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River Cities Reader Issue #793 - December 8, 2011

River Cities Reader Issue #793 - December 8, 2011

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No.

793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Browning Field
Moline
1635 23rd Ave.
762-4626
John Deere Rd.
Moline
4101 44th Ave.
764-7303
East Moline
Moline
1842 18th Ave.
755-9123
Rock Island
2532 18th Ave.
786-0035
Milan
902 W. 4th St.
787-4884
Kennedy Square
East Moline
4117 Kennedy Dr.
755-4747
Elmore
Davenport
4810 Elmore Ave.
359-1228
Old Town
Davenport
903 E. Kimberly R.
391-3323
53rd Street
Davenport
1640 53rd St.
386-3188
Bettendorf
2320 Spruce Hills Dr.
355-3919
West Locust
Davenport
1432 W. Locust St.
322-2275
LeClaire
1109 Canal Shore Dr.
563-289-1506
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
H
ow curious is it
that both liberal
and conservative
media have so obviously
colluded in blacking out
meaningful coverage
of GOP presidential
candidate Ron Paul?
Add to this phenomenon
that when coverage is
unavoidable, it is heavily
biased against Dr. Paul.
This blanket policy by the mainstream media
(MSM) toward this single candidate begs the
question: Why is Ron Paul such a threat to both
parties, so much so that the MSM has orders
from on high to label him as “unelectable” but
offers very little in terms of rationale for why it
deems him so?
Voters’ curiosity should be piqued over this
blatant dismissal of the candidacy of such a
highly respected member of the U.S. House of
Representatives. Texas voters have elected Dr.
Paul 12 times as a Republican, and his base has
grown exponentially since he became a national
candidate, attracting conservative Republicans,
moderate Democrats, and independents alike
because his message has remained steadfastly
constitutional in all things, no exceptions.
In fact, his ability to raise money from
individual voters is extraordinary, and if he were
anyone else, this phenomenon would be covered
ad nauseam by the MSM, especially because
for them it is low-hanging fruit, so to speak. In
other words, it does not require a lot of energy,
intelligence, or work to cover fundraising.
In the final analysis, Ron Paul is the only
candidate who can beat Obama in 2012. (See
cover story on page 6.) The establishment
Republicans had best get their head around this
sooner rather than later, because the Iowa caucus
is around the corner. No other candidate can
garner votes from the independents and moderate
Democrats in the requisite numbers, especially
if the the nominee is Gingrich or Romney.
Furthermore, neither can hope to transfer votes
from Ron Paul supporters, regardless.
Interestingly, Congressman Paul’s platform
resembles that of Obama’s 2008 candidacy of
“hope and change,” with promises of ending the
war; repealing the USA PATRIOT Act because
it harms Americans more than it protects
them; eliminating expensive and fraudulent
war contracting; deeply cutting spending; and
evicting banksters and corporate insiders from
cabinet and agency positions. These are all things
Obama promised, but once in office he not only
reneged on these promises but advanced these
problems considerably, making him even more
reprehensible than his predecessor.
These campaign promises are also found as
planks in the Iowa Republican Party platform
(IowaGOP.org/platform.php). With such a large
number of contenders
in the upcoming GOP
caucus, efficiency would
dictate that comparing
individual candidates’
positions on the core
issues to the planks in
the Iowa Republican
Party platform would be
the best way to properly
examine electability.
Again, a relatively
easy task for the MSM, which has devolved
into nothing more than lazy American Idol-ish
political coverage.
It can be strongly argued that Ron Paul’s
positions, substantiated with an unblemished 20-
year voting record, adhere to the Iowa Republican
Party platform more consistently than any of the
other GOP candidates. In fact, Dr. Paul does not
even have a close second if the Iowa Republican
Party platform is the measuring stick. So why do
the GOP and the media cast Paul’s libertarian
constitutional positions as being “extreme”? If
Paul’s positions are extreme, then so is most of the
Iowa GOP platform.
Most controversial, according to establishment
Republicans and the MSM, are Paul’s positions on
foreign policy, defense spending, and homeland
security. The Iowa GOP platform planks read
in part: “9.04. We support the repeal of the
Patriot Act”; “9.08. We believe that the federal
government should reduce the threat of terrorism
by securing the United States borders at all points
of entry”; “11.01. We insist on a national defense
policy and a foreign policy that is in the sole
interest of the United States”; “11.02. We believe
in a strong national defense. We believe that one
of the Government’s primary roles is to maintain
an adequate military force to secure the borders
of the U.S. To accomplish this, we believe the
U.S. should provide adequate funds to maintain
a military force capable of protecting U.S.
Sovereignty”; “11.12. We believe the United States
must not adhere to or abide by any treaties that
compromise the sovereignty of the United States
or that are prohibited by the Constitution”; “11.13.
We believe our servicemen should serve only the
United States, our Constitution, and the American
Flag. We are adamantly opposed to United
Nations oversight of our military units, ceding
national sovereignty to any foreign body, or to the
establishment of a one world government”; “13.04.
We oppose any taxes being placed on the United
States by the United Nations.”
The above planks are practically verbatim
what Congressman Ron Paul espouses, and
has stood for unyieldingly during his 20 years
in office. There is not a single word in Iowa’s
platform about nation-building, improving
other countries’ infrastructures, constructing
Ron Paul Personifies
Iowa GOP Party Platform
Continued On Page 14
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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ILLINOIS POLITICS

I
t’s a fairly common Statehouse phe-
nomenon that bills will zoom out of the
Senate or the House and then flame out
in the other chamber. People in the other
chamber don’t always care as much as the
people who first sponsor the bills. Often,
they also don’t want to be pushed around by
the other chamber.
That explains part of what happened
last week, when the Senate passed a major
tax-cut package with a super-majority of 36
votes and then the bill received only eight
votes in the House, despite the fact that the
Senate bill would cost just a few million
dollars more than the House’s plan.
There’s far more to this failure than the
usual House-versus-Senate dynamic, of
course. House Speaker Michael Madigan has
declared neutrality on the bill, apparently
because of a conflict of interest. Without
the “Velvet Hammer”
pushing hard for what
is obviously a hugely
controversial measure,
the House just couldn’t
get it done.
House Majority
Leader Barbara Flynn
Currie has made it clear
that she’s skeptical of
the repeated threats
to leave the state by
CME Group and Sears. Part of that tax-cut
bill would lower both companies’ taxes.
Rank-and-file Democrats could have taken
her public comments as a sign that Speaker
Madigan was also not thrilled with this
tax-cut idea.
The House Republicans have been
irritated with the Senate Republicans all
year, and vice versa. That irritation came
to a head at the end of the spring session,
when many Senate Republicans supported
the workers’ compensation reform bill while
the House Republicans opposed it, and
the House Republicans backed the budget
while the Senate Republicans all voted
against it. The House GOPs say their Senate
counterparts undercut them again on last
week’s budget deal, and they were furious
that nine Senate Republicans voted for the
tax-cut bill after House Republican Leader
Tom Cross made it clear that he and his
caucus were opposed.
Cross’ opposition was certainly a major
factor in the bill’s overwhelming failure.
The Democrats say they had 38 of the 60
votes needed to pass it, but almost all of
them bolted as soon as they realized that the
House Republicans wouldn’t be supporting
the bill. There’s no sense in being on-record
supporting a controversial bill when nobody
else is, either.
Cross said his caucus had problems with
the Senate’s increase of the state’s Earned
Income Tax Credit, which was higher than
the House version, as well as the Senate’s
indexing of the standard income-tax
exemption to inflation. Cross also said he
didn’t fully believe CME Group’s contention
that its new tax levels ought to be as low as
the company claims.
