being
hurt when using our transportation system but also in terms of personal safety and security. Consultation has shown that road
safety issues are of concern to people and consultation through the Crime reduction Strategy has shown that crime and the
fear of crime are also a high priority for the public.
Consultation feedback, priorities and issues
Lack of understanding of City role in road safety X
Pedestrian safety identifed as a priority within City Centre X
Lack of respect for traffc laws – speeding, red light running, not stopping for pedestrians at crossings. 49% of public X
identifed the need for “considerable or lots of improvement”
Need for more driver education on traffc laws and safety a priority X
Truck traffc using non-truck routes X
Neighbourhood traffc speeds but mixed response to traffc calming – although supported some concerns about too much X
being introduced.
Pedestrian safety and absence of sidewalks. 71% of public described safe sidewalks and walking paths as “important” X
or “very important”
Crosswalk safety – signing, lighting, pavement markings X
Personal security when accessing and using transit at night X
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: improve community Safety, Health and Quality of Life
SerVICe oBjeCTIVeS:
Undertake physical measures to improve the safety for all road users 1.
Support the increased enforcement of speed limits and traffc laws 2.
Promote a culture of road and community safety into all aspects of engineering services 3.
Raise awareness of road safety and encourage safer travel in partnership with others 4.
Reduce Crime and the Fear of Crime 5.
Improve Community Health and Quality of Life 6.
[12]
Safer, healthier communities
Successful local economies
Safer, healthier communities
Successful local economies
Transportation plays a signifcant role in supporting Surrey’s economic development. The businesses and institutions located
within our employment lands are valued as being critical to the short, medium and long term economic and social viability of
the City. Within Surrey, we want to see a modern, responsive and effcient transportation system that is capable of supporting
the competitiveness of our businesses and boosting productivity and access to local, national and international markets. The
emphasis of the City’s economic Development Strategy is to maintain Surrey’s economic position within the region while
supporting local business growth. The existing and future capacity, location and alignment of transportation infrastructure
within Surrey and within the Metro Vancouver region are critical factors that will infuence the demand for and success of
employment lands.
Consultation feedback, priorities and issues
Congestion and intersection delays – Highest ranked improvement area during public consultation with 71% of X
respondents describing this as needing “considerable or lots of improvement”
Ineffcient operation of traffc signals X
Perceived piecemeal approach to road construction X
Completion of the planned road network a priority for the public X
Impact of truck traffc X
Rapid growth of the City and concerns over the ability to provide the supporting transportation infrastructure X
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: reduce congestion and support the sustainable economic development and vitality of Surrey
SerVICe oBjeCTIVeS:
Promote access to employment lands 1.
Provide transportation infrastructure and services that support sustainable economic growth 2.
Relieve congestion 3.
Infuence and manage transportation demand and supply 4.

PRINCIPLE 4
Successful local
economies

PRINCIPLE 5
Protection of our
built and natural
environment
Transportation has led to huge improvements in our quality of life by giving individuals unprecedented mobility and access to
jobs and a better life. Surrey’s natural environment is a high priority for its citizens. It faces real and growing pressures from
the expansion of the City. The importance of dealing with growth in ways that minimize environmental impacts is vital and this
is a particular challenge with respect to transportation.
Consultation feedback, priorities and issues
Air quality issues associated with traffc X
Truck movement and the management of goods movement X
Disruption to wildlife corridors X
Recognition of the contribution of transportation to greenhouse gas emissions X
Need for heavy and sustained investment in transit X
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: reduce the impacts of transportation on the built and natural environment
SerVICe oBjeCTIVeS:
Reduce the impacts of road freight 1.
Reduce the impacts of traffc on air quality and climate change 2.
Reduce the impacts of traffc on water quality, vegetation, trees and land consumption 3.
Protection of our built
and natural environment
[14]
Protection of our built
and natural environment
Integration of transportation

PRINCIPLE 6
Integration of
transportation
As the responsible authority for guiding development, Surrey is a lead player in promoting sustainable, pedestrian, cycle and
transit friendly communities that are well served by all aspects of the transportation system. Many aspects of travel demand such
as origin and destination locations, lengths of trips and choice of mode are shaped by land use patterns. How and where we plan
and direct growth in the City is probably the most fundamental determinant of the nature and scope of the transportation system
we have and how far it will be possible to move towards reduced dependence on the car. With the high growth rates we see in
Surrey, there is high potential to bring about a fundamental change during the life of this Strategic Plan.
Consultation feedback, priorities and issues
Support for facilities to be located within walking and cycling distances - shopping, schools and leisure X
Need for more integration of transit with new development X
Transportation servicing and road building – perception of City “catching up” X
Incomplete road network and missing links. Public support for completion of planned road network X
Increasing understanding of the benefts of a fner grid network, especially in town and City centres for improved routing X
options and better multi modal connectivity.
Current poor transit services but an expectation of change through the South of Fraser Area Transit Plan and X
development of the Frequent Transit Network (FTN)
Need for OCP update X
Rapid growth of City and the lag in transit provision with missed opportunities for transit to shape growth X
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: Promote integration between transportation and land use to reduce the need for travel
and support trips by more sustainable modes
SerVICe oBjeCTIVeS:
Co-ordinate transit investment with land use planning in support of high density, mixed use and compact development 1.
Promote integrated and universal transportation elements within development projects so that modes other than only the 2.
private car are supported and improved
Improve and enhance Surrey’s Town Centres and City Centre by promoting integration with transit 3.
[16]
ProjeCTS AnD ProGrAMS
|
once we have established
our Vision for transportation, and developed the strategic
objectives of what the Strategic Plan will be delivering, the
City will need to translate these into projects and programs.
It is essential that the investments we make are structured
and logical so that the City delivers what is needed to
service the demand for transportation by all modes,
responds to the different community needs and priorities
and protects the infrastructure. As we move towards
the implementation stages we will look at whether the
projects, programs and services we deliver, are being done
so in the most effective way. We will look at our funding in
a way that helps to integrate projects and initiatives with
the strategic objectives and priorities of the Plan and their
contribution to other Council priorities. In tandem with the
6 Principles, they will also help provide a framework for
monitoring and reporting on performance.
Core Needs: X Core needs would represent our
priority, taking frst call on resources and include
the repair and replacement of our assets such as
pavement, sidewalks, traffc signals, street lighting
and structures.
City Networks: X City networks would consist of the
priority road, bus, cycle and pedestrian networks.
Cycling, pedestrian and transit strategies will identify
our aims and priorities. Road and intersection
improvement priorities will be based on safety and
projected road network needs by modeling future
traffc volumes from expected development.
Local Programs: X This would consist of smaller
scale measures that would be targeted at the
neighbourhood level, to promote community priorities
such as safety, the impact of traffc on local roads,
provision of and access to education and services
and the quality of the local environment. The
traffc calming program would be an example. We
would explore the support of partners such as the
Police, TransLink and ICBC and an expanded role
in “non engineering” programs and initiatives to
take a more proactive role in educating, informing
and encouraging people to make the best use of
the transportation system in the safest and most
appropriate manner.
IMPleMenTATIon
|
The City infuences and guides
the nature of the transportation system in many ways.
As the responsible authority for guiding development, it
has a fundamental part to play in promoting sustainable
communities that are well served by all modes. once in
place, through the management and maintenance of the
infrastructure, we would want to see the level of choice and
quality continue to improve. The Strategic Plan is therefore
made up of strategies and objectives to deliver, manage,
maintain and fnance the transportation system in ways that
are sustainable, responsive to local needs and priorities,
fexible, innovative and which provide value for money.
The 10 year Servicing Plan is the current document that
presents the planned projects for implementation based
on predicted funding. The Plan does not include details on
all of the City’s transportation activities and initiatives and
further work will take place to establish a broader based
means of identifying the priorities for the broad spectrum
of our responsibilities.
rooT AnD BrAnCH DelIVery
|
Delivery of the City’s
transportation system will not be achieved only by
constructing capital projects. While this will continue to be
a huge component of the effort, the City can infuence how

The Strategic Plan
is therefore made
up of strategies and
objectives to deliver,
manage, maintain
and fnance the
transportation
system in ways that
are sustainable,
responsive to local
needs and priorities,
fexible, innovative
and which provide
value for money.
transportation is delivered in many other ways. ultimately,
the Strategic Plan should be something that guides and
infuences a broader spectrum of service provision. How
services to the public are delivered, how development is
planned and responded to, the way we plan parks and
recreational facilities and the day to day “caretaking” of
the streets all contribute to the transportation system.
The Strategic Plan should allow us to recognize that the
construction of a new 20 metre walkway to the local shops
as part of a new housing development, or having a bus
stop which is free of graffti and is well lit, is as important
as a $5 million road widening project to ease congestion. It
is hoped that the Strategic Plan will guide decision making,
funding priorities and planning by all those involved, in the
broadest sense, in transportation.
MonITorInG AnD PerForMAnCe
|
There is a
responsibility to assess whether the effort and money
being invested by the City is achieving what we set out
to do. The Strategic Plan contains performance indicators
based on key indicators that will be used to help judge the
performance of the Plan.
FunDInG
|
The Strategic Plan explores funding sources.
Further to the adoption of our Strategic Plan, resource
needs will be assessed and funding sources will be
identifed as each of the supporting implementation Plans
are completed. This will ensure that it is achievable,
realistic, and fnancially sustainable.
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part 1 Developing a vision
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TransporTaTion
Moving surrey Forward
Transportation impacts everyone’s lives all of the time, and continual planning and management for the transportation
system in Surrey is needed. A reliance on the car is having serious implications for congestion, the environment and people’s
well being and health. There are emerging issues related to the health of our population, social isolation and exclusion from
employment and services. For people who do not have access to a car, or who want to use their car less, getting around can
be diffcult. The City is aiming to develop a transportation system that better caters to everyone’s mobility needs by creating
a balanced transportation system that gives real choices in the way people travel to, from and within Surrey.
Travel is an important and often essential part of people’s daily lives. National surveys show that transportation is the
second largest item of household expenditure representing typically 13% of what is spent. More is spent on transport than
on food, holidays and clothing. People are traveling more often and over longer distances. About 6% of Surrey households
have no car and 35% have access to one car. In our car-dependent way of life this can result in inequalities. Children,
people with disabilities and the elderly especially, rely on alternative modes of transport to get around and access the
services and facilities they need.
Surrey is a great place to live and more people want to call it home. The City is expected to grow from 450,000 in 2008 to
680,000 in 2031. Managing growth can be a challenge. Un-managed growth can reduce the quality of life due to increased
congestion, impact on community safety and health and degradation of the natural environment. However, growth and
development also brings huge opportunity to make change providing momentum for promoting a new way of living and moving
with better transit, more walking and cycling trips developing in and around higher density, mixed use and compact development.
pl anni ng F or THe F UT Ure

Surrey is a great place to live and more people want to call it home.
[21]
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THe TransporTaTion
principles
our Framework for change
Transportation has a part to play in most aspects of
people’s lives and a good system responds to varying
needs and priorities. The Transportation Strategic Plan has:
Sought to increase the accessibility and mobility X
options available to people
Enhance the integration between and across modes X
of transportation
Increase the safety and security of the system, for X
both motorized and non-motorized users
Promote the effcient management and operation of X
the system
Ensure funding is in place to make sure the system X
infrastructure is preserved and able to support the
Plan’s objectives
Support the economic vitality of the City, allowing X
competitiveness and effciency
Protect and enhance the environment by promoting X
sustainability and effciency and improving the
quality of life.
We have summarized the different objectives of what a good transportation
system should be seeking to achieve within 6 Principles.
Effective and Effcient Management of the Road Network 1.
More Travel Choice 2.
Safer, Healthier Communities 3.
Successful Local Economies 4.
Protection of our Built and Natural Environment 5.
Transportation Integration 6.
The importance transportation has in people’s lives is fundamental. From the time we step out of our
home we are within the transportation environment. This is where we travel to meet our employment,
social and health needs, shop, exercise and interact with others. Getting transportation working right
is therefore a priority for the City. We are responsible for managing this most important environment
and the City’s decisions, policies and priorities will shape how Surrey will develop and move forward.
To ensure we properly refect this comprehensive and all-encompassing impact that transportation has
on people’s lives, we have changed how we look at transportation in Surrey. Instead of concentrating
on whether people walk, drive, use transit or cycle and then identifying how these can all be
accommodated in our system, we have sought to examine transportation in a way that better refects
how it relates to wider environmental, social, economic and health policy. This approach also ensures
that transportation is looked at with the three pillars of sustainability at the forefront.
[22]
QUaliTy TransporTaTion
planning
This Strategic Plan has been structured around a number
of criteria:
external integration: X The nature and performance
of the transportation system is infuenced by a
combination of broader conditions, City policies and
priorities and external policies by others such as the
Federal and Provincial governments and regional
planning bodies such as Metro Vancouver. The City
functions in a wider economic and demographic
environment and the success of this Plan depends on
it being integrated with other strategies. Although
a local, “Made in Surrey” Plan, responsive to the
issues and challenges within the City, it has not been
developed in isolation. The Strategy is based on
Shared Priorities and it employs Cross Partnership
Strategies to move towards making change.
internal integration: X The Strategy aligns with the
Sustainability Charter and the Offcial Community
Plan (OCP) and has linkages with other City policies
associated with community safety, social inclusion,
environmental protection and growth.
analysis: X The Strategy is built on sound analysis
of local transportation problems and opportunities
identifed through consultation, modeling of our
transportation network, an understanding of external
changes and pressures and existing monitoring of
our system.
Maximizing value from resources: X The Strategic
Plan will attempt to deliver the best possible results
given the funding available and the current and future
state of infrastructure and transport services and to
strengthen user-pay principles within our funding
mechanisms.
involvement: X The Strategy has been produced by
the City of Surrey, but there has been the input of
many individuals, organizations and stakeholders,
providing their knowledge and experience to help
reach our conclusions. The City of Surrey may have
produced the Strategy but it is important that it has a
wider ownership, refecting the common interests of
all of those involved.
priorities: X Identifcation of Shared Priorities with
other City Departments as well as regional bodies
and agencies.
Flexibility: X The ability to adapt to changing
priorities, changing context and changing funding.
performance Management: X Signifcant funding
is needed to create an equitable and effcient
transportation system and there is a responsibility to
assess whether the effort and money being invested
is achieving what is in the Plan. The City has
established challenging but realistic performance
indicators that will be used to help judge the
performance of the Strategic Plan.
[23]
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Delivery anD
iMpleMenTaTion sTrUcTUres
The Strategy is underpinned by public and stakeholder
input, technical assessment and fnancial responsibility.
It is much more than a list of highway, transit or cycling
investments and programs. It sets transportation in
a wider context. Delivery of Surrey’s transportation
system will not be achieved only by constructing capital
projects. Although a huge component of the effort,
capital investment alone is insuffcient. The City can
infuence how transportation is delivered in other ways.
How services are delivered, our decisions on land use
and development, using our advocacy and lobbying
infuence regionally and nationally, planning of our parks
and recreational facilities, making roads safer and the
day to day “caretaking” of our streets all contribute. The
construction of a new walkway to the local shops or a bus
stop free of graffti and that is well lit can be as important
as a multi million dollar road widening project.
Different City policies directly infuence how
transportation happens in Surrey. As the authority
responsible for guiding development, we have a lead
role in promoting sustainable, pedestrian, cycle and
transit friendly communities that are well served by all
aspects of the transportation system. Once in place, the
ongoing operation and maintenance of the transportation
infrastructure will improve effciency and level of choice.
The Plan is made up of strategies and objectives to
manage, maintain and fnance the transportation system
in ways that are responsive to local needs, are innovative,
provide value for money and which are sustainable.
a sHareD responsibiliTy
Planning for sustainable, compact and complete
development and continuing to invest in transportation
infrastructure are fundamental components of the delivery
process and are only part of the answer to tackling the
issues. This Strategic Plan identifes an increasing level
of attention to developing policies and partnerships with
other agencies to bring about behavioral change. This
same partnership culture needs to be fostered between
the City and the people who live and work here. The City
can and will provide the framework and opportunities
but at the end of the day progress will be achieved as a
result of individuals making a change. Ultimately, positive
changes will only happen if, at the individual level,
changes in how everyone chooses to travel are made.
Deciding to shop at the local store, walking children to
school or car sharing with a neighbour for the journey to
work are examples of how everyone can help reduce the
reliance on the car. When the car is the choice, driving
respectfully and carefully or avoiding short cuts though
local neighbourhoods will help reduce the impact of traffc
on communities. This Plan will succeed only if there is a
commitment by everyone to make a change.

