WEB TABLES

U.S. Department of Education
August 2011 • NCES 2011-336

Student Reports of Bullying and Cyber-Bullying: Results From the 2009 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey
In school year 2008–09, some 7,066,000 U.S. students ages 12 through 18, or 28.0 percent of all such students, reported they were bullied at school, and about 1,521,000, or 6.0 percent, reported they were cyber-bullied anywhere (i.e., on or off school property). These Web Tables use data from the 2009 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) 1 to show the extent to which bullying and cyber-bullying are reported by students with different personal characteristics. Estimates are included for the following student characteristics: student sex, race/ethnicity, grade, and household income. In addition, data appended from the 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and the 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS) show the extent to which bullying and cyber-bullying are reported by students in schools with different characteristics.2 School characteristics examined are region; sector (public or private); locale; level; enrollment size; studentto-full-time-equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio; percentage of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native, Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and students of two or more races students; and percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. Furthermore, the tables use the SCS data to show the relationship between bullying and cyber-bullying victimization and other variables of interest, such as the reported presence of gangs, guns, drugs, and alcohol at school; selected school security measures; student criminal victimization; and personal fear, avoidance behaviors, fighting, and weapon carrying at school. The tables are grouped into four sections. Section 1 is an overview table, showing the number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere, by type of bullying or cyber-bullying (table 1.1). Section 2 focuses on bullying at school, displaying estimates for the location of bullying, the percentage distribution of the frequency of bullying, and the type of bullying reported by students ages 12 through 18, by selected student and school characteristics (tables 2.1–2.6). Section 3 focuses on cyber-bullying anywhere, providing estimates for the percentage distribution of the frequency of cyber-bullying

These Web Tables were prepared for the National Center for Education Statistics under Contract No. ED-05-CO-0044 with the American Institutes for Research. Mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. These Web Tables were authored by Jill DeVoe and Christina Murphy of the American Institutes for Research.

and the type of cyber-bullying reported by students ages 12 through 18, by selected student and school characteristics (tables 3.1–3.4). Section 4 displays the percentages of students who were bullied at school or cyber-bullied anywhere by student reports of unfavorable school conditions; by student reports of selected school security measures; by student reports of criminal victimization at school; and by student reports of personal fear, avoidance behaviors, fighting, and weapon carrying at school (tables 4.1–4.4).

questions in the SCS questionnaire. These criteria require students to be in grades 6–12, to be currently enrolled in a primary or secondary education program leading to a high school diploma or enrolled sometime during the school year of the interview, and not to have been exclusively homeschooled during the school year.3 In 2009, some 5,023 respondents completed the 2009 SCS and 4,326 met the criteria for inclusion in this analysis. These criteria are detailed in the glossary. Among newly sampled households, the NCVS/SCS interview is administered faceto-face using computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI). Interviews with recurring households are administered by telephone using CAPI. The data used to produce the SCS estimates, as well as the SCS questionnaire, are available for download from the Student Surveys link at the NCES Crime and Safety Surveys portal, located at http://nces.ed.gov/ programs/crime/. The final data file is available in multiple software formats and contains all variables collected in the SCS as well as selected variables collected in the NCVS Basic Screen Questionnaire (NCVS-1) and NCVS Crime Incident Report (NCVS-2) that have been appended to the SCS. SAS 9.2 software was used to compute the statistics for these Web Tables.

Data
The estimates presented in these tables were generated from the 2009 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). Created as a supplement to the NCVS, the SCS has been conducted in 1989, 1995, and biennially since 1999 to collect information about student and school characteristics related to criminal victimization on a national level. The U.S. Census Bureau selects households for the NCVS using a stratified, multistage cluster sampling design. Once sampled, all persons in the household ages 12 and older are administered the NCVS every 6 months (for a total of seven interviews over a 3-year period) to determine whether they have been victimized during the 6 months preceding the interview. The SCS is administered to all eligible NCVS respondents ages 12–18 within NCVS households between January and June of the year of data collection. In 2009, there were approximately 61,000 households in the NCVS sample, and 8,986 NCVS household members were between ages 12 and 18. In order to complete the SCS, respondents must have completed the NCVS and meet certain criteria specified in a set of screening

Response rates
Because the SCS interview is with students and could only be completed after households had responded to the NCVS, the unit completion rate for the SCS reflects both the household interview completion rate (91.7 percent) and the student interview completion rate (55.9 percent). The overall unweighted SCS unit response rate (calculated by multiplying the household completion rate

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by the student completion rate) was 51.3 percent. Furthermore, as in most surveys, the responses to some items were not obtained for all interviews. While the mean item weighted item response rate in 2009 was greater than 97.0 percent, there were five survey items with response rates lower than 85 percent, all between 72.8 and 82.3 percent. NCES requires that any stage of data collection within a survey that has a baseweighted response rate of less than 85 percent be evaluated for the potential magnitude of nonresponse bias before the data or any analysis using the data may be released. In the 2009 SCS, then, both unit and item nonresponse bias analyses were performed to determine the extent to which there might be bias in the estimates produced using SCS data.

95.5 percent, were successfully matched to schools on the CCD or PSS files. The remaining 194 students, who represent a total weighted number of 1,145,000 could not be matched and therefore were excluded from the tables showing school characteristics (tables 2.2, 2.4, 2.6, 3.2, and 3.4). There are additional sources of missing data that should be considered when examining the row variables. Student characteristic data on household income contain some missing values, as do school characteristic data on locale; level; enrollment size; student-toFTE teacher ratio; percentage of combined American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and two or more races students; and percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. For these row variables, missing percentages (ranging from 15 to 31 percent) were calculated separately, but are not shown. Furthermore, across all tables, there were about 30 student records with missing bullying data and about 30 student records with missing cyber-bullying data. These students were excluded from the analysis and represent a total weighted number of 166,000 students with missing bullying data and 221,000 students with missing cyberbullying data. The total weighted number of students for whom there are bullying data is 25,217,000, and the total weighted number of students for whom there are cyber-bullying data is 25,162,000. Table details do not reflect the weighted student population (25,383,000) because of these missing data. These Web Tables were prepared for the National Center for Education Statistics under Contract No. ED-05-CO-0044 with the American Institutes for Research. Mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations does not imply endorsement

Other data sources
The characteristics of the schools that SCS respondents attended are presented in tables 2.2, 2.4, 2.6, 3.2, and 3.4. In the SCS interview, respondents provided the school name, school location, and other school characteristics that led to the identification of their schools on the 2008–09 CCD or 2009–10 PSS. Census, then, captured the school characteristics from those external datasets to produce the estimates. The school characteristics variables are not in the 2009 SCS data file available to the public. Further information about the CCD is available at http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/. Further information on the PSS is available at http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pss/.

Missing data
When calculating column totals, readers should note there are several sources of missing data. Overall, of the 4,326 SCS students included in the analysis, 4,132, or

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by the U.S. Government. These Web Tables were authored by Jill DeVoe and Christina Murphy of the American Institutes for Research. For more information, contact Monica R. Hill Project Officer National Center for Education Statistics 1990 K Street NW Washington, DC 20006-5652 (202) 502-7379 Monica.Hill@ed.gov

ENDNOTES
1

The SCS data are available for download from the Student Surveys link at the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Crime and Safety Surveys portal, located at http://nces.ed.gov/ programs/crime. Estimates for school characteristics, produced by the U.S. Census Bureau, were appended to the SCS from the CCD and PSS and appear only in a data file that is not available for public use, housed at Census. Persons who have dropped out of school, have been expelled or suspended from school, or are temporarily absent from school for any other reason, such as illness or vacation, can complete the SCS as long as they have attended school at any time during the school year of the interview. Students who receive all of their education through homeschooling are not included past the screening questions, and those who receive part of their education through homeschooling are not included in this report.

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3

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National Center for Education Statistics
Table 1.1 Number and percentage distribution of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere, by type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09
Number of students 25,217,000 7,066,000 4,735,000 4,149,000 1,442,000 2,266,000 916,000 1,190,000 832,000 18,151,000 25,162,000 1,521,000 502,000 335,000 448,000 753,000 193,000 224,000 23,642,000 Percent of students 100.0 28.0 18.8 16.5 5.7 9.0 3.6 4.7 3.3 72.0 100.0 6.0 2.0 1.3 1.8 3.0 0.8 0.9 94.0 Type of bullying Total bullied or not bullied Bullied Made fun of, called names, or insulted Subject of rumors Threatened with harm Pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on Tried to make do things they did not want to do Excluded from activities on purpose Property destroyed on purpose Not bullied Total cyber-bullied or not cyber-bullied Cyber-bullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Not cyber-bullied

NOTE: For bullying, “at school” includes the school building, school property, school bus, or going to and from school. Bullying and cyberbullying types sum to more than totals because students could have experienced more than one type of bullying or cyber bullying. Detail does not sum to total population of students because of rounding and missing data. The population size for all students ages 12–18 is 25,383,000. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), 2009.

S.66 0.42 0.16 0.65 0.National Center for Education Statistics Table S1.24 0.600 97.800 Percent of students † 0.500 39.500 211.800 47.14 0. SOURCE: U.800 110.400 666.34 0.18 0. 2009.22 0. Bureau of Justice Statistics. by type of bullying or cyberbullying: School year 2008–09 Number of students 693.400 71. called names.800 691.48 0.000 61. or insulted Subject of rumors Threatened with harm Pushed.200 56.83 † 0.600 532.600 34.300 88.30 0. tripped.800 75.1 Standard errors for table 1.28 0.1: Number and percentage distribution of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere. Department of Justice.900 205.42 Type of bullying Total bullied or not bullied Bullied Made fun of. shoved.700 74.34 0.28 0.100 142. or spit on Tried to make do things they did not want to do Excluded from activities on purpose Property destroyed on purpose Not bullied Total cyber-bullied or not cyber-bullied Cyber-bullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Not cyber-bullied † Not applicable.83 0.600 292. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). .

3 17.2 43.9 28.5 31.1 20.3 43.157.1 29.8 8.5 Cafeteria at school 6.0 73. Number of students 25. 1 Respondents who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified as “Hispanic or Latino.1 7.000 Not bullied 72. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.000 2.0 10.3 7.6 33. and having property destroyed on purpose.000–24.5 82.7 29. by location of bullying and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Location of bullying In a Classroom 33.1 67.5 5. ‡ Reporting standards not met.2 2.4 30.1 71. and respondents of two or more races (1 percent of all respondents).6 8.1 41. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and missing data.1 8.1 46.4 3.3 26.8 ‡ 8.0 5.2 38. or going to and from school.9 20.7 ‡ ‡ ‡ 4.1 23.5 17.000 11. American Indians or Alaska Natives.4 ! 2.6 28.6 21.4 34. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.6 37.000 3.6 49.9 79.4 ! 2.8 48.9 33.4 33.999 $25.7 Student characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity1 White.8 ‡ ‡ 8.000 4. “Black.2 9.6 4. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). “At school” includes the school building. Estimates are reported for 25.9 8.1 31.1 In a hallway or stairwell 47.2 27.000 885.5 25.7 28.2 5.000 3. shoved.4 7.1 25.090.9 74.805.3 ‡ 13.1 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.3 ! 10.0 ! 4.7 22.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2. 2009.1 ! 14.9 ! 3.4 57.000 70.0 24.4 ! # 3. Comparisons between students in 6th grade and those in other grades should be made with caution. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value.6 39.000 2.5 7.7 70. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do.8 8.0 45.000 1.3 10.801.999 $50.000 3. might not be representative of students in 6th grade.000 71. not Hispanic or Latino” includes African Americans.8 38.4 70.7 69.0 ! 9.7 50.8 72.7 ! 4.9 ! 4. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian. being threatened with harm. school bus. Bureau of Justice Statistics.7 20.0 50.4 10.1 ! 6.3 23.217.791.1 7. being excluded from activities on purpose.1 34.000 3.000 3.2 9.4 ! 4.3 40.963.6 ! 3.8 ! # 3.383.000 or more # Rounds to zero.1 26.000.4 28.3 15.3 29.4 29.6 66.500 $7.4 School bus 6. or spit on.0 26.1 31.000 12.7 ! 7.7 ! 624.8 ‡ # 2.5 Bullied 28. being the subject of rumors.7 ! 6.3 72.3 7. not Hispanic or Latino Black.2 10.” regardless of their race.3 7. being pushed.0 47.1 20.3 4.1 5.S. tripped.4 ! 3.789.9 ! 3.0 73. Department of Justice.000–49.3 2.794.7 ! 4.8 ! ‡ 608.7 40.999 $15.901.014.500–14.0 ! ‡ 20.3 38.000 1.8 ‡ 7.000 60.974.5 45.999 $35.9 32.3 26. Missing data are not shown for household income.9 33.1 ! 10. SOURCE: U. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25. NOTE: “Bullied” includes students being made fun of. 2 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 and.9 68.8 25.3 54.3 26.6 26.0 3. called names.000 73.9 29.5 ! 10.426.3 31.1 33.8 47.0 20.1 ‡ 9.7 50. “All other races.619. Location totals may sum to more than 100 percent because students could have been bullied in more than one location.885. not Hispanic or Latino Grade2 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.7 37. not Hispanic or Latino” includes Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders.3 30.0 Outside on school grounds 23.717.000 12.000 students for whom data on bullying are available.6 29.6 71. .3 29.000 3.0 ! 5.4 78.000–34.8 Somewhere else at school 3.292.4 36.5 In a bathroom/ locker room 9.8 ! ‡ 3.0 10.000 3. school property.7 15.0 9.8 3.8 24.217. or insulted.6 40.1 8.0 26.1 ! 50.4 5.1 ! Interpret data with caution. therefore.0 ! ‡ 40.3 46.9 33.650.2 9.