Democrats in both chambers believe
that Cross has some ulterior motives for
opposing the tax bill, and they pointed
to CME Group campaign contributions
to Democrats, big Cross contributors,
campaign politics related to Sears’ portion of
the bill, and a general national Republican
plan to create as much chaos as possible
then blame the Democrats for it.
Nobody offered
any proof of any of
their allegations, of
course, but there’s
no doubt that Cross
holds the cards here,
and he doesn’t appear
to be cooperating.
Cross said he’d
put 30 votes on a
revamped proposal
that eliminated all tax relief for the working
poor, but the Democrats say they’d only get
10 to 15 votes for such a plan, which would
leave them far short of a 60-vote majority.
So where does the General Assembly go
from here? Democrats in both chambers
believe they need to somehow put public
pressure on Cross. That’s easier said than
done. Democrats control the government,
after all, and blaming the minority party is
never a simple thing to do. The Democrats
tried to blame the Republicans for the
failure of the proposal to borrow money to
pay off the state’s past-due bills, but it didn’t
work. They’re still getting the blame for
those past-due bills, and the Democrats will
almost undoubtedly wear the jacket if CME
and Sears bolt the state for greener pastures
– even if it isn’t their fault.
Some top Democrats believe that Chicago
Mayor Rahm Emanuel must get more
involved. Since Speaker Madigan’s neutrality
means nobody with any real clout is pushing
this bill in the House, Emanuel will have to
take Madigan’s customary place.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a
daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax.
com.
by Rich Miller
House GOP Leader Blocks Tax-
Cut Package
Democrats control
state government, and
blaming the minority
party is never a simple
thing to do.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
I
owa business groups, undeterred by the lack
of success this year in getting state lawmak-
ers to lower property taxes, will make the
issue a top priority once again in the 2012
legislative session.
The Iowa Chamber Alliance, a nonpartisan
coalition representing 16 chambers of
commerce and economic-development groups
statewide, on November 30 released its 2012
legislative priorities. Property-tax relief topped
the list.
“The table is set for a substantive dialogue,”
said John Stineman, executive director of the
Iowa Chamber Alliance. “All the right people
are talking, and they’re talking about the right
things. We just have to make sure that at the
end of the day, they can reach an agreement.”
In the nation, Iowa has the second-highest
urban commercial property taxes and rural
commercial property taxes, according to the
National Taxpayers Conference. Its 50-state
property-tax study is often cited by Governor
Terry Branstad.
“In order to compete with other states,
regions, and countries, Iowa must improve
its business tax climate,” said Dennis Hinkle,
CEO of the Greater Burlington Partnership, the
umbrella economic-development organization
in Burlington. “The number-one thing that
can help achieve this is property-tax relief for
commercial and industrial property taxpayers.”
Branstad made commercial-property-tax
relief a top priority in the 2011 legislative
session. Lawmakers spent a great deal of time
on the issue, but the Democrat-led Senate and
the Republican-led House couldn’t reach an
agreement.
A plan offered by Iowa Senate Democrats
would have given a property-tax credit to
businesses. It would have cost the state $50
million in Fiscal Year 2013 and would have
grown to $200 million over four years – but
only if state revenue increased by at least 4
percent in each of those years.
Republicans wanted a bigger, bolder plan.
Branstad’s plan called for a 40-percent rollback
on commercial property taxes over the next
five years, which would have cost the state $500
million. Meanwhile, a $347-million plan by
Iowa House Republicans would cut commercial
and industrial property taxes by 25 percent
and give all property taxpayers some relief by
picking up more of the cost for schools.
A key hurdle to passage of property-
tax reform in the 2011 session was the
impact on local governments. Mayors, city
managers, county supervisors, and school and
community-college officials told lawmakers
that a GOP plan to reduce property taxes
would lead to service reductions, layoffs, and
increased tax rates. They described the loss
in revenue as “crippling” and predicted an
increase in tax rates would fall on homeowners.
Some progress appears to have been made
since the session ended June 30.
“We have continued to work throughout
the summer and fall with the local officials and
with business people, to look at what we can do
to prevent a massive property-tax increase on
all classes of property and to reduce the very
high commercial-property-tax burden that we
have in Iowa,” Branstad told IowaPolitics.com
at his weekly news conference. “We want to
make sure that we’re doing that in a way that
protects the budgets of local governments.”
Branstad declined to say whether his 2012
plan again will call for a 40-percent rollback
on commercial property taxes. He said the
state is considering opportunities to assist local
governments, financially as well as freeing them
from some state requirements and costs.
“I think this is one of the most important
things we can do to grow the state’s economy,”
Branstad said. “This is important not just to the
businesses, but to their tenants. The people that
are renting apartments are paying that property
tax.”
Hinkle agreed that the impact on local
governments must be considered with any plan
for property-tax relief.
He said the plan must be substantive,
permanent, and targeted at commercial and
industrial property. He said any move toward
real reform must move the four locally assessed
classes of property taxpayers – residential,
agricultural, commercial, and industrial
– closer to equitable treatment. And he said
the plan must be simple, transparent, and
predictable.
Under state law, businesses pay property tax
on 100 percent of the value of their buildings,
while homeowners pay 50 percent.
“Property taxes have been disproportionately
carried by business for over three decades, and
it has become a severe impediment to growth,”
Hinkle said. “Substantial reform is in order,
and Iowa’s businesses and communities simply
cannot sit by and watch another session slip
by without providing needed commercial/
industrial property tax relief.”
Other 2012 legislative priorities for the Iowa
Chamber Alliance include new or alternative
sources of revenue to pay for Iowa’s roads. The
group supports a gas-tax increase, but wants to
change the Road Use Tax Fund formula so more
money is given to Iowa’s most traveled roads.
This article was produced by IowaPolitics.com.
For more stories on Iowa politics, visit RCReader.
com/y/iapolitics.
Property-Tax Relief Tops
Priorities for Business Groups
IOWA POLITICS
by Lynn Campbell
IowaPolitics.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Electability: Ron Paul Soundly Defeats Obama for These 11 Reasons
E
stablishment political personalities are
quick to claim poor “electability” to di-
minish Ron Paul’s chances because they
presume that Paul holds no positive advantage
in a head-to-head matchup against President
Barack Obama in the general election. That’s
an apparent premise of their calculation.
This is either a sublime miscalculation
or a profound deception. If Ron Paul can
win the Republican nomination, the path to
the White House could seem downhill by
comparison. Why?
Unprecedented debt circumstances
demand an unprecedented re-imagining of
U.S. government priorities and obligations.
The U.S. national debt is categorically
unsustainable and, literally, it’s now
mathematically impossible to repay, too.
That the debt, banking, and finance system
is increasingly proven to be a rigged
Ponzi scheme in mainstream media only
underlines Ron Paul’s tenured criticism of
the oligarchical Federal Reserve system itself.
Further, increasing numbers of voters awaken
daily to the direct correlation between endless
foreign interventionism and that categorically
unsustainable debt that vexes the nation.
Indeed, because of wars, rumors of wars,
a fading dollar, climbing prices, hopeless
unemployment, and an overreaching federal
police state, the time is ripe for Ron Paul’s
small-government message.
There’s merely that small prerequisite for
the general election: winning the Republican
nomination.
The first contest, the Iowa caucus, is an
activist-gathering, hand-raising event that
heavily favors a strong ground organization.
Ron Paul, by all accounts, enjoys a robust
ground organization in Iowa – the strongest
of the field. Ron’s numbers are up recently
in Iowa, too, leading many previously
dismissive pundits to consider seriously the
prospect of a Paul victory next month.
After all, Paul fell just short of winning the
Ames Straw Poll in August by a mere 150 votes
to Michelle Bachmann, who’s since collapsed
utterly from relevance – or posing any serious
threat of repeating. Bachmann was merely
the first of several anybody-but-Romney
candidates to grab the “frontrunner” baton for a
few precious moments of prime time.