The construction of a
new walkway to the
local shops or a bus
stop free of graffti and
that is well lit can be
as important as a multi
million dollar road
widening project...
[24]
THe iMporTance oF consUlTaTion
Wider involvement and dialogue
A common theme of this Plan is that transport cannot be considered in isolation. It is important that attention is paid to how
it relates to other issues such as the economy, health, education or crime. The Plan is ultimately the responsibility of the
City, but for it to respond to the broader context and refect other policy areas, the City needs to work with other partners,
bodies, stakeholders and the public to ensure integration with other initiatives and develop a proper understanding of the
issues and priorities that are important to people. The advantages of full involvement are many, with “shared ownership”,
“awareness and education” and “better quality decision making” identifed as key benefts.
The City’s involvement and role is broken down into two broad areas:
partnership: The City has close working relationships with established partners and neighbouring municipalities at staff
and elected representative level. Transportation, economic, social and environmental issues do not stop at the edge
of the City. Surrey is part of a larger community of municipalities and agencies all with responsibility for the wider
transportation system. The City wants this Strategy to have a broad level of support and ownership and a common
interest shared by all, with all agencies, organizations and residents.
public participation: The consultation initiatives undertaken during the development of this Strategy will allow us to better
understand the needs and priorities of the public and in turn gain broader support for what the Plan is seeking to achieve.
parTi ci paT i on anD i npUT

A common theme
of this Plan is that
transport cannot be
considered in isolation.
[25]
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sTraTegy
Although an ongoing process throughout the
development of the Strategic Plan, there were
discrete steps integrated into the process where we
engaged with the public and stakeholders. The key
phases of consultation were:
issues and attitudes consultation:
This consultation sought to get a better
understanding of the main issues and actions
for change by listening to stakeholders
including advocacy groups, Business
Improvement Associations, Community
Associations and transport operators. We also
engaged with the public, undertaking focus
group meetings followed up by telephone and
web-based surveys.
Testing Understanding consultation:
Having been told what the attitudes were
towards transportation, strategies were
developed incorporating the many and varied
opinions and views. Further consultation
was undertaken to make sure the issues and
priorities were understood and that there was
a level of agreement, shared understanding and
ownership of the Plan and what it was setting
out to achieve.
confrming completeness consultation:
Before fnalizing the Plan the City submitted the
draft to the public to get reaction and feedback
on what it was saying.
In undertaking this staged approach to the
consultation, the City set itself some minimum
requirements as to what was to be achieved from
the process. Participation should:
Involve a wide group of opinions and views X
Ensure that all members of the community X
with different transportation needs were
represented including youth, seniors,
women, people with mobility diffculties, the
unemployed, people with families.
Establish local issues and priorities X
Employ a range of consultation methods so X
that we receive broad and representative
feedback and comment
HoW parTicipaTion Has
sHapeD THe sTraTegy
Consultation with the public identifed 4 strategic
principles that the plan should incorporate:
The Strategy should facilitate choice, mobility X
and balance in transportation
In doing this, the plan should promote X
attractive, safe, affordable and convenient
alternatives
Surrey should plan and invest for the long X
term and for substantial growth
Sustainable and secure funding for X
transportation should be achieved
FUTUre involveMenT
anD MoniToring
Success in delivering the objectives of the Plan
will rely on the involvement of the public and
stakeholders as partners, as well as clients.
Surrey’s residents will want and expect to see
changes made and efforts to shape how travel
and transportation occur in the City will rely on
partnerships. The City will be responsive and
accountable, helped in part by our commitment
to setting targets. By joining with others to
create change, rather than imposing it on them,
the City can both inform and learn. A robust and
continuing dialogue with the public will improve
the City’s understanding of what their needs and
expectations are.
What was very clear during the
consultation was that people were
interested in issues like fnding
employment, accessing health care
being able to enjoy recreational
opportunities and feeling safe.
Transportation in itself was not the
goal. Transportation was required
to get to the goal.
[26]
policy conTexT
This Strategic Plan sets out the priorities for transportation over the coming years. It has been developed with reference
to the wider goals and objectives for Surrey. This broader City Vision is achieved by bringing together all the roles and
responsibilities of the City under the Surrey Strategic Plan so that there can be a common, complementary and consistent
direction in the services provided. Because of the impact transport has on everyone’s lives, it has a central part to play,
affecting and supporting the broader Surrey Vision.
sUrrey’s oFFicial coMMUniTy plan
The Transportation Strategic Plan aligns with City priorities identifed in other plans and strategies including the Crime
Reduction Strategy, the Social Plan and the Employment Lands Strategy. The Offcial Community Plan (OCP) is perhaps
the most important of these plans in terms of the cross-cutting strategies between it and the Transportation Strategic
Plan. It guides land use management, economic and residential growth, transportation systems, community development,
provision of City services and environmental protection. It provides the framework for which the other Community Plans
are developed and which together deliver the objectives and priorities of the City. Of particular relevance are the following
policies of the OCP:
Manage Growth for Compact Communities X
Build a Sustainable Local Economy X
Enhance Image and Character X
Increase Transportation Choice X
Protect Natural Areas X
Improve the “Quality of Community” X
T He sUrre y vi si on

Because of the impact
transport has on
everyone’s lives, it
has a central part to
play, affecting and
supporting the broader
Surrey Vision.
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sUsTainabiliTy
A sustainable vision for Surrey is vital for the City’s
future development and our vision for transportation
includes economic, environmental and social goals.
Increasingly the roles and responsibilities of the City
need to be underpinned by sustainability. The concept of
sustainable transportation promotes a balance between
transportation’s economic and social benefts and the
need to protect the environment. One defnition of
sustainable transportation is:
Allowing individuals to meet their access needs in a
manner that is safe, equitable, affordable and effcient,
offering transportation choice that supports a vibrant
economy, in a manner consistent with human and
ecosystem health within and between generations
Surrey is putting sustainability at the front of its agenda.
The City’s Sustainability Charter has been created to act as
an overarching policy document for the City and as such,
this Strategic Plan has been structured in a way that aligns
with the Charter goals and vision and many of the specifc
Charter objectives are explicitly identifed. The Charter
identifes the three pillars of sustainability: socio-cultural,
economic and environmental. This Strategy has been
established in a way that embeds these sustainability
fundamentals into the 6 Core Principles and from this
starting point, the social, economic and environmental
aspects of transportation are repeatedly highlighted
throughout the Plan.
THe TransporTaTion vision
The Vision for the previous Transportation Plan described:
busy, high density town centres X
priority given to the movement of transit on X
important routes
more opportunities for cycling, walking and use of X
transit through good land use design
fair and universal access to transportation X
an improving environment X
a well operated and properly maintained X
infrastructure
an involved public X
The policies, objectives and vision described within the
Plan refected an appreciation of the challenges directly
associated with a dependence on the private car including:
congestion X
the public health impacts of automobile use X
community safety X
sprawl X
Many of the aspirations and objectives described in the previous Transportation Plan
Vision are also seen within the 6 Core Principles of this Transportation Strategic Plan.
Effective and Effcient Management of the Road Network 1.
More Travel Choice 2.
Safer, Healthier Communities 3.
Successful Local Economies 4.
Protection of our Built and Natural Environment 5.
Transportation Integration 6.
[28]
Our Vision
oUr vision
The fundamental direction provided within the previous Transportation Plan remains valid and that is why it features within our
Vision for this Plan as we continue to move forward.
It is the Year 2031 and Surrey is an active and healthy community of 680,000 persons. Multi-use town centres are high
density with mixed use along connecting corridors supporting transit that has operating priority. Compact, mixed use
and connected communities emphasize a sense of place and have pedestrian, cycling and transit friendly design.
Transit, walking, bicycle and road networks, the effcient movement of goods and services and parking are planned
and co-ordinated throughout the City. The percentage of trips made by walking, cycling, transit and high occupancy
autos continues to increase while the number of trips made by single occupant cars decreases. The average
distance and travel time for peak hour commuter travel within Surrey continues to decline. The citizens, regardless
of age, income or disability, enjoy universal access to transportation and the services, educational and recreational
opportunities it provides. Transportation infrastructure is in a good state of repair and is adequately funded from stable
and sustainable revenue sources. Surrey’s elected representatives have the support of a well informed public in
making decisions on urban development and the supporting transportation systems.
To help emphasize that transportation cannot be
considered in isolation and that it is a means to an end
this strategy summarizes the Vision in the following way:
The transportation system is effcient, equitable, safe X
and sustainable.
There is more choice and better access to X
transportation, land uses that emphasize compact
and complete communities and a modern and well
funded infrastructure.
Our transportation planning will support safe, livable X
and healthy communities with good access to local
jobs, education, services and recreation.
We continue to move our transportation system X
forward by having an informed and engaged public,
strong partnerships with others, supportive elected
representatives and sustainable investment.
The Vision refects Surrey’s social, environmental,
sustainability and economic aspirations that are all key
parts of our overall community objectives. The Vision
expresses important directions and outcomes rather than
specifc projects or services. It seeks to establish what
we will achieve and why. The detailed how, who, when
and where will be addressed through the various policies,
programs, funding systems and performance indicators
that will be developed from the Plan.
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The Vision refects Surrey’s social, environmental,
sustainability and economic aspirations that are
all key parts of our overall community objectives.
|
part 2 StratEGIC DIrECtIONS
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MEETI NG ThE ChAl l E NGE
MADE IN SuRREy
The Strategic Plan is intended to be responsive and applicable to Surrey. It has been produced by the City and has been
infuenced and shaped by the people, businesses and transport providers in Surrey. However, Surrey’s Vision needs to
complement broader federal and regional policy if it is to be successfully delivered. Through the Plan, the City will seek
to provide sustainable improvements in the economy, promote better access to employment, health and leisure, protect
and improve the local environment and support a high quality of life. To achieve this, the Transportation and other
strategic plans of the City need to be based on partnership working, co-ordination between service delivery, suffcient and
sustainable funding, responsible and effcient use of resources and meaningful input from users.
STRATEGy DEvElOpMENT
This Transportation Strategic Plan looks at how the City will deliver the transportation system for the years ahead. It
sets out the wider agenda for mobility and deals with principles and objectives while at the same time establishing the
framework for translating these into an implementation program, with appropriate targets and objectives in the future.
Local transportation planning, perhaps more than any other area of local policy needs to be “joined-up” with the wider
planning and policy framework. This means that transport needs to be set in a wider context and must consider linkages
with land use planning, economic development, social planning and community safety. It also means that the City’s
approach to transport needs to link with the plans of others. Transportation is not an end in itself. It exists to support the
achievement of other, wider policy objectives, such as economic development, social inclusion, reduced levels of crime and
improvements to health and ftness. These factors all ultimately lead to improved quality of life for the people of Surrey.
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STAGE 1
The 6 Key principles
The 6 Principles are one of the constant features of
this Plan and provide the plain English, understandable
explanation of what the City is seeking to achieve. These
principles provide the framework for understanding
the issues and describing the strategic aims and
implementation approaches contained within it.
Effective and effcient management of the road X
network
More travel choice X
Safer, healthier communities X
Successful local economies X
Protection of our built and natural environment X
Transportation integration X
STAGE 2
Context, Issues and priorities
Through the feedback we received from our consultation
and our analysis we have organized the main issues and
priorities that the Plan needs to respond to. Although a
large range of issues have been raised the following broad
themes have been identifed:
Operating, preserving and modernizing infrastructure X
Accessibility and social inclusion X
Road and community safety, health and quality of life X
Congestion, economic activity, sustainable growth X
and development and goods movement
Environmental impact and protection X
Integration with land use X
Funding X
Personal attitudes and choices X
STAGE 3
The Transportation vision
Having established our Plan structure and identifed the
issues and priorities, a clear explanation of where we
want the City to be in the future has been developed.
This Vision refects Surrey’s social, environmental,
sustainability and economic aspirations that are all key
parts of our overall community objectives and which are
contained within the 6 guiding principles. It responds to
our assessment of the issues and the public priorities
highlighted in our consultation. The Vision describes
important directions and outcomes rather than specifc
projects or services seeking to establish what we will
achieve and why.
It describes a City where the transportation system is
effcient, safe, available to everyone, promoting good
access to employment and services, supported by
livable, healthy and sustainable neighbourhoods which
emphasize compact and complete communities and which
is underpinned by secure and suffcient funding and a
supportive public.
The development of the Transportation Strategy consists of a number of stages:
[34]
STAGE 4
Transportation Strategies
OvERAll
TRANSpORTATION STRATEGy
The Balanced Approach
The overall strategy direction emphasizes a balanced
approach that provides for wider travel choice and
opportunity through improved walking, cycling and transit,
while acknowledging the need for improved roads and
accommodating sustainable levels of traffc growth. The
balanced approach to the Plan combines many elements to
improve the transportation system including:
Recognition of the need to invest in improving and X
maintaining the road network
Continued planning and investment in the X
development of the road network
Strongly advocating for greatly improved transit at all X
levels and supporting it by providing the necessary
framework and conditions
Improving facilities for pedestrians, cyclists and X
transit users
Facilitating wider accessibility to transportation for X
everyone
Giving attention to tackling the number and severity X
of collisions
Managing the impact of traffc on residential X
neighbourhoods
This balanced approach to transportation will create an
equitable, needs-based transportation system that will
seek to reduce the reliance on the car, promote social
inclusion, encourage a buoyant local economy and help
protect our environment.
STRATEGIC
TRANSpORTATION OBjECTIvES
Strategic objectives have been developed for each one of
the 6 Key Principles. They refect the issues identifed by
stakeholders and the public, the Vision and the identifed
priorities of the different stakeholders. They provide
a clear indication of what the City wants to deliver.
Sometimes, these are translated into discrete projects and
initiatives identifed in the 10 Year Servicing Plan but they
will also be achieved through the day to day activities and
decisions of planners and engineers, through collaboration
with transport providers and those responsible for
enforcement and public education.
The Strategic Transportation Objectives are:
Effciently manage, maintain and improve the X
transportation system for all modes
Promote alternative and sustainable travel choice X
and provide better accessibility to jobs, education,
health and recreation for all
Improve community safety, health and quality of life X
Reduce congestion and support the sustainable X
economic development and vitality of Surrey
Reduce the impacts of transportation on the built and X
natural environment
Promote integration between transportation and land X
use to reduce the need to travel and support trips by
more sustainable modes
For these to be achieved we will:
Establish stable and secure funding X
Measure performance towards identifed targets X

This balanced approach
to transportation will
create an equitable,
needs-based
transportation system
that will reduce the
reliance on the car…
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STAGE 5
Service Delivery plans
Having developed the Strategic Transportation Objectives,
these must be turned into actions. These provide the level
of detail needed around which to organize future planning
effort, and particular programs and projects. In doing so, the
City needs to consider the funding realities and the demands
on individual budgets. To help ensure the resources we
have are used well and provide the best value, a system
of performance management will be developed which will
measure our success in achieving targets.
RElATIONShIp BETwEEN
ThE DIffERENT STRATEGIC
OBjECTIvES
For the City, there are a number of key challenges that
relate back to effcient maintenance and management.
The Strategic Objective to effciently manage, maintain
and improve the transportation network is a long-term
challenge and forms the basic building block of all the
other strategies. Failure to preserve and modernize our
transportation infrastructure will act as an obstacle to
delivering the other strategies. Our Strategic Objectives
are therefore presented in a way that clearly identifes
this underpinning role in achieving the other Strategic
Objectives.
This inter-relationship will be refected in how the Capital
Program is organized. The quality and suitability of the
network is basic to the successful implementation of our
strategies so this must be refected in the program of
projects and programs undertaken. The following structure
has been developed which will help with the prioritization
of capital investment:
Core Needs - These are our priority, taking frst
call on our resources and would include repair and
maintenance of our assets and safety Projects
City Networks - City networks consist of the
key road, bus, cycle and pedestrian networks. The
program includes road and intersection improvements,
strategic bicycle network projects and strategic transit
infrastructure improvement projects
local programs - Local measures will be promoted
for neighbourhoods, building on the City Networks
to refect community priorities. The program includes
responding to the impact of traffc on local roads,
safety around schools, improved pedestrian facilities
and environmental improvements
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EffIcIEnt MAIntEnAncE
And MAnAgEMEnt
[36]
AChIEvING BAlANCE
It is important to note that the Strategic Plan embodies
a variety of objectives that represent the interests and
aspirations of a wide range of individuals, stakeholders
and constituents. Because of this, there may be apparent
conficts among the Strategic Objectives. The Plan must
therefore be fexible enough to accommodate these
differences and seek to promote a balanced approach and
be able to accommodate compromise and trade-offs.
ShARED pRIORITIES AND
CROSS CuTTING pOlICIES
A fundamental theme within this Plan has been identifying
and promoting integration with broader policy. There are
commonalities between this Plan and the other policies
and objectives that exist within the City and with other
agencies and levels of government. Although these are
discrete policies, there are Shared Priorities. It is important
to understand these because they show the links between
regional and national policy and how the Transportation
Strategic Plan provides a good ft and complements the
higher-level plans. To help ensure these are properly
responded to, the policies and strategies contained within
the Transportation Strategic Plan have not been developed
in isolation. By relating the Plan back to the Sustainability
Charter and the OCP, we have made sure that there is
consistency between the policies contained within this Plan
and the other policies and objectives of the City as well as
the policies of other levels of government and agencies.
The shared priorities are:
Better interaction between land use and X
transportation
Promotion of the equitable provision and improved X
choice within transport
Funding of infrastructure and improvements X
Managing growth in a sustainable manner by X
supporting compact, vibrant, transit friendly
communities
Reducing congestion in support of more effcient X
goods movement and economic vitality
Supporting sustainable Economic Development X
Reducing the environmental impact of transportation X
Enhancing livability, quality of life, a sense of space X
and safer roads – healthy neighbourhoods
Increasing attention to managing both the supply of X
and demand for transportation
A fundamental theme
within this Plan has
been identifying and
promoting integration
with broader policy.
Unfortunately, there is currently no Provincial
Transportation Strategy and therefore more “local”
transportation planning is often undertaken in the absence
of an overarching Provincial context. This can lead to
disjointed planning so Surrey will therefore support the
development of a Provincial Transportation Strategy. Even
without this, there is much commonality between our
policies and those of other levels of government.
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SuMMARy Of STRATEGIC TRANSpORTATION OBjECTIvES
PrIncIPlE Effective and Effcient network Management
Strategic Objective
Effciently manage, maintain and improve the
transportation system for all modes
Maintain and improve the transportation network and promote best value in asset maintenance and rehabilitation X
Establish secure, sustainable and predictable funding streams X
PrIncIPlE More travel choice
Strategic Objective
Promote alternative and sustainable travel
choice and provide better accessibility to jobs,
education, health and recreation for all
Promote alternatives to the car by improving walking and cycling opportunities X
Promote alternatives to the car by improving public transit X
Protect and improve transportation infrastructure in support of strategic transit expansion and upgrades X
Integrate behavioral change initiatives with sustainable transport infrastructure and service developments X
PrIncIPlE Safer, Healthier communities
Strategic Objective
Improve community safety, health and quality
of life
Undertake physical measures to improve the safety of all road users X
Promote a culture of road and community safety into all aspects of engineering service provision X
Raise awareness of road safety issues and encourage safer travel by working in partnership with others X
Reduce crime and the fear of crime X
Improve community health and the quality of life X
PrIncIPlE Successful local Economies
Strategic Objective
Reduce congestion and support the sustainable
economic development and vitality of Surrey
Promote access to employment lands X
Provide a transportation infrastructure and support transportation services that foster sustainable economic growth X
Relieve congestion X
Infuence and manage transportation demand and supply X
PrIncIPlE Protection of Our Built and natural Environment
Strategic Objective
Reduce the impacts of transportation on the
built and natural environment
Reduce the impacts of road freight X
Reduce the impacts of traffc on air quality and climate change X
Reduce the impacts of traffc on water quality, vegetation and trees and land consumption X
PrIncIPlE transportation Integration
Strategic Objective
Promote integration between transportation
and land use to reduce the need for travel and
support trips by more sustainable modes
Co-ordinate transit investment with land use planning in support of high density, mixed use and compact development X
Promote integrated and universal transportation elements within development projects so that they can be accessed by and X
in turn support means other than the private car
Improve and enhance Surrey’s town centres and City Centre by promoting integration with transit X
[38]
Ef f ECTI vE AND Ef f I CI E NT
NETwORK MANAGE ME NT
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Effciently manage, maintain and improve the transportation system for all modes
BACKGROuND
While users don’t often think about the road network, this is the largest and most visible asset the City owns. In a City
experiencing population growth of about 1000 people a month the size of the asset is also growing and what we already
have is under increasing and competing demands. The road network is the backbone of how people, goods and services
move around the City and it also represents the largest public open space the City has. The way this asset is managed
and maintained is hugely important. Keeping this infrastructure “ft for purpose” is a 24 hour job and costs many millions
of dollars. It falls to the City to take responsibility for it and in practice, the City’s largest task is its management and
maintenance. Effective and timely maintenance of the system helps reduce the burden of costs in the future. The road
network is used daily by people who live and work in the City and it is fundamental to the local economic, social and
environmental well-being of the City.
It is important that there is a clear appreciation of the fundamental importance that a well operated and maintained
transportation infrastructure has in the delivery of the City’s transportation vision and the increasing demands of in keeping
assets working effciently, serviceable and preserved for the future. As public expectations rise, the amount of infrastructure
that is in place expands and the use and demands placed upon it increase. The proportion of budgetary demands from the
total “transportation pot” will likely have to increase if the City is to avoid a deteriorating transportation infrastructure in
the future.
CONSulTATION fEEDBACK, pRIORITIES AND INfluENCES
Need fo X r increased expenditure on maintenance to deal with potholes and rough road surfaces
Improved winter maintenance X
Rapid deterioration of road pavements after periods of extreme winter weather X
A public perception of “piecemeal” approach to road maintenance X
Strong public support for completion of the planned road network X
Noise caused by truck traffc on uneven and potholed roads X
Rutting of some traffc lanes where high truck volumes exist X
Increasing complexity of the transportation system and the need for new and innovative engineering approaches X
Concerns about a potential growing infrastructure defcit in the future without investment now X

