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Maroon Pointing+to+Progress

Maroon Pointing+to+Progress

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Categories:Types, Speeches
Published by: John Hartley on Dec 06, 2011
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12/06/2011

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Maroon:
Pointing
to
Progress
 Topic
 Discuss
your
progress
toward
effective
public
speaking
in
a
1‐2
page
essay.
Create
an
 informative
essay
with
your
instructor
as
the
intended
reader.


Consequently,
you
needn't
 explain
the
assignments
because
your
reader
already
knows
them.
Instead,
focus
on
your
 own
work,
your
reactions,
and
your
progress
as
you
worked
your
way
through
the
 semester.
Your
essay
should
reflect
ethos,
pathos,
and
logos.
Be
careful
to
consider
an
 ethical
(truthful)
approach,
to
include
personal
attitude/emotion,
and
lo
develop
logical
 organization
of
and
support
for
your
main
ideas.
That
support
should
include
references
to
 your
own
speeches
and/or
references
to
material
in
the
textbook.
 
 Note:
The
paper
is
informative;
let
your
instructor
know
that
you
have
reflected
on
your
 growth
this
semester.
This
is
not
a
persuasive
paper;
there
is
no
need
to
persuade
anyone
 about
your
accomplishments.
 
 Submission
­­
Please
complete
your
essay
and
submit
it
via
email
or
in
any
other
way
 assigned
by
your
instructor.
 
 Developing
your
essay
 We've
been
referring
to
the
Canons
of
Rhetoric
as
we
developed
each
speech;
they
are
 certainly
relevant
to
writing
assignments
too!
 
 Invention
‐‐
Brainstorm
and/or
free
write
to
generate
some
ideas
for
this
essay.
Consider
 the
topic
and
its
relevance
to
your
work
during
the
semester.
 •
Has
your
work
made
a
difference
in
your
speaking
apprehension?
(Refer
to
PRPSA
 scores.)
Are
you
feeling
more
confident
as
you
prepare
and/or
deliver
a
speech?
 •
Consider
your
speaking
skills
“before
and
after”
this
course.
What
changes
could
you
 identify?
 •
Have
you
seen
progress
in
certain
areas
and
not
in
others?
(Refer
to
the
speaking
 competencies
used
on
the
critique
forms.)
Review
the
feedback
you've
received
on
your
 speeches
this
semester.
What
areas
have
you
mastered?
(Give
specific
examples
from
your
 speeches.)
What
do
you
still
need
to
work
on?
 •
Were
you
able
to
integrate
the
readings
from
the
text
into
your
speech‐writing
and
 performance?
 
 Arrangement
‐‐
Once
you
have
lots
of
ideas,
create
a
shape
for
your
paper
with
several
 main
points
and
specific
supporting
details
(examples)
in
the
same
way
you
would
a
 speech.
 • Consider
your
MAP
(Message?
Audience
=
Your
instructor
Purpose
=
To
inform)
and
 then
use
a
traditional
structure
with
an
intro,
body
and
conclusion.
 • The
intro
should
include
your
thesis,
a
statement
of
your
overall
sense
about
your
 progress
or
competence.
(Make
a
claim;
characterize
your
progress.)
The
rest
of
the
 essay
will
prove
this
statement.
 • The
body
paragraphs
should
each
have
a
specific
focus
and
should
open
with
a
topic
 sentence.
 • The
conclusion
paragraph
might
summarize
or
give
a
final
thought
for
your
reader
to
 process.
The
conclusion
shouldn't
introduce
a
new
idea.


Possibilities
for
organization
‐‐
You
may
certainly
choose
any
informative
strategies
for
 organization
as
discussed
in
O'Hair.
Three
possibilities
are
described
here:
 1.
You
might
use
chronological
order:
the
first
body
parag
could
include
your
discussion
of
 your
starting
point
this
semester
(with
specific
details
about
attitudes,
expectations,
 competencies
in
writing
and
presenting
speeches);
the
2nd
body
parag
might
address
your
 progress
those
areas
with
specific
details
about
your
accomplishments,
comments
on
 feedback
forms,
and/or
your
mistakes;
the
3rd
body
parag.
could
address
your
future
as
a
 speaker
–
in
other
classes
or
in
your
career.
You
could
explain
your
speaking
goals
so
that
 you
can
continue
to
build
competence
and
confidence.
 
 2.
You
might
try
the
progress
report
format
we
used
in
Speech
2.
 
 3.
You
might
consider
a
comparison‐contrast
format
‐‐
maybe
the
block
method
or
the
 point
method
as
explained
in
the
Course
Guide
and
used
in
the
Issue
Analysis
speech.
 
 Style
and
Memory
‐‐
What
strategies
will
you
use
to
draft
your
essay
so
that
it's
accurate
 and
meaningful
to
your
reader?
How
will
you
help
your
reader
to
remember
your
written
 presentation?
Language
and
grammar
should
be
accurate
and
appropriate
for
your
 audience.
Use
vivid
language
to
describe
speaking
circumstances
that
support
your
main
 ideas.
 
 Delivery
‐‐
Consider
the
presentation
of
your
essay.
Will
your
reader
get
the
message
from
 you
that
your
paper
is
important
and
that
you
prepared
it
carefully?
The
format
should
 include
double‐spacing
and
1"
margins.
Your
name
should
be
on
the
first
page
of
the
file
 AND
in
the
name
of
the
file
you
submit.
The
paper
should
have
a
title
that
suggests
the
 focus
of
your
essay
‐‐
not
merely
the
name
of
the
assignment.
 
 Evaluation
 Your
essay
will
be
evaluated
in
much
the
same
way
your
speeches
have
been
evaluated.
 The
rubric
below
is
a
modified
version
of
the
Competent
Speaker
Speech
Evaluation

 Form
that
we
have
used
for
most
of
the
speeches.
 
 Ineffective
Satisfactory
Good
Excellent
 1.
Narrows
a
topic
appropriate
for
audience,
purpose,
and
occasion.
 2.
Communicates
thesis
appropriate
for
audience,
purpose
and
occasion.
 3.
Provides
supporting
materials
appropriate
for
audience,
purpose
and
occasion.
 (sufficient
and
specific
detail)
 4.
Uses
effective
organization
for
audience,
purpose,
and
occasion
 5.
Uses
effective
language
for
audience,
purpose,
and
occasion
 6.
Uses
effective
sentence
structure,
grammar,
and
spelling.
 7.
Uses
effective
delivery
strategies
‐‐
appropriate
format
 Please
review
the
grading
criteria
for
formal
assignments,
p.
12
of
Course
Guide.


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