The momentum for Ron Paul coming
out of an Iowa victory could roll right
through New Hampshire, considered a more
libertarian-leaning electorate, and in turn
trigger Romney’s long-inevitable glass-house
collapse.
Despite a hiccup here or there, maybe in
South Carolina, no other already-passed-the-
baton “frontrunner” could stop Ron Paul after
victories in both Iowa and New Hampshire.
So there you go: early victories, nomination,
a speech, and on to the general election.
In that general-election matchup, Ron Paul
would make short work of Obama, for these
11 reasons.
(1) Ron Paul significantly outclasses
Obama in any extemporaneous,
conventionally conceivable economic or
foreign-policy debate format not involving
teleprompters. How does Obama justify
expanding the bailouts, the wars, and the
police state at home after promising the
opposite – “hope and change” – throughout
his 2008 campaign? Filling his cabinet with
crony bankster speculators and lobbyists?
Secretly bailing out insiders and foreign
banks alike? How does Obama defend
Solyndra or Fast and Furious? Answer: He
can’t.
I say “conventionally conceivable” because
it seems there’d be one offsetting chance
here for Obama: cancel the debates. And the
election.
One thing’s clear, though: If Ron Paul
wins the Republican nomination, the debate
moderators will have much more difficulty
ignoring him on a stage of two or three than
in the midst of eight or more in the GOP
primary debates.
(2) Ron Paul wins the issue of war
and foreign policy for anti-war liberals,
independents, libertarians, and
constitutional conservatives. Don’t look
now, but that’s a sizable and growing coalition,
and one that isn’t currently gauged by
restricting polling samples to GOP primary
likely Republican voters. There’s upside there,
too, as Paul makes progress with traditional
Bush-supporting “conservatives” who begin
to recognize that wars cost trillions, and the
U.S. is flat broke.
There’s a significant portion of Obama’s
base that elected him based on his anti-war
rhetoric, which he subsequently abandoned
upon inauguration. These disillusioned
liberals and independents have witnessed
Obama expand the war in Afghanistan as he
drew down symbolic numbers in Iraq (and
replaced those troops with mercenaries).
They watched Obama expand the front in
Pakistan with collateral-damage-inflicting
drone strikes – even as he launched a
completely new conflict in Libya, without
a declaration or even an unconstitutional
authorization from Congress.
The most depraved recent offense?
Obama executed an American citizen
and his children in Yemen without a
trial, presentation of evidence, or any
authentication whatsoever of the speech
crimes allegedly committed by him. (Anwar
Al-Awlaki, this new Bogeyman/Goldstein/
Osama, had himself questionable ties to
the U.S. military industrial complex shortly
after 9/11.) Consider that with Ron Paul and
Barack Obama on a debate stage, Obama
becomes the pro-war candidate. Needless to
say, any voter who trends anti-war will likely
vote for Ron Paul.
(3) Ron Paul wins the domestic-police-
state issue before the debate even begins.
After all, Obama is the one on that stage
who must answer for gratuitous TSA abuse.
Seemingly all voters have either had bad
experiences themselves with the TSA, or have
heard anecdotes from friends or relatives
describing the rampant violations of dignity
and body so common now to airport travel.
Everyone’s heard the stories about TSA agents
raping, stealing, leering, and murdering.
Would Obama attempt to suggest that the
TSA keeps us safe – by exposing our children
to pat-downs by pedophiles?
With domestic surveillance, Obama
essentially expanded Bush’s worst abuses and
then argued for more. Even more disaffected
liberals and independents will join the
libertarian and constitutional-conservative
coalition over these issues and vote for Ron Paul.
(4) Ron Paul wins the federal drug-war
issue by arguing to end it . By killing that
decades-old federal boondoggle, Paul wins
the support of most California, Washington,
Nevada, Montana, South Dakota, New
Mexico, Alaska, Hawaii, Colorado, and
Oregon medical-marijuana patients who’ve
COVER STORY
Participants at the Iowa Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, August 2011.
Photo by Jesse Anderson
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
V
oters memories’ are getting
shorter and shorter,
emboldening the mainstream
media (MSM) to utterly
fabricate information in order
to manipulate public opinion
regarding Ron Paul’s popularity
and electability.
At the 2010 Conservative
Political Action Conference
– an annual multi-day event
of speakers presented as
quintessential conservatives
(Dick Cheney, Don Rumsfeld,
and Donald Trump all spoke at
this year’s convention held in
February in Washington, D.C.)
– Fox News edited the footage
it broadcast by inserting booing
during the announcement
that Ron Paul had won the straw poll
(for second year in a row), when in
reality he was getting loud cheers.
Fox was called out quickly by direct
observers and had to issue an apology,
stating, “It was clearly a mistake; we
used the wrong videotape.” Said Fox’s
Bill Hemmer, “It’s an honest mistake.
We apologize for the error. We look
forward to having representative
Paul back on our program very soon.”
(RCReader.com/y/media1) How is
deliberately altering footage, replacing
fact with fiction, an “honest mistake”?
What possible explanation could there
be for altering any news footage in the
first place? It begs the question: How
much of this “editing” is going on in
other parts of the news?
Not to be outdone, CNN's Candy
Crowley, broadcasting live from Ames
in August, boldly lies and states that
despite Ron Paul’s veritable win at
the straw vote, the polls show that
he is “among the worst when put up
against President Obama. In the end,
aren’t Republicans going to go for the
person that they think is the strongest
against Obama?” (RCReader.com/y/
media2)
Never mind that less than a month
earlier, the Rasmussen pollsters
released their Interactive Poll results
stating: “Looking ahead to November,
it seems there are three possible
candidates who could give President
Obama a difficult time. President
Obama would lose his re-election
if Rudy Giuliani (53 percent to 47
percent) or Mitt Romney (51 percent
to 49 percent) was the Republican
nominee. Each candidate would
receive 50 percent of the vote if the
president was running against Ron
Paul. Right now, President Obama
would win re-election against the
10 other candidates presented.”
(RCReader.com/y/media3)
Granted this is only one of dozens
of polls and was taken more than a
year prior to the general election. But
the clear-cut, ongoing effort to spin
Ron Paul’s success in polling as either
insignificant or inaccurate cannot be
understated as evidence that Ron Paul
is a major threat to the organizations
that fund the dominant media,
including both major political parties.
The MSM’s dismissal of Ron Paul
after losing by only 172 votes at the
Ames straw vote was so blatant that
The Daily Show with Jon Stewart did
a segment called “Indecision 2012:
Corn Polled Edition – Ron Paul & The
Top Tier”: “This pretending Ron Paul
does not exist has been going on for
weeks,” states Stewart, amidst clip
after clip of talking heads, pundits, and
news anchors completely ignoring
Ron Paul’s second-place finish by less
than 1 percent. “How did libertarian
Ron Paul become the 13th floor in
a hotel? He is Tea Party patient zero.
All that small-government grassroots
business, he planted that grass.