The road network is
the backbone of how
people, goods and
services move around
the City and it also
represents the largest
public open space the
City has.
Ef f E CTI vE AND Ef f I CI E NT
NETwORK MANAGEMENT
SERvICE OBjECTIvES
1. Maintain and improve the transportation
asset and promote best value in asset
maintenance and rehabilitation
Any investment in the highway network for maintenance
needs to be carefully planned, effciently managed
and supported by effective technical and management
systems. The City carries out programs of road
inspections, pavement condition surveys and employs a
Pavement Management System (PMS) that predicts how
the road pavement deteriorates over time in response to
varying levels of traffc loading. This helps determine how
much investment is needed and when. The PMS seeks
to maximize the service life of the pavement asset at the
least cost and where and how to invest the rehabilitation
budget to preserve the road system most effectively and
effciently. Adopting this “life cycle cost” approach helps
ensure the City achieves best value from the resources
it employs and that intervention is not undertaken on a
“worst frst” basis. The funding decisions and intervention
strategies we implement need to relate to the future so
that we can avoid building an infrastructure funding defcit
for later generations.
Actions for Change:
Target structural maintenance to those roads in greatest need and with the largest traffc volumes on the X
basis of road hierarchy and condition
Employ life cycle costing principles when identifying rehabilitation projects and programs X
Promote life cycle costing principles within all traffc, safety and road improvement projects X
Examine alternative and cost effective maintenance strategies X
Maximize the effcient use of existing infrastructure X
Develop road and transport asset management plans X
Service re-design to undertake all levels of preventative maintenance and replacement through the City X
pavement management system (PMS)
Establish systems to compensate for impact on pavement life due to trucking activity X
Establish a GIS database for improved tracking and management of infrastructure X
Enhance and expand monitoring systems to better direct maintenance programs and achieve value for money X
2007
ARTERIAl ROADS (INC. MRN ROADS) 378 km
COllECTOR ROADS 212 km
lOCAl ROADS 1,045 km
CITy MulTI uSE pAThwAyS 52 km
There is also supporting infrastructure including:
STREET lIGhTS 25,000
TRAffIC SIGNAlS 300
BRIDGES AND STRuCTuRES 49
TRAffIC SIGNS 70,000
The statistics of the road network are impressive in their
numbers and in the complexity they imply. Since the last
Transportation Plan was produced, the City has grown
considerably and so too has the amount of transportation
infrastructure. In the very simplest terms, the City is
responsible for maintaining and managing a range of
assets which include:
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[40]
2. Establish secure, sustainable and
predictable funding streams
Construction materials, labour and maintenance costs are
currently rising at a faster rate than general infation. The
current energy market, of which bitumen, used in paving,
is a by-product, continues to escalate in price making
disproportionate demands on funding levels. The cost of
lighting our streets and running our traffc signals is going
up as are the costs of other materials such as concrete and
labour. The expectation is that these costs will continue to
rise more steeply than other costs.
This Strategy creates a framework to explore secure
additional transportation funding and increase revenue
from other sources. Part Four of the Transportation
Strategy examines funding issues in more detail. The City
will lessen its dependence on property taxes and seek
a greater proportion of funding directly from users. The
increased use of “user pay” principles will allow the City
to more effectively infuence individual travel choices
through the price of transportation.
Actions for Change:
Develop a Transportation Utility Charge X
Strengthen the “User Pay” component of X
transportation funding
Establish additional and alternative funding X
sources for transportation.
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ISSUES & InflUEncES
New legislative responsibilities X
(PSAB) for asset management &
absence of AM plans
Growing asset and inventory X
Broader range of inventory in X
response to increasing complexity
of transportation system
Aging infrastructure and X
increasing asset.
Increased maintenance liabilities X
with new traffc, safety and road
improvement projects
Maintaining condition of arterial X
and collector road network but
deterioration of local road network
Funding gap X
Rising labour and material costs X
Rising energy costs X
Increasing claims and litigation X
Increasing “taxation” based funding X
Potential for future X
infrastructure defcit
OBJEctIVE OUtcOMES ActIOnS fOr cHAngE
Maintain and 1.
improve the asset
of the transport
network and promote
best value in asset
maintenance and
rehabilitation
Reduced proportion of roads, bridges and structures where X
structural maintenance needs to be considered
Improved understanding of funding needs and priorities X
Increased asset life and reduced proportion of roads where X
structural maintenance needs to be considered
A reduced (or at least stabilized) demand on revenue maintenance X
funds from new projects
Improved effciencies and better value for money X
Increased user satisfaction with the condition of roads X
Develop road and transport asset management plans X
Service re-design to undertake all levels of preventative pavement X
maintenance and replacement through PMS
Establish a GIS database for improved tracking and management of X
infrastructure
Enhance and expand monitoring systems to better direct maintenance X
programs and achieve value for money
Target structural maintenance to those roads in greatest need and with X
the largest traffc volumes on the basis of road hierarchy and condition
Employ life cycle costing principles when identifying rehabilitation X
projects and programs
Promote life cycle costing principles within all traffc, safety and X
road improvement projects
Examine alternative and cost effective maintenance strategies X
Maximize effcient use of existing infrastructure X
Establish systems to compensate for impact on pavement life due X
to trucking activity
Establish secure, 2.
sustainable and
predictable funding
streams
Confdence and certainty for longer term investment X
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions and lower energy costs X
Reduced number of personal injury claims arising from X
maintenance issues
Reduced longer term funding liabilities and needs X
Develop Transportation Utility charge X
Strengthen the user pay component of transportation funding X
Establish additional and alternative funding sources for transportation X
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Effciently manage, maintain and improve the transportation system for all modes
effective
and effcient
network
management

The City will lessen its
dependence on property taxes
and seek a greater proportion
of funding directly from users.
[42]
I MpROvE D ACCESSI BI l I T y
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Promote alternative and sustainable travel choice and provide better accessibility to jobs,
education, health and recreation for all
BACKGROuND
The main purpose of transportation is to provide mobility and access for people to services, goods and other people. Surrey
has a very diverse population with diverse needs that are not all being met by the current transportation system. Access to
safe, convenient and affordable transportation helps ensure that everyone can participate fully and equally within society.
The transportation system should properly address the needs of all the population regardless of age, ability or economic
circumstances. This desire for full, universal access, while often presented in terms of the needs of some, has benefts for
all. At one time or another, everyone will have experienced some level of mobility impairment, so good access to transport,
in the very broadest sense, is relevant to everyone.
Recent surveys in the City have shown that about 12% of residents do not have regular access to a car. That equates to
about 50,000 people. This means that many residents are reliant on others with cars, or alternative modes of transport such
as transit, taxis, walking or cycling. The current level of transit services in the City, combined with the comparatively high
costs, has left some individuals with limited or infexible travel choices. The City believes that access to opportunity and the
ability to fully participate in society should not be dependent on access to a car.
CONSulTATION fEEDBACK, pRIORITIES AND INfluENCES
Poor transit service identifed as the number 1 issue during public consultation X
88% of public agreed that “Transit should be as convenient and attractive as driving a car on City Roads” X
About 12% (about 50,000) of Surrey’s residents do not have unhindered access to a car X
High level of public priority given to sidewalk provision X
Incomplete road network and lack of cross-city connectivity for transit services X
City’s Greenway network over 50% complete X

The City believes that
access to opportunity
and the ability to
fully participate in
society should not be
dependent on access
to a car.
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I MpROvED ACCE SSI BI l I Ty
hierarchy of Consideration
The planned order for transportation
consideration is:
Walking 1.
Transit 2.
Bicycles 3.
Commercial Traffc and Trucks 4.
High Occupancy Vehicles 5.
Single Occupancy Vehicles 6.
The hierarchy is used to help ensure that the
needs and safety of each group of road users
are sequentially considered when a project is
prepared, that each group of users is given proper
consideration and that the measures will not make
existing conditions worse for more vulnerable
transport users. Each and every time a new
roadway is designed or an existing one improved,
opportunities for improving walking and cycling will
be routinely reviewed. The approach does not mean
that users at the top of the list will always receive the
most benefcial treatment. It is recognized that it is
often not possible to provide for all users’ demands
and compromises have to be made. The weight given
to the different user groups will recognize:
The nature of the location involved X
The relative levels of competing demands X
for facilities
The ability of the transport network to X
accommodate the range of facilities involved
The funding resources available for the X
measures under consideration
Taxis
Taxis provide a demand responsive, fexible, 24-hour,
door to door service and it is important that they
play their full role in helping to meet the needs of
both current and potential passengers in Surrey. The
services provided by taxis support the principles of
the Transportation Strategy by:
Offering accessibility for those with mobility or X
sight disabilities
Providing affordable travel choice for people X
otherwise excluded, the ability to get to work,
enjoy cultural and leisure opportunities and
access health and education services
Integrating with other modes of transportation X
as the often frst or last link in a journey
As part of our efforts to support the role of taxis in
the transportation system the City will:
Promote the accommodation of taxis within
the design of major development proposals,
advocate for the integration of taxis within major
transit projects promoted by other agencies and
consider the needs of taxis within the on-street
environment, mindful of the often high level of
competition for loading, transit and parking.
Accessibility Issues
When looking at accessibility there are key
areas of opportunity and service provision that
are relevant especially access to health care,
education, employment, food shopping, leisure
and recreation. There are some very basic issues
that need addressing. For example, being able
to arrive in time for hospital appointments
and returning home in a reasonable time, the
inability to access the full range of employment
opportunities due to misalignment between
transit services and shift times or the difficulty
of carrying more than a few items of food or
multiple strollers. Not owning a car, whether by
necessity or choice, should not limit the ability of
the people of Surrey to access opportunities.
more travel choice
[44]
SERvICE OBjECTIvES
1. Promote alternatives to the car by improving
walking and cycling opportunities
The integration of cycling and walking into our wider
transport operations and land use decision making forms
the key means by which these modes will be used to
improve accessibility. We will increase our consideration
of the needs of cyclists and pedestrians in transport
projects, and will follow this through into other City
services such as land development, spatial planning
and parks and greenways developments. For example,
the Engineering and Parks, Recreation and Culture
Departments will work together to update and complete
the new Greenway/Blueway Master Plan. Providing safe
and comfortable routes to schools will encourage good
habits to be established early on in children’s lives and
in support of the Community Safety Principle, lighting
of important walking links will be examined. Promoting
walking and cycling is not just a means to an end. By
doing so, individuals see health benefts and community
cohesiveness and character is enhanced.
Getting the environment right at street level and creating
a sense of place will make people want to get out of their
cars in order to walk or cycle to the local shops or collect
their children from school. Although opportunities are
greater at some locations than others, if our streets are
thought of as the largest and most heavily used public
space the City is responsible for, we can begin to better
understand the importance of getting that physical
environment right. A street that is safe and comfortable
to use and which offers interest and enjoyment is not just
good for encouraging walking or cycling, it is also good at
enhancing the quality of the local environment, creating
and strengthening community cohesion and reducing the
fear of crime.
More needs to be done to continue to further develop
cycling and walking as real transportation alternatives.
The City will undertake a review of the “Bicycle Blueprint”
with input from Metro Vancouver and TransLink and
update the Pedestrian Master Plan. These will become
key supporting and fully integrated components of our
Strategic Plan.
Actions for Change:
Continue implementation of the strategic bicycle X
network
Update the Pedestrian Master Plan X
Develop School Safety Zone and Safe routes to X
school programs
Update the Bicycle Blueprint X