62 5.90 1.38 1.61 3.54 1.000 142.73 † Not applicable.999 $50.49 † 5.63 2.23 1.90 2.01 8.89 10.00 1.93 1.72 3.87 1.09 1.71 1.90 1.1: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.11 3. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).54 5.82 7.66 3.500 245.90 2.37 1.93 2.82 1.61 3.80 1.08 9.78 3.31 † 83.33 3.74 † 3.08 1.46 8.90 1.69 1.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.71 1.76 4.83 1.28 1.24 4.45 † 1.97 Student characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity White.900 413.85 4.01 0.52 † 1.27 5.68 1.04 1.13 In a bathroom/ locker room 0.49 Somewhere else at school 0.30 3.38 1.25 3.38 2.03 2.00 1.15 1.51 2.000–34.500 124.04 In a hallway or stairwell 1.71 0.100 165.14 2.11 School bus 0. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.20 1.13 0.87 3.52 1.83 1.86 1.04 1.07 1.69 1.89 83.82 † † † 2.72 3.93 1.20 10.89 1.21 4.99 1.54 1.S.86 4.00 3.01 4.75 4.02 2.10 † † 2.96 524.72 3.02 2.100 276.100 Not bullied 0.08 3.800 4.41 2.85 1.79 1.71 † 1.93 † 1.800 167.92 1. by location of bullying and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Location of bullying In a Classroom 1.20 1. 2009.000 or more Number of students 693.600 95.02 1.95 † † 141.81 5.1 Standard errors for table 2.61 4.36 2. Department of Justice.800 2.08 Bullied 0.85 2.999 $25.75 2.67 1.86 1.47 3.500 170.16 8.56 4. SOURCE: U.76 † 4.61 8.600 4.03 1.23 3.000 169.91 8.85 2.48 3.60 0.76 1.100 170.69 1.41 2.56 1.59 2.97 1.44 1.65 1.500–14.29 1.40 3.72 3. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian.45 2.999 $15.26 4.02 1.60 1.66 3.96 2.700 1.85 1.17 2.02 2. .63 1.82 3.000–24.21 3.63 3.999 $35.99 2.57 0.44 3.08 4.42 3.49 2.19 Outside on school grounds 1.12 4.88 1.37 3.09 2.300 146.29 1.60 1. Bureau of Justice Statistics.47 † 0.61 0. not Hispanic or Latino Black.59 2.20 † 4.600 386.16 4.67 1.38 1.84 1.51 2.500 175.62 1.800 408.76 9.500 $7.000–49.03 2. not Hispanic or Latino Grade 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.08 Cafeteria at school 0.87 1.600 185.

8 30.210.2 8.9 ! 5.000 1.000 7.4 35.4 18.5 48.2 Outside on school grounds 23.3 2.0 35.7 Bullied 28.2 22.7 ‡ 6.8 30.0 ! 1.3 7.570.9 24.9 ! 4.0 38.8 33.2 ! 9.3 24.0 46.9 27.5 6.000 Not bullied 72.0 33.7 23.347.6 7.7 ! 7.300.4 10.3 5.000 70.7 2.000 7.7 24.6 ! .9 31.3 41.000 8.5 68.6 4.217.3 51.8 44.000 4.000 5.3 24.756.0 33.9 47.0 24.2 31.2 ‡ 3.3 47.0 32.1 42.3 18.7 5.7 ! 1.1 8.000 1.500–1.5 36.8 ‡ 2.384.3 6.9 47.0 74.0 74.3 Cafeteria at school 6.3 18.655.0 8.1 7.2 5.000 4.0 25.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.3 17.000 8.2 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.0 48.2 35.3 22.8 29.2 ‡ 46.2 10.0 26.6 50.6 6.6 37.4 6.9 29.622.7 4.0 32.0 4.1 71.1 ! 4.9 ‡ ‡ 4.6 69.5 4.008.7 ! 3.5 3.9 9.1 73.0 27.4 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 6.5 28.8 45.1 71.8 8.0 1.6 31.000 73.4 9.1 4.1 52.1 8.268.5 ! 7.2 8.000 4.259.000 13.2 22.2 3.4 30.000 3.0 38.5 32.5 33.8 28.9 34.8 25.8 17.6 2.9 ! 5.3 6.9 3.980.5 2.8 In a hallway or stairwell 47.2 35.000 493.5 In a bathroom/ locker room 9.2 6.0 ! ‡ 22.8 33.000 70.4 34.000 907.000 5.9 ! 4.499 1.3 69.3 8.7 8.6 ‡ 50.8 2.0 18.459.3 ‡ 8.7 12.487.716.1 ! School characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level1 Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.6 45.000 4.000 or more Student-to-full-time equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students See notes at end of table.000–1.719.8 9.0 ! 8.2 46.7 9.000 6.154.074.2 5.9 49. Number of students 25.5 27.3 35.474.6 Somewhere else at school 3.000 7.4 ! ‡ ‡ ‡ 23.0 25.5 6.9 ! 28.3 72.0 School bus 6.8 64.6 6.7 27.000 3.8 4.9 28. by location of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Location of bullying In a Classroom 33.3 3.8 24.4 31.0 45.4 31.4 29.5 5.1 79.0 4.2 12.7 5.799.391.6 12.8 ! 3.8 79.6 8.5 11.2 20.7 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 3.8 47.2 3.2 ‡ 9.5 36.2 6.7 23.6 22.4 ! 9.9 20.1 ‡ ‡ ‡ 47.6 80.2 7.0 66.5 10.5 10.7 55.0 72.8 9.6 68.2 29.152.6 5.000 69.5 22.3 ! 3.3 20.7 82.999 2.0 25.4 19.9 33.2 75.3 30.8 56.7 6.7 42.3 6.7 30.1 ! 4.6 81.2 69.1 5.1 35.4 31.5 10.7 33.259.000 68.2 25.000 301.0 74.9 28.9 7.6 12.000 2.813.0 2.8 15.7 75.2 27.5 31.000 6.9 14.

9 30.1 69. 2009.4 ! Interpret data with caution.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.0 5. and having property destroyed on purpose. or spit on.4 30.2 29.4 33.624. Comparisons between students in primary schools and those in other school levels should be made with caution. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).0 11. being pushed. Hispanic/Latino.6 9. therefore. or going to and from school.6 35.8 35.7 51.000 6.8 8.3 15.8 36.7 49.1 6. might not be representative of students in primary schools.4 8.0 5.396. .000 6. ‡ Reporting standards not met. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.0 30.000 7.000 6. Black/African American.9 5.4 51.3 6. special tabulation using data appended from the U.5 74. being the subject of rumors. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS).2 48.4 28. and two or more races students.S. Department of Justice. school property.4 ! 3. Additional missing and not applicable data are not shown for locale.292.0 20. and two or more races students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch2 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not bullied Bullied Cafeteria at school School bus 3.1 10.0 5. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value.2 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.0 45. school level. “At school” includes the school building.4 1.000 70. Hispanic/ Latino.000 69.0 7.2 20.6 ‡ 6.1 6. shoved. school bus.000 students for whom data on bullying are available.9 5.6 19.217. being threatened with harm. 2 Data on free or reduced-price lunch eligibility are only available for public schools.7 7.0 37. National Center for Education Statistics. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25. percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native. student-to-FTE teacher ratio.0 8.9 29. enrollment size. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.7 31.2 7.770.1 4. Black/African American.8 32.7 69.0 22.000 students and have been excluded from the analysis. 1 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 who were enrolled in grades 6–12 and.5 26. NOTE: “Bullied” includes being made fun of.2 42.7 7. tripped.4 45.145.424. Estimates are reported for 25.4 6.4 11.4 2.000 9.383. School characteristic data were not available for 1.6 71. or insulted. SOURCE: U. called names. being excluded from activities on purpose.4 ! 3. and percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. Bureau of Justice Statistics. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do. by location of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09—Continued Location of bullying In a Classroom In a hallway or stairwell In a bathroom/ locker room Outside on school grounds Somewhere else at school School characteristic Percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native.5 28.3 30. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.000.S.5 71.7 6.598.662.5 7. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and these missing data. Department of Education.

39 2.57 2. Number of students 692.56 2.39 1.40 1.49 1.23 1.63 1.83 1.82 1.22 1.85 0.68 In a hallway or stairwell 1.53 2.67 2.63 0.60 1.98 2.000 167.71 1.28 2.69 1.86 4.55 2.65 1.99 3.700 1.52 2.300 291.73 † † † † 0.62 3.52 0.57 4.39 3.08 1.40 2.71 † † † 1.43 1.06 1.33 1.89 2.57 1.500 188.94 1.00 School characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.49 0.10 1.27 1.56 † 1.18 1.44 2.42 1.67 1.64 1.83 Bullied 0.69 2.85 1.04 † 3.60 1.69 1.31 3.26 † † † 1.87 2.38 3.11 1.06 1.27 1.53 0.34 1.16 3.95 1.21 3.40 1.98 † 0.16 1.17 1.94 2.16 1.000 12.85 3. by location of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Location of bullying In a Classroom 1.80 0.600 11.81 2.42 1.39 1.05 1.36 1.83 2.68 1.92 2.500 1.67 4.96 1.57 1.91 2.57 2.400 128.29 0.63 2.04 Somewhere else at school 0.53 1.41 1.25 1.75 3.00 1.84 4.98 0.79 2.78 1.41 2.35 1.45 School bus 0.35 3.18 0.700 254.33 1.97 2.10 1.28 2.33 1.60 3.000 264.69 1.93 2.76 2.49 2.16 † † 270.99 1.49 3.54 Outside on school grounds 1.38 2.86 2.81 † 158.61 1.25 1.53 1.68 1.000–1.500–1.25 2.85 1.54 3.63 1.81 0.27 1.18 1.46 2.54 1.28 5.76 2.38 2.09 1.33 1.95 2.25 1.82 1.63 1.98 48.89 2.11 1.74 1.10 2.07 0.19 1.57 3.400 345.45 In a bathroom/ locker room 0.20 0.73 1.68 0.79 1.97 2.80 2.000 192.40 1.15 † 1.12 2.12 2.78 1.10 1.83 Cafeteria at school 0.28 1.2: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.71 0.96 1.83 1.99 3.29 1.100 47.71 1.800 192.800 1.59 2.20 2.400 345.300 430.52 2.52 1.500 93.21 2.42 649.40 1.63 1.500 130.56 1.22 1.62 2.10 0.71 2.39 3.91 2.90 5.499 1.04 † 0.33 3.81 3.49 1.22 3.000 or more Student-to-full-time equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students See notes at end of table.52 1.93 1.40 1.41 1.300 268.900 225.40 3.49 † 0.62 † † † † 231.64 1.900 0.500 Not bullied 0.26 1.13 2.52 8.35 3.40 1.23 2.84 0.65 1.97 3.96 2.40 1.24 2.200 88.999 2.2 Standard errors for table 2.72 1.500 230.88 2.07 1.100 413.95 2.45 1.27 2.49 .02 2.300 2.42 3.67 2.91 † 3.66 3.52 1.700 309.

35 1.23 1.33 2. SOURCE: U.19 1.41 1.57 2.78 2.800 1.02 1.46 1.73 1. by location of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09—Continued Location of bullying In a Classroom In a hallway or stairwell In a bathroom/ locker room Outside on school grounds Somewhere else at school School characteristic Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native.2 Standard errors for table 2. Hispanic/Latino.000 276.01 1.45 1.02 1.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.95 † Not applicable.18 1. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS).70 1. Black/ African American.18 3.02 2.97 2.72 0. National Center for Education Statistics.59 1.35 1.000 1.57 2.73 1.45 1.41 1.100 421.800 267.200 306.05 † 1.44 2.54 2.500 260.41 1. Bureau of Justice Statistics. and two or more races students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not bullied Bullied Cafeteria at school School bus 163.73 1.43 2. Department of Justice. Department of Education.36 0.40 2.33 1.59 1.25 1. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).43 2.55 0.79 207.01 2.46 1. 2009.S.27 0.2: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.14 2.44 2.42 1.16 1.02 1.78 2.44 1.35 1. special tabulation using appended data from the U.35 1.32 2.77 2.57 1.86 1.S. Asian/ Native Hawaiian/ Other Pacific Islander.29 1. .19 1.05 2.87 0.13 2.15 1.

000 12.000 2.3 42. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.000 73.1 28. Missing data are not shown for household income.7 7.000 885.1 67.2 Once or twice a month 18.090.9 28.7 66.9 15.3 67. might not be representative of students in 6th grade.6 28.0 ! 8. school bus.000 1. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value. called names.5 63. school property.1 16.1 5.3 Adult was notified 36.999 $15.7 6.7 69.1 48.7 ‡ 13.217. not Hispanic or Latino” includes African Americans. or spit on. or going to and from school.4 68.0 37.9 3. tripped.3 4.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.014.4 70.6 8. not Hispanic or Latino Black.4 ! 8.6 66.0 19.000 3.7 4. Only students who reported they were pushed.0 5. ‡ Reporting standards not met.0 39.9 59.4 33. and having property destroyed on purpose. or insulted.000 71.0 73. 2 Respondents who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified as “Hispanic or Latino.2 37.8 64.000–49.9 ‡ ‡ 624.3 72.8 ! 11.0 12.801.2 35.3 19.6 29.6 61.619.7 ! 11. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do.901.000 608.974. and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of bullying Number of students 25.791.5 15.000 3.3 29.6 20.6 71.5 19.650.9 32.292.2 40.794.2 22. or spit on were asked if they suffered injuries as a result of the incident.5 8. or scrapes.4 41.3 30.000.157.9 ! 10. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). “All other races. SOURCE: U.7 77.000–34.8 62.7 28.0 21. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian.4 28. “At school” includes the school building.2 7.7 16.2 ! 2.7 6.000 Not bullied 72.000 60.8 Almost every day 6. or other injuries.1 67. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.8 8.0 26.4 67.4 5. therefore.885.1 ! 9.9 ! 14.9 # ‡ 9.8 8.8 ! 21.500–14. 1 Injury includes bruises or swelling.0 69.8 42.3 26.0 Once or twice in the school year 67.7 30.5 ! 16.500 $7. scratches. and respondents of two or more races (1 percent of all respondents).5 17.000 1.8 7. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and missing data.S.000 students for whom data on bullying are available.000 3.717.9 71.3 29.1 ! 5.3 Student was injured1 6. Bureau of Justice Statistics.000 70. Department of Justice.9 74. being threatened with harm.9 ‡ 8.2 8.3 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school. not Hispanic or Latino All other races. NOTE: “Bullied” includes being made fun of. ! Interpret data with caution.999 $25. 2009.5 21. black eye or bloody nose.3 18.6 19.7 73. cuts.4 66. being pushed. shoved.2 20. “Black.4 19.9 79.4 ! 6.9 64. tripped.7 70.1 71.9 67.9 52.7 21. whether an adult was notified. broken bones or internal injuries.6 65.3 ! 4.5 66. being excluded from activities on purpose.963.0 8.4 5.4 78.9 Student characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity 2 White.8 ! 25.000 3.217.999 $35. not Hispanic or Latino” includes Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders.1 ‡ ‡ 5. Comparisons between students in 6th grade and those in other grades should be made with caution.000 or more Bullied 28.426.999 $50.7 9.2 15.2 27. American Indians or Alaska Natives.000 3.2 ‡ ‡ 5.3 52.4 # Rounds to zero. whether the student was injured.5 ‡ ‡ 33.0 15.000 11.000–24.5 18.6 18. .000 4.8 67.7 69.6 39.9 7. Estimates are reported for 25.1 20.4 ! ‡ 51. shoved. not Hispanic or Latino Grade3 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.6 35.9 68.789.8 42.9 ! 6.1 25.000 3.0 8.7 4.7 ‡ ‡ 5.0 9. 3 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 and.9 44. being the subject of rumors.000 3.7 ! 8.6 21.” regardless of their race.9 7.805.0 7.383.7 7.000 2. knocked unconscious. by the frequency of bullying.5 82.7 Once or twice a week 7.1 31.8 72.0 10.5 26. teeth chipped or knocked out.