These other folks, they’re just moral
majorities in a tri-cornered hat. Ron
Paul’s the real deal, and Fox News
should love this guy.”The segment
is such an excruciatingly thorough
and sadly humorous deconstruction
of media malfeasance that it should
be required viewing for all high-
school or college journalism and
communications students. “He’s the
one guy in the field who does not go
out of his way to regurgitate talking
points or change what he believes
to fit the audience he is in front of,”
Stewart states. (RCReader.com/y/
media4)
The day after the Ames straw vote,
Ron Paul was invited to be on only
one Sunday-morning TV show, and
that show purportedly canceled his
appearance. Four months later, Ron
Paul is still going strong, and he lands
an appearance on the venerable CBS
program Face the Nation with Bob
Schieffer. In the interview, Schieffer
asks Paul: “You actually believe 9/11
was America’s fault?” Paul replies that
our government’s foreign polices
create blowback, citing published
government sources such as the
9/11 commission itself as evidence,
to which Schieffer retorts, “I would
question the import of what some of
those commissions found that you
cited.” Schieffer’s hostility toward
Paul was more than apparent and
was so blatant that Salon.com’s Glen
Greenwald wrote: “Schieffer repeatedly
mocks, scoffs at, and displays his
obvious contempt for two claims of
Paul’s which virtually no prominent
politician of either party would dare
express. ... I would have no problem
with Schieffer’s adversarial behavior
here if this were also how he treated
claims made by David Petraeus, Joe
Lieberman, John McCain, and Hillary
Clinton. But one would never, ever see
that.” (RCReader.com/y/media5)
As Adam Curry, co-host of the
NoAgendaShow.com podcast, stated:
Ron Paul is “not part of the script” that
the Ministry of Truth has provided to
the media. “Ron Paul doesn’t know
he’s just supposed to be an extra.”
– Todd McGreevy
Media Manipulation
by Dave Trotter
davetrottercrs@gmail.com
Continued On Page 23
watched as Obama’s DEA raids state-
approved medical-marijuana dispensaries
contrary to state law. You know who else
would appreciate an end to federal drug
enforcement? Minority populations, who are
disproportionately prosecuted for nonviolent
federal drug crimes. Still think Obama has
an unquestionable advantage with minority
groups? How is this growing coalition of
voters even quantified?
(5) Ron Paul wins the abortion issue. Ron
Paul is unabashedly pro-life in his personal
life, and as an obstetrician, he speaks with
conviction – from wisdom and personal
professional experience. He will own the
Christian vote on this issue, obviously. But
Paul argues that the federal government
holds no jurisdiction over the issue, and if
individual states wish to pass more restrictive
or permissive laws, those states should pursue
the legislation that best fits their unique
populations.
It’s a compromise, in other words. So even
if pro-life Christians can’t be enthusiastic
about Paul’s lack of advocacy for a federal ban
on abortion, “pro-choice” abortion supporters
can’t credibly be existentially threatened by
Paul’s 10th Amendment approach, which is
less strident than sound-bite saber-rattling
over a federal ban. In other words, don’t look
for this issue to serve as a convincing single-
issue rallying cry for Obama supporters,
which qualifies it as a win for Paul.
(6) Ron Paul wins the home-school,
pro-organic, anti-mandatory-vaccination,
and other pro-liberty niche crowds. Who
else but Ron Paul has argued for the rights
of the people to consume raw milk? Who
else but Ron Paul has proposed granting tax
credits and more freedom to home-schooling
families to set their own curricula? Contrast
this with Obama’s attempts to nationalize
education standards further on the back of
Bush’s overreaching “No Child Left Behind,”
and the more recent viral images of armed
FDA goons raiding organic-food store
Rawesome Foods in Venice, California. Yep,
even more Californians sympathetic to Paul.
(7) Republicans will turn out en masse
to support the GOP nominee – even if it’s
Ron Paul. Consider how anti-Obama the
lowest common denominator of GOP talking
points has become, as voiced by pundits, talk
radio, and primary candidates in the debates.
Making Obama a “one-term president,”
repealing “Obamacare,” and so on.
Republican voters, long accustomed
to “lesser of two evils”-type calculated
rationalizations, won’t bat an eye when pulling
the lever for Ron Paul. After all, Paul’s single
heresy from current GOP orthodoxy is over
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Vol. 19 · No. 9
December - 1, 011
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T
here are so many smart line deliver-
ies in the Prenzie Players’ Tartuffe
that I could gush over each one
here and still not have space for half of
them. From Stephanie Moeller’s force-
ful proclamation “I’m timid!” to Jessica
Sheridan’s delightfully wicked warning
about being stuck with the unbearable
title character “each day ... and night ... for
life,” Friday’s performance had me cack-
ling over and over again. I won’t, however,
point to any more specific line interpreta-
tions, for fear of ruining the element of
surprise. A large part of the production’s
humor lies in hearing its words delivered
in unexpected ways.
Molière’s best-known work involves a
family whose head of household, Orgon,
is taken in by a man named Tartuffe,
whom the rest of the clan (excluding
Orgon’s mother) see for what he is: a
falsely pious con artist. Consequently,
the family sets in motion a plan to reveal
Tartuffe’s immorality by exposing his
flirtation with Orgon’s wife, and while the
play itself is funny, the Prenzies, under
the direction of Jeremy Mahr, make it
hysterical.
As is common with the Prenzies, Tartuffe
features female actors playing male roles
and a male actor playing a female, a risky
practice that can easily come across as
gender-bending casting merely for the sake
of gender-bending casting. (Here, no fewer
than five characters are played by actors of
the opposite sex.) Yet because of the adept
portrayals, none of it seems gimmicky – not
even the casting choice that seemed the
most likely to be: Andy Curtiss as family
matriarch Madame Pernelle. Looking not
unlike Dana Carvey’s Saturday Night Live
Church Lady, Curtiss acts in earnest and
avoids caricature. There isn’t a “nudge-
nudge, wink-wink, I’m a man playing a
woman” air to his performance; instead,
he wisely plays the part (fairly) straight,
allowing Molière’s hilarious lines to express
the humor, and I think his performance is
funnier for it.
Denise Yoder has the weighty task of
enacting Tartuffe, and while her effort
to play masculine is evident and seems
to stymie her interpretation a bit, she
effectively portrays her con without overt
smarminess. Tartuffe’s insincere piety,
presented to gain the trust (and, eventually,
the possessions) of Orgon, actually seems
sincere, which makes it more believable
that the wealthy man could be taken in by
this schemer. Rather than wearing feigned
goodness so obviously on his sleeve, Yoder’s
Tartuffe is subversively fake in his moral
superiority.
Unlike Yoder, some of Tartuffe’s other
actors appear rather enslaved to Molière’s
rhymes, which affects the natural rhythms
of their deliveries. None of the cast
members, however, is disappointing. As
Orgon, Jeb Makula struggles to make his
pre-planned reactions seem organic, but
delivers the emotion behind his lines with
sometimes-gut-busting gusto. Moeller
beautifully shades Orgon’s somewhat
air-headed daughter Mariane – first
betrothed to her true love, Valere (also
played by Curtiss), and then to Tartuffe
against her will – with efforts to be polite
and respectful, mixed with undertones of
nervous frustration. Portraying Mariane’s
brother Damis, Brianne Kinney has an
appropriately boyish look and a notable ebb
and flow of anger behind her character’s
attempts to defend his mother’s honor.
I’m smitten with Kitty Israel for her
believably composed, demure deliveries as
Orgon’s wife Elmire, while James Driscoll
– perhaps best known to local audiences
for his work with Quad City Music Guild
– is a welcome addition to this cast, with
his careful enunciation and air of class
as Orgon’s brother-in-law Cleante. And
Angela Rathman makes quite an impression
with not one but three roles in the show, the
most memorable being her Monsieur Loyal,
the bailiff who arrives to remove Orgon and
his family from (what becomes) Tartuffe’s
house. With dramatically emphasized,
accented vocals, her Loyal is brightly
amusing – even though Molière himself
doesn’t appear to have made him so.
It is the always impressive Jessica
Sheridan, though, who has the good
fortune to tackle, in my opinion, the play’s
most enjoyable role. As the housemaid
Dorine, Sheridan gets to utter the work’s
most coarse, shocking, and laugh-worthy
lines, which she does through adept
navigation of Molière’s rhymes. Acting as
though Dorine speaks in rhyme all the
time, Sheridan doesn’t allow the style to
prevent her from natural inflections, and
delivers her dialogue almost as if it were
prose and not couplets.