A street that is safe and
comfortable to use and
which offers interest and
enjoyment is not just
good for encouraging
walking or cycling, it is
also good at enhancing
the quality of the local
environment …
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2. Promote alternatives to the car by
improving transit
The City expects to see year on year improvements to
transit being provided by other agencies and supported
by higher levels of government. The main mechanism for
the delivery of transit within the City is TransLink’s South
of Fraser Area Transit Plan (SoFA TP). This provides a
detailed 7 year investment and delivery plan and for the
frst time it has included a long range Vision for transit
in the South of Fraser area. The SoFA TP represents a
very important planning tool for the City as it gives us the
necessary guidance to start improving specifc corridors
where improvements are planned and it confrms where
the City needs to be strategically protecting and improving
the transportation systems to accommodate future
improvements including Rapidbus and rail.
Through the SoFA TP, Surrey residents and workers will
for the frst time begin to get a level of transportation
choice that is fairer and more equitable when compared
with the rest of Metro Vancouver, and with the additional
funding resources from the Provincial Government we can
anticipate moving towards this in the shorter term. In the
frst 5 to 7 years of the SoFA Plan, there will be an almost
doubling of the number of buses operating within the City.
These will be used to improve frequencies on existing
routes, extend the hours of operation of routes and
introduce of entirely new routes to improve the “fneness”
of the transit network.
However, the medium and longer term transit expansion
plans are currently not funded and without a major review
of how Transit is funded by TransLink and higher levels
of Government, Surrey and the region could experience
a reduction in transit service. This would undermine
many core policies of the Transportation Strategic Plan,
seriously impacting on our ability to make change.
Therefore, the City will actively participate in the debate
on TransLink funding and continue to strongly advocate
for the full and rapid implementation of all aspects of the
SoFA Plan.
Actions for Change:
Support the expansion and effectiveness of the TransLink Frequent Transit Network X
by developing a Transit Improvement Plan in partnership with TransLink (including
transit priority measures and improvements to transit infrastructure)
Provide an appropriate level of transit infrastructure funding to match the expansion X
of bus services within the City identifed within the SoFA Transit Plan
Give priority to transit infrastructure at locations where competition for curb space X
exists
Jointly identify and implement an annual program of localized road improvements X
at transit “pinch points” with TransLink
Work with TransLink to establish future alignment, technology and timing of X
implementation of rail within the City
Actively participate in funding discussions with TransLink, the Provincial and X
Federal governments to ensure the full and timely implementation of the SoFA TP
[46]
3. Protect and improve corridors and
infrastructure in support of strategic
transportation expansion and upgrades
Surrey does not provide the transit services within the
City but that does not mean that we have a passive role
to play in supporting better and higher level transit.
With a growing population the City needs to plan for
signifcant expansions and enhancements to the transit
system. Through our policies to provide transit priority
and safe and comfortable bus stop infrastructure,
we recognize the fundamental role of buses in the
transit system. Our policies to complete missing road
links and establish a fner grid network also provide
the framework for more improved transit penetration
throughout the City. Buses will always remain the
backbone of any system. However, in themselves,
traditional bus services cannot meet the growing
demands for alternatives to the car. Higher-level transit
service will come to Surrey and the City must be ready
for this. By protecting the required road right-of-way on
strategic corridors throughout the City including King
George Highway, Fraser Highway and 104 Avenue and
alignments such as for the urban rail, we will ensure
that rapid transit can extend further into Surrey.
The City can also ensure other rights-of-way are
protected for future transportation use and we
will identify opportunities within developments for
establishing walkways and cycleways on the alignment
of utility corridors where this is practical.
Actions for Change:
Protect strategic corridors for future rail service X
Complete the strategic road network and promote X
a fner grid system for transit service
Seek additional road Right-of-Way on strategic X
corridors for future rapid bus or rail transit service
through the land development process
Collaborate with the transit service providers X
to deliver the implementation of the supporting
infrastructure including transit exchanges,
maintenance facilities and rail yards
Identify and promote the use of utility corridors X
for walking and cycling routes
4. Integrate behavioral change initiatives
with sustainable transport infrastructure
and service developments
Progress will only be achieved by individuals making
changes in how they think about transportation.
Traditionally, the City has promoted a program of capital
projects identifed within the 10 Year Servicing Plan
aimed at maintaining and improving the road, walking,
cycling and transit networks. When it comes to promoting
the use of more sustainable forms of transport, it is
recognized that it is insuffcient simply to build the
infrastructure and expect people to use it. The City does
produce publicity material to let people know of the
alternatives to the car, such as the Bike Map but there is
opportunity for a more proactive role in promoting travel
awareness and “smarter choices”. Through this Strategic
Plan the City will start to develop an expanded program
of initiatives to infuence travel behavior towards more
sustainable and responsible travel decisions.
Actions for Change:
Through the sustainability development check list X
encourage developments to incorporate travel plan
initiatives
Encourage adoption of school travel plans X
Undertake travel awareness and behavioural change X
campaigns under the banner of “Travelwise Surrey”.
Advocate for personalized travel planning X
recognizing the value of promoting tailored travel
plans for individuals
With a growing population the City needs to plan
for signifcant expansions and enhancements to the
transit system.

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ISSUES & InflUEncES
Sidewalk provision an identifed X
priority for the public
Bicycle network incomplete and X
piecemeal
Currently low modal share X
Role of taxis in the transportation X
“chain”
External funding mechanisms X
inequitable and uncertain
Competition for funding X
Low transit use associated with X
insuffcient level of service and
choice
Inequitable transit service within X
Metro Vancouver
Provincial transit plan funding X
Strong public desire for improved X
transit service
Some transit priority measures likely X
to reduce level of service for private
car users
Rising costs of operating private cars X
Competition for funding X
Heavy reliance on City to X
successfully negotiate transit
improvements through land
development
Enhanced funding and statutory X
powers for TransLink
Heavy reliance on City to X
successfully negotiate adoption
of travel planning through land
development process
“Soft” engineering measures reliant X
on revenue funding
Opportunities for partnership X
working with other agencies
OBJEctIVE
Promote alternatives 1.
to the car by
improving access to
walking and cycling
opportunities

Promote alternatives 2.
to the car by
improving public
transit
Protect and improve 3.
transportation
infrastructure in
support of strategic
transit expansion
and upgrades
Integrate behavioral 4.
change initiatives
with sustainable
transport
infrastructure
and service
developments
OUtcOMES
Reduced use of SOVs particularly at peak periods X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased number of children traveling to school by non car modes X
Improved road safety awareness for children X
Increased cycling usage X
Increased walking trips X
Increased transit modal share X
Improved “people moving” effciency of road network X
Improved access to employment, health, education and leisure X
opportunities for all
Increased profle for Transit X
Reduced congestion X
Increased cycling usage X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased profle for Transit X
Increased walking trips X
Improved access to employment X
Increased network fexibility and options X
Increased cycling usage X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased profle for Transit X
Increased walking trips X
Improved access to employment X
ActIOnS fOr cHAngE
Protect strategic corridors for future rail service X
Complete strategic road network and promote fner grid system for transit X
service
Seek additional right-of-way on strategic corridors for future rapid bus or rail X
transit service through the land development process
Collaborate with the transit service providers to deliver the implementation X
of the supporting infrastructure including transit exchanges, maintenance
facilities and rail yards
Identify and promote use of utility corridors for walking & cycling X
Develop School Safety Zone and Safe Routes to school program X
Review and update Bicycle Blueprint X
Continue implementation of the strategic bicycle network X
Review and update Pedestrian Master Plan X
Support the expansion and effectiveness of the TransLink FTN by developing X
a Transit Improvement Plan
Provide an appropriate level of transit infrastructure funding to match the X
expansion of bus services within the City identifed within the SoFA TP
Give priority to transit infrastructure at sites where competition for curb X
space exists
Jointly identify and implement an annual program of localized road X
improvements at transit “pinch points” with Translink
Work with TransLink to establish future alignment, technology and timing of X
rail within the City
Actively participate in funding discussions with TransLink, the Provincial and X
Federal Governments to ensure the full and timely implementation of the
SoFA TP
Through the Sustainability development check list encourage developments X
to incorporate travel planning initiatives
Encourage adoption of school travel plans X
Undertake travel awareness campaigns under the banner of “Travelwise X
Surrey”
Advocate for personalized travel planning recognizing the value of promoting X
tailored travel plans for individuals
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Promote alternative and sustainable travel choice and provide better accessibility to jobs, education, health and recreation for all
[48]
COMMuNI Ty SAf E T y AND hE AlT h
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Improve community safety, health and quality of life
BACKGROuND
Promoting safer communities is a key element of the Transportation Strategic Plan. It looks at safety in terms of the risk
of being hurt when using our roads but also in terms of personal safety and security. The Community Safety and Health
strategy seeks to address these issues by providing a clear framework around which we can improve casualty reduction,
maintaining and improving street and sidewalk lighting, examining an expanded role for the City to be involved in road
safety education and publicity and by continuing to work closely with partners, especially the police but also health
providers, ICBC, TransLink and the Surrey School Board.
Our consultations have identifed road safety as important to local people. ICBC data from 2005 shows that there were
approximately 2700 injuries plus 30 fatalities on Surrey’s roads. The consequences of being involved in a collision to an
individual or the friends and relatives of someone can be equally as devastating. In addition to this, we know that the
collisions taking place on our roads are resulting in signifcant costs to society and the local economy through increased
insurance premiums, delays to traffc, costs for the emergency services, both short and long term health care and
rehabilitation costs as well as individuals being “non productive” to society through injury. Through this strategy we will
begin the process of establishing a more consistent approach to how road safety is incorporated into our decision-making.

Road and community
safety can be an
emotive subject
and many agencies
are working to a
common goal.
safer, healthier
communities
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COMMuNI Ty SAf ETy AND hEAlT h Improving road safety is achieved by targeting the issue
from different directions. The City has taken the lead
in making Surrey a better and safer place to live and
do business. Our Crime Reduction Strategy contains a
series of bold and innovative strategies to tackle the root
causes of crime and begin to put in place more effective
and streamlined mechanisms and structures to deal with
offenders. The strategy is intended to reduce crime and
the fear of crime.
The Transportation Strategy can provide support
by infuencing:
Safety accessing public transit. X
Safety in our Town and City Centres. X
Location and design of transit exchanges X
Caretaking of streets and condition of streets X
Road and community safety can be an emotive subject
and many agencies are working to a common goal.
There are existing long established methods of working
together with other agencies to bring about a reduction in
casualties. Consultation identifed the public felt that road
safety was primarily the responsibility of other agencies
such as the police and ICBC. This has highlighted a gap in
people’s knowledge of what the City does with respect to
road safety and the need to raise the profle of collision
reduction in the work we do.
CONSulTATION fEEDBACK,
pRIORITIES AND INfluENCES
Lack of understanding of City role in road safety X
Pedestrian Safety identifed as a priority within City X
Centre
Lack of respect for traffc laws – speeding, red light X
running, not stopping for pedestrians at crossings.
49% of public identify need for “considerable or lots
of improvement”
Need for more driver education and enforcement of X
traffc laws a public priority
Truck traffc off of truck routes X
Neighbourhood traffc speeds but mixed response to X
traffc calming – although supported some concerns
about too much being introduced.
Opportunities for an expanded City role in promoting X
healthier travel modes
Pedestrian safety and absence of sidewalks. 71% of X
public described safe sidewalks and walking paths
as “important” or “very important”
Crosswalk safety – signing, lighting, pavement X
markings
Personal safety when accessing transit at night X
[50]
SERvICE OBjECTIvES
1. Undertake physical measures to improve
safety of all road users
Casualty reduction and prevention already forms a
component of the work undertaken by the City at every
level. For example, the designs of large capital projects
are checked to make sure they are safe, reviews to speed
limits, the promotion of projects in and around schools and
our on-going maintenance of signs and pavement markings
also helps keep the road system safe. Even with this
attention, we know that collisions still occur and there is
a need to respond to these through continued engineering
and education efforts.
Consultation showed a desire to reduce the effects of
excessive or inappropriate speeds in our communities.
There is increasing research and evidence showing the
relationship between speed and the risk of collision and
the severity of injury. Giving attention to managing speeds
is important. Vulnerable road users such as cyclists and
pedestrians are particularly exposed to the effects of
speed. Pedestrians have a 90% chance of survival if
involved in a collision with a vehicle traveling at about 30
km/h, decreasing to a 10% chance of survival at just over
60 km/h.
High traffc speeds also contribute to a poor environment
for pedestrians and cyclists and can promote community
severance. There is a need to critically look at our speed
limits to ensure they are appropriate for the particular
road conditions and surrounding environment. Although
there is a need to be fexible in how speed limits are
applied, there is an equally important desire to maintain
consistency so that drivers can readily understand what
a speed limit is and why it has been introduced. By
implication, this means that any review might include
raising the speed limit in some locations although this
is appropriate, if there is to be driver understanding and
respect for the speed limits and a realistic chance for
the police to enforce them. As part of our reviews we
will seek to support the speed limits along corridors by
promoting signal progression based on the posted speed
limit. Our review of speed limits will be guided by the
outcome of the National Speed Limit Review of which
the City is an active member of the steering group. In
conjunction with the implementation of any speed limit
changes, we will seek the active participation of our
partners including ICBC and the RCMP to promote and
help educate the public on the importance of respecting
speed limits.
A Local Safety Project Program will become the
established method of delivering cost effective casualty
reduction and will be a key element of our Community
Safety Strategy. Safety projects are by their very nature
reactive to local safety problems and aim to improve the
safety of existing infrastructure. Analysis of casualty
trends can identify the priority issues that need dealing
with. However, there are a number of challenges that
need to be addressed in relation to the form of the ICBC
data and the City will engage with the agency to seek
ways to enhance the value and usability of it.
Actions for Change:
Develop a School Safety Zone program and best X
routes to school program
Introduce a speed management program and speed X
limit review
Use signal co-ordination to support more consistent X
and safer driving speeds along corridors
Improve pedestrian routes to and from transit X
facilities
Target road maintenance at sites where we know X
intervention will reduce collisions
Establish a discrete local safety projects program X
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2. Promote a culture of road and community
safety into all aspects of engineering services
The transportation system represents the largest
City controlled public space. As such there are huge
responsibilities and equally large opportunities to improve
how this space is safe and comfortable to use. The way the
City designs, implements and maintains its transportation
infrastructure dictates to a large degree how safe it is. The
City will apply a more structured approach in its design,
management, operations and maintenance systems with
respect to road safety.
There are opportunities for the City to undertake a more
organized and proactive role in collision reduction through
its maintenance activities (for example, by aligning its
program of repaving projects with locations where there
has been a history of collisions involving skidding or loss of
control). Potentially modest increases in resources towards
signing and pavement markings repair and replacement
can offer very large rates of return in terms of collision
reductions. This has already been recognized by the City
though its enhancement of pavement marking capabilities
allowing more frequent re-painting cycles. These added
road safety benefts demonstrate the good value for money
that the maintenance program can provide.
Actions for Change:
“Audit” major rehabilitation projects for casualty reduction benefts X
Recognize the contribution of well maintained street lighting, pavement markings X
and signing to collision reduction
Promote “safety audit” of larger design assignments X
Enhance relevant contracts to include safety elements – (street lighting, bus stop X
shelters, graffti and traffc signals)
Use collision data to help inform need for additional “non maintenance” works X
within projects eg: medians, pedestrian barrier fencing or anti-skid paving
Formalize casualty reduction and road safety projects and programs within a new X
Road Safety Strategy

The transportation system
represents the largest City
controlled public space.
[52]
3. Raise awareness of road safety and encourage
safer travel in partnership with others
Many collisions occur because road users are either
not trained to meet the challenges of modern driving
or because their behaviour leads to greater risks for
themselves and other road users. Although road safety
is generally viewed as a responsibility of other agencies
the City should and will take a more proactive and
collaborative role to support the current strategies and
initiatives undertaken by our partners. There are existing
long established methods of working together with other
agencies to bring about a reduction in casualties. The
benefts of inter-agency working with respect to road
safety cannot be overestimated and the City needs to
make full use of the opportunities provided. By identifying
common priorities, partnership working can deliver more
than the individual agencies are able to. Examples include
promoting safer driving and speed reduction campaigns.
As the prime agency responsible for the design,
implementation, maintenance and operation of the
transportation network as well as the enforcement of
many of the rules and regulations associated with it, the
City is a central player. The City already has in place a
Traffc Advisory Safety Committee consisting of City staff,
the Police, ICBC and the School Board to consider safety
issues particularly in and around schools. The role of
this Committee will be reviewed and its scope expanded
to further improve the level of collaboration and co-
ordination between the City and other agencies.
The Surrey RCMP is committed to reducing both the levels
of road casualties and the levels of crime. The City has
close liaison and working practices with the police and
they provide essential education and enforcement to
help reduce speeding, maintain respect for traffc laws,
reduce aggressive and dangerous driving, drinking and
driving, promotion of the use of seatbelts and ensuring
vehicles are kept in a roadworthy condition. Much of the
current enforcement activities are targeted at high crash
locations. Through the Traffc Safety Committee, the City
will work with the police in achieving a more pro-active
and expanded speed enforcement role.
Actions for Change:
Develop promotion of road safety educational X
programs with others
Further develop working in partnership with X
others to address road safety issues
Work with ICBC to improve the accuracy of X
collision data
Advocate for the use of more technology, including X
red light cameras on the road network to assist
enforcement at high crash locations
Advocate for a review of the use of speed cameras X
on the road network at high crash locations
Seek an expansion of the traffc and speed X
enforcement role of the RCMP

The Surrey RCMP is
committed to reducing both
the levels of road casualties
and the levels of crime.
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4. Reduce Crime and the Fear of Crime
Our town centres are also the location of some of the
larger transit exchanges and these can become a focus for
anti-social behaviour. The City will work collaboratively
with TransLink to plan the new transit exchanges that will
accompany service expansion within Surrey to ensure
they are safe, attractive and welcoming places and fully
integrated within the town centres. We know that the
presence of graffti creates a very negative perception of
an environment and that its quick and complete removal
is hugely important in creating safe, accessible and active
town centres.
Actions for Change:
Through the Local Safety Project Program and Crime X
Reduction Manager and other agencies, identify
locations for new and improved street lighting
Develop a strategy to improve lighting and other X
relevant assets on key walking and cycling
connections within communities
Introduce accessible, integrated and safe bus stop X
infrastructure
Promote improved safety and security at transit X
facilities in liaison with transit operators
Ensure adequacy of graffti removal contract to X
ensure timely removal of graffti
The City will work
collaboratively with
TransLink to plan the new
transit exchanges that will
accompany service expansion
within Surrey to ensure
they are safe, attractive and
welcoming places…
safer,
healthier
communities
[54]
5. Improve Community Health and Quality of Life
There is a growing recognition of the role that transport
planning can play in improving health and quality of life. It
includes the health protective value of increased physical
activity and a recognition of the positive social function
that streets have in local communities.
We recognize the role that transportation has in the
health of our residents and we know that an active
lifestyle can play a big part in reducing certain illnesses
such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and strokes. For
example, approximately 25% of all deaths in Surrey are
associated with heart disease. The City knows that active
transportation choices such as walking and cycling can
make a big contribution to individual health.
Actions for Change:
Promote an annual program of community identifed X
traffc calming projects
Expand the Engineering Department’s contribution to X
the promotion of active and healthy living programs
such as “go for 20” in partnership with the Parks,
Recreation and Culture Department and health
service providers to promote an active and healthy
City using our transportation system