71 1.000–34.15 3.800 408.58 1.100 1.14 1.60 1.100 170.78 6.60 6.87 1.14 1.83 Once or twice in the school year 1.85 1.53 141.34 4.500 245.90 1.69 1.66 3.66 3.14 7.000 169.94 4.77 2.76 5.800 2.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.26 Once or twice a week 0.500 124.96 † 2.40 3.800 1.04 † † 1. Bureau of Justice Statistics.98 4.92 2.75 Adult was notified 1.89 7.72 3.700 83.77 1. whether an adult was notified.999 $15.999 $50.23 2.72 0.84 2.67 9.75 1.92 2.71 1. not Hispanic or Latino Grade 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.32 3.45 2.71 1.S.02 4.45 4.37 9. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.92 † † 0.600 4.56 3.60 4.61 1.93 3.67 2.92 † Not applicable.90 2.99 1.86 3.25 3. not Hispanic or Latino Black.79 Student characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity White.72 3.21 2.37 2.11 1.83 386.14 1.73 † † 83.25 2.90 1.04 1.29 1.600 Not bullied 0.10 1.62 2.17 1.09 1.03 2.60 1.59 2.83 † 3.69 5.30 0.40 Once or twice a month 1.87 Almost every day 0. SOURCE: U.35 2.300 146.85 1.3 Standard errors for table 2.500 175.08 1.91 † † 2.78 2.28 2.18 2.71 2.63 3.00 9.87 1.95 2. and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of bullying Number of students 693.000–49.15 3.92 1.36 1.000 142.500 $7.38 3.08 2. . by the frequency of bullying.12 0.15 3.100 276.02 1.02 4.33 † † 2.72 3.26 10.38 1.61 3.63 2. 2009.87 2.29 1.56 4.35 1.03 2.17 1.01 3.76 3.600 185.19 3.48 4.23 5.66 3.500–14.16 8.92 524.16 4.900 413.09 1.000–24.83 9.49 12.23 1.32 1.04 1.37 1.07 2.07 4.3: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).61 1. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian.600 95.72 3.68 3.41 2.31 2.91 2.03 2.59 2. whether the student was injured.100 165.47 3.41 2.000 or more Bullied 0.38 1.33 0.31 3.999 $35. Department of Justice.83 3.46 Student was injured 0.90 3.07 † † 2.60 2.999 $25.78 1.93 1.500 170.69 1.52 2.74 † 5.800 167.

2 29.9 20.1 79.000 7.3 Student was injured1 6.9 6.7 4.000 8.7 5.7 75.000 6.8 7.2 38.6 31.7 40.980.0 74.3 — — 7.0 40.9 67.4 21.7 15.3 69.0 72.0 3.5 6.384.000 4. by the frequency of bullying.3 7.2 20.1 ‡ 50.8 9.5 65.8 33.0 5.1 7.6 65.000 493.4 13.5 6.2 69.1 71.0 27.2 17. 2.3 6. whether the student was injured.391.000 5.0 6.9 ‡ ‡ 8.2 20.8 64.9 32.3 6.474.6 18.008.8 17.2 27.5 ! 5.999 2.259.4 42.8 Almost every day 6.5 68.813.8 36.6 69.0 5.6 7.1 19.5 68.2 75.6 9.9 21.0 16.6 68.719.000 68.154.9 28.8 ! ‡ ‡ ‡ 4.000 3.5 68.6 81.2 11.000 69.3 72.210.5 13.3 22.4 6.7 20.1 7.000 or more See notes at end of table.2 31.4 ! 4.3 32.2 Once or twice a month 18.4 60.6 18.487.3 17.000 1.9 28.2 20.000 907.1 64.4 18.5 68.000 70.3 ! 1.2 64.3 70.6 8.000 6.4 69.347.3 6.1 72.5 5.8 30.4 46.5 27.7 ! 9.7 20.000 5.4 6.2 9.9 ! 9.7 25.8 3.8 64.0 ! 8.8 69.7 30.0 33.8 73.5 26.0 4.7 ! 8.5 5.8 25.9 20.8 16.0 ‡ ‡ ‡ 36.6 7.8 64.7 Once or twice a week 7.4 19.4 30.6 5.0 26.0 5.5 17.3 74.0 Once or twice in the school year 67.5 8.000 2.8 79.4 19.6 65.7 82.1 71.0 25.3 39. whether an adult was notified.9 6.500–1.000 1.5 31.2 35.4 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.000–1.0 6.5 6.9 67.3 Adult was notified 36.499 1.5 4.4 7.3 10.217.1 9.000 8.2 6.8 67.6 80.5 Number of students 25.0 66.000 3.3 10.1 20.8 12.0 64.152.9 ! ‡ ‡ ‡ 6.7 3.4 34.716.799.6 44. and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of bullying School characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level2 Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.3 24.000 74.000 Not bullied 72.000 13.0 29.0 10.7 ! 66.7 27.0 4.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.0 36.8 7.1 — 18.2 8.000 301.6 8.655.000 73.259.570.0 ! 6.8 9.622.074.0 8.9 .0 Bullied 28.3 30.000 4.

2 8. teeth chipped or knocked out. being the subject of rumors. student-to-FTE teacher ratio. or insulted.4 34. being threatened with harm. and two or more races students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch3 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more 5.1 Almost every day 8. percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native.7 4.9 27. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.000 7.1 69.6 6. Only students who reported they were pushed.1 8.756.6 3.6 6.0 25.5 21. tripped.2 19. shoved.7 6. Hispanic/Latino. called names. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.662.3 35.5 5.5 30. therefore. 1 .4 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school. Black/African American. special tabulation using data appended from the U.5 17.2 29.8 68.2 69. 2 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 who were enrolled in grades 6–12 and. shoved. cuts. NOTE: “Bullied” includes being made fun of.6 8.217. SOURCE: U.0 30.000 Not bullied 70.7 30.598.0 69.5 41.7 9.2 6.300.4 35.8 68. being excluded from activities on purpose.424.000 students for whom data on bullying are available.0 66. Injury includes bruises or swelling.3 33. “At school” includes the school building.1 Once or twice in the school year 64.624. Bureau of Justice Statistics. National Center for Education Statistics. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do.8 Number of students 4.5 26.4 15.459.3 Once or twice a month 21.8 8. or scrapes. Department of Justice.6 68.770. Department of Education.9 4.9 Student was injured1 7. school level. 3 Data on free or reduced-price lunch eligibility are only available for public schools. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.7 7.3 6. and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09—Continued Among bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of bullying School characteristic Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native. school property.0 Adult was notified 40. Comparisons between students in primary schools and those in other school levels should be made with caution.0 62.0 14.5 22. by the frequency of bullying.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.000 4.6 19.0 74. whether an adult was notified.1 40.7 9. school bus. Hispanic/Latino. and percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.3 4.S. School characteristic data were not available for 1.2 7. Estimates are reported for 25.383.000 students and have been excluded from the analysis.6 7.S. or going to and from school.9 Bullied 29. 2009.1 70.000 69.000 6.7 41.000 70.000 6. enrollment size. or spit on.0 67.4 28.000 7.292.5 8. ‡ Reporting standards not met.7 5.4 31. and having property destroyed on purpose.1 14.5 28.3 19. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and these missing data. scratches. and two or more races students.000 7.268.4 5.1 8.396. Asian/ Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander. or spit on were asked if they suffered injuries as a result of the incident.000.2 5.5 — Not available. or other injuries. Black/African American.3 19.5 71. black eye or bloody nose. might not be representative of students in primary schools.000 6. tripped. knocked unconscious.1 68.6 71. Additional missing and not applicable data are not shown for locale.7 69.145.4 4. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS). broken bones or internal injuries.2 9.9 30.5 9.4 6.5 5.6 Once or twice a week 6.5 68.000 9. ! Interpret data with caution. whether the student was injured.3 30.2 4.1 73.7 35. being pushed.1 8.5 74.

53 2.42 1.71 2.44 2.100 47.43 2.15 2.10 1.37 3.81 2. by the frequency of bullying.21 1.900 0.43 1.40 1.00 4.79 .64 1.85 1.04 1.52 † † † 1.35 2.35 1.700 1.41 1.18 1.000 12.67 2.83 Once or twice in the school year 1.33 1.18 † † † 0.31 2.40 1.83 2.65 1.05 † † † 291.500 130.200 88.63 1.14 1.32 3.500–1.18 2.58 3.34 0.94 1.91 1.71 1.64 1.25 1.45 1.40 1.300 2.71 1.92 1.34 1.42 2.500 230.65 1.83 1.63 1.48 1.67 2.08 2.86 † 3.100 413.24 1.10 1.23 2.13 3.52 1.85 1.35 1.21 3.000 192.40 0.23 1.69 2.39 3.34 2.56 1.33 2.31 1.03 2.02 1.63 1.39 Student was injured 0.82 1.28 2.45 649.04 1.300 430.000 264.40 1.400 128.400 345.72 Adult was notified 1.14 2.500 188.89 1.23 1.12 2.45 1.28 2.600 11.48 2.59 1.15 4.78 1.27 2.21 1.52 1.60 2.03 1.22 1.39 3. 158.11 2.68 1.31 1.12 2.52 1.300 Not bullied 0.91 2.499 1.25 1.000 or more See notes at end of table.88 0.23 1.25 1.62 0.03 1.79 2.14 1.02 0.33 1.67 2. whether an adult was notified.45 1.63 1.83 Bullied 0.40 1.19 Once or twice a week 0.04 48.83 1.18 1.49 1. whether the student was injured.26 1.79 0.54 2.500 93.34 1.65 2.900 225.14 2.32 1.54 1.48 1.28 3.69 1.66 2.56 1.49 0.40 1.60 1.78 2.01 Number of students 692.49 4.400 345.66 1.30 Once or twice a month 1.700 254.71 1.46 1.97 2.28 2.4: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.40 1.25 1.81 2.91 † 1.96 4.00 † † 0.81 3.71 2. and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of bullying School characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.000–1.83 Almost every day 0.4 Standard errors for table 2.80 2.74 1.78 1.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.12 1.34 1.28 2.59 231.17 3.57 2.57 1.999 2.76 3.500 1.91 2.22 † † 0.83 1.69 1.39 3.28 1.000 167.500 1.46 1.26 0.

11 0.12 1.18 3. whether the student was injured.01 0.18 1.09 1. Bureau of Justice Statistics.80 1.66 1. Asian.24 270.10 1.11 0.40 2. and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more 207.79 1.03 1.04 1.S.S.19 1.19 1.84 1.4 Standard errors for table 2.31 1.23 1.70 2.500 260.19 1. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).43 163.08 1.28 1.57 1.12 1.89 1.33 1.27 0.93 3.92 2.96 1.16 1.77 1. .74 1.14 3. Department of Education.13 2.43 1.00 1.200 306.000 276. Hispanic/Latino.31 3.73 1.99 1.4: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.10 1.08 2.800 267.85 1. by the frequency of bullying.85 1.96 0.15 1.31 1.35 1.59 1.19 1.000 1.42 2.17 2.19 2. and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 —Continued Among bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of bullying School characteristic Student-to-full-time-equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native.70 1.800 192. SOURCE: U.57 1.57 2.300 268.100 421.13 Number of students Not bullied Bullied Once or twice in the school year Once or twice a month Once or twice a week Almost every day Adult was notified Student was injured † Not applicable.02 1.50 1.800 1.23 1. whether an adult was notified.46 1.92 1.700 309. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS).46 1. Black/African American.80 1.35 1.35 2.73 1.800 1. 2009.33 1.40 1.14 1.35 1.59 1.01 1.82 1.52 1.70 1.94 1. Department of Justice.74 2.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.40 1. National Center for Education Statistics.49 1.57 1.56 1.37 1. special tabulation using appended data from the U.69 2.56 2.