The show’s locale within Rock Island’s
Skellington Manor is also a smart choice, as
the room being used already has the look
and feel of a wealthy family’s living room.
Yet while it’s a perfect fit for the piece, it’s
also one of my few complaints about the
production; the space creates a welcome
intimacy, but also limits the number of
audience members to about 40. That’s
unfortunate, because the Prenzie Players’
Tartuffe should be seen by as many theatre
fans as possible. Along with 2008’s Life’s a
Dream and 2010’s Pericles, Prince of Tyre,
Tartuffe is now one of my all-time favorite
Prenzie efforts.
For tickets and information, call (309)278-
8426 or visit PrenziePlayers.com.
For a review of Clinton Area Showboat
Theatre's Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa
Claus, visit RiverCitiesReader.com.
Tartufe, at Skellington Manor through December 11
By Thom White
THEATRE
(left to right, from top) Brianne Kinney, James
Driscoll, Jessica Sheridan, Kitty Israel, Denise
Yoder, Stephanie Moeller, Angela Rathman,
Jeb Makula, and Andy Curtiss
False Profit
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Deep in the “Ha!” of Texas
A Tuna Christmas, at the District Theatre through December 10
By Thom White
W
hile I like David Turley’s work
as a director – with this year’s
Chicago at the District Theatre
and Gypsy with Countryside Community
Theatre among his most notable efforts
– I’d like to see more of him on-stage.
I was wowed by his John Hinckley Jr.
in 2008’s Assassins at the Green Room
Theatre, tickled pink by his William
Barfee in 2010’s The
25th Annual Putnam
County Spelling Bee at
the Harrison Hilltop
Theatre, and amus-
ingly intrigued by
his Vladimir in that
venue’s 2010 Waiting
for Godot.
With the District
Theatre’s current
offering, A Tuna
Christmas, Turley
more than makes
up for not acting
for almost a year
by portraying 11
characters through
the course of the
almost two-hour show. Having enjoyed
watching him flesh out so many
characters in truly funny ways during
November 25’s performance, I hope he
doesn’t wait another year to act again.
This second in a series of plays written
by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears, and Ed
Howard, A Tuna Christmas also marks
Paul Workman’s directorial debut. And
what’s somewhat obvious about his effort
is the production’s lack of polish; in
particular, the telling of the mysterious
“Christmas Phantom” tale, featuring
a character who vandalizes holiday
displays throughout third-smallest-
town-in-Texas Tuna, could be tightened
up a bit in terms of pacing. However, I
would also argue that the rough edges
and somewhat incongruent pacing are
actually appropriate for these endearingly
satirical stories of 22 characters living and
interacting in this little town.
With Turley taking on 11 of the Tuna
townsfolk, the other half are left to his
capable co-star, James Fairchild. And
what’s perhaps most interesting about
both actors’ portrayals is that, while their
male characters are notably nuanced and
believable, their female Tunites (Tunans?)
are far more dynamic and interesting.
Turley uses his baritone voice, with an
added rasp, for his Didi Snavely, the
woman who owns Didi’s Used Weapons.
With a (pantomimed) cigarette in hand,
Turley gives her a laugh-worthy, no-
nonsense, tell-it-like-it-is attitude. His
Charlene Bumiller, however, deserved
more stage time than the few minutes
she appears in the play. Dressed in a
bright green “Wicked: The Musical” T-
shirt over a gray plaid skirt and under a
gray cardigan – and
wearing a curly
blonde wig – Turley’s
self-absorbed, self-
important, snobby,
annoyed-at-the-
world-she’s-forced-
to-endure teen (you
know, pretty much a
typical teen) had me
in tears with laughter.
In contrast,
Fairchild’s Bertha
Bumiller plumbed
the play’s depths of
emotion, eliciting
sympathy for how
hurt she is by
her never-home,
philandering, fresh-out-of-jail husband,
and hope regarding her love for local
disc jockey Arles Struvie. Fairchild’s
Pearl Burras – Bertha’s elderly aunt – is
similarly endearing, with a soft heart
and gentle laugh that are sweet even
when she’s trying to shoot bluejays with a
slingshot. And her concern for her great-
nephew, Stanley Bumiller – who has just
finished reform school and is almost
done with his court-ordered community
service and probation – is the most
touching part of the play.
The most impressive element of the
production, however, is how quickly
some of the costume changes are made.
There are points in A Tuna Christmas in
which either Turley or Fairchild seems to
merely step backstage, take a breath, and
return to the stage, outfitted in different
clothes from head to toe. Some of these
clothing changes seem impossible to pull
off, and yet, much to my amazement,
the actors and their wardrobe assistants
do the impossible. That, alone, would
be almost enough to warrant seeing the
District’s latest show. As would Turley’s
Charlene. And Fairchild’s Bertha. And
Turley’s Didi. And Fairchild’s ... .
For tickets and information, call (309)235-
1654 or visit DistrictTheatre.com.
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 10 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
the bass origins, the band employed
a foundation of rhythm, and a more
collaborative approach to songwriting.
Member Micah Natera helped the
band use gear in unusual ways – for
example, plugging the bass into an analog
synthesizer – and guitarist Brandon
Darner played a lot of Moog guitar. “You
don’t actually have to pick it,” Pettipoole
explained. “You just put your finger where
the note is, and it
ends up swelling
and sounding like
a cello. ... We were
kind of trying to
redefine, through
the instruments that
we were using, what
the sound was going
to be. It made it a
little more ethereal
... .”
The key phrase
there is “a little
more.” The explosive
“Ms. Hospital Corners” is propelled by
thick layers of bass over twitchy drums,
with bridges that climb and descend
– an unlikely but hugely effective hook.
“Exchequer” is similarly driving and bass-
heavy, with distortion and noise balanced
by smooth synthesizers.
“Med. Song” is more restrained, built on
what Pettipoole described as an Arabic/
Mediterranean guitar line that’s contrasted
with a bass that “kind of moves the song
through more of a pop chord structure”
and augmented by the Moog guitar.
The opening half of the nine-minute
“Fools (How I Survived You & Even
Laughed)” shows that the band can thrive
in austerity, as well – with sensitive, bare-
bones instrumentation and Pettipoole’s
fragile singing.
Those are highlights, but the whole of It
Culls You is similarly poised – confidently
experimental and idiosyncratic but keenly
cognizant of the songcraft niceties that let
audiences inside.
The Envy Corps will perform on Friday,
December 16, at the Redstone Room (129
Main Street in Davenport). The show starts
at 9 p.m., and tickets are $8 in advance
and $10 the day of the show. Tickets
and more information are available at
RiverMusicExperience.org.
For more information on the Envy Corps,
visit TheEnvyCorps.com.
T
he Envy Corps sell a T-shirt that
proclaims the Iowa- and Nebraska-
based band is “Radiohead for
Coldplay Fans.”
Vocalist and bassist Luke Pettipoole said
in an interview last week that he came up
with the idea with his tongue in cheek,
and that he’s been surprised how receptive
fans have been. “People really seem to
enjoy it,” he said. “I don’t know if they’re
making fun of us,
or we’re making
fun of Coldplay, or
what.”
But it’s possible
there’s no mockery
involved at all.
After a one-record
stint on major-label
imprint Vertigo
(which released
2008’s Dwell),
the Envy Corps
returned this fall
with the self-
released full-length It Culls You. Beyond
the way Pettipoole’s phrasing and frequent
falsetto bring to mind Thom Yorke (“I
sing the way I sing,” he said), the album
sounds like the child of Radiohead’s Hail
to the Thief – and in the best way possible.
Spacious yet full, odd yet alluring, the
parentage is obvious but It Culls You
never feels like you’re listening to a clone.