The City knows that
active transportation
choices such as
walking and cycling
can make a big
contribution to
individual health.
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ISSUES & InflUEncES
2700 people killed or injured on X
Surrey roads each year
Vulnerable road users, especially X
cyclists and pedestrians are more
likely to suffer more severe injuries
in a collision
Huge societal costs associated with X
deaths and injury on the roads
Competition for funding X
Potential for service re-design to X
improve delivery
Public perceptions of road safety X
responsibilities
Cross cutting, multi disciplinary X
approach needed
Reducing crime identifed as a City X
priority
Historical high demand for X
neighbourhood speed management
but support for use of traffc calming
not universal
Increased delays on strategic X
road network leading to more
neighbourhood “rat running”
OBJEctIVE
Undertake physical 1.
measures to improve
safety of all road
users
Promote a culture 2.
of road and
community safety
into all aspects of
engineering service
provision
Raise awareness of 3.
road safety issues
and encourage safer
travel by working
in partnership with
others
Reduce crime and 4.
the fear of crime
Improve community 5.
health and quality
of life
OUtcOMES
Fewer people killed or injured in road traffc collisions X
Increased number of children traveling to school by non-car modes X
Better road safety awareness for children X
Improved community quality of life X
Increased transit, walking and cycling trips X
“Added Value” to maintenance projects X
Fewer people killed or injured in road traffc collisions X
Increased transit, walking and cycling trips X
“Added Value” to maintenance projects X
Improved community quality of life X
Less crime and the fear of crime in town centres and on transit X
Improved economic viability and vitality of town centres X
Reduced criminal damage and anti-social behaviour X
Improved public road safety awareness X
Fewer people killed or injured in road traffc collisions X
Increased cycling usage X
Increased user satisfaction X
Fewer people being the victims of crime and feeling unsafe when X
in town or city centres and when using public transit
Increased transit modal share X
Increased walking and cycling trips X
Improved access to employment, health, education and leisure X
Increased user satisfaction X
Improved economic viability and vitality for town centres X
Reduced criminal damage and anti-social behaviour X
Improved neighbourhood quality of life X
Reduced impact of traffc on communities X
ActIOnS fOr cHAngE
Develop road safety educational programs with partners X
Continue to develop partnership working to address road safety issues X
Work with ICBC to improve accuracy of collision data X
Support the use of new technology, including red light and speed cameras on X
the road network to assist enforcement at high crash locations
Advocate for a review of the use of speed cameras on the road network at X
high crash locations
Advocate for an expansion of the enforcement role of the RCMP X
Develop School Safety Zone program and Best Routes to school program X
Undertake City-wide speed limit review. Develop a program of speed limit X
changes and supporting measures including corridor signal progression plans
Improve pedestrian routes used to access transit X
Align road maintenance at sites where there is an issue X
Develop a local safety projects program X
“Audit” major rehabilitation projects for casualty reduction. X
Recognize the contribution of well maintained street lighting, pavement X
markings and signing to collision reduction
Enhance relevant contracts to include safety considerations (street lighting, X
bus shelter, graffti and traffc signal contracts)
Use collision data to help determin the need for additional “non X
maintenance” works within projects
Work with the Crime Reduction Manager and other agencies to help identify X
program of lighting improvements on key walking and cycling connections
within communities including routes to transit and local services
Introduce accessible, integrated and safe bus stop infrastructure in X
conjunction with our Transit Improvement Plan
Liaise with transit operators on transit security X
Ensure adequacy of graffti removal contract to ensure timely removal X
of graffti
Promote an annual program of community identifed traffc calming projects X
Expand contribution to the promotion of active and healthy living programs X
such as “go for 20” in partnership with Parks, Recreation & Culture
Department and health service providers using our transportation system
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Improve community safety, health and quality of life
[56]
Ef f I CI ENT ECONOMy
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Reduce congestion and support the sustainable economic development and vitality of Surrey
BACKGROuND
Transportation plays a signifcant role in supporting Surrey’s economic development. The businesses and institutions located
within our employment lands are valued as being critical to the short, medium and long term economic and social viability
of the City. Within Surrey, we want to see a modern, responsive and effcient transportation system that is capable of
supporting the competitiveness of our businesses and boost productivity and access to local, national and international
markets. The emphasis of the City’s Economic Development Strategy is to maintain Surrey’s economic position within the
region while supporting local business growth. The existing and future capacity, location and alignment of transportation
infrastructure within Surrey and within the Metro Vancouver region are critical factors which will infuence the demand for
employment lands.
Transportation itself cannot create growth, but a high performing system is an important supporter of sustained economic
prosperity. Historically, new connections have played a pivotal role in economic growth. This remains the case in Surrey
where new employment lands are being developed, but increasingly in our maturing transportation system, it is constraints
within the existing system that will likely have a signifcant impact. Our location in the region means that our transportation
corridors are the arteries for both domestic and international trade. Surrey’s transportation system needs to provide the
right connections, in the right places to support the level of mobility that is needed for the economic growth.
There are over 18,000 businesses in Surrey and there is a diversifed industrial manufacturing and service base. Surrey has
over 20 million sq. ft. of industrial buildings that represents almost 45% of the total inventory for the Fraser Valley. Over the
next 25 years, some 106,000 jobs are expected to be created, requiring an estimated 47 million sq. ft. of building space on
about 2,850 acres of land. This represents a 57% increase over the 4,960 acres in use today.

Within Surrey, we
want to see a modern,
responsive and
effcient transportation
system that is capable
of supporting the
competitiveness of
our businesses and
boost productivity
and access to
local, national and
international markets.
successful
local economies
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Ef f I CI ENT ECONOMy

The growth of Surrey within the region
has made the City a central, and no longer
peripheral, location in transportation terms.
Regional Changes Impacting Surrey
The growth of Surrey within the region has made the City a central, and no longer peripheral, location in transportation
terms. Changes in the regional road network are being undertaken by higher levels of Government. These are intended to
both improve existing defciencies in the system and position the region to support an expanding Pacifc Gateway role. The
importance of the Gateway to Canada’s international trade and travel will increase as the Asia Pacifc economies expand
their shares of world trade. Any changes in regional transportation infrastructure are important for Surrey and we recognize
that any widening of Highway 1, twinning of the Port Mann Bridge, replacement of Pattullo Bridge, the new Golden Ears
bridge, improvements to Highways 10 and 15, the South Fraser Perimeter Road or extensions to rapid transit will all impact
on Surrey, particularly the north. Guildford especially, which could be poised to become one of the most important locations
within the City for employment. In addition, Surrey is impacted by:
The vancouver fraser port. This is Canada’s largest
port and within Surrey, the Fraser Surrey Docks is a
deep sea facility on the Fraser River. About 25 million
tonnes of cargo with an economic impact of over $9
billion, moves through Fraser Port each year. This volume
has made Fraser Surrey Docks the third largest port
in Canada. Locally, more than 350 businesses depend
on the port and port related activities. They provide
more than 11,000 direct and indirect jobs and annually
contribute about $65 million into the local economy.
Container traffc in the region is projected to increase
signifcantly with the expansion of the Port. At this
time there are about two million containers moved
through the region annually and this is expected to
rise to six million by 2020. A third of containers and
other freight movements are moved by truck and the
increase in freight movements will therefore have an
impact on truck traffc movements on the Major Road
Network and Provincial highways.
successful
local economies
International border crossings. The Pacifc
Highway and Peace Arch Pacifc Highway #15 crossing
is the second largest commercial crossing between
Canada and the United States.
Surrey’s location within the Pacifc Gateway and
with two major international crossing points means
that our transportation corridors are the arteries of
both domestic and international trade. Surrey is part
of a globalized economy. Surrey’s transportation
system needs to provide the right connections, in the
right places to support the journeys that matter to
economic performance.
[58]
CONGESTION ISSuES
Congestion already exists on parts of our network
and will increase rapidly if nothing is done. With
the policies and programs identifed in this Strategy,
the rate of traffc growth and congestion can be
reduced. Although it wastes the time of all road
users, importantly, success for business depends on
the ability to move goods and services effciently and
safely. Our strategy to tackle congestion therefore
sits alongside our work on supporting sustainable
economic and land use development. These
businesses are looking for relief from delays and given
the adverse effects that congestion has on economic
activity and the quality of life, measures must be
adopted to improve the movement of traffc and the
fow of people on our transportation network.
Modeling of the City’s road network based on current
anticipated development types and patterns has shown
that projected growth in travel will require massive
investment in the road network to accommodate
the additional car traffc. The scale of infrastructure
improvements required in the coming years is broadly
known but there is a recognition that expansion of the
road system alone will not be suffcient to service all
the traffc growth being predicted. No other high growth
City in the world has been able to eliminate congestion
by focusing just on road building. Although it will
remain the major part of the City’s efforts for some
years, continued road building and widening cannot be
sustained indefnitely in terms of funding, managing
the demand for movement or the impact on the
environment. There is a growing case for investment in
the existing infrastructure to achieve maximum value
for money. “Better use” measures such as elimination
of temporary traffc obstructions or more effcient traffc
signals can offer large returns on investment. Smaller
improvement projects that unblock pinch points,
infrastructure projects that support transit and targeted
international gateway infrastructure access projects
are likely to offer the highest returns. The importance
of the City’s land use planning in reducing the demand
for travel, supporting fewer car trips and lower car
ownership and generating more walking, transit and
cycling trips as a means of delaying or negating the
need for additional road infrastructure is central.
Congestion Related problems
A reduction in congestion could make a big contribution
to our ability to make changes in our other priorities
including:
Improving air quality. X
Improving the safety of vulnerable road users. X
Enhancing transit reliability. X
Reducing maintenance costs. X
Consultation feedback,
priorities and Infuences
Congestion and intersection delays – Highest X
ranked improvement area during public
consultation with 71% of respondents describing
this as needing “considerable or lots of
improvement”
Ineffcient operation of traffc signals X
Piecemeal approach to road construction X
Completion of the planned road network a priority X
for the public. Completion of east-west routes a
priority for the business community
Impact of truck traffc X
Rapid growth of the City and concerns over the X
ability to provide the supporting transportation
infrastructure
Increasing importance of Vancouver Port X
Pacifc Gateway infuence X
SERvICE OBjECTIvES
1. Promote access to employment lands
The City will advocate for good transit access to all economic lands, both existing and planned, that meets the particular needs
of shift working and unusual hours to ensure there is full opportunity provided to local employment opportunities and to reduce
the reliance on the private car. The City’s objective of providing one job per resident worker from the current 0.63 jobs per worker
will help reduce long distance travel and support the local economy.
In areas such as Campbell Heights with a build-out employment population estimated to be 40,000 there are obvious
advantages in providing good transit to reduce the traffc generation. Some of the current employment lands are located
adjacent to residential areas within walking and cycling distance. Through the Accessibility Strategy, the City will ensure
that safe and convenient walking and cycling opportunities are provided.
2. Provide transportation infrastructure and services that support sustainable economic growth
The City is often characterized only in terms of expansion of the built environment. However, increasing attention needs to
be given to intensifcation of those parts of the City that are already developed but which will experience redevelopment
in the future. Within this context, as land uses change and higher densities are encouraged all forms of traffc, whether
walking, cycling, cars or transit become increasingly important. These transportation corridors provide an important
resource in terms of supporting employment related growth and routes such as King George Highway, 104 Avenue
between the City Centre and Guildford, Fraser Highway and Scott Road present important opportunities to promote
mixed use development. With redevelopment opportunities, reviews of our Offcial Community Plan and Neighbourhood
Concept Plans, intensifcation of land use in areas already serviced by transportation or where there is an expectation
of improvements is the best way to maximize existing infrastructure to accommodate employment demand. Within the
City Centre for example, where transit services are already good and expected to improve greatly, 48% of the land is
underutilized and 20% is vacant.
Contributions
from land Development
The contribution development makes to
transportation infrastructure is most evident in those
areas where new roads are being built to service
a particular development site. However, there is
signifcant potential for the development community
to undertake its responsibilities on reducing the
impact of its development traffc through the
provision of infrastructure to help ease congestion
based on a road system that incorporates an internal
network providing routing options and connectivity.
Add to this the attention that could be given to
parking provision, the accessibility of development
to transit and the walkability of a development, and
the contribution of good spatial and site specifc
development in dealing with congestion can start to
be seen as the most important and the fundamental
shaping tool available to the City to deal with traffc
growth and congestion.
Actions for Change:
Improve the strategic road network that services economic lands X
Support Provincial projects to improve road access to major employment land X
Promote road network improvements that support economic development and which reduce the impact of X
trucks on communities
Promote a grid road network and completion of missing road network links X
Support spatial planning of new development to better align with alternative transportation opportunities X
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Actions for Change:
Advocate for improved transit X
service to planned and existing
employment areas
Introduce fully accessible, X
integrated, safe and comfortable
bus stop infrastructure linked to
TransLink Frequent Transit Network
Review Truck Route Network X
[60]
3. Relieve congestion
Transit is a key consideration in Surrey’s congestion issues and is part of the solution. As part of our future transit
improvement plans contained within the “Improved Accessibility” Strategy we will seek to improve transit infrastructure
and priority in partnership with other agencies.
Often the most effective and most appropriate response to a local congestion problem, even taking into account the
alternative approaches available to us, will be to remove a traffc “bottleneck”. This should always be approached with
some caution. We are not seeking to encourage the use of cars by people who have a realistic alternative. In any case,
research indicates that the amount of time spent traveling has been constant over the years and the main effect of easing
the fow of traffc, whether by relieving congestion or building increased road capacity, is not to save time but to enable
longer distances to be traveled. Even so, this in itself is not justifcation for leaving untouched any situation that is affecting
transit reliability, local air quality and the general economic well being of an area.
Effcient operation of the transportation system
The City supports the use of regional road tolling to help reduce the demand for car travel. Tolling of individual pieces of the
strategic network is not supported as this introduces inequity and potentially increases traffc demands on other parts of the
road network where tolling is absent. For example, the long periods of congestion currently occurring on Highway 1 through
Surrey suggest a considerable latent demand for access to Highway 1. While the widening to the Highway will divert traffc
from parallel routes in Surrey to Highway 1, it will also add traffc to connecting routes such as 152 Street, 160 Street and
104 Avenue. Tolling of the Port Mann bridge will also create demand for a free or cheaper alternative. Some of this will be
taken up by transit but the City would expect Pattullo Bridge to experience traffc increases of approximately 11% in the
morning. The City will advocate for the Province to introduce broader tolling systems.
Traffc Signals and Intelligent Transportation Systems
One of the most powerful tools in the movement of traffc within the City is the operation of its over 300 traffc signals. In
addition, improvements to the effcient operation of our system help delay the need for expensive new road infrastructure.
Traffc signals are found mainly on the busier collector and arterial roads with upgrades offering signifcant benefts and at a
very low cost. Regular reviews and monitoring of the performance of the traffc signals can offer large improvements.
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Examples of initiatives include:
Using the signal controllers as traffc counters to X
receive real time traffc information as a basis for
updating signal timing plans
Half of the City’s traffc signals are now monitored in X
real time, remotely from a central location allowing
engineers to quickly respond to problems such as
damage to detector loops or loss of power
Investment in UPS (Uninterrupted Power Supply) X
for strategically important signals to improve the
robustness of the system during emergencies and
power outages
When replacing old signal controllers the City X
is investing in replacements capable of multiple
functions
Expanding the number of routes to beneft from X
traffc signal co-ordination plans
Increased frequency of updates for signal co- X
ordination plans and individual signal timing plans to
better refect changing traffc conditions
Improvements in traffc signals is technology driven.
Investment in new, modern equipment and the latest
technologies will move the contribution of traffc signals
in relieving congestion a step further. In addition, the
more sophisticated the traffc signals the greater the
ability to offer more opportunities to other road users
such as transit or pedestrians. The City will continue to
improve and modernize the traffc signal system and seek
to make full use of the existing signal capabilities already
available. We will actively examine opportunities for
further investment in the most modern and capable signal
infrastructure and technology and create a Traffc Signal
Operations Centre. This centre will co-ordinate system
monitoring, tracking of signal equipment faults and the
dispatch of repair crews, assessment of the operation and
performance of individual signals as well as optimizing
movement along major traffc corridors.
Temporary Obstructions
and Traffc Management
The City has a responsibility to ensure the safe and
effcient movement of people and traffc on our road
network. This responsibility is impacted upon by many
external and internal infuences and has links with
the City’s day-to-day maintenance activities and the
coherence of our traffc management activities. The road
network is signifcantly impacted upon by the numerous
land developments, road improvement and construction
projects taking place, with controls over truck traffc,
lane and road closures often impacting on other traffc
sometimes at those times when traffc levels are at their
highest. As the City grows and the roads get busier,
the need for a coordinated and strategic approach to
managing temporary traffc obstructions associated with
maintenance and construction is needed. On a typical
working day, there are some 100 active construction sites
generating traffc on and off the public road system. A
new roadworks and temporary obstructions management
policy will be developed backed up by enhanced
inspection and enforcement.
Actions for Change:
Concentrate site specifc traffc fow X
enhancements at intersections where there
are identifed congestion issues
Implement a program of intersection and X
link improvements to assist traffc fows.
When on TransLink FTN routes incorporate
transit priority measures
Plan for strategic road improvements and X
protect necessary road right-of-way based
on traffc modeling
Develop a corridor based traffc signal X
improvement program. When on the
TransLink FTN, include transit priority
measures
Make better use of traffc signal technology X
already available to the City
Create a Traffc Signal Operations Centre X
Develop an ITS Investment Strategy for X
improved traffc signal operation
Promote localized improvements at transit X
“pinch points”
Establish a roadworks and temporary X
obstructions management policy
[62]
3. Infuence and manage transportation
demand and supply
Transportation Demand Management (TDM) is the use of
policies, programs and services to infuence whether, why,
when, where and how people travel. The most important
outcomes of TDM measures are new behaviours which
result in modal shift (more people choosing to walk,
cycle, take transit, carshare), trip reductions (more people
choosing to telework, shop online or conduct personal
business by telephone), driving reductions (more drivers
making fewer trips by car and to closer destinations) and
time and route shifting (more drivers changing the time or
route of their driving trip to avoid traffc congestion).
There are two main categories of TDM initiatives:
Education, promotion and outreach raise individuals’ X
awareness, improve their understanding and build
positive attitudes about sustainable transportation
choices.
Incentives and disincentives offer tangible benefts or X
disbenefts related to personal travel choices, making
those choices more or less attractive.
Benefts of TDM
TDM makes personal travel decisions more effcient. X
Many drivers make travel decisions based on poor
information and a lack of experience with non-
automobile options. TDM improves their awareness
and understanding of options and their willingness to
try them.
TDM maximizes the City’s return on infrastructure X
spending. Studies have shown that good information
can signifcantly increase ridership on new transit
infrastructure and services.
TDM makes the most of the City’s current assets. It X
saves people money and time by helping them make
effcient travel decisions and it improves health by
promoting physical activity and less-polluting modes.
It benefts employers by increasing productivity,
reducing parking costs, and helping to attract and
retain workers. It promotes economic development
by reducing congestion and enhancing worker
mobility.
TDM is a versatile and fexible management tool X
that can be customized for specifc transportation
users (e.g. car commuters), destinations (e.g.
major hospitals), travel modes (e.g. cyclists), travel
corridors (e.g. a congested major arterial road), trip
purposes (e.g. school) or specifc timeframes (e.g.
major events). There is also the potential for them to
be delivered in terms of months, rather than years.
TDM initiatives have multimodal benefts. They X
recognize that people see alternatives to driving as
a “suite” of options. Non-drivers tend to be transit
users, carpoolers, pedestrians or cyclists at different
times, for different reasons.
TDM works at the scale of individuals but X
incrementally has huge power across a community.
If every person who drives to work in a community
decided to leave their car at home just one day a
month, the 5% reduction in commuter traffc could
signifcantly ease daily congestion.