might not be representative of students in 6th grade.000 70. or going to and from school.6 Excluded from activities on purpose 4.2 15.9 13.6 1. ‡ Reporting standards not met.” regardless of their race. shoved.5 4. 2009.7 12.5 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.4 19.1 4.3 30.8 10.4 17.000 2.3 ! 6.0 13.6 29.7 Property destroyed on purpose 3.2 ! 4.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.7 4.1 2.3 ! 2.0 73.805.6 4.000 3.157.6 4.1 ! 4.6 23.4 33.999 $35.6 11.8 ! 4. NOTE: “Bullied” includes being made fun of.6 4.500 $7.6 22.1 2.000 students for whom data on bullying are available.963. 1 .2 15.383.7 10.4 78.5 13.1 21.7 17.0 21.4 5.8 20.5 18.8 9.4 12.789.0 18.0 26.4 28.4 16.8 9.000 4.7 29.0 ! ‡ 3.4 9. not Hispanic or Latino” includes Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders.2 27. tripped.6 5.000 1.000 or more Number of students 25.6 28.3 9. school property.4 20.650.5 17.426. being threatened with harm.000–34. tripped.2 ! 2.974.217.3 18.1 12.4 3.014.1 ‡ 5.9 4.717. called names.9 9.0 14.901.3 3.1 20. called names.5 4.3 5.0 3.5 ! 1.500–14.6 39.3 18.1 16.3 7.7 7.6 2.1 ! 7.000 73.000 3.6 2.000 2.000 3.4 15.0 Bullied 28.0 4.3 4.9 2. SOURCE: U.000 70.1 7.4 20.791.3 4.2 3. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.4 4.4 19.6 5.5 29.7 ! 6.8 7. or insulted.0 3.2 ! 4.3 72.1 71. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and missing data.000 60.1 5.000–49.4 30.3 20.6 3.5 1.8 ! 6. and having property destroyed on purpose. or spit on 9. not Hispanic or Latino” includes African Americans. Missing data are not shown for household income.1 16.000–24.0 Tried to make do things they did not want to do 3.8 72.2 11.6 17.000 73.7 14.8 7.1 25. American Indians or Alaska Natives.1 9. Respondents who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified as “Hispanic or Latino.8 Pushed.1 67.3 26.7 17. “All other races.5 ! 3.8 5.5 ! 4.000 71. shoved.9 32.0 Spread Threatened rumors with harm 16.794.000 82.2 15.8 2.1 ! Interpret data with caution.5 6. being the subject of rumors.4 9.5 8.0 13.8 ! 2.5 ! ‡ 3.9 1. Department of Justice.3 5.3 16.7 3. not Hispanic or Latino Black.6 4.9 5.7 28.619.6 8.9 11.9 8. Comparisons between students in 6th grade and those in other grades should be made with caution.9 9.1 ! 2.6 21.8 5. or spit on.8 ! 4. “At school” includes the school building.999 $50. “Black.000 885. and respondents of two or more races (1 percent of all respondents).2 12.1 3.4 3.8 19.2 3.6 66.5 5.5 18.9 79.7 6.1 3.8 17. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.000 11.1 31. 2 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 and. by type of bullying and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of bullying Made fun of.6 6.3 Student characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity1 White.7 5.9 68. Bureau of Justice Statistics. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian.5 26.9 4. school bus.9 74. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do.3 5.9 28. or insulted 18.7 23.000.4 70. Bullying types may sum to more than total because students could have experienced more than one type of bullying.7 ! 7.999 $15. not Hispanic or Latino Grade2 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.6 6.0 4.7 ! 5.000 12.090. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.6 5.801.217.0 3. being excluded from activities on purpose.S.000 3.8 4.0 19.000 3. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value.000 Not bullied 72. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).4 ! ‡ 608.8 2.7 69.000 3. being pushed.4 12.999 $25.3 ! 624. Estimates are reported for 25. therefore.2 3.6 71.885.1 6.292.

29 1.5 Standard errors for table 2.89 0.86 1.72 3. not Hispanic or Latino Grade 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.98 0.53 1.66 3.85 1.02 2.900 413.999 $25.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.20 2.31 0.74 2.100 170.83 3.16 4.04 1.61 0.34 Property destroyed on purpose 0.66 1.79 0.29 1.16 4.34 386.46 83.56 1. 2009.55 124.800 2.69 1.38 1.55 0.92 0.41 2. called names.64 1.66 2.92 0.00 0.600 Not bullied 0.38 0.000–49.000 142.20 0.800 167.42 1.500 2.00 2.66 3.62 3.85 1.999 $15. by type of bullying and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of bullying Made fun of.57 1.97 0.11 † 1. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.36 1.14 2.41 † 83.32 1.63 0.800 4.500 175.39 524.600 4.52 1.50 0.52 2.84 0.85 0. Department of Justice.85 0.40 0. shoved.63 0.90 1.00 0.38 0.08 1.53 2.97 2.50 1.39 3.27 0.48 Tried to make do things they did not want to do 0.83 0.700 3.14 1.97 1.100 1.40 1.32 1.87 1.46 † 0.03 0.60 1.76 1. not Hispanic or Latino Black.02 3.32 † Not applicable.86 0.64 0.72 2.87 1.91 0.21 3.99 0.65 Pushed.83 1.08 0.90 1.52 0. tripped.89 1.72 1.60 1.40 0.00 0.71 1.37 0. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).59 2.83 Bullied 0.78 0.12 1.99 0. SOURCE: U.34 1.68 0.500 1.44 0.89 0.20 1.28 Student characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity White.74 0. or spit on 0.15 2.76 0.39 0.71 1.999 $50.59 0.34 1. .03 1.63 2.38 1.01 2.800 408.600 95.49 0.91 0.94 1.55 0.83 Spread Threatened rumors with harm 0.000–34.000 169.100 276.42 1.64 1.13 0.16 0.600 185.72 3.29 1.28 Excluded from activities on purpose 0.08 1.97 0.40 1.000–24.24 1.41 1.56 2.34 3.17 2.95 0.34 1.96 3.58 1.03 0.07 1.04 1.43 0.32 1.39 2.85 0.69 1.76 0.95 1.44 1.50 0.100 165.08 1.82 0. Bureau of Justice Statistics.63 2.61 4.92 0.75 † 1.20 2.500–14.40 1.63 0.500 $7.66 0.39 2.65 1.000 or more Number of students 693.60 1.300 146.89 0.71 0.5: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.68 141.41 2.89 0.78 1.44 3.32 245.61 3. or insulted 0.59 2.S.84 0.33 0.04 0. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian.65 0.999 $35.500 170.87 1.

0 6.7 82.2 3.8 23.6 18.000 73.1 3.0 Spread rumors 16.National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.9 ! 5.5 31.5 5.7 10.8 25.8 9.6 13.000 or more See notes at end of table.719.4 22.4 3.1 4.000 6.000 13.4 19.2 4.8 3.6 Excluded from activities on purpose 4.9 22.3 4.2 3.980.000 493.1 5.5 9.5 11.000 3.1 71.2 18.3 9.570.1 3.0 72.0 ‡ ‡ 9.0 3.9 8.9 6.1 71.0 2.4 2.384. Number of students 25.4 3.500–1.000 4.1 4.7 25.259.7 7.0 27.6 69.6 9.6 17.5 11.000 Not bullied 72.5 11.0 Tried to make do things they did not want to do 3.0 5.4 5.7 Property destroyed on purpose 3.622.3 10.6 8.799.0 19.9 8.000–1.5 1.9 28.210.2 35.8 12.3 24.4 5.2 29.6 18.000 907.6 3.6 81.7 25.2 15.9 3.2 4.4 5.0 2.1 3.000 5.0 4.3 3.000 1.7 4.152.4 19.716.6 9.3 4.6 ! ‡ ‡ ‡ 4.5 14.6 .6 4.3 16.2 1.8 3.5 20.000 8.7 School characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level1 Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.3 72.000 4.7 17.499 1.9 28.2 18.1 14.9 3.1 3.3 4.6 5.999 2.6 5.4 3.347.3 17.6 5.6 11.3 6.2 31.7 5.0 6.6 80.1 4.4 2.4 10.5 3.000 74.7 27.154.8 Pushed.000 6.6 31.0 19.5 68.6 20.8 79.000 7.5 6.0 3.813.6 ! ‡ ‡ 6.6 3.000 8.1 15.3 2.000 69.8 6.2 69.8 3.487.000 301.0 ! 5.8 3.4 3.5 3.074.000 68.1 7.5 17.4 18.0 33.5 4.0 14.7 30.4 30.0 ! 1. by type of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of bullying Made fun of.6 22.5 27.217.1 4.9 7.7 6.2 ! 3.391.000 3.2 20. shoved.8 16.2 6.474.4 4.0 74.2 75.8 5.7 5.3 3.1 10.6 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.6 16.3 16.0 66.655.0 Bullied 28.5 12.8 64.8 19.5 Threatened with harm 5.2 17.2 20.000 2.3 18.0 4.2 8.9 15.4 5.4 1.000 5.6 7.9 6.3 6.3 19.4 11.000 70.2 12.000 1.4 17.1 79.0 25.5 ! 5.008.4 10. or insulted 18.7 5.0 8.259.0 ! 3.7 3.9 1. tripped or spit on 9.8 4.7 5.6 4.0 23.5 2.9 4.2 2.0 16.0 4.7 75.7 3.2 17.3 69.8 30. called names.9 20.5 15.3 15.9 5.3 6.7 6.

9 5.0 4. shoved.7 15.1 73.0 74.4 4. Department of Justice.000 6.5 3.624.9 3.1 5.0 30.1 20. might not be representative of students in primary schools. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS). special tabulation using data appended from the U.1 20.2 7.000 4. tripped. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.4 5.0 19.1 4.7 11.1 5.770. Department of Education.7 4.7 3. school bus. SOURCE: U.0 9.5 74.4 4.0 3.6 3.3 6. Additional missing and not applicable data are not shown for locale.0 8.5 71. NOTE: “Bullied” includes being made fun of.0 15.7 69. tripped or spit on Tried to make do things they did not want to do Excluded from activities on purpose School characteristic Student-to-full-time-equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native. Black/African American.6 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value.5 28. or insulted Pushed.1 3.2 6. Bureau of Justice Statistics.8 4. called names.1 3.8 20.4 28.000 students and have been excluded from the analysis.6 18.6 7. 1 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 who were enrolled in grades 6–12 and.217.7 3. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).National Center for Education Statistics Table 2.5 3. and percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.4 18. school property.4 31.396.3 20.9 17. student-to-FTE teacher ratio. Comparisons between students in primary schools and those in other school levels should be made with caution.4 4.0 6. school level. National Center for Education Statistics.4 7. shoved.3 3. Asian. or insulted.000 70.9 27.292.1 ! Interpret data with caution. Hispanic/Latino.756. Estimates are reported for 25. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.0 21. ‡ Reporting standards not met.1 4.6 17.0 5.424.6 71.7 16.383.000 69.9 3.9 13. percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native. Hispanic/Latino.7 3.5 9.6 15.5 26.662.6 68. and two or more races students.5 4.268.9 29. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do.7 5.7 20.000 students for whom data on bullying are available. by type of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2006–07—Continued Type of bullying Made fun of. or spit on.3 30. called names.6 2.300. School characteristic data were not available for 1. therefore.3 8.0 3.S.0 25.5 3.2 29.000 6.0 9. Black/African American. and having property destroyed on purpose.3 3.1 69.145. being the subject of rumors. and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch2 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not bullied Bullied Spread rumors Threatened with harm Property destroyed on purpose 4.9 30.7 18.4 3.000 7. 2 Data on free or reduced-price lunch eligibility are only available for public schools.000 7.2 4. enrollment size.1 21.459.000 9.2 5.3 9.2 6.2 11.7 2. 2009.4 8.6 4.5 17. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and these missing data.000.000 70.4 16. . being pushed. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.4 17. being threatened with harm.8 3. being excluded from activities on purpose.000 6.7 16.5 4. or going to and from school. “At school” includes the school building.000 7.8 9.9 5.598.6 4.S.

72 0.50 0.83 Bullied 0.35 0.60 1. or insulted 0.57 0.97 0.54 0.000 12.19 1.60 0.31 0.54 0.81 2.25 0.47 0.11 1.02 0.09 0.28 2.94 0.91 2.82 1.52 1.37 1.82 1.76 0.41 0.74 1.500 130.70 1. by type of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of bullying Made fun of.65 1.10 1.67 1.54 649.38 1.75 1.10 1.00 0.73 1.83 † † 0.96 1.64 † † † 0.29 0.05 0.65 0.63 2.500–1.000–1.75 0.60 0.49 48.900 225. tripped or spit on 0.300 2.72 0.74 0.83 1.53 1.56 0.71 0.89 0.81 0.78 0.6: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.300 Not bullied 0.64 1.000 or more See notes at end of table.30 0.02 1.65 0.12 2.92 1.72 0.72 1.60 0.77 0.49 0.80 0.400 345.41 .27 1.500 1.08 0.40 1.25 1.42 0.72 1.60 1.01 1.14 1.30 0.37 1.78 1.58 1.63 1.68 0.39 3.27 1.67 158.28 0.600 11.34 1.64 1.400 345.66 0.57 0.74 1.25 1.63 1.08 1. Number of students 692.01 0. shoved.44 0.33 2.12 2.100 47.64 0.62 0.87 † † 231.55 0.900 0.78 0.500 1.54 0.61 0.200 88.67 0.17 1.56 0.28 Excluded from activities on purpose 0.65 1.10 1.58 0.96 0.89 0.85 0.77 0.28 0.89 0.63 1.000 192.94 0.91 2.39 3.14 1.000 264.79 0.49 1.19 1.300 430.84 0.10 1.67 0.34 0.14 0.500 93.40 1.68 0.44 1.83 Spread rumors 0.12 1.70 1.63 1.72 1.18 1.18 1.97 0.49 1.68 0.69 1.100 413.66 Threatened with harm 0.18 1.78 1.52 1.93 1.83 1.56 1.500 230.28 1.69 1.69 0.33 1.36 0.36 0.700 1.27 1.55 0.21 0.70 0.00 0.30 0.11 1.15 1.400 128.29 2.38 0.06 0.34 Property destroyed on purpose 0.71 1.57 0.85 0.71 1.34 School characteristic Total bullied or not bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.54 0.81 2.49 0.39 1.40 1.57 1. called names.40 1.72 0.57 1.56 0.000 167.72 0.84 0.499 1.48 Tried to make do things they did not want to do 0.24 2.999 2.69 0.700 254.59 0.96 0.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.71 1.56 0.500 188.33 1.65 0.28 2.88 1.55 1.25 0.58 0.45 0.50 0.65 Pushed.6 Standard errors for table 2.64 1.28 291.