If Coldplay figures in, it’s in the way the
Envy Corps favors accessibility over
alienation.
That’s not to say it’s an easy album.
The band chose to release the record in
October but is waiting to support it on
the road until next year – a way to give
audiences an opportunity to let It Culls
You grow on them. (The Envy Corps’
December 16 show at the Redstone Room
is one of its rare performances this year.)
“You lay the foundation by putting out
your record,” Pettipoole said. “I think
you can challenge your fans a little bit.
There are a lot of sounds in there that you
may not totally understand the first few
listens.”
That’s partly a function of how the
album was composed. The song’s primary
songwriter, Pettipoole had switched from
guitar to bass, and “we ended up writing
the record from a bass player’s point of
view, which to me would sound probably
like the worst thing in the world.”
Overall, Pettipoole said, “we were kind
of bored with guitar music.” Beyond
Confidently, Accessibly Experimental
The Envy Corps, December 16 at the Redstone Room
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
MUSIC
Photo: Seth Warrick
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 11 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 10-9 FM with Dave & Darren
Ben Stiller and Eddie Murphy in Tower Heist
THE MUPPETS
I adored nearly
every minute of the
big-screen reunion The
Muppets, the musical-
comedy brainchild of
screenwriters Jason Segel
(who also co-stars) and
Nicholas Stoller. But
before commencing
with the rave, I should
probably offer a caveat,
because I can barely
imagine the conditions
under which I wouldn’t
have adored this movie.
Theoretically,
I might’ve been
disappointed if the presentation
strayed too far from the playful,
sweetly irreverent, occasionally fourth-
wall-busting antics of The Muppet
Show and previous Muppet features,
and if the felt characters’ voices didn’t
sound at least reasonably close to the
unforgettable ones originated by Jim
Henson, Frank Oz, and company. (As
it stands, the Oz-influenced cadences
of Eric Jacobson – given the unenviable
task of resurrecting Miss Piggy and
Fozzie Bear, among others – do take
some getting used to.) I would’ve likely
been bummed if The Muppets went too
snarky, or too sentimental, or if, God
forbid, studio executives thought it
would be wise to update the puppetry
with a dash (or an onslaught) of CGI.
And it probably goes without saying
that if the project were shepherded
Play the Music! Light the Lights!
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 12
Kemit the Frog, Amy Adams, Walter, Jason Segel, and Rowlf in
The Muppets
by Muppet fans less devoted, and less wise,
than Segel and Stoller – anyone from the
Happy Madison brain trust, for instance
– the results could’ve easily ranged from
embarrassing to unwatchable.
Within the film’s first few minutes,
though, it’s clear that Segel, Stoller, and
director James Bobin absolutely love
this franchise, and have no intention of
mucking it up with a second-rate offering.
The Muppets, consequently, is a first-rate
love letter to both Henson’s creations and
the mad Muppet devotees, myself among
them, for whom these characters will always
be gloriously iconic. At the screening I
attended, it sounded as though the younger
audience members were having a pretty
great time, but no adult should feel the
slightest bit silly about buying a ticket
without pre-teen chaperones. After all, it
wasn’t kids’ laughter I heard during the
movie’s most satisfyingly self-
referential punchlines, or kids’
sniffles I registered when Kermit
the Frog and the whole Muppet
gang gathered for a moving
rendition of “The Rainbow
Connection.”
In the film, the Muppets,
having disbanded years ago,
decide to reunite for a fundraising
performance à la the Judy-and-
Mickey “Let’s put on a show!”
musicals of the 1930s. (A point
underscored by, I kid you not, the
appearance of Mickey Rooney
himself.) Along the way, there’s
some romantic tension between
the ever-chipper Gary (Segel)
and – after 10 years of dating
with no engagement ring – his increasingly
agitated girlfriend Mary (Amy Adams); an
understandable identity crisis involving
Segel’s starstruck Muppet brother Walter
(voiced by Peter Linz); and a series of evil
machinations initiated by oil tycoon Tex
Richman (Chris Cooper). Yet as hoped
for, the storylines here are merely excuses
for a ceaseless parade of verbal and visual
gags, genial and clever musical numbers,
goofy and unexpected celebrity cameos
(the arrival of Jim Parsons, I thought, was
especially priceless), and an overall spirit
that boasts exactly the right balance between
grown-up wit and childlike wonder. Barring
the occasional, hardly vexing bummer
– I can’t be the only one who wished for
a somewhat less grating celebrity host for
the climactic fundraiser – The Muppets’
filmmakers did this thing just right.
Unfortunately, to discuss much of
what makes The Muppets so wonderful
is to potentially ruin its greatest bits. The
previews had prepared me for the inspired
“traveling by map” routine that gets our
heroes from California to France in a matter
of seconds, but I was glad that the genius
of Chris Cooper’s maniacal laugh, at least,
wasn’t spoiled for me in advance. So rather
than expounding on Fozzie’s nightclub act
in Reno, or Alan Arkin’s grousing as a jaded
tour guide, or the choice of musical number
by Gonzo’s longtime chicken companion
Camilla (hint: the first word of the hit
song’s title rhymes with “cluck”), let me
instead reference the hilarity, charm, and
surprisingly deep emotionalism of just one
late-film scene.
In it, Walter finally discovers his long-
dormant Muppet talent during his first
live performance, and at first, you laugh
because Walter’s particular gift seems
inconsequential and silly. But as the
sequence nears its completion, you begin to
acknowledge the great beauty and intense
difficulty in what Walter is doing, and by
the time this wonderfully funny, earnest
character finishes his act, you – like the
on-screen audience he’s performing for
– may also feel like standing and cheering,
and maybe wiping away a tear. And that,
in a nutshell, is The Muppets. As the end
credits rolled, with Muppets and humans
alike mugging to the infectious, peppy joy of
(what else?) “Mah Ná Mah Ná,” I didn’t want
to thank Segel, Stoller, and Bobin for their
work so much as hug the living daylights
out of them.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
HUGO
When I attended a recent screening
of Happy Feet Two, it was preceded by a
preview for Martin Scorsese’s Hugo. And
I can only assume that when the trailer
ended, and a nearby patron, quite loudly,
decreed, “Martin Scorsese has lost his
mind,” the sentiment was uttered because
Hugo seemed such a radical, potentially
ill-fitting, and possibly money-grubbing
departure for its director. (“A children’s
movie?” you can hear the faithful cry. “In
3D?!? What’s the world coming to?!?”)
Allow me a moment, then, to assuage the
fears of that irked gentleman and anyone
else who might roll their eyes at the
thought of a kid-friendly Scorsese with a
3D surcharge:
The movie is
an exceptional
achievement,
and all the
more so for
its director
having made
a gripping,
visually
breathtaking,
emotionally
resonant family
entertainment
about film
preservation, for Pete’s sake.
Set in a bustling Paris railroad station
in the 1930s, and concerning a young
orphan (the empathetic, grave Asa
Butterfield) who grows fascinated with
the works and presence of legendary
film pioneer George Méliès (a splendidly
touching, effective Ben Kingsley),
Hugo, at roughly 130 minutes, ran a bit
long for my tastes. That’s pretty much
the only complaint I can make about
it. With its genius-level production
design at every turn, Scorsese and his
wildly gifted collaborators have crafted
a work of such period specificity and
mesmerizing mechanical detail that
it might be the finest argument for
3D that the movies have yet provided;
you’re wholly, thrillingly transported to
its world of steam-filled terminals and
metal stairways and gloomy catacombs.