We are not seeking to
encourage the use of
cars by people who have
a realistic alternative.
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parking – On street. The City regards parking
management as one of the important demand
management tools available. The use of
comprehensive on-street parking controls including
paid parking, allied with the provision of transportation
alternatives, represents a powerful tool in infuencing
travel demand and is a core component in achieving
success with transit-oriented development. Parking has
also been identifed within other strategy areas given
its prominence in helping ensure the free and safe
movement of traffc, the buffer effect it can provide
between moving traffc and pedestrians and its role in
supporting shops and businesses.
parking – Off street. Parking cannot be looked at in
isolation and in the same way that on-street parking
is an important tool for the City to use to encourage
alternative transportation use, so to is the supply
of street parking off street. Where development is
located close to good transit services or where there is
a good balance of mixed use residential development
with close access to services and employment, the
need for a car is reduced. To reduce reliance on the
car, the City will develop revised off-street parking
standards related to the availability of alternative
transportation choices. A suite of other incentives
will be expanded to include supporting reductions in
parking in conjunction with for example, car co-op
initiatives, encouraging shared use of parking facilities
where peak demands are at different times or the City
securing a cash in lieu contribution for any relaxation
in parking to be used for investment in transit, walking,
cycling or City managed parking infrastructure.
The City has started to develop and apply a number of TDM tools but as the list above shows there is potential for many
and varied approaches to be used, and across many of the City’s transportation areas of infuence and decision making.
Whether it is our role in promoting smarter travel choices or encouraging car co-ops in support of parking relaxations near
transit corridors, the introduction of more walking and cycling infrastructure or promotive of transit priority, to better organize
and maximize the opportunities that exist with TDM, we will develop a “toolbox” of policies and approaches that can be
used. This will be undertaken in collaboration with the development of the planned sustainability checklist arising out of the
Sustainability Charter.

Education, promotion
and outreach raise
individuals’ awareness,
improve their
understanding and
build positive attitudes
about sustainable
transportation choices.
[64]
MANAGING Supply
In the same way that TDM has increased in importance
as a means of shaping demand to meet available supply,
so too has the notion of supply management become
important as a way to make the most of the existing
facilities. Maximizing their current capacity is vital to
deferring or eliminating the need for very costly new or
wider roads at some locations. One principle that has been
very evident in this Strategic Plan has been the need to
properly manage and maintain the transportation assets.
At the heart of any supply management strategies is the
realization that building infrastructure is just the frst step
toward a successful transportation system. Once these are
built, facilities must be maintained and renewed, optimized
for fnancial effciency and effective levels of service.
Actions for Change:
Develop a TDM “toolbox” X
Develop on-street parking management strategy and X
reorganize service delivery structures
Develop new development parking standards to X
include maximum parking stalls allowed
Promote walking and cycling through application of X
sustainability development checklist
Promote transit facilities and linkages through X
developer checklist

At the heart of any
supply management
strategies is the
realization that
building infrastructure
is just the frst step
toward a successful
transportation system.
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ISSUES & InflUEncES
Low transit use associated with X
insuffcient level of service and
choice
Strategic location of Surrey in X
regional road network
Growth of Vancouver Port and X
increased rail freight
Competition for funding X
Infuence of Pacifc Gateway X
Traffc growth and increasing car X
ownership
Impact of congestion on transit X
reliability and therefore constrains
travel choice
Tensions between economic growth X
and development and traffc growth
Cost and sustainability of road X
building
Growing appreciation of “best use” X
of existing infrastructure
OBJEctIVE
Promote access to 1.
employment lands
Provide 2.
transportation
infrastructure
and services that
foster sustainable
economic growth.
Relieve congestion 3.
Infuence 4.
and manage
transportation
demand and supply
OUtcOMES
Increased transit modal share X
Improved “people moving” effciency of road network X
Improved access to local employment X
(including shift and night time working)
Reduced congestion X
Improved viability and success of employment lands X
Improved truck access and moving effciency X
Reduced use of SOVs particularly at peak periods X
Increased transit modal share X
Improved access to local employment X
Improved viability and success of employment lands X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased profle for transit X
Increased walking trips X
Improved access to local employment X
Reduced congestion X
Improved reliability X
Quicker access to local employment X
Reduced congestion X
Increased cycling usage X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased profle for transit X
Increased walking trips X
ActIOnS fOr cHAngE
Concentrate site specifc traffc fow enhancements at intersections where X
there are identifed congestion issues
Undertake intersection and link upgrades and widenings to X
assist traffc fows
Incorporate transit priority measures on FTN routes. X
Develop corridor based traffc signal improvement strategy. When on FTN, to X
include transit priority measures
Make better use of traffc signal technology available to City X
Develop an ITS Investment Strategy for improved traffc signal operation X
Create a traffc signal operations centre X
Plan for strategic road improvements and protect necessary road RoW based X
on traffc modeling.
Establish a roadworks and temporary obstructions management policy X
Advocate for improved transit service to planned and existing employment X
lands
Introduce fully accessible, integrated, safe and comfortable bus stop X
infrastructure linked to TransLink FTN
Review truck route network X
Improve strategic roads that service economic lands X
Support Provincial projects to improve road access to major employment land X
(such as SFPR, New South Westminster & Port Kells)
Promote a grid road network and completion of missing links X
Promote road network improvements that support economic development X
and which reduce impact of truck traffc on communities
Support spatial planning of new development that better aligns with X
alternative transportation opportunities.
Develop TDM “toolbox” X
Develop on-street parking management plan X
Develop new development parking standard maximums X
Promote walking and cycling through application of development X
sustainability checklist
Promote transit facilities and linkages through develpes checklist X
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Reduce congestion and support the sustainable economic development and vitality of Surrey
[66]
pROT ECT I ON Of ThE E NvI RONME NT
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Reduce the impacts of transportation on the built and natural environment
BACKGROuND
Surrey’s natural environment is a high priority of its residents. The importance of dealing with growth in ways that minimize
environmental impacts is vital and this is a particular challenge with respect to transportation.
Transportation has led to huge improvements in our quality of life by giving individuals unprecedented opportunities to
travel and access better jobs and a better life. These improvements and advances come at a cost. Transportation can affect
the landscape, generate noise and pollution that can affect human health and the environment and the majority of fuels that
power the transportation systems are the cause of signifcant greenhouse emissions. They are the single largest source of
air pollution in the Lower Mainland with on average, about 75% of carbon monoxide emissions, 48% of nitrogen oxides and
13% of atmospheric particulates produced by cars, trucks and buses. Athough newer cars create far less air pollution than
older ones, unless the region can rely less on the car, the increase in the number of cars and the longer time taken to travel
could mean that these improvements will be overtaken by the overall increase in vehicle emissions.
Car and truck traffc is estimated to contribute about 35% of greenhouse gas emissions in Metro Vancouver and it is the
fastest rising source of carbon emissions within the economy. Addressing the challenge of climate change has important
implications for any long-term transportation strategy. Air pollution and the reduction in greenhouse gases must be tackled
on a regional basis and transportation policies have a key part in helping reduce the long term trend. Very large increases in
the use of transit are needed with supportive land uses allowing fewer and shorter trips, many of which can be by walking
or cycling. However, the car can and will remain a legitimate and widely used form of transport and thus the focus must be
given to encouraging fewer and shorter car trips.

The importance of
dealing with growth
in ways that minimize
environmental
impacts is vital
and this is a
particular challenge
with respect to
transportation.
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pROTECTI ON Of ThE ENvI RONME NT
Consultation, feedback,
priorities and Infuences
Concerns over air quality issues associated with X
traffc
Truck movements and the management of goods X
movement
Disruption to wildlife corridors X
Loss of trees X
Impact on watercourses X
Recognition of contribution of transportation to X
greenhouse gas emissions
Need for heavy and sustained investment in transit X
Need to defer and minimize road and traffc growth X
adjacent to agricultural lands
SERvICE OBjECTIvES
1. Reduce the impacts of road freight
In a modern economy, trucks are the main form of movement of the majority of our goods and services.
Our town centres rely on truck access to service the stores and businesses with the goods we need
and expect. The transportation of goods is an important activity within Surrey and the surrounding
region. Freight is carried by road, rail, sea and air and often a combination of these. Surrey’s central
location within the region means that it has an important role in supporting this activity which in turn
creates wealth and economic growth both for the City and for the region. In addition, a signifcant
number of people are directly employed within the trucking industry or in services associated with it.
Recognizing the important function of truck traffc in keeping the economy moving, we must manage
the movement of trucks on our network so as to reduce the impact they can have on neighbourhoods
and the wear and tear on our transportation infrastructure. The noise, pollution, and street level
impact of trucks, especially where they are waiting or turning, can be signifcant.
One of the main outcomes of the last Transportation Plan was the introduction of the truck route
network in response to the public concern over truck traffc. Public consultation through this
Transportation Strategic Plan has identifed that truck traffc remains a priority issue.
The movement of freight on our roads is a good barometer of economic well being. The trucks we see
moving within and across the City carry the goods we rely on in a modern society. They are a fact of
life and we must acknowledge their presence on our network especially on strategic routes and where
mixed use development has been promoted. Nevertheless, there are a number of initiatives the City
can undertake to reduce their impact.
Spatial and land use planning
Freight issues are also very important in the consideration
of spatial and land use planning. The servicing of new
employment generating developments have specifc
requirements and issues. From a transport point of view
the City wants to encourage development in locations
served easily by rail and major roads thus aiming to reduce
congestion and impact on local routes. The City also needs to
encourage the provision of safe and secure service facilities
and overnight truck parking in appropriate locations.
Actions for Change:
Review and update the City Truck Route Network X
Develop Truck Parking Policy and work with the X
trucking industry to address the shortage of parking
available
Increase the enforcement and monitoring of truck X
licensing and routing as governed by the appropriate
by-laws
Support more short sea shipping for the movement X
of freight
Support the increased use of rail for the movement X
of freight
2. Reduce the impacts of traffc on air quality
and climatic change
Our strategies to reduce congestion in support of
a healthy local economy also have an important
contribution to make to the reduction of greenhouse gas
emissions. The effcient and effective management of our
transportation systems will keep traffc moving freely and
smoothly, and minimizing delays and congestion improves
vehicle effciency and reduces carbon emissions. The level
of contribution will depend on how pro-active the City is
in giving priority to alternative transportation modes. The
largest reductions in carbon emissions will be achieved by
making diffcult and potentially controversial choices such
as giving more priority to cleaner and more effcient people
moving modes even if this means cars are delayed.
The City will support transportation related measures that
can reduce the emission of greenhouse gases that cause
climate change. While future growth in population and
traffc volumes may cause total vehicle emissions to rise,
the City must achieve a reduction on a per capita basis.
The Provincial Government’s environmental legislation
identifes transportation as an important contributor to
greenhouse gas emissions. The municipalities have a key
role to play in delivering the targets being set and Surrey
as one of the fastest growing municipalities in Metro
Vancouver, will likely be prominent. Fundamental to the
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City making a contribution to greenhouse gas emissions
is the rapid development of high quality transit services
which will allow the City to promote sustainable, compact
and complete communities located along these corridors
and nodes. Through the recommendations within the City’s
Sustainability Charter, in order to reduce the causes of
climate change as much as possible and to mitigate the
potential impacts, the City will work within the framework
of the British Columbia Climate Change Charter and
implement a Climate Change Action Plan.
Actions for Change:
Promote alternatives to private car travel to help protect and enhance air quality and X
reduce carbon emissions.
Reduce congestion X
Promote land use patterns that are oriented to transit services X
Maximize effciency of existing infrastructure before providing new infrastructure X
Inform, involve and educate the public, identifying ways to reduce the impacts of X
transportation through measures such as anti-idling regulations, the promotion of fuel
effcient vehicle purchases, driving habits, fuel choices and maintenance of vehicles.
Adopt a leadership role in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by encouraging X
alternatives to driving for City employees and reducing the use of carbon emitting fuels
in City vehicles
Reduce Energy consumption for City Infrastructure X
protection of our built
and natural environment
[70]
3. Reduce the impacts of traffc on water
quality, vegetation, trees and land
consumption
water quality. Paved streets, driveways and parking
lots prevent water from soaking into the ground and
increase storm water volumes in the drainage system. In
order to improve the quality of storm runoff and reduce its
volume, the City will encourage shared parking facilities
and reduce the size and number of parking lots, reduce
the parking requirements for some land uses, encourage
shared driveways and encourage the use of permeable
surfaces for driveways and parking lots. Transportation
facilities will incorporate storm water management
principles and techniques into approved drainage designs.
This will include for example opportunities to incorporate
side street and parking lot bioswales to reduce fooding
and erosion within river courses, while also fltering and
trapping pollutants including silt, rubber compounds,
heavy metals, oils and chemicals. Applying techniques
such as this are part of a growing attention being given to
the management of non point source pollution that also
includes looking at the City’s street sweeping and catch-
basin cleaning regimes.
Green Streets. The City places high importance in
greening our streets. Extensive planting and landscaping
make them more attractive and comfortable for
walking and cycling. They reduce heat at street level
in the summer months and enhance the quality of the
environment making neighbourhoods attractive and
pleasant places to live. To stay in pristine condition they
require regular maintenance and upkeep.