40 1. National Center for Education Statistics. Department of Education. and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not bullied Bullied Spread rumors Threatened with harm Property destroyed on purpose 270.88 0. Department of Justice.42 163.56 1.59 0.100 421.19 1.800 1.57 1.75 0.78 0.33 1.74 0.26 1.35 1.46 1.04 1.52 0.57 0.85 1.44 0.43 1. tripped or spit on Tried to make do things they did not want to do Excluded from activities on purpose School characteristic Student-to-full-time-equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native.35 1.000 276. called names. special tabulation performed by the U.55 0.81 0.33 1.09 1.92 0.200 306.6 Standard errors for table 2.62 0.19 1. .23 1.68 1.18 1.43 0.52 0.800 267.49 0.76 0.49 0.35 1.15 0.35 1. Hispanic/Latino.79 0.55 1.60 0.71 0.51 0.32 0.01 0.51 0.19 1.05 1. Black/African American. by type of bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09—Continued Type of bullying Made fun of.44 0.46 0.73 1.000 1.75 0.53 0.59 1. Asian.61 0.66 0.23 0.92 0.41 0.97 1.51 0.61 0.05 0.08 1.46 1.48 207.48 0.78 0.91 1. SOURCE: U.35 1.33 1.S.58 0.800 1.National Center for Education Statistics Table S2.14 1.92 0.64 0.80 0.25 1.59 0. Bureau of Justice Statistics.59 0.500 260.300 268.700 309.50 0.40 1.73 1.48 0.59 1.25 0.47 0.6: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school.55 0.85 1.65 0.75 1.S. 2009.800 192.65 0.08 1. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).66 0.57 1.75 0.S. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS). or insulted Pushed. Census Bureau using appended data from the U. shoved.18 1.55 † Not applicable.67 0.

2 ! 14.6 5. or online gaming. and respondents of two or more races (1 percent of all respondents).4 # 17.3 # 3.8 15.2 5. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.8 4.0 95.6 27.0 39. whether an adult was notified.0 27.1 19.705. Department of Justice.4 ! # # 2.047.5 95.5 63. not Hispanic or Latino” includes Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders.769. Estimates are reported for 25.4 ! 60.9 11.8 ! 6.2 9.999 $25.000 12.000 93.0 17.2 69.2 ! 16.4 3. not Hispanic or Latino Grade2 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.2 71. NOTE: “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet.2 84.8 ‡ # 2.000 95. and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among cyber-bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of cyber-bullying Number of students 25.2 18.0 Once or twice in the school year 67.7 ! 22. Comparisons between students in 6th grade and those in other grades should be made with caution.2 # # 16.2 ! 6.3 5.000 3.2 53.2 ! 33.5 72.1 6.6 14. ! Interpret data with caution.4 35.9 65.5 6.8 ‡ 10. instant messaging.000 95.6 17.5 ! 6.000 95.789.7 94. by the frequency of cyber-bullying. ‡ Reporting standards not met. not Hispanic or Latino” includes African Americans.974. 1 Respondents who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified as “Hispanic or Latino. “Black.3 82.000–24.5 17.500–14.2 ! 67.5 37. therefore.5 # 6.S.8 94.1 24.0 # 12.749.0 97.0 12.8 ‡ 9.6 64.000 or more Cyber-bullied 6.414.000 3.5 ! 25.000 students for whom data on cyber-bullying are available. Missing data are not shown for household income.000 3.4 52.2 ! 9.6 65.0 # Rounds to zero.2 94.383.1 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.8 15.000 3.6 ! 17.4 27.5 68.1 ! ‡ 62.9 ! 4. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.014.5 18.9 93. . not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian.000 3.6 ‡ 8.000 2.885.000–34.1 95.9 8.1 93.0 ! 10.8 36.0 48.4 94.000 608.1 ! 13. not Hispanic or Latino Black.8 5. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and missing data.0 4. might not be representative of students in 6th grade.5 30.000 4.5 Student characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyber-bullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity 1 White.4 4.5 6.805.5 93.9 49.2 31.000 Not cyberbullied 94. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community.999 $15.9 21.000 3.5 624. 2009.2 46.0 27.000.3 8.6 Once or twice a week 10. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail.National Center for Education Statistics Table 3.6 15.0 15.0 2.1 19.0 ! 82.2 76. “All other races. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).999 $50.0 44. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.000 885.9 6.162.1 5.644.3 38.789.292. Bureau of Justice Statistics.5 5.3 92.000 1.7 7.000 1.4 Once or twice a month 16.999 $35.5 32.889.000 11.1 92.0 # ‡ 8.2 3. American Indians or Alaska Natives.3 7.606. SOURCE: U.4 72.151.2 93.8 ‡ 2.4 8.000–49.9 7. text messaging.6 84.4 12.1 8.500 $7.” regardless of their race. 2 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 and. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value.8 6.000 3.4 Almost every day 5.940.5 93.6 Adult was notified 31.2 15.7 10.5 93.000 2.6 62.162.6 8.

29 1.42 1. .400 245.84 2.999 $50.48 7.48 4.23 6.15 2.66 2.200 407. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.55 0.000 142.64 2.77 1.28 4.47 11.500 $7.80 7.97 0.39 6.600 185. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian. SOURCE: U.72 4.85 0.22 4.000–34.800 1.900 166.18 1. by the frequency of cyber-bullying whether an adult was notified.600 95.88 7.20 2.National Center for Education Statistics Table S3.06 † 11.68 522.999 $35.60 3.49 4.72 † † 1.76 1.500–14.81 1.11 0.41 0.26 6. 2009.28 1.25 † 4.71 83.500 170.100 275.800 0.96 3.999 $25.700 413.42 0.09 0.36 7.29 1.16 † 1.200 165.93 1.65 3.56 0.85 0.29 5.900 124.17 2.99 0.76 4.98 4.76 4.55 1.24 5.22 2.97 4.09 † † 0.11 0. Department of Justice.05 1.81 3.79 3.49 † 3.84 5.92 1.42 1.86 1.84 1.100 172.05 7.55 0.86 0.999 $15.70 13.75 4.91 3.31 1.28 1.03 0.70 0.32 1.61 † Not applicable.82 2.61 5.87 2.74 6.300 146.22 2.1: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.95 0.12 1.000–49. Bureau of Justice Statistics.58 0.56 0.800 2. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among cyber-bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of cyber-bullying Number of students Not cyberbullied Once or twice in the school year Once or twice a month Once or twice a week Almost every day Adult was notified Student characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyberbullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity White.34 3.25 7.92 1.700 83.63 6.50 2.1 Standard errors for table 3.71 3.26 2.400 169.95 0.55 7.31 1.00 1.66 13.67 † † 141.80 † † 0. not Hispanic or Latino Black.78 1.91 † 1.93 1.03 0.89 2.73 3.09 0.200 0.800 0.77 1.000–24.09 7.66 † 0.04 383.00 1.49 † 1.62 3.72 4.22 † 0.83 2.67 2.31 1.500 170.18 1.04 3.S.000 or more Cyber-bullied 691.97 0.25 5.90 1.58 2. not Hispanic or Latino Grade 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.43 † 0.89 5.17 1.80 4.

000 96.6 4.7 3.4 5.643.8 70.2 # 35.7 28.0 22.2 63.210.8 30.7 17.1 59.3 6.5 6.8 ! 17.391.000 5.8 .384.5 36.4 4. by the frequency of cyber-bullying.2 77.9 17.0 93.5 93.3 ! 5.2 18.000 94.000 907.7 6.210.146.6 ! ‡ ‡ 8.6 71.3 4.8 8.592. and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among cyber-bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of cyber-bullying Once or twice in the school year 67.813.974.3 22.6 94.0 3.4 43.9 10.7 # 11.4 66.7 73.130.000 8.0 Almost every day 5.7 4.4 Once or twice a month 16.8 6.4 ! ‡ ‡ 66.000 or more See notes at end of table.3 16.499 1.3 21.4 12.6 27.4 12.8 ! 27.9 6.474.000 Not cyber-bullied 94.4 94.6 Once or twice a week 10.000 3.999 2.6 85.6 26.000–1.696.000 3.564.6 62.000 1.775.000 94.8 6.9 36.3 — ‡ ‡ 16.7 5.336.3 66.0 4.6 70.0 5.487.5 ‡ ‡ ‡ 6.000 5.0 Cyber-bullied 6.3 71.057.1 18.7 95.000 6.1 10.4 4.9 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 10.6 66.6 30.9 25.7 38.000 1. whether an adult was notified.6 6.0 6.9 ‡ 16.7 19.0 ! # 7.4 94.4 Adult was notified 31.000 493.000 4.000 4.4 7.7 93.8 14.000 301.5 ‡ 2.8 ‡ 8.0 ‡ 7.6 43.000 2.6 7.9 9.5 62.247.6 6.2 93.6 5.7 94.9 ! 12.1 67.3 7.4 96.3 7. Number of students 25.7 17.4 11.0 94.0 26.1 6.2 18.5 School characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyber-bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level1 Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.000 93.4 63.705.8 32.9 16.3 — 60.000 5.3 67.500–1.0 7.2 ‡ # 15.2 21.4 93.5 5.000 92.997.1 93.6 95.0 6.0 95.000 7.3 93.2 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.7 93.2 94.162.6 12.000 8.6 6.6 ! 10.0 22.3 10.National Center for Education Statistics Table 3.7 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 32.7 # # # # 5.8 ‡ 6.000 13.6 ‡ ‡ 44.2 1.

1 73. Black/African American. ! Interpret data with caution.4 36. Hispanic/Latino.S.000 students for whom data on cyber-bullying are available.0 70. and two or more races students. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail.S.5 24. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and these missing data.1 65.5 6. Asian. ‡ Reporting standards not met.8 18.000 7.0 28.8 22. Comparisons between students in primary schools and those in other school levels should be made with caution. 1 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 who were enrolled in grades 6–12 and. Additional missing and not applicable data are not shown for locale.4 59.6 93.5 4.4 73. therefore.9 8.7 ‡ ‡ 4.000 6.584.1 92.4 6. school level.2 73. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).0 6.2 8.0 7.2 35. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.2 9.5 ‡ 2.000 students and have been excluded from the analysis.5 95.000 4.000.1 5.419. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.9 ‡ ‡ 33.3 11.7 14. text messaging.9 7. Black/African American.618.000 7.000 93. Cyber-bullying types may sum to more than total because students could have experienced more than one type of cyber-bullying.2 ! 7. National Center for Education Statistics. percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native.269.4 28. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value. text messaging.145. by the frequency of cyber-bullying and whether an adult was notified. might not be representative of students in primary schools. Bureau of Justice Statistics.5 5.2 10.0 8.5 94.3 23.000 6.4 13.6 16.6 6. special tabulation using data appended from the U. # Rounds to zero.000 7. enrollment size.000 6.2 10. Estimates are reported for 25. student-to-FTE teacher ratio. 2009.8 7.4 95.6 10.6 16.735.5 93.0 5. by selected school characteristics: School year 2006–07—Continued Among cyber-bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of cyber-bullying Once or twice in the school year Once or twice a month Once or twice a week Adult was notified School characteristic Student-to-full-timeequivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native.000 94.2 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.5 37.662.749.1 40. Department of Justice.4 12.2 ! 8. . Hispanic/ Latino.1 29.1 31.000 92.8 — Not available.6 72.000 9. Department of Education. instant messaging. 2 Data on free or reduced-price lunch eligibility are only available for public schools.9 94. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS).5 13.8 14.4 3.9 64.0 92.1 19.8 10.3 10.1 7.300.1 71.2 11. online gaming. NOTE: “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet.7 16.447.3 59. SOURCE: U.237.6 5.391. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community. and percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.383.0 21. School characteristic data were not available for 1.National Center for Education Statistics Table 3.162. and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch2 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not cyber-bullied Cyber-bullied Almost every day 4.5 63.

National Center for Education Statistics Table S3.35 † 0.46 0.81 1.62 0.50 3.22 2.000–1.12 0.41 Once or twice a week 0.69 1.94 0.63 0.14 0.06 0.73 2.13 0.85 3.71 0.80 1.39 3.000 12.12 0.42 Almost every day 0.68 2.28 1.96 0.24 3.03 0.40 0.92 † 0.25 † 1.999 2.82 † 9.86 2.63 0.400 345.72 † † 1.31 2.42 Cyber-bullied 0. and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Among cyber-bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of cyber-bullying Once or twice in the school year 1.25 1.50 † † † † 1.600 254.800 93.60 3.97 1.300 429.19 8.500–1.68 3.16 3.89 0.00 3.499 1.96 1.48 4.100 225.87 0.08 1.81 1.84 1.53 2.62 0.84 3.17 3.14 0.36 2.10 1.60 1.500 88.04 290.400 130.27 .2 Standard errors for table 3.600 11.69 1.100 126.60 0.000 167.58 † 0.38 0.43 2.66 0.89 1.89 † 0.94 0.75 † † † † 2.23 4.300 1.37 3.300 192.900 345.96 1.77 3.68 0.03 2.60 0.26 0.09 † 0.94 1.62 0.2: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.50 2.40 0.100 47.88 1.88 0.40 † † 1.60 0.63 0.03 0.71 0.07 † † † 1.81 48.900 0.19 13.46 0.48 † 2.59 5.17 4.36 4.66 0.33 1.01 3.77 0.74 † 158.100 1.10 † † † 230.01 † † † † 0.89 0.87 2.500 187.12 0.07 3.400 412.03 1.400 Not cyberbullied 0.70 2.87 0.29 0.12 † † 2.26 2.83 0.06 3.89 3.500 0.55 Once or twice a month 1.32 1.62 0.57 3. by the frequency of cyber-bullying.500 228.19 0.68 2.000 or more See notes at end of table.400 0.57 2. whether an adult was notified.68 0.38 † † 1.99 School characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyber-bullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.88 0.63 0. Number of students 690.12 0.87 Adult was notified 2.56 648.000 264.