(Visiting Hugo’s murky train-station
dwelling for the first time, Chloë Grace
Moretz’s Isabelle exclaims, “I feel like
Jean Valjean!”) In his role as an officious,
comically threatening station agent,
Sacha Baron Cohen delivers some much-
welcome slapstick, with his mechanical-
leg shtick an apparent nod to Kenneth
Mars in Young Frankenstein. Yet beyond
Hugo’s beauty and its chuckles, Scorsese
and his top-
tier actors
– working
from a
smartly
structured
John Logan
script based
on Brian
Selznick’s
The
Invention of
Hugo Cabret
– have also
fashioned a
loving, graceful, and remarkably vivid
elegy for celluloid, and for those feelings
of utter, magical rapture that occur when
you’re in thrall to a film that quite simply
knocks your socks off. I’m betting that
for many, especially the film lovers in
attendance, Hugo itself might just be one.
ARTHUR CHRISTMAS
Of the three (count ’em!) family
films that opened the day before
Thanksgiving, the animated Arthur
Christmas initially seemed the most ideal
option for younger children, given the
nostalgic, in-joke appeal of The Muppets
and the melancholia and gravitas of
Hugo. Who could have guessed, however,
that this frisky, buoyant entertainment
might actually be the least appropriate
for the grade-school-and-under set?
Sure, the bright colors and fast pace will
keep the
ankle-biters
amused, but
is there any
way they’ll
register just
how freakin’
hysterical
this thing
is?
During
its first 10
minutes, in
which our dotty Santa Claus (voiced by
Jim Broadbent) and his team of silent-
ninja elves descend from a camouflaged,
city-sized aircraft and deliver toys
worldwide, director Sarah Smith’s outing
appears to have been made expressly
for hyperactive tots with short attention
spans. The animation and choreography
are spectacular, yet between Santa’s
duties and the bustling, behind-the-
scenes activity at his high-tech North
Pole headquarters, the movie is manic
without being particularly enjoyable.
(A product of the British animation
studio Aardman, Arthur Christmas,
at first, is too much Flushed Away and
too little Wallace & Gromit.) But once
Santa returns from his rounds, and
stands triumphantly under a banner
reading “Mission Accomplished” – the
first of many comic references that kids
likely won’t get – the film morphs into
a sensationally witty, riotous, and even
touching generational comedy designed
less for children than adults’ giggly inner
children.
One toy, you see, has accidentally
been left behind during the Christmas
Eve mêlée, leaving Santa’s aged pop (Bill
Nighy) and adorably clumsy younger son
Arthur (James McAvoy) responsible for
delivering the gift before sunrise – much
to the consternation of Santa’s officious
elder son, and heir apparent, Steve (Hugh
Laurie).
What
happens
next,
meanwhile,
is really
better
experienced
than
described,
but if you
imagine
a revved-
up, animated, holiday-themed episode
of Everybody Loves Raymond, you’ll
get the basic idea. Beginning with a
board-game-playing scene reminiscent
of those fabulously caustic “Mama’s
Family” sketches on The Carol Burnett
Show, the awkwardness and tension
between the three generations of Clauses
here are bitingly funny and instantly
recognizable; in a lovely touch, the gift
maven Santa gives his sons personal
checks for Christmas. (Dad gets cash.)
And once Arthur and Grandsanta take
to the skies, the film’s ingenious visual
and verbal gags arrive at a joyously
speedy clip, with consistently clever,
farcical routines about GPS and the
sleigh mistaken for a UFO and Steve’s
overly solicitous elf assistant (he gives his
boss boxer briefs for Christmas) paying
off again and again. It may start shakily,
but Arthur Christmas winds up a terrific
holiday treat for grown-ups. Bring the
kids if you want to.
Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/
MikeSchulzNow.
Continued From Page 11 MOVIES
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Asa Butterfeld in Hugo
Arthur Christmas
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
matter-of-fact humor (“I need five dollars;
you have five dollars. Boom! Do the math!”),
impatience, and heart. She also has this mildly
wicked sense of humor that really tickled me.
At one point, she throws the paper with her
Secret Santa recipient’s name on it the ground,
stomps on it, and then rubs it into the floor
with her foot. And in my favorite moment in
the bit, the actress concludes the tantrum with a
dismissive rear kick, pushing the paper behind
her in a final insult to the person named on it.
Hilarious!
What strikes me about this telling of the
story, though, is that any of its characters
could take the lead,
as all of them are so
amusing, so individual,
and so enjoyably
portrayed by the
members of Furness’
cast. Jessica Sheridan
couldn’t be more
exuberant as Junie
B.’s enemy May, while
Ciemiewicz’s Sheldon
could seemingly get
away with anything
with his comedic
cuteness. Tom Taylor’s accent is spot-on as
Junie’s Spanish-speaking classmate José, but
his effervescent, sing-song inflections as music
teacher Mr. Toot are even more memorable.
Janos Horvath’s playful inner child shines
through, entertainingly, as Junie B.’s best friend,
Herb. Jillian Prefach delightfully pouts and
brags as the well-to-do first-grader Lucille. And
Brad Hauskins uses exasperated eye rolls and
glances to humorously punctuate his severe,
dry deliveries as Mr. Scary.
But in the end, what really mattered was
what Madison thought of the play. And
Madison, who has “read about 12 of the books”
(there are currently 30), thought the Junie B.
show “was really funny and awesome.” She said
she liked Junie B. and Sheldon the best – I was
partial to May, myself – and her favorite part of
the show involved the “squeeze-a-burp,” which
is a belching version of a whoopie cushion.
(I guess I don’t have a Little Princess after
all. Sigh.) Madison even noticed the work of
lighting designers Jonathan Allender-Zivic and
Joe Simpson, noting that she liked how Junie
B. was alone in a spotlight while the rest of the
stage was dark during her monologues. And
in Madison’s highest praise for Junie B. in Jingle
Bells, Batman Smells, she said there was nothing
she didn’t like about Circa ’21’s production, and
that she wants to see it again. I couldn’t have
said it better myself.
For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733
extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
B
efore November 26, I didn’t know
much about Junie B. Jones beyond her
being the main character in a popular
children’s book series by Barbara Park. With
that in mind, I felt I needed to enlist the help of
my family’s resident Junie B. expert, eight-year-
old Madison, to adequately review the Circa
’21 Dinner Playhouse’s production of Junie B.
in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells. (Madison is, after
all, the show’s target audience, as opposed to
this 37-year-old, balding male.) I suspected that
if she was pleased with the play, I would be, too.
But as it turned out, I left the show feeling
that I enjoyed it whether Madison did or not.
(It turned out she
did.) Playwright
Allison Gregory’s
script and director
Kimberly Furness’
staging deliver
enough humor – and
humor that only the
adults in the audience
would appreciate –
that I was legitimately
laughing throughout
the performance,
rather than simply
chuckling in amusement at childish jokes. For
example, at one point, the character of Sheldon
(Marc Ciemiewicz) chokes on his lines in his
school’s Christopher Columbus play and, in his
role as the ship the Niña, breaks into a nervous
rendition of Styx’s “Come Sail Away.” What
eight-year-old is going to appreciate that? I,
however, giggled over the bit for quite a while,
and it was one of many jokes in the production
to elicit lasting laughter from me.
Here’s what I learned about the Junie B. Jones
universe: Junie’s first-grade teacher, Mr. Scary,
is stern but has no control of his classroom. Her
mortal enemy, May, is a goody-goody tattletale,
and all but friendless for it. Junie frequently
confides in her stuffed pink elephant, Philip
Johnny Bob, who gives her frank advice.
(When Junie B. plots to give May a lump of
coal, Philip points out, “That’s not actually coal.
It’s called a charcoal briquette.”) And our Miss
Jones likes to steal the spotlight through gross
(at least for a first grader) misbehavior; in this
show’s case, she sings the “Batman smells”
lyrics during her class’ performance of “Jingle
Bells” at the school assembly.