Transportation infrastructure projects sometimes require
the removal of natural vegetation and trees but measures
can be taken to help avoid or mitigate this such as
meandering sidewalks, altering the road or boulevard
cross section and shifting the road alignment to protect
signifcant trees. Extensive tree planting also takes place
within all road projects.
land consumption. Approximately 35% of Surrey is
designated agricultural land and much is still actively
farmed. To reduce the possible consumption of valuable
agricultural and natural resource lands by transportation
infrastructure expansion, the City will seek to maximize
the effcient operation of existing facilities in tandem with
any expansion of the system. A wide range of strategies
will also help to increase the use of walking, cycling and
transit which can move a given number of people in less
physical space than needed for cars. Within Surrey there
are a number of arterial roads that bisect the Agricultural
Land Reserve (ALR) and with the growth of the City these
are seeing signifcant increases in traffc volumes and
increasing pressure for road widening. They also link
with the regional road network including Highway 15
and Highway 10 both of which have undergone major
upgrades as part of the Border Infrastructure Program.
Some of these roads are located on poor sub soils and
are susceptible to settlement and increased maintenance
costs as traffc volumes increase. Therefore it is in the
interest of the City to seek alternatives to mitigate the
impacts of additional traffc on these routes. The City
will promote projects on those corridors that will assist
in reducing the need for signifcant expansion of some of
the more vulnerable corridors.
Actions for Change:
Incorporate best practices for storm water management X
design into transportation projects
Develop systems to better manage non point source X
pollution including street sweeping and catch-basin
cleaning cycles and the use of side street bioswales
Continue to maximize enhanced greening guidelines X
for landscaping and tree planting in transportation
corridors including roads, multi use paths and
greenways. Streetscaping will be part of all
reconstruction and construction projects for all City
road projects
Seek to maximize the effcient operation of existing X
road infrastructure to delay the need for expansion of
roads within the ALR
Incorporate meandering of sidewalks and modifying X
road cross sections and changing alignments, where
possible, to help protect signifcant trees
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ISSUES & InflUEncES
Impact of truck traffc on Surrey X
road network including pavement
maintenance, noise and vibration
Loss of trees X
Funding constraints X
Impact on watercourses X
Traffc growth and increasing car X
ownership
Concerns about air quality and X
transportation
Impact of congestion on transit X
reliability and therefore constrains
travel choice
Need to reduce traffc growth on X
roads through ALR
Tensions between economic growth X
and development and tensions
between economic growth and
development and traffc growth
OBJEctIVE
Reduce the impacts 1.
of road freight
Reduce the impacts 2.
of traffc on air
quality and climate
change
Reduce the impacts 3.
of traffc on water
quality, vegetation
and trees and land
consumption
OUtcOMES
Improved compliance with Truck Route Network X
Reduced impact of trucks in town centres X
Reduced congestion X
Reduced noise X
Improved customer satisfaction X
Less truck traffc X
Reduced use of SOVs particularly at peak periods X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased cycling usage X
More walking X
Reduced energy costs for City X
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions X
Improved air quality X
Improved neighbourhood quality of life X
Reduced storm water run-off X
Improved street level environment for walking and cycling X
Enhanced image for City X
Reduced need for road widening projects X
ActIOnS fOr cHAngE
Incorporate best practices for storm water management design into X
transportation projects
Develop systems to better manage non point source pollution X
Continue to maximize enhanced greening of transportation corridors X
Seek to maximize the effcient operation of existing road infrastructure X
Incorporate meandering of sidewalks and modifying road cross-sections X
to help protect signifcant trees
Review and update the City Truck Route Network X
Increase enforcement and monitoring of truck licensing and routing as X
governed by appropriate by-laws
Support the increased use of rail for the movement of freight X
Support more short sea shipping for the movement of freight X
Develop Truck Parking Policy to address the shortage of parking available X
Reduce congestion X
Promote alternatives to private car travel to help protect and enhance air X
quality and reduce carbon emissions
Maximize the effciency of existing infrastructure before providing new X
infrastructure
Inform, involve & educate the public on reducing impact of transportation X
Adopt a leadership role in greenhouse gas reduction X
Reduce energy consumption for City infrastructure X
Promote land use patterns that are oriented to transit services X
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Reduce the impacts of transportation on the built and natural environment
[72]
I NTEGRATI ON Of T RANSpORTAT I ON
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Promote integration between transportation and land use to reduce the need to travel and
support trips by more sustainable modes
BACKGROuND
Transportation and land use – A fundamental relationship
As the responsible authority for guiding development, Surrey is a lead player in promoting sustainable, pedestrian, cycle
and transit friendly communities that are well served by all aspects of the transportation system. Many aspects of travel
demand such as origin and destination locations, lengths of trips and choice of mode are shaped by land use patterns so
how and where we plan and direct growth in the City is probably the most fundamental determinant of the nature and
scope of the transportation system we have and how far it will be possible to move towards reduced dependence on the
car. With consistent application of land use policies much can be done to reduce the demand for travel generated by new
development and it could well be expected to play the dominant role in determining how far it will be possible to achieve
the Vision. With the high growth rates we see in Surrey, there is big potential to bring about a change in the status quo
within the life of this Plan.
The location and form of development are principle determinants of the potential for urban transportation systems to
be sustainable. At the same time, it is equally true that transportation systems greatly infuence the form and nature of
development. More recent development locations and forms respond to the pre-dominance of the private car and often the
ability to access these by other means is greatly limited. With strategic, long term and sustained investment in alternative
transportation, particularly transit, there is a huge potential for an alternative way for transportation to shape growth and
the form of development. For these reasons, transportation and land use should be viewed as interdependent.

With consistent
application of
land use policies
much can be done
to reduce the
demand for travel
generated by new
development …
integration of
transportation
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OCp policies
Manage Growth for Compact Communities - X
Effcient land use allows the City to continue growing
while preserving open space and agricultural
areas. A compact form of development contains
future growth within planned areas, provides new
opportunities for housing, business and mobility, and
allows more effcient use of City utilities, amenities
and fnances.
Build a Sustainable Local Economy - X The OCP
is committed to the concept of a complete City,
built upon a strong and sustainable local economy,
balanced with a high quality residential environment.
Build Complete Communities - X Complete
communities have a wide range of housing choices,
opportunities for employment, recreation and leisure
activities. Complete communities will be distinct in
character, livable and energy effcient, and will be
designed to be safe and attractive places for people
to walk and cycle to a variety of places and activities
close to home.
Increase Transportation Choice - X The road
network will be improved to move people and goods
more effectively and to support the development
pattern of businesses, workplace centres, towns
and neighbourhoods in the City. Other improvements
include providing alternatives to car travel such as
bicycles, walking routes and better transit service.
Consultation feedback,
priorities and Infuences
Support for shopping, schools and leisure to be X
located within walking and cycling distances of
communities
Need for more integration of transit with new X
development
Transportation servicing and road building. X
Perception of City “catching up”
Incomplete road network and missing links. Public X
support for completion of planned road network
Current poor transit services but an expectation of X
change through the South of Fraser Area Transit Plan
and development of the Frequent Transit Network (FTN)
OCP Update X
Rapid growth of City and the lag in transit provision X
with missed opportunities for transit to shape growth
SuRREy’S OffICIAl COMMuNITy plAN
The Transportation Strategy structure, based on the care of our assets, providing choice and access to transportation,
improving community safety, supporting sustainable economic development, protecting the environment and seeking
integration with development is intended to align with the Offcial Community Plan (OCP).
[74]
SERvICE OBjECTIvES
1. Co-ordinate transit investment with land use
planning in support of high density, mixed
use and compact development
Land use changes are happening all the time and
there are few places where this is more evident than
in Surrey. Opportunities are now becoming available
and will continue over the life of this Strategy to ft our
development patterns with transit improvements. This is
a two-way relationship with development both supporting
transit and transit shaping development. The City has for
many years been protecting the necessary road right-of-
way on strategic corridors to allow future improvements
to transit. With the confrmation of the TransLink Frequent
Transit Network (FTN), incorporating local bus services,
rapid bus and future rail, there is now an expectation that
this strategic planning can now start producing signifcant
and rapid change. In addition, the City needs to update its
OCP to formalize the relationship and identify those priority
locations in need of new or updated NCPs which will align
with the planned transit infrastructure improvements with
a view to promoting compact, mixed use, transit oriented
development along these transit corridors and at transit
exchanges. Commitment from the transit service providers
on the timing and levels of improvement is needed to
provide the City and the development community certainty
to plan for transit. Surrey believes the creation of the FTN
is an important frst step and we will continue to lobby
for on-going expansion of the FTN network and advocate
for transit upgrades to be delivered quickly to deal with
the regional inequities, refect the growth of the City
and allow planning and shaping of future development.
Improvements to the bus system are important but future
rail commitments are also critical in supporting the
sustainable growth of the City. Through its partnering
position within the strategic planning of future rapid
bus and rail, we will seek commitments from TransLink
for the early development of the alignment, technology
and timing of future investments in the City. To help
facilitate our collaboration on planning of these transit
improvements as well as the co-ordination, management,
monitoring and reporting of progress of all aspects
of the SoFA Plan, the City will foster enhanced inter-
organizational relationships and working practices.
It is recognized that these nodes and corridors will
also be places of economic activity and employment.
Economic activity within the City incorporates a range of
land use types and there is a need for intensifcation and
redevelopment of existing centres and corridors with a
mix of commercial, institutional, service and residential
uses which have adequate amenities and existing or
planned transit.

Land use changes
are happening all the
time and there are
few places where
this is more evident
than in Surrey.
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2. Promote integrated and universal
transportation elements within
development projects so that they can
support other means than the private car
Approval of new development and redevelopment
should be based on considerations that include
high levels of transit, pedestrian, cyclist and car
connectivity allowing more direct travel by motorized
and non-motorized travel. For the pedestrian,
cyclist and transit user realms, the facilities and
infrastructure must be of a high quality. In the town
centres this will include supporting and protecting
the provision of appropriate transit exchanges
and facilities. Through the development approvals
process the City can encourage the provision of
convenient and secure parking and storage for cycles
and motorcycles in new developments, existing
public spaces and public facilities. We can ensure
new development provides for accessible transit
services including developer contributions where
necessary and address mobility access issues for
new development. By promoting a fner grid network,
communities will beneft from having improved
connectivity, improved transit and walking options
and a reduced need for circulation of traffc. To help
us understand where these defciencies in the road
network exist, we will undertake a review of our road
concept plans looking for appropriate locations where
additional transportation connections can be made.
INTER AGENCy wORKING
linking Densities with Transit
While it is instinctively known that higher density and
transit go hand in hand, the City needs to understand
what land use characteristics are required for transit
of a certain level to be promoted. The City is seeking to
encourage more and better transit in Surrey and with
Transit Service Indicators the City can better provide the
conditions necessary for transit to be introduced. These
indicators are based on:
Population and employment densities X
Walking distances and times to access transit X
Minimum transit vehicle operating speeds X
Applying these indicators creates a “contract” between
the City and the transit providers and they provide a tool to
better promote transit supportive development densities
through the OCP and NCP planning processes and allow
partnership-based promotion of transit in the future.
Actions for Change:
Collaborate with TransLink to establish Transit X
Service Indicators to help inform future land use
decision making
Densities identifed within the future OCP update X
and new and updated NCPs to incorporate and
refect all levels of the Frequent Transit Network
and future BRT and rail lines
Establish a joint City/TransLink steering group to X
co-ordinate transit implementation
Actions for Change:
Promote walking, cycling and transit X
through the application of the
development sustainability checklist
Secure improved parking for cyclists X
within new developments and fully apply
the bicycle parking by law
Revise bicycle parking design criteria X
Promote employer travel planning X
programs
Secure transit infrastructure close to X
activity generators and destinations
Promote community connectivity for all X
modes through the development of a fner
grid network and reduction in the number
of cul-de-sacs
Undertake a review of the City’s road X
concept plans to support improved routing
options and connectivity for all modes.
Undertake a review of the missing links X
within the City’s strategic road system
identifying priorities for completion of the
planned network for inclusion within the
10 Year Servicing Plan
Incorporate TDM measures within new X
development including initiatives for car
co-ops and the application of maximum
parking standards.
[76]
3. Improve and enhance Surrey’s Town Centres and City Centre by promoting integration with transit
Strengthening the position and role of the Town Centres of Guildford, Newton, Fleetwood, Cloverdale and Semiahmoo
is one of the main OCP goals. These are more than just locations for shopping, business, leisure and education. They
are vital components of the working and expansion of the transportation system being the location of the main transit
exchanges. With the initiatives within the City Centre requiring the relocation of transit layover to other locations,
combined with steadily increasing transit service identifed in the South of Fraser Area Transit Plan (SoFA TP), the
City needs to be planning for suffciently sized and suitably located transit facilities. These will be crucial parts of the
transit system that support vibrant and vital town centres, with sustainable, transit oriented development. The City
works closely with other transportation providers to secure more and better transit services. In doing so there is a
responsibility to promote and protect the required facilities to allow this to happen.
Actions for Change:
Collaborate with the transit service providers to X
ensure integrated and high quality transit exchanges
as part of town centre improvements
Future NCPs to identify transit corridors, stations and X
exchanges to ensure integration with town centres
and incorporate supporting land uses.
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ISSUES & InflUEncES
Public support for facilities to be X
located within walking and cycling
distances – shopping schools and
leisure
TransLink FTN development X
Provincial Transit Plan X
Incomplete road network and X
missing links
OCP update X
Poor Transit services X
Integration of transit with new X
development
Land Development process X
Transportation servicing and road X
building – perception of City
“catching up”
SoFA Transit Plan X
New NCPs X
OBJEctIVE
Coordinate transit 1.
investment with
land use planning
in support of high
density, mixed
use and compact
development
Promote integrated 2.
and universal
transportation
elements within
development
projects so that they
can be accessed by
and in turn support
other means than
the private car
Improve and enhance 3.
Surrey’s Town Centres
and City Centre by
promoting integration
with Transit
OUtcOMES
Reduced use of SOVs particularly at peak periods X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased cycling usage X
More walking X
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions X
Improved air quality X
Reduced congestion X
Reduced use of SOVs particularly at peak periods X
Increased transit modal share X
Increased cycling usage X
More walking X
Reduced energy costs for City X
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions X
Improved air quality X
Improved neighbourhood quality of life X
Improved street level environment for walking and cycling X
Enhanced image for City X
Improved accessibility options for home to work for an increasing X
proportion of the population
ActIOnS fOr cHAngE
Collaborate with the transit service providers to ensure integrated and high X
quality transit exchanges as part of town centre improvements
Future NCPs to identify transit corridors, stations and exchanges to ensure X
integration with town centres and incorporate supporting land use.
Collaborate with TransLink to establish Transit Service Indicators to help X
inform future land use decision making
Densities identifed within the future OCP update and new and updated X
NCPs to incorporate and refect all levels of the Frequent Transit Network
and future BRT and rail lines
Establish joint City/TransLink steering group to co-ordinate transit X
implementation
Promote walking, cycling and transit through the application of sustainability X
checklist
Secure improved parking for cyclists within new developments and fully X
apply the bicycle parking by law
Revise bicycle parking design criteria X
Promote employer travel planning programs X
Secure transit infrastructure close to activity generators and destinations X
Promote community connectivity for all modes through the development of a X
fner grid network and reduction in the number of cul-de-sacs
Undertake a review of the City’s road concept plans to support improved X
routing options and connectivity for all modes
Incorporate TDM measures within new development including initiatives for X
car co-ops and the application of maximum parking standards
Undertake a review of the missing links within the City’s strategic road X
system identifying priorities for the completion of the planned network for
inclusion within the 10 year servicing plan
STRATEGIC OBjECTIvE
Promote integration between transportation and land use to reduce the need to travel and support trips by more sustainable modes
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part 3 measuring performance
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Tracking progress Towards The Vision
The Transportation Vision drives everything we want to achieve in this Strategic Plan. It can be diffcult to quantify the
Vision and to precisely measure “success”. However, we can look at what we are trying to achieve in transportation terms
and set targets in different areas to help measure success. Introducing performance management into the Plan means
that plans and policies that will be produced from it, will be scrutinized and examined to determine whether the City is
achieving what it said it would and in turn introduce accountability. The City needs to better understand how well it is
performing, that we are heading in the right direction and that we are making progress towards our goals. Our approach to
performance is based on:
Identify, analyze and plan X
Implement X
Monitor X
Review and adjust X
Linking performance wiTh sTraTegies
It is important that the policies and proposals identifed within this Strategic Plan are not seen as an end in themselves but
as a means of achieving the strategic objectives. The City will develop a performance measurement process, focusing on
actions taken and the progress made toward the identifed strategic objectives. Key targets and indicators will be created
and the required data collection and monitoring mechanisms identifed.
new poLicies and pLans
The Transportation Strategic Plan identifes many areas of policy and practice that need to be updated or developed
with, for example, updates to the pedestrian master plan and the establishment of a transportation asset management
plan. In themselves the development of these “daughter” plans are targets that the City must meet. These plans will be
developed in a way that ensures they align with the performance indicators identifed within the Strategic Plan. Within these
implementation plans there will be a performance component and as they are developed, new and additional indicators may
i denT i f Yi ng i ndi caT ors
and seT T i ng Targe T s

It is important that
the policies and
proposals made within
this Strategy are not
seen as an end in
themselves but as a
means of achieving the
strategic objectives
contained within the
Strategy.
[80]

The input of the public is one of the fundamentals in the
development of the Strategic Plan and has been important in
understanding issues and priorities for change.
be identifed and monitored that support those contained within
this Strategic Plan. As they are developed or updated, there may
also be a need to revise the targets or develop new indicators.
Decision makers, the public and other stakeholders require an
approach that remains relevant to changing circumstances and
so we will remain alert to changing circumstances and the need
to adjust the Plan. In addition, we will identify the potential risks
in delivering what we set out to achieve and establish delivery
systems that help mitigate these.
Indicators for the Strategic Plan and the plans that will be
produced from it are important as they allow the City to compare
itself with others, analyze trends and evaluate policy options and
policy decisions. They also provide the basis for assessing the
value for money for the projects and programs we promote. The
City will also report on its progress. Reporting is a very important
part of performance monitoring as it keeps decision makers and
stakeholders informed of successes, failures and challenges as
circumstances change.
performance appraisaL
The City is committed to ensuring that the best use is made
of the funds available for transportation investment. Projects
and measures are therefore measured as a matter of routine
to check that they are delivering their objectives and to see
whether any further improvements are needed. For example,
traffc calming projects are checked to see if they are reducing
speeds and volumes of traffc. The process of checking and
monitoring needs to be extended to the Strategic Plan as a
whole. We need to know for example whether circumstances
are changing in such a way that we need to modify the priorities
or emphasis of the Strategic Plan. Importantly we need to know
whether we are achieving our objectives.
There are 6 Components to Performance Management
Identifying Performance Indicators 1.
Setting Targets 2.
Assessing Risks 3.
Data Collection 4.
Reporting progress 5.
Project & Program Appraisal 6.
pubLic parTicipaTion and
inpuT
The input of the public is one of the fundamentals in the
development of the Strategic Plan and has been important in
understanding issues and priorities for change. It is important that
the City continues to seek feedback as it progresses and therefore
specifc performance indicators will relate to public satisfaction of
our services and actions.
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[81]
idenTifYing performance
indicaTors and seTTing TargeTs
The indicators and associated targets will relate to the strategic
objectives. Primary and secondary performance indicators have been
identifed. The primary indicators refect the core aspirations of the Plan
such as increasing transit use or reducing collisions, while the secondary
indicators refect other targets which are useful to track. Where targets
have been set, there will be some with interim and ultimate targets and
they focus on outcomes and service delivery aims that are at the core of
the Plan. Specifying the different targets to be achieved is not always
easy. However, by the City making reference to previous achievements,
past trends and the future potential for change, the targets will be
set at levels that are achievable but suffciently challenging to make
a difference. Through the life of the Strategic Plan there may also be
opportunities to stretch ourselves further. The indicators chosen and
targets set will be chosen based on:
The need for co-ordination with other City of Surrey policies X
including the Sustainability Charter
Our role in supporting shared priorities with other agencies and X
organizations
Local circumstances and priorities identifed by the public X
The availability and reliability of existing data and the cost X
effectiveness and constraints of collecting additional data
Being ambitious but realistic X
Potential for “stretching” targets in the future X
Our approach to achieving the target X
Current trends and potential for reversal or slowing of progress X
An assessment of the risks associated with successfully reaching X
our targets
ouTcomes and ouTpuTs
The performance indicators identifed allow for two types of target to be
set. Firstly, there are measures of outcomes, such as the percentage of
people cycling and secondly, measures of outputs, such as the number
of corridor studies undertaken or pedestrian crossings introduced
each year. In general, it is easier to measure outputs than outcomes
as the latter are often less directly controlled by the City. Measures of
outcome, however, are particularly important as it is these that measure
the success of the Strategic Plan in achieving its objectives. The City
has identifed indicators that monitor both outcomes and outputs.
performance managemenT
– change, adapTabiLiTY and
eVoLuTion
During the life of the Strategic Plan, circumstances and conditions will
change and it must also be able to change. These may be associated
with local issues such as changes in funding or responding to growth, or
they may come about as a result of Provincial or Federal policy change.
There will be a need to regularly re-evaluate both the performance
indicators being applied and the targets being set.
The performance indicators will be developed as a means to evaluate
and report on progress in achieving our broad strategic aims. This
is the start of the process and our effort will be ongoing. Within the
implementation plans such as the walking plan, cycling plan or the traffc
signal optimization strategy, new and additional performance indicators
can be expected to be developed or existing ones refned. With the
introduction of performance being an important part of the Sustainability
Charter there will be a need for overlap and the performance indicators
identifed within the Transportation Strategic Plan will align with the
targets identifed within the Charter.
[82]