90 0.68 0.17 1.73 0.37 0. Black/African American.91 0.17 3.12 0.80 2.09 4.16 † † 1.38 1.06 2. special tabulation using appended data from the U.200 268.13 2.12 2.59 0.83 0.49 2.800 260.54 0.39 1.99 0.800 0.20 2.93 2.88 0.S.21 1.100 420.500 192.45 2.19 2. 2009.000 0.43 207.400 267.99 3.10 † Not applicable.83 0.73 0. by selected school characteristics: School year 2006–07—Continued Among cyber-bullied students Percentage distribution of the frequency of cyber-bullying Once or twice in the school year Once or twice a month Once or twice a week School characteristic Student-to-full-timeequivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native.60 0. National Center for Education Statistics.35 1.88 0. Department of Justice.800 0.93 0.S.93 4. .15 2.900 274. and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not cyberbullied Cyber-bullied Almost every day Adult was notified 271. Asian.44 3.93 0.95 1.00 159.16 2.54 4.65 0. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).200 306.77 1.60 0.13 1.65 0.89 1.2 Standard errors for table 3. Bureau of Justice Statistics.19 1.67 2.68 0.06 4. Hispanic/ Latino.71 3. by the frequency of cyber-bullying and whether an adult was notified.60 2.46 1. Department of Education.04 2.25 0. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS).700 309.10 † 0.2: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere. SOURCE: U.90 0.73 0.National Center for Education Statistics Table S3.64 1.35 2.16 1.28 3.59 0.16 1.61 † † 2.93 0.05 3.17 1.

.0 2.9 ! 1.6 ! 1.2 94.000 3. Department of Justice.0 ! 1.8 ! 1.5 93.” regardless of their race.0 ! 2.974.5 ! ‡ ‡ 3.0 4.0 2.000 95.749.047.1 2. and respondents of two or more races (1 percent of all respondents).8 6.9 6.5 2.885. Missing data are not shown for household income.3 # ‡ 0.1 92.6 ! ‡ 2.9 93.000 or more Number of students Not cyberbullied Cyberbullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail 25.500–14.606.5 6. by type of cyber-bullying and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of cyber-bullying Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Student characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyberbullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity1 White.4 3. 1 Respondents who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified as “Hispanic or Latino.1 ! 2.S.9 15.4 ! 2. ‡ Reporting standards not met.6 ‡ ‡ 2.3 2.1 5.0 1.000–24.0 ! ‡ 1.000 4.9 0.0 ! # # 2.0 0.8 5.000–49.9 ! ‡ 2.0 ‡ ‡ 2.9 ! 1.5 ! 1.2 # 3.0 2.0 1.414.2 ! 2.769.0 6.2 93.4 ! ‡ 0.000 608.4 3. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.9 1.7 ! 1.1 2. Cyber-bullying types may sum to more than total because students could have experienced more than one type of cyberbullying.8 94.0 1.000 95.2 1. not Hispanic or Latino Grade2 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.0 0.383.014.7 7.1 95.4 94.999 $15.1 ! 1.644.6 ‡ ‡ 2.0 0.000 94.5 6.292. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value.2 5.8 ! 6. SOURCE: U.8 4. American Indians or Alaska Natives.162.6 2. ! Interpret data with caution.789.0 ‡ 4. text messaging.4 ! 2.000 885. Comparisons between students in 6th grade and those in other grades should be made with caution. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and missing data.5 ! 6.0 97.4 2. Estimates are reported for 25.8 0.3 2.3 4. not Hispanic or Latino” includes African Americans.3 2.0 ! 1.000 11.2 ! 1.000 1.000 2. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.National Center for Education Statistics Table 3. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).000 students for whom data on cyber-bullying are available.3 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.9 7.8 0.705. 2 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 and.8 ! ‡ 1.9 12.000–34.5 ! 1. or online gaming.7 ! 1.3 1.5 ! 1.9 ! 4.000 95.6 ! 1.4 2.6 5.0 3.000 3.5 5.2 1.8 3. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community.000 3.9 ‡ ‡ ‡ # 1.000 1.940. therefore.999 $35.4 ‡ ‡ 1.000 2. not Hispanic or Latino Black.151.3 ! ‡ 0.0 95.9 ! 1.7 2.0 2.8 ! 1.0 # ‡ 1.4 ‡ 0.3 92.4 4. Bureau of Justice Statistics.9 ! 3.789.889.999 $50.4 ! 1.9 ! 3.4 0.8 ! 0.1 ! 1.000 3. 2009.1 ! 2. might not be representative of students in 6th grade.6 2.7 ! 1.000.4 ‡ 0.000 12.9 # Rounds to zero.1 1.5 93.5 ! 1.5 95. instant messaging.000 3. “Black.1 93. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value. not Hispanic or Latino” includes Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders.162.0 4.1 ! 2.000 93.6 ! 2.7 94.2 ‡ ‡ # ‡ ‡ 1.0 1. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail.5 93.3 5.000 3.500 $7. “All other races.999 $25.805.1 6.000 3. NOTE: “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet.6 2.0 ! ‡ ‡ ‡ 624.7 ! 1.

30 0.51 0.03 0.66 0.42 0.500 170.800 1.56 0.84 0.16 383. not Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino Asian.51 0.36 † 0.42 0. Bureau of Justice Statistics.86 0.200 0.09 0.000 142.60 † 0. 2009.26 † 0.33 1.93 1.85 0.3 Standard errors for table 3.25 † 1.25 0.32 † † 0.S.29 1.05 1.00 1.55 0.200 165.68 0.500 $7.18 0.999 $35. not Hispanic or Latino All other races.44 0.13 0.33 1. Department of Justice.34 † 1.00 1.47 † † 0.30 0.600 185.29 0.23 2.71 0.45 † † † † † 0.000–24.53 0.900 124.92 1.73 † 0.400 245.31 0.95 0.47 0.23 0.76 0.56 0. .22 522.28 1.97 0.800 2.20 0.800 0.66 2. not Hispanic or Latino Grade 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th Household income Less than $7.58 0.41 † † 0.36 0.65 0.29 1.22 0.51 0.61 0.55 0.65 0.45 † 0.95 0.51 0.92 1.62 0.69 0.94 1.999 $50.700 413.National Center for Education Statistics Table S3.41 † † 0.21 0.62 0.42 0.58 0.44 † † † 83.57 0.999 $25.67 0. by type of cyber-bullying and selected student characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of cyber-bullying Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Student characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyberbullied Sex Male Female Race/ethnicity White.53 0.22 † † 0.300 146.500 170.34 0.500–14.40 0.05 0.64 0.48 0.400 169.69 0.64 0.42 0.38 † † 141.39 0.000–34.97 0. SOURCE: U. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).700 83.55 0.93 1.39 0.77 1.74 † 0.85 0.600 95.66 † † 0.37 † 0.09 0.14 0.60 0.23 2.64 0.87 0.59 0.100 275.13 0.41 0.03 0.3: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.31 0.57 † † 0.57 † 0.000–49.56 0.58 0.47 0.22 † Not applicable.200 407.55 0.73 0.37 0.56 0.28 1.999 $15.10 0.19 † † † † 0.000 or more Number of students Not cyberbullied Cyberbullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail 691.49 0.86 0.64 0. not Hispanic or Latino Black.18 0.24 0.24 0.800 0.56 0.900 166.77 1.100 172.

7 ! ‡ 1.487.2 1.130.000 5.7 1.8 ! 1.6 1.0 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 6.4 93.7 1.3 1.000 or more See notes at end of table.1 3.000 94.7 6.5 2.8 1.5 6.705.6 6.6 5.7 3.1 1.5 2.7 94.500–1.2 ! ‡ 2.9 0.8 ! 0.2 ! ‡ ‡ 1.643.2 1.3 ! 5.7 ! 2.000 6.3 93.000 92.0 6.3 1.7 ‡ ‡ 1.000 93.8 ! 1.0 2.1 ! 3.1 1.4 1.0 0.8 6.2 ! 2.7 93.4 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 1.8 2.000 96.1 ‡ ‡ ‡ 1.4 96.7 3.000 4.000 7.000 301.6 6.9 2.8 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 1.9 2.2 ! 0.4 2.7 1. by type of cyber-bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of cyber-bullying Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Student characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyberbullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level1 Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.391.2 ! 2.1 3.8 6.999 2.7 2.162.5 3.6 1.6 0.0 ! 0.7 93.4 1.3 ! 2.5 5.336.1 2.8 0.7 5.8 ! ‡ 1.000 3.000 94.9 0.1 1.7 95.1 1.0 ‡ ‡ 0. Number of students Not cyberbullied Cyberbullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail 25.146.0 94.4 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.9 4.3 3.974.4 94.0 1.997.5 3.6 94.7 ! 1.1 93.1 ! .775.210.499 1.4 94.5 0.7 3.0 1.000 493.2 1.000 907.2 0.9 2.8 3.2 94.3 4.813.0 ! 0.2 1.3 3.474.9 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ 3.7 ! 0.000 3.9 3.210.564.3 ! 1.5 ! 1.3 2.592.000 5.5 ! 1.9 2.9 ! 0.4 ! 0.0 2.9 0.000 4.National Center for Education Statistics Table 3.000 94.9 2.3 7.5 1.0 1.2 2.000 1.6 2.3 6.0 93.3 2.0 5.0 6.9 6.2 0.057.000 2.3 1.7 1.000 1.000 5.2 ‡ 0.5 ‡ 1.000 8.247.3 0.696.6 ‡ 2.9 1.5 93.4 4.0 4.9 ! 1.1 ! 1.3 2.4 ! ‡ ‡ 2.2 1.000 8.3 7.3 3.7 1.000 13.6 6.7 3.2 ! 1.4 2.2 93.0 3.5 ! 2.2 ! 1.000–1.384.8 0.8 ‡ ‡ 1.0 0.0 2.1 ! 1.6 1.8 ! 1.0 95.6 95.7 ! 22.

237.1 0.S.000 7.5 4.9 ! 3. Additional missing and not applicable data are not shown for locale.5 ! 1. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25. Hispanic/ Latino. special tabulation using data appended from the U.6 6. might not be representative of students in primary schools.0 92.5 6.9 1. by type of cyber-bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09—Continued Type of cyber-bullying Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Student characteristic Student-to-full-time equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native.3 1. Black/African American.000 students and have been excluded from the analysis. Hispanic/Latino. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS).7 1.0 7.6 93.1 5.2 ! 0.6 1.000 4.1 2. National Center for Education Statistics.4 3.1 ! Interpret data with caution.2 3.000 93.000 students for whom data on cyber-bullying are available. percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native.3 0. and two or more races students.5 1.162.3 2.8 1. .6 5.0 0.447.7 ‡ 1.7 ! ‡ 1. 2009. Estimates are reported for 25.6 1.0 6.0 ! 2.5 95.National Center for Education Statistics Table 3. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail.4 Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.4 95.9 ! 1.8 1. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.5 93.2 2.7 0. Black/ African American.8 ! 1. ‡ Reporting standards not met. Cyber-bullying types may sum to more than total because students could have experienced more than one type of cyberbullying.419.6 1. instant messaging. 1 The School Crime Supplement sample includes students ages 12–18 who were enrolled in grades 6–12 and.000 92.7 ! 0.5 5. SOURCE: U. 2 Data on free or reduced-price lunch eligibility are only available for public schools.9 0. Comparisons between students in primary schools and those in other school levels should be made with caution.2 3. school level.9 94. Department of Education.000 94.749.4 1.618.9 2.4 2.3 3.2 ! 1. and percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.8 1. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).2 1.0 0.5 1.662.2 ! 0.584.0 ! 1.8 ! 5.2 2.7 1.2 2.3 0.1 7.9 1.7 1.000 7.1 92. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding and these missing data.4 2.0 1.5 94. enrollment size.000.3 1.145. Bureau of Justice Statistics.9 ! 0.4 6.2 3. student-to-FTE teacher ratio.7 2.000 6.269.735.9 2.8 0. Department of Justice. online gaming. text messaging.3 1.300.2 2. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.7 ! 1. School characteristic data were not available for 1. and two or more races students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch2 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not cyberbullied Cyberbullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail 4.7 1.1 ! 1. NOTE: “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value.S.000 6.1 1.4 1. therefore.391.000 6.8 2.9 7.6 3.000 9.9 2.383.000 7. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community.3 3.

72 0.59 0.36 0.22 0.77 0.35 0.31 0.81 † 0.41 † 0.400 412.63 0.000 or more See notes at end of table.51 0.34 0.500–1.16 290.33 0.40 0.000 12.42 0.500 187.75 0.64 0.500 228.34 0.87 0.40 † † 0.34 0.53 0.36 0.13 0.51 0.77 † † 0.400 345.56 0.19 † † 0.88 0.300 1.25 0.800 93.99 0.89 0.59 0.22 0.18 0.29 0.14 0.32 † 0.44 0.91 0.4 Standard errors for table 3.44 0.63 0.499 1.20 0.23 0.36 0.81 1.54 † 0.60 0.77 0.48 0.89 1. by type of cyber-bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 Type of cyber-bullying Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Student characteristic Total cyber-bullied or not cyberbullied Region Northeast Midwest South West Sector Public Private Catholic Other religious Nonsectarian Locale City Suburb Town Rural Level Primary Middle High Other Enrollment size Less than 300 300–599 600–999 1.41 0.34 0.46 0.14 0.400 130.500 0.88 0.36 0.62 † 0.19 0.15 † † † † 0.24 0.30 0.12 0.600 11.36 0.999 2.37 0.84 0.400 0.34 0.57 † † 0.34 0.43 0.43 0.49 0.60 0.73 0.33 0.66 0.60 0.19 0.71 0.28 0.14 0. Number of students Not cyberbullied Cyberbullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail 690.National Center for Education Statistics Table S3.56 0.63 0.38 0.71 0.40 .70 0.46 0.66 0.28 0.400 0.43 0.48 0.54 0.4: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyber-bullied anywhere.100 126.46 0.43 0.54 0.35 0.32 † † † 0.34 0.37 0.62 0.87 0.24 0.000 264.24 0.900 345.18 † 158.50 0.44 0.31 0.12 0.12 0.94 0.94 0.19 † † 0.58 0.29 648.89 0.43 0.33 0.26 48.000 167.68 0.12 0.29 0.89 0.500 88.100 225.39 0.100 1.75 0.47 0.300 429.300 192.17 † † † † 230.25 0.29 0.600 254.32 0.53 0.54 0.100 47.42 0.68 0.000–1.22 0.81 1.40 0.56 0.96 1.57 0.96 1.40 0.900 0.63 0.68 0.40 0.33 0.22 0.84 1.42 0.30 0.31 0.26 † † † † 0.46 0.20 † † † † 0.62 0.44 0.

800 260.27 207.4 Standard errors for table 3.60 0.38 0.49 0. 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS).33 159.35 0.53 0.45 0.30 0.65 0.29 0.73 0.93 0.38 0.30 0.30 0.41 0.30 0.700 309.31 0.21 0.56 0. special tabulation performed by the U.200 268.21 0.54 0.29 0. .37 0.33 0. Black/African American.800 0.88 0.500 192.90 0.47 0.45 0.68 0.30 0.73 0.59 0.50 0.54 0.100 420.48 0. 2009.59 0. SOURCE: U.35 0.000 0.4: Number and percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being cyberbullied anywhere.24 0.46 0.35 0. and two or more races students Less than 5 percent 5 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch 0 to less than 20 percent 20 to less than 50 percent 50 percent or more Number of students Not cyberbullied Cyberbullied Hurtful information on Internet Unwanted contact via e-mail 271. National Center for Education Statistics.35 0.28 0.63 † 0.65 0.40 0.93 0.93 0.41 0.68 0.32 0. by type of cyber-bullying and selected school characteristics: School year 2008–09 —Continued Type of cyber-bullying Unwanted contact via instant messaging Unwanted contact via text messaging Unwanted contact via online gaming Purposeful exclusion from an online community Student characteristic Student-to-full-time equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio Less than 13 students 13 to less than 16 students 16 to less than 20 students 20 or more students Percent of combined American Indian/ Alaska Native.56 0.54 0. Bureau of Justice Statistics.83 0.26 0.32 † Not applicable. Hispanic/ Latino.National Center for Education Statistics Table S3.S.32 0.58 0. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).900 274.800 0.32 0.24 † 0.40 0.30 0.41 0.88 0. Department of Education. Census Bureau using appended data from the U.83 0.60 0.200 306.32 0.36 0.36 0.54 0.93 0.400 267.59 0.36 0.25 0.32 0.36 0.48 0.46 0.34 0. Department of Justice.90 0.S.22 0.S.58 0.61 0. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.21 0.36 0.

S. being the subject of rumors.1 Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).5 Alcohol at school 16. school bus. Department of Justice. PCP. prescription drugs illegally obtained without a prescription. text messaging. and having property destroyed on purpose.1 14. SOURCE: U.8 Type of bullying or cyber-bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied ! Interpret data with caution.7 67. “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet. or other illegal drugs were available at school.9 16.7 19. called names. downers. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value.6 ! 1.4 29. instant messaging.2 Drugs at school1 30. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.7 28. NOTE: “Bullied” includes students being made fun of. other forms of cocaine.National Center for Education Statistics Table 4. or spit on. LSD. shoved.7 24.9 46.7 3. or insulted. being pushed. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do. “at school” includes the school building. tripped. or going to and from school. by student reports of unfavorable school conditions and type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09 Gangs present at school 20.000. Bureau of Justice Statistics.0 40. 2009. 1 Includes students who reported that marijuana.1 13.3 25. being threatened with harm. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community.7 41.383.9 0. school property. For bullying. heroin.3 2. crack.1 Saw student with a gun 1. or online gaming. uppers. being excluded from activities on purpose. .

56 0.16 1. . School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).S.90 3.71 1.08 2.19 0.1 Standard errors for table 4. Bureau of Justice Statistics.85 1.92 Alcohol at school 0.20 Drugs at school 0.70 3.67 Type of bullying or cyber-bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied SOURCE: U.83 Saw student with a gun 0.44 0.87 0.95 1.56 0.17 0. 2009. by student reports of unfavorable school conditions and type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09 Gangs present at school 0.National Center for Education Statistics Table S4.69 1.47 0.28 0. Department of Justice.1: Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere.

5 95.383. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do. tripped. 2009.7 Type of bullying or cyber-bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied NOTE: “Bullied” includes students being made fun of. instant messaging. For bullying. called names.7 Security cameras 70. “at school” includes the school building.1 90. school bus.8 69. “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet. school property.7 Staff supervision in hallways 90. and having property destroyed on purpose. being excluded from activities on purpose. or insulted. shoved. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25.2 Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere.2 68. Bureau of Justice Statistics. SOURCE: U.8 90.S.National Center for Education Statistics Table 4.1 97.9 Student code of conduct 95.6 90.0 67.1 74. being the subject of rumors.1 90. or going to and from school. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail.1 67. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).000.9 68. Department of Justice.0 73. by the reported presence of selected school security measures and type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09 Security guards or assigned police officers 68. text messaging. or online gaming.6 97. being threatened with harm. being pushed.2 95. . or spit on. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community.9 75.

2009.10 Staff supervision in hallways 0.22 2. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). .86 0.54 1.97 1.08 Student code of conduct 0.21 2.S.2 Standard errors for table 4.39 0.49 1.46 0. by the reported presence of selected school security measures and type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09 Security guards or assigned police officers 1.49 Security cameras 1.2: Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere.53 1.05 1.84 0.68 1.17 0.48 1. Bureau of Justice Statistics.National Center for Education Statistics Table S4.05 1. Department of Justice.51 0.37 Type of bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied SOURCE: U.

4 1.7 Any victimization1 3. 3 “Violent victimization” includes rape. completed pickpocketing. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail. “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet. being threatened with harm. 2 “Theft victimization” includes attempted and completed purse snatching.8 5.383.0 Type of bullying or cyber-bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied ‡ Reporting standards not met. For bullying. or online gaming.2 1. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value. and simple assault. Department of Justice.5 ‡ 6.2 96. school bus. Bureau of Justice Statistics. NOTE: “Bullied” includes students being made fun of. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community.9 2.5 Violent victimization3 1. or going to and from school. aggravated assault. called names.S. school property. excluding motor vehicle theft. in which the threat or use of force is involved.4 4.3 Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).7 2. 1 “Any victimization” includes theft and violent crimes. being excluded from activities on purpose. SOURCE: U.8 7. . shoved.1 91. or spit on.9 8. “at school” includes the school building. Student reports of “theft” and “violent” victimization may not sum to “any” victimization because respondents can report more than one type of victimization.National Center for Education Statistics Table 4. being the subject of rumors.8 3. robbery. being pushed. and all attempted and completed thefts. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25. 2009.0 87. Theft does not include robbery. or insulted. sexual assault. tripped. by student reports of criminal victimization at school and type of bullying or cyberbullying: School year 2008–09 No victimization 96. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do.000.3 Theft victimization2 2. instant messaging.1 98. text messaging.0 12. and having property destroyed on purpose.

78 0. 2009.27 Theft victimization 0.28 0. . by student reports of criminal victimization at school and type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09 No victimization 0.78 0.61 † 1. Department of Justice.16 Type of bullying or cyber-bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied † Not applicable.23 Violent victimization 0.62 0. Bureau of Justice Statistics.17 0.27 2.28 0.24 1.27 Any victimization 0.27 2.3: Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere.S.13 0.23 0.National Center for Education Statistics Table S4.57 0.13 0. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).3 Standard errors for table 4. SOURCE: U.66 0.

SOURCE: U.7 ! 1. or insulted. Population size for students ages 12–18 is 25. text messaging.383.8 3.1 2.000. The standard error for this estimate is equal to 50 percent or more of the estimate’s value. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). school bus.0 3.6 1.7 1. or objects that can be used as weapons. “Cyber-bullied” includes having another student post hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet. fighting.6 5. by student reports of personal fear. ‡ Reporting standards not met. and other places inside the school building.National Center for Education Statistics Table 4. instant messaging.7 Skipped school 0.S. or purposefully exclude the respondent from an online community.4 Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere. school property.6 0. being threatened with harm. Bureau of Justice Statistics.2 15. being pushed. restrooms.5 0. For bullying.4 2.8 1. . or spit on. or going to and from school. being the subject of rumors. Includes respondents who “sometimes” or “most of the time” were fearful at school.4 Avoided school activities 1.2 ! 3.4 Type of bullying or cyber-bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied ! Interpret data with caution. tripped.1 Avoided a specific place at school2 4. and having property destroyed on purpose. 2 Includes the entrance into the school. knives. being excluded from activities on purpose.4 ! 3.8 15. shoved. Department of Justice. and type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09 Feared attack or harm1 4.4 17. hallways or stairs. avoidance behaviors. or online gaming. called names.0 ‡ 4.0 0. parts of the cafeteria.1 7.1 Carried a weapon to school3 2. NOTE: “Bullied” includes students being made fun of. 1 Includes fear of attack at school and on the way to or from school.3 3.4 Skipped class 0.6 2. make unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via e-mail.1 Engaged in a physical fight 5.2 10. The standard error for this estimate is 30 to 50 percent of the estimate’s value. and weapon carrying at school.1 2. “at school” includes the school building.7 4.9 ! 0.0 10. being pressured into doing things they did not want to do.7 12. 3 Includes guns.

22 0.32 Type of bullying or cyber-bullying Total Bullied Not bullied Cyber-bullied Not cyber-bullied † Not applicable.19 Avoided a specific place at school 0.99 0. avoidance behavior.14 0.09 1.96 0.30 Engaged in a physical fight 0.30 0.50 Carried a weapon to school 0. 2009.40 2. fighting.11 Avoided school activities 0.61 0.12 0.24 2.19 0.65 0.24 0. School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).35 0. and type of bullying or cyber-bullying: School year 2008–09 Feared attack or harm 0.31 0. and weapon carrying at school.33 0.National Center for Education Statistics Table S4. .4: Percentage of students ages 12 through 18 who reported being bullied at school and cyber-bullied anywhere.44 † 1.32 0.13 0.13 1.53 1. SOURCE: U. Bureau of Justice Statistics. by student reports of personal fear.51 0.20 0.31 1.11 Skipped class 0.61 0.4 Standard errors for table 4.24 2.30 0.S.30 Skipped school 0. Department of Justice.

Students who indicate they are not of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified according to the race they identified (e. 2. G-1 .4 and were produced by the Census Bureau using variables taken from the 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) and the 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS). All other races.999. and respondents of two or more races (1 percent of all respondents).6. were enrolled in grades 6 through 12 (using SC008 [GRADE LEVEL IN SCHOOL]). 3. Variables Taken From the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Basic Screen Questionnaire (NCVS-1) Household income (SC214) Household income refers to income as reported by the head of household and was collapsed into the following categories: (1) less than $7. Hispanic origin (SC412R and SC413) SC412R asked respondents their race.ed. and 3..asp.” regardless of their race. and (6) $50. (2) $7. located at http://nces. and homeschooling (203 cases) were deleted from the analysis. not Hispanic or Latino.000–24.gov/ programs/crime/surveys.999. The SCS data and questionnaire are available for download from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) via the Student Surveys link at NCES’s Crime and Safety Surveys portal.2. were enrolled in school in the current school year (using SC006 [ATTEND SCHOOL THIS SCHOOL YEAR]).4. not Hispanic or Latino includes African Americans. Black. The final unweighted sample size is 4. and SC413 asked respondents whether they are of Hispanic or Latino origin. Race/ethnicity.Glossary All of the variables that were used in these tables are described in this glossary.2.000 or more. Respondents who identified themselves as being of Hispanic or Latino origin were classified as “Hispanic or Latino. White. not Hispanic or Latino.999. The 2009 School Crime Supplement (SCS) data file contains all variables collected in the SCS as well as selected variables collected in the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Basic Screen Questionnaire (NCVS-1) and NCVS Crime Incident Report (NCVS-2) and appended to the SCS. Black. These variables are included in the glossary as a reference for readers. Estimates showing the characteristics of schools attended by SCS respondents are presented in tables 2. not Hispanic or Latino includes Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders. American Indians or Alaska Natives.000–34. not Hispanic or Latino). but are not available in the 2009 SCS data file. (5) $35. and were not homeschooled during that time (using SC092 [HOMESCHOOLED]). enrollment in current school year (245 cases). All other races.500.000–49.326. Prior to analysis.999. The NCVS questionnaires are also available through ICPSR. 2. the 2009 SCS data file was filtered to include only students who were ages 12 through 18 (using SC003 [RESPONDENT AGE]).500–14. The 697 students who did not fulfill one or more of these requirements for age (0 cases). (3) $15. grade (249 cases).g. (4) $25.

robbery. This is a created variable where students who responded “yes” to one or more of these behaviors were included in the “avoided a specific place at school” category. whether they were on their way to or from school. aggravated assault. along with a “type of crime” (TOC) code derived from NCVS2 responses.Sex (SC407A) SC407A asked respondents whether they are male or female. Data from incident reports. assault without a weapon and without injury. excluding motor vehicle theft. Each of these categories represents a measure of the prevalence of such victimization. For each incident of victimization reported. were appended to the SCS data file for each respondent who reported at least one victimization in the 6 months prior to the survey. violent. G-2 . completed pickpocketing. These five TOC codes were used to construct the any. Variables Taken From the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Crime Incident Report (NCVS-2) Activity at time of incident (SC832) Students were asked what they were doing at the time of the criminal victimization incident: specifically. whether it occurred inside the school building or on school property (school parking area. an NCVS Crime Incident Report (NCVS-2) was completed. school bus. Theft includes attempted and completed purse snatching. hallways or stairs (SC070). Location where incident occurred (SC616) Students were asked where the criminal victimization incident occurred: specifically. in which the threat or use of force is involved. “Any” crimes include one or more reports of any of the crimes listed above. Variables Taken From the 2009 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the NCVS Adult notification (bullying) (SC147) Students were asked if a teacher or some other adult at school was notified about (this event/any of these events) with regard to reported bullying. and verbal threat of assault. and all attempted and completed thefts. Avoided school activities (SC078) Students were asked if they had avoided any activities at school because they thought someone might attack or harm them. school cafeteria (SC071). simple assault with injury. Type of victimization (TOCNEW_1 through TOCNEW_5) Each SCS respondent could have reported as many as five incidents of victimization in the NCVS-1 in 2009.). restrooms (SC072). etc. and theft crime categories used in these Web Tables. Alcohol at school (SC040) Students were asked if it was possible to obtain alcohol at school. sexual assault. Adult notification (cyber-bullying) (SC166) Students were asked if a teacher or some other adult at school was notified about (this event/any of these events) with regard to reported cyber-bullying. Avoided a specific place at school Students were asked if they had stayed away from any of the following places because they thought someone might attack or harm them: entrance to school (SC069). Theft does not include robbery. and other places in school building (SC073). Violent crimes include rape. play area.