During the life of
the Strategic Plan
circumstances and
conditions will
change and the
Strategy must also
be able to change.
daTa coLLecTion and
moniToring arrangemenTs
It is relatively straightforward to set out intentions for
gathering data but it can turn out to be unreliable or
diffcult to collect. The City will therefore propose a
realistic program of monitoring which makes full use
of existing data sources or relatively minor changes
to existing data collection arrangements. A variety of
different approaches to data collection will be used.
In some instances comprehensive information will be
available but in others a sampling approach will be used.
It is important that the information collected is relevant.
For example, it would not be a good use of our resources,
and it is unlikely we would obtain valuable information
were we to monitor bicycle trips across the entire City.
Where we would have an expectation that our policies
will effect the most change is where we will target our
monitoring. Clearly, it would not be cost effective to
measure everything so the performance indicators that
have been selected are intended to provide the “best
ft” to the previous criteria and which most holistically
represent the service delivery objectives and actions for
change included within the Plan.
managing risk
Assessment and management of risk ensures that the
delivery of the Strategic Plan is managed within a level
of risk that is acceptable and manageable. There are
different risks that the City must consider when setting
our indicators, the targets and our expectations of
meeting them. These are categorized as external risks,
such as economic cycles or changing energy costs,
risks associated with delivery of our programs such as
increasing construction and labour costs or changing
staffng levels and partnership risk associated with other
agencies including TransLink.
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[83]

Where we would have an
expectation that our policies
will effect the most change
is where we will target our
monitoring.
PRINCIPLE 1 Effective and Effcient Network Management
LEVEL INDICATOR MEASURE
Primary Local road condition % of local road network in need of repaving (Road Pavement Index)
Primary Collector Road condition % of collector road network in need of repaving (Road Pavement Index)
Primary Arterial Road condition % of arterial road network in need of repaving (Road Pavement Index)
Secondary Sidewalk condition % of sidewalk network in need of repaving
Secondary User Satisfaction – road condition Public satisfaction with condition of roads
PRINCIPLE 2 More Travel Choice
LEVEL INDICATOR MEASURE
Primary Transit use Modal share for transit – key screenline counts
Primary Transit priority Number of transit priority projects introduced each year
Primary Bicycle use Kms of new bicycle/multi use paths
Secondary Accessibility % of households within walking distance of FTN
Secondary School Safety Zones Number of SSZs introduced
Secondary External Funding Amount of external funding for walking and cycling projects obtained
Secondary User Satisfaction – Walking, Transit & Cycling Public satisfaction with walking and cycling environment
PRINCIPLE 3 Safer, Healthier Communities
LEVEL INDICATOR MEASURE
Primary Collisions Absolute Numbers vs Per vehicle km traveled vs Registered vehicles
Secondary Pedestrian crossings Number of new or improved pedestrian crossings introduced
Secondary Speed Limits Program of speed limit review – 3 years from adoption
Secondary User Satisfaction - safety Public satisfaction with community safety improvements
eXampLe: performance indicaTors
[84]
PRINCIPLE 4 Successful Local Economies
LEVEL INDICATOR MEASURE
Primary Congestion Annual review of 14 strategic corridors and addition of 1 corridor a year
Primary Access to transit % employees within walking distance of transit
Secondary User Satisfaction - congestion Public satisfaction with congestion improvements
PRINCIPLE 5 Protection of our Built and Natural Environment
LEVEL INDICATOR MEASURE
Primary Water Quality Number of projects incorporating alternative drainage systems
Secondary Tree Planting Number of trees planted with road improvement projects
PRINCIPLE 6 Transportation Integration
LEVEL INDICATOR MEASURE
Primary Density Density targets on key transit corridors
Secondary Modal share Modal share on key transit corridors
Secondary User Satisfaction - Integration Public satisfaction with transportation improvements at key redevelopment locations
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[85]
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|
part 4 moving forward
|
our TransporTaTion sTraTegic plan – Taking acTion
Implementation of the Plan will not happen overnight, rather it will be a progressive improvement and change in our
transportation plans and individual service delivery strategies. It will include the following key processes:
Adoption of the Transportation Strategic Plan objectives and policies that establish key priorities X
Commencing the development of the identifed “daughter” implementation plans such as: Transit Plan, Walking Plan, X
Bicycle Plan, Road Safety Plan, Asset Management Plan, 10-Year Servicing Plan
Developing cost effective capital works and operating programs based on life cycle costs X
Securing the sustainable funding required to build the planned transportation facilities and to effciently manage, X
maintain and operate an expanding and increasingly more complex transportation system
Establishing processes for monitoring progress towards objectives X
Informing and directing strategic investments and service delivery by measuring performance and setting targets X
Setting priorities for change and improvements X
Adjusting, refning and updating the Transportation Strategic Plan to respond to changing circumstances and X
infuences such as development trends, funding availability or emphasis of policy.
changing service and delivery sysTems
Transportation is front and centre in the City’s future as a livable, sustainable and safe place in which to live and work and to
achieve this the Plan identifes the need for change. Change in how the City thinks about transportation and change in how
we develop and design our specifc plans, policies and programs. The whole way the Strategic Plan is organized refects this.
It is intended to be fexible and provide the framework to respond to different priorities and changing circumstances. Since
the last Transportation Plan was produced, the City has changed considerably and over the life of this Strategic Plan, it will
continue to change. As Surrey matures, there will be different pressures, priorities and needs. The transportation system will
be increasingly complex and the importance of keeping the system in good condition, effectively managed and operated will
increase. There will be increasing attention given to maximizing the effectiveness of the infrastructure that is available by
means of modern technology, infuencing travel patterns and individual travel choices through innovative land use policies
and comprehensive public education and information programs.
Taki ng acTi on

Transportation is front and
centre in the City’s future as
a livable, sustainable and
safe place in which to live
and work ...
[88]

The transportation system will be increasingly complex and the
importance of keeping the system in good condition, effectively
managed and operated will increase.
Delivery of transportation services is often described in
terms of programs of engineering based capital projects.
These will remain a core part of the transportation
function of the City. However, this Strategic Plan has
sought to highlight that when we look at transportation
policy we are looking at land use, social, environmental,
community safety and economic policy. As such, delivery
of the transportation agenda requires the City to promote
integrated service delivery across all departments.
paying for TransporTaTion
Much of what is described within this Transportation
Strategic Plan will need to be identifed within the 10
Year Servicing Plan. This is the document that establishes
the program of works to facilitate the provision of all the
engineering services. Securing sustainable funding for
these services is critical as many of the initiatives take
several years to deliver signifcant change. Although our
sphere of infuence is large, a signifcant proportion of the
funding required does not come from the traditional City
tax base but rather by others, including TransLink and other
levels of government.
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[89]
The projects and programs the City implements each year
represent a realistic expenditure judged to deliver our
current transportation priorities and objectives based on
the capital and revenue funding available. Future Servicing
Plans will refect the structure and priorities identifed
within this Strategic Plan and will remain the key policy
document for project delivery programs and priorities.
In the City’s 10 Year Servicing Plan, the program of
improvements and projects is presented in terms of “non
growth” and “growth” refecting the difference in the
services provided and the funding mechanisms in place.
Non growth services include works such as road re-paving
and infrastructure replacement. Growth related needs
are those works that are required to provide the servicing
capacity for the growth that is occurring within the
residential, institutional, commercial and industrial areas of
the City. As development and growth occurs, traffc volumes
will correspondingly increase and the City will construct new
sections of the ultimate arterial and major collector road
network and improve and upgrade the existing road network
with additional street lights, traffc signals, additional travel
lanes or turning lanes, new sidewalks and measures to
mitigate the impacts of growth on communities such as
traffc calming and safety initiatives.
The growth component of the programs is funded
predominantly through Development Cost Charges
(DCCs). The investment available is directly related to
the level of development taking place. In the future,
as the City reaches its ultimate size, and the amount
of new development reduces, correspondingly, the
level of funding will reduce. Although one of the most
evident challenges facing the City now is its growth,
this will not always be the case. DCCs will not remain
the primary source of funding for the City indefnitely.
Add to this, aging infrastructure, changing standards
and escalating construction costs and the City will
have to continue to increase alternative means of
funding the transportation system as Surrey moves
from a City characterized by predominantly growth to a
City in a state of maturity.
This Strategic Plan creates a framework to establish
secure additional transportation funding and
increase revenue from other sources. The City needs
to broaden and diversify its funding sources to
help manage future funding risk and to support an
increased range of services.
addiTional resources To
deliver TargeTs
This Strategic Plan identifes many new transportation
challenges for the City and these will require new
approaches in how we deliver our transportation services.
The Plan promotes the need for several new initiatives,
changing priorities and responsibilities. It does so in the
context of the setting of measurable targets. If the Plan is
to successfully meet these targets, additional funding may
be needed. Within the context of competing demands for
resources, consideration needs to be given to where the
extra funding would be spent. The decision needs to be
based on a combination of our priority areas and the degree
to which we can be sure that the additional funds will
provide good value for money. Funding needs and priorities
will be assessed in more detail as each of the supporting
implementation plans are developed.
oTher funding
opporTuniTies
city generated income
There is already an established principle that residents of
the City who make use of the transportation facilities and
infrastructure provided should contribute towards it. The
Strategic Plan has sought to show that there is a clear
relationship between the contribution the public make to
funding transportation and the solutions there are to their
issues. We will also examine the contribution that other
City activities can make to the funding base including the
on-street parking account, permit and fnes income, use
of road allowance permits, bus shelter and bus bench
advertising, cycle parking advertising, the use of City property
for communications infrastructure and the application of “Bill
37” legislation allowing collection of cash in lieu of parking for
new developments towards a “reserve fund” for investment in
other transportation infrastructure.
There is potential for these income-generating sources
to make a larger contribution. A specifc target of the
Transportation Strategic Plan will be to increase the amount
of City generated income to reduce demands on other tax
based funding sources by seeking increases from our existing
income sources and identifying new sources of income.
partnership funding
There are opportunities to secure additional funding through
Provincial and Federal grants and programs of other agencies.
These offer a range of funding opportunities which assist in
delivering otherwise expensive or lower priority projects. The
City will adjust programs and budgets to make full use of these
monies. The City already actively pursues funding from different
sources including the Province, Federal Government, TransLink
and ICBC and there is potential for these to make a larger
contribution. A specifc target of the City will be to increase
the amount of external grant money so as to reduce demands
on other tax based funding sources. In working to secure these
alternative grant monies, it is recognized that some signifcant
time and resources are often needed to bid for them.
[90]
provincial and federal
responsibilities
This is a local, “made in Surrey” Strategy refecting
local demands, priorities and needs. However, the
transportation system does not stop at our boundaries
and much of what is contained within the Strategic Plan
contributes to provincial, national and international
policy aspirations. The City is part of an alliance of
municipalities and agencies that together are responsible
for transportation services in the region. The City will
continue to bid for more equitable funding and seek new
funding opportunities for itself and also in support of
other municipalities and TransLink. Municipalities are
seeing increasing downloading of responsibilities from
higher levels of government for many services, including
transportation. As these responsibilities increase, so does
the burden on the local taxpayer. The City will advocate
for equitable taxation and responsibilities and more
Federal and Provincial funding for our transportation
needs and responsibilities.
user-pay principles
The City will examine user pay principles in more of the
areas of control we have. Examples will include:
Truck Traffc: We know for example that truck traffc
contributes to a more rapid deterioration of structures
and pavements. The concentration of truck traffc onto
the City truck Route Network means that the effects
of this wear and tear are sometimes very pronounced.
Through the management and enforcement of the
trucks using Surrey’s roads, there are opportunities for
the City to more effectively recover the real costs to the
taxpayer associated with truck traffc.
Temporary roadworks and obstructions: Disruption
to the traveling public due to temporary obstructions
or roadworks associated with development can be
signifcant affecting many thousands of travelers. Within
the future policy development to better manage this
activity, the costs of permits and approvals will start
to refect the true costs to the City and the impact on
system users.
on-street parking: To help ensure parking properly
contributes to different transportation, planning and
economic objectives it is expected that the level of
control and management of on-street parking will
increase. Other municipalities beneft from large incomes
through parking fees and fnes from enforcement as
a means of helping to fund transportation services.
While the City will not pursue more on-street parking
management as a means of increasing income, we
must be properly positioned to make full use of the
fnancial opportunities for investment in transportation
improvements that it offers.
maximizing value for money
added value of projects
When implementing projects the City will consider
and recognize the contribution to the broader aims and
objectives of the Transportation Strategic Plan. As part of
our future monitoring processes, these will be identifed.
Examples of added value from projects include:
Collision reduction benefts from maintenance X
Combining preventative maintenance with the repaving X
program to lower long term costs
Traffc Signals – pedestrian crossing improvements X
Traffc signal co-ordination – air quality improvements, X
improved transit reliability
key contracts
The costs of providing the transportation system and
services are often thought about in terms of projects and
programs that are introduced each year. However, the
signifcance of operating the transportation system and
associated infrastructure should not be underemphasized.
Undertaking this function costs signifcant amounts of
money. For example, within some of the contracts managed
by the City there are opportunities to examine the amount
of energy being consumed by particular parts of our
infrastructure. For example, many thousands of dollars
are spent each year on energy costs for the traffc signals
and street lighting responsibilities of the City. With the
background increases in energy costs, it becomes more
important for the City to examine strategies to reduce energy
consumption. By doing so, we can help ensure both fnancial
and environmental sustainability.
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[91]
nexT sTeps
development of daughter plans
The Transportation Strategic Plan establishes our Vision for providing
a modern, sustainable, integrated, safe and accessible transportation
system. Work on delivering this is a long term and multi faceted effort.
Over the next few years, we will develop, in consultation with the public
and stakeholders, a number of daughter implementation plans, such as
the Walking Plan and the Transit Plan, which will build upon the direction
given by this Strategic Plan.
early actions
The Strategic Plan has identifed over 100 Actions for Change. Some
represent specifc deliverables while others refect a change in how we
provide our services. A number have been identifed as early Actions for
Change and work will commence right away on moving these forward.
These are:
Improve existing and establish new intergovernmental 1.
relationships to promote joint working with key partners including
TransLink, ICBC, Surrey RCMP, Ministry of Health and Ministry of
Transportation and Infrastructure
Partner with TransLink to establish the future alignment, technology 2.
and timing of the implementation of rapid transit in the City
Establish an expanded Traffc Control Centre supported by a program 3.
of traffc signal improvements and strategic corridor upgrades
Initiate early updates to major policy documents starting with the 4.
Bicycle Blueprint and Pedestrian Master Plan
Commence a City-wide speed limit review allied with educational 5.
and enforcement efforts in collaboration with the Police and ICBC
Undertake a review of the strategic road network “missing links” 6.
and identify priorities for completion of the planned network
Commence an annual program of school zone improvements 7.
Undertake service design to undertake all levels of maintenance 8.
through an enhanced asset management and monitoring systems to
better direct maintenance programs and achieve value for money
[92]
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[93]
B K S F O L K J B K Q > I ? B K B C F Q P P Q > Q B J B K Q
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Design, layout, production and photos provided by the City of Surrey - Marketing & Communications ©
Prepared by the City of Surrey Engineering Department - October 2008
City of Surrey
14245 56 Avenue
Surrey, British Columbia V3X 3A2
Canada
Visit our web site at www.surrey.ca
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