Gangs present at school (SC058) Students were asked whether there are street gangs present at their school.” “tenth. Grade (SC008) Students were asked what grade they were in. This is a created variable where students who brought one or more of these to school were included in the “carried a weapon” category. including the Internet (SC161).” “seventh.” and “twelfth” grades. downers (SC098).” “eleventh. or insulting via electronic means. This is a created variable where students who responded “yes” to one or more of these behaviors were included in the “bullied” category. Cafeteria at school (SC173) was added as a category during post-data collection processing of the data file. e-mail (SC170).” “ninth. other forms of cocaine (SC043). knives brought as weapons (SC083). instant messaging (SC162). prescription drugs illegally obtained without a prescription (SC159). LSD (SC045). or online gaming (SC171). hallway or stairwell at school (SC168). or destroyed their property on purpose (SC140). This is a created variable where students who responded “yes” to the availability of any these drugs were included in the “drugs available” category. threatening. Frequency of bullying (SC142) Students were asked how often they were bullied during the school year. spread rumors about them (SC135). shoved. and somewhere else at school (SC146). “other”. Location of bullying Students were asked about the location of the bullying behavior. and other illegal drugs (SC048). tried to make them do something they did not want to do (SC138). and “college/GED/ postgraduate/other noneligible.” “sixth. or insulted them (SC134).Bullied Students were asked if another student had bullied them by traditional means at school during the school year. pushed. bathroom or locker room at school (SC169). called them names.” Only respondents in grades 6 through 12 were included in the analysis. excluded them from activities on purpose (SC139). This is a created variable where students responding they were afraid “sometimes” or “most of the time” were included in the “feared attack or harm” category. Specifically. This is a created variable where students who responded “yes” to any of these behaviors were included in the “cyber-bullied” category. Feared attack or harm Students were asked how often they were afraid someone would attack or harm them at school (SC079) or on the way to or from school (SC080). text messaging (SC163). or spit on them (SC137).” “eighth. tripped. students were asked whether another student was hurtful. Drugs asked about were marijuana (SC041). Carried a weapon Students were asked if they had carried a weapon to school for protection during the school year. crack (SC042). They were asked about guns (SC082). G-3 . Response options included in a classroom at school (SC143). heroin (SC047). outside on school grounds (SC144). Cyber-bullied Students were asked if another student did any of the following behaviors anywhere to make them feel bad. Frequency of cyber-bullying (SC165) Students were asked how often they were cyber-bullied during the school year. or other weapons (SC084). PCP (SC046). on a school bus (SC145). uppers (SC097). or purposefully excluded them from an online community (SC172). Engaged in a physical fight (SC103) Students were asked whether they had been in one or more physical fights at school during the school year. Drugs at school Students were asked about drug availability at their school. threatened them with harm (SC136). including made fun of them. Response options included “fifth or under.

shoved. a set of written rules or guidelines that the school provides to ensure student safety. or spit on during bullying. spread rumors about them (SC135). shoved. black eye/bloody nose (SC151). tried to make them do something they did not want to do (SC138). called them names. and other (SC155). or online gaming (SC171). Type of cyber-bullying Students were asked if another student did any of the following behaviors anywhere to make them feel bad. made unwanted contact by threatening or insulting the respondent via email (SC170). broken bones/internal injuries (SC153). text messaging (SC163). students were asked if another student had made fun of them. Specifically. Type of bullying Students were asked if any student had bullied them during the school year. Skipped class (SC077) Students were asked if they had avoided any classes because they thought someone might attack or harm them. Specifically. or purposefully excluded the student from an online community (SC172). pushed. G-4 . excluded them from activities (SC139). scratches.Saw student with a gun (SC086) Students were asked if they had actually seen another student with a gun at school during the school year. that is. Staff supervision in hallways (SC029) Students were asked whether there was hallway supervision by school staff or other adults at school to ensure student safety. threatened them with harm (SC136). or going to or from school. Security guards or assigned police officers (SC028) Students were asked if there were security guards or assigned police officers present at their school to ensure student safety. tripped. teeth chipped or knocked out (SC152). or destroyed their property (SC140). on a school bus. Injuries asked about were bruises or swelling (SC149). Student was injured Students were asked about any injuries that resulted from being pushed. Skipped school (SC078) Students were asked if they had stayed home from school because they thought someone might attack or harm them in the school building. on school property. This is a created variable where students who responded “yes” to any of these injuries were included in the “student was injured” category. Security cameras (SC095) Students were asked if there were one or more security cameras to monitor the school to ensure student safety. tripped. students were asked whether another student posted hurtful information about the respondent on the Internet (SC161). instant messaging (SC162). Student code of conduct (SC096) Students were asked if there was a code of student conduct. being knocked unconscious (SC154). or spit on them (SC137). or insulted them (SC134). or scrapes (SC150). cuts.

which includes 21 = Suburb. Level (LEVEL09) This is the variable for school level. and 4 = Rural. Distant Census-defined rural territory that is more than 5 miles but less than or equal to 25 miles from an urbanized area. Small Territory outside a principal city and inside an urbanized area with a population less than 100.000 and greater than or equal to 100. Small Territory inside an urbanized area and inside a principal city with a population less than 100.5 miles but less than or equal to 10 miles from an urban cluster. Remote Census-defined rural territory that is more than 25 miles from an urbanized area and is also more than 10 miles from an urban cluster.000 or more. Locale This is a created variable based on the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) urban-centric locale code (ULOCAL09).000. 13 = City. The TOTFRL09 variable is only available if both details (i.000. including ungraded). which includes 31 = Town. which includes 41 = Rural. Mid-Size Territory inside an urbanized area and inside a principal city with a population less than 250. 2 = Suburb. 2 = Middle (low grade = 04 through 07. Percent of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch This is a created variable where the total number of free-lunch eligible and reduced-price lunch eligible students (TOTFRL09) is divided by the reported total membership of the school (MEMBER09). as well as rural territory that is more than 2.5 miles from an urban cluster.000. 42 = Rural. 22 = Suburb. 3 = Town. Remote Territory inside an urban cluster that is more than 35 miles from an urbanized area. Large Territory inside an urbanized area and inside a principal city with a population of 250.000 and greater than or equal to 100. 23 = Suburb. The following codes were calculated from the school’s corresponding values for lowest and highest grades: 1 = Primary (low grade = PK through 03. 12 = City. and 4 = Other (any other configuration not falling within the above three categories. G-5 . high grade = PK through 08). which includes 11 = City. 43 = Rural. Large Territory outside a principal city and inside an urbanized area with a population of 250. 32 = Town.000 or more. high grade = 04 through 09). Distant Territory inside an urban cluster that is more than 10 miles and less than or equal to 35 miles from an urbanized area. as well as rural territory that is less than or equal to 2. Fringe Census-defined rural territory that is less than or equal to 5 miles from an urbanized area. 3 = High (low grade = 07 through 12. high grade = 12 only). Fringe Territory inside an urban cluster that is less than or equal to 10 miles from an urbanized area.. 33 = Town. number of free lunch and reduced-price lunch eligible students) were reported in the CCD. Mid-Size Territory outside a principal city and inside an urbanized area with a population less than 250.000.School Characteristic Variables Appended From the 2008–09 Common Core of Data (CCD) Enrollment size (MEMBER09) This variable contains the total number of students for all grades or the reported total membership of the school. 1 = City.e.

and unidentified (AMALU09) fields. 3 = South (AL. MO. WY). NM. this field was calculated by summing the Asian/Pacific Islander male (ASALM09). AZ. If the number of American Indian/Alaska Native students was not reported. and 4 = West (AK. The following categories were constructed using the school’s corresponding values for lowest (LOGR2010) and highest (HIGR2010) grades: 1 = Primary (low grade = PK through 03. if the number of Black/African American students was not reported. Black/African American. MI. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander. VT). ME. DE. WV). and if the number of Hispanic/Latino students was not reported. NE. DC. For the 2009 CCD. this field was calculated by summing the American Indian/Alaska Native male (AMALM09). School Characteristic Variables Appended From the 2009–10 Private School Universe Survey (PSS) Enrollment size (NUMSTUDS) This variable represents the total number of students in the school. MS. Black/African American students (BLACK09). GA. and unidentified (BLALU09) fields. female (ASALF09). CA. Student-to-full-time-equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio (PUPTCH09) This variable provides the student-to-FTE teacher ratio. and two or more races students This is a created variable and is the sum of the following: American Indian/Alaska Native students (AM09). SC. ID. and 4 = Other (any other configuration not falling within the above three categories. TX. female (AMALF09). PA. 3 = High (low grade = 07 through 12. AR. WA. KS. this field was calculated by summing the Hispanic/Latino male (HIALM09). WI). The following regions were created based on the state in which the school was located: 1 = Northeast (CT. SD. high grade = 12 only). NC. female (HIALF09). Asian/Pacific Islander students (ASIAN09). UT. NH. Native Hawaiian is assumed to be included with the Pacific Islander category. KY. VA. OR. LA. Region This is a created variable based on the two-letter U. RI. and Hispanic/Latino students (HISP09). OK. Level This is a created variable representing school level. MD. Sector This is a created variable to denote public or private school sector based on the source of the data. FL. 2 = Middle (low grade = 04 through 07. and students of two or more races was reported by 14 states. Data from the CCD were coded as sector = 1 (public). this field was calculated by summing the Black/African American male (BLALM09). 2 = Midwest (IL. including ungraded). MA. divided by the reported total membership of the school (MEMBER09). TN. MN. MT. Postal Service abbreviation of the state where the school is located (LSTATE09). IN. if the number of Asian/Pacific Islander students was not reported.Percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native. G-6 . female (BLALF09). high grade = PK through 08). and unidentified (HIALU09) fields. IA. Hispanic/Latino. CO. NY. high grade = 04 through 09). OH. ND. NV. HI.S. and unidentified (ASALU09) fields. NJ.

IN. 3 = Town. Fringe Territory inside an urban cluster that is less than or equal to 10 miles from an urbanized area. which includes 41 = Rural. NH. TN. RI. VT). WI). as well as rural territory that is more than 2. 23 = Suburb. 42 = Rural. KY. NM. which includes 21 = Suburb. Remote Census-defined rural territory that is more than 25 miles from an urbanized area and is also more than 10 miles from an urban cluster. CA. NV.000 and greater than or equal to 100. Distant Territory inside an urban cluster that is more than 10 miles and less than or equal to 35 miles from an urbanized area. which includes 31 =Town.000. NY. 22 = Suburb. as well as rural territory that is less than or equal to 2. LA. 2 = Suburb. Small Territory outside a principal city and inside an urbanized area with a population less than 100.000 and greater than or equal to 100. KS.S. NE. 13 = City. Mid-Size Territory outside a principal city and inside an urbanized area with a population less than 250. VA. 3 = South (AL. G-7 . UT. AR. Remote Territory inside an urban cluster that is more than 35 miles from an urbanized area. GA. HI. FL. and two or more races students This is a created variable that represents the sum of the percentages of Black/African American students (P_BLACK). 43 = Rural. Asian/Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander. MS.000. OR. MN. 33 = Town. Large Territory outside a principal city and inside an urbanized area with population of 250. MT. Mid-Size Territory inside an urbanized area and inside a principal city with a population less than 250. Large Territory inside an urbanized area and inside a principal city with a population of 250. MO. Hispanic/Latino. Asian students (P_ASIAN). Small Territory inside an urbanized area and inside a principal city with a population less than 100.5 miles but less than or equal to 10 miles from an urban cluster. ID. American Indian/Alaska Native students (P_INDIAN). MD.000 or more. 1= City. ME. MI. SD. NJ. Region This is a created variable based on the two-letter U. PA. TX. WY).000. IA.5 miles from an urban cluster.000 or more. MA. AZ. and students of two or more races (P_TWO). Black/African American. Percent of combined American Indian/Alaska Native. Postal Service abbreviation of the state where the school is located (PL_STABB). SC. Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students (P_ISLAND). CO. NC. Hispanic/Latino students (P_HISP). DE.Locale This is a created variable based on the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) urban-centric locale code (ULOCALE). WA.000. 12 = City. WV). and 4 = West (AK. Fringe Census-defined rural territory that is less than or equal to 5 miles from an urbanized area. Distant Census-defined rural territory that is more than 5 miles but less than or equal to 25 miles from an urbanized area. 2 = Midwest (IL. ND. which includes 11 = City. and 4 = Rural. OH. 32 = Town. The following regions were calculated based on the state in which the school was located: 1 = Northeast (CT. OK. DC.

13 = Disciples of Christ. 15 = Friends. and 3 = Nonsectarian (P430 = 2). 27 = Presbyterian. Data from the PSS were coded as sector = 2 (private). 17 = Islamic. 11 = Church of God in Christ. The RELIG variable includes the following categories: 1 = Catholic (P430 = 1 and P440 = 1). other religious. 12 = Church of the Nazarene.Sector This is a created variable to denote public or private school sector based on the source of the data. 16 = Greek Orthodox. 25 = Methodist. 26 = Pentecostal. 19 = Latter Day Saints. 05 = Baptist. in estimated FTEs. and 29 = Other. Catholic. 18 = Jewish. Variable P430 asks. 03 = Amish. 23 = Other Lutheran. Responses include: 01 = Roman Catholic. “Does School Have Religious Orientation?” where 1 = Yes and 2 = No. 24 = Mennonite. 04 = Assembly of God. Variable P440 asks for the school/program’s religious orientation or affiliation. 20 = Lutheran Church . 09 = Church of Christ. 28 = Seventh-Day Adventist. G-8 . 08 = Christian (no specific denomination). 21 = Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. 14 = Episcopal. It is calculated by dividing the total number of students in school (NUMSTUDS) by the number of K–12 teachers (NUMTEACH). 2 = Other religious (P430 = 1 and P440 = 02–29). and nonsectarian were reported using the RELIG variable. 07 = Calvinist. 02 = African Methodist Episcopal. which is based on PSS variables P430 and P440. 06 = Brethren. Student-to-full-time-equivalent (FTE) teacher ratio This is a created variable that provides the student-to-FTE teacher ratio. 10 = Church of God. 22 = Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod.Missouri Synod.

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