Sunshine Woolison-Ramsey plays our
heroine for the second time on the Circa ’21
stage – following 2009’s Junie B. Jones & a Little
Monkey Business – and the casting was a smart
move on the theatre’s part. While the performer
doesn’t get to showcase her fantastic vocal
belt, Woolison-Ramsey does get to prove that
she’s got some acting chops, layering her Junie
B. with a mix of impertinence, obstinance,
Brat Packed
Junie B. in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells, at the Circa ’21
Dinner Playhouse through December 31
By Thom White
THEATRE
Jessica Sheridan, Brad Hauskins, and
Sunshine Woolison-Ramsey
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1
could not achieve. There is no other candidate
committing such an exhaustive and detailed fiscal
plan to paper.
At a minimum, the MSM could use Paul’s plan
as a point of comparison, but instead it ignores
it altogether. Certainly if Paul’s plan is without
merit, the MSM would use it against him, but
apparently that is not an option.
By every measure Dr. Paul far exceeds
the other candidates in his understanding
of and commitment to all the conservative
core issues, such as no more deficit spending,
limited taxation, free-market economies,
personal and family liberties, protection of
property rights, strong defense with limited
foreign interventionism, and, above all else, the
conservative principle of small government and
state sovereignty. His plan cuts five agencies,
including the IRS and TSA, altogether and
decreases the federal payroll by 10 percent, for
starters. These are all in keeping with the Iowa
platform.
Let us not forget that in 2003 Paul accurately
predicted the approaching financial crisis due
to the federal government’s intervention in the
housing market via Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, along with the Federal Reserve Bank’s
manipulation of interest rates. Don’t Americans
want a president that pays this close attention and
fearlessly warns us?
All the evidence points to the other candidates,
most especially Mitt Romney and Newt
Gingrich, as big-government Republicans.
Both have a long history of supporting huge
government programs, especially in health care
– Romneycare in Massachusetts, and Gingrich’s
well-documented support of Clintoncare.
Gingrich also has a lucrative history with the
health-care industry, receiving $37 million from it
for lobbying Congress. In addition, he was a paid
consultant during the same time that Fannie and
Freddie were failing, and while Fannie executives
were indicted for cooking the books.
Add to this both Gingrich’s and Romney’s
documented support of cap-and-trade, including
support of aggressive government intervention in
climate change. This central-bank-backed agenda
is rooted not only in growing government, but
in expanding global intervention in domestic
policies. There is little evidence beyond campaign
rhetoric that these counterfeit conservatives
would fulfill a limited-government agenda.
Paul espouses, and history validates, that
increased taxation has never resulted in reduced
spending, but instead has always led to increased
spending. Every time Congress legislates
additional revenue through taxation, it has only
increased expenditures and borrowing. Neither
the Republican and Democratic parties nor
the MSM share this fiscal truth with the public,
so their arguments for additional taxation as a
solution for resolving the national deficits are
false from inception.
the largest embassy in the world in Iraq before
we withdraw troops in December, maintaining
900 bases in 150 countries, providing exorbitant
amounts of foreign aid in the form of cash,
soldiers, war contractors, weapons, and the list
goes endlessly on. Paul contends that there is no
tangible evidence that any of these expenditures
overseas has made us safer here at home. He does
contend, on the other hand, that our intervention
has made us exceedingly unpopular. He
makes the case: “How would you feel if foreign
armies occupied your cities, especially when
bombing and fighting was occurring in your
neighborhoods?”
Perhaps even more important, Dr. Paul
receives more contributions from individual
military personnel than all the other candidates
combined. Paul is adamant about keeping
spending for defense, but is opposed to
militarism, claiming it is mostly foreign aid
that does little to protect Americans but instead
enriches a corrupt global military industrial
complex. Obviously, military personnel agree.
Other planks that mirror Paul’s positions
include: 2.20 – Abolish the federal Department
of Agriculture; 2.22 – Farm subsidies should be
phased out; 3.03 – Oppose government subsidies
and bailouts that distort free markets; 3.25
– Oppose government control of the Internet;
4.16 – Eliminate both the Iowa and federal
departments of education; 4.19 – Oppose No
Child Left Behind; 5.04 – Global warming is a
scientific fraud; 5.04-05 – Oppose any fines, taxes,
laws, regulations, etc. related to climate change;
5.11 – Oppose cap-and-trade (American Power
Act); 5:12 – Abolition of the Department of
Energy; “12.12. We strongly oppose the diabolical
collusion of the United Nations in establishing the
unconstitutional ‘sustainable development agenda
21’ in our local communities, our state, and our
nation”; 8.17 – Due to imminent failure of these
programs, to abolish Medicare, Medicaid, and
Social Security over time; 8.14 – Parents decide
which vaccinations their children receive, if any;
10.25 – Jury nullification; 13.09 – Support the
abolition of the IRS; 14.02 – Vetoing all earmarks
and pork spending; 13.32 – Require a balanced
budget; and 13.35 – Support auditing the Federal
Reserve Bank.
Stack these similarities up against the other
candidates, and there is no contest. The other
candidates have diverged too far, too often to
compete as the leading conservative in the race.
As for leadership skills, again, candidate Paul is
second to none. A perfect example of this is Paul’s
Restore America Plan, which is a highly detailed
blueprint for achieving nearly every plank in the
Iowa Republican platform. You can evaluate it for
yourself at RonPaul2012.com.
None of the other candidates has submitted
such a comprehensive plan for cutting $1 trillion
in government spending and balancing the
national budget in three short years. This is
considerably more aggressive, something that
the even the deficit-reduction “super committee”
Ron Paul Personifies Iowa GOP Party Platform
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
Continued On Page 24
Continued From Page 3
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1
trying to push their career into the next
phase. The personal nature of the songs
creates a genuine intimacy.
Between “I Want You to Run” and the
closing title track, the brothers thread
their themes through related stories;
the deep longing to escape smacks into
the reality that comes with chasing any
ambition. “She’s Always on My Mind”
and “Caroline” wrap sad and lonely lyrics
around pristine stringed instruments. “It’s
Too Damn Hard,” and “Don’t Be Afraid
of the Light” illustrate the inevitable
choice that all star-chasers face – to quit
and go home or forge ahead despite the
potential for loss and failure.
“Dream” resolves those conflicts with a
meditative sound and determined lyrics:
“They’re all wrong / I’ll never let their
words have holds on me / Keep us in
chains from being what we should be.”
Only one song doesn’t fit the general
theme: first track “Whoa, Whoa, Whoa.”
On instrumental and lyrical levels, it’s
hardly a bad song, but it does feel tacked
on, as if hoping for a Subaru commercial
or a spot on Grey’s Anatomy. While a pop
influence is evident throughout Dream
– particularly in the vocals – the opener
is so fluffy it’s nearly forgettable on this
otherwise thoughtful and rich record.
The Cerny Brothers will perform on
Friday, December 23, at the Redstone
Room (129 Main Street in Davenport).
The show starts at 8:30 p.m., and tickets
are $7. Tickets and more information are
available at RiverMusicExperience.org.
Mick Parsons is a freelance writer,
published poet, and former teacher. He
lives in northwestern Illinois.
I
n an interview,
Robert and Scott
Cerny – who will
be playing as the
Cerny Brothers on
December 23 at the
Redstone Room – said
their album Dream
grew out of one song:
“I Want You to Run.”
The record’s second
track, it fuses elements
of country, folk, and
bluegrass with pol-
ished vocal and lyrical
stylings that sound
more like pop.
Starting at an
ambling pace, “I
Want You to Run” mixes a simple drum
and high-hat beat supporting steel and
acoustic accompaniment that rolls into
the first verse: “I want you to run / Past
your childhood home / To the great
unknown.”
This verse embodies the major
thematic element of the album – that
yearning to leave, that desire to take a
chance and have someone else come
along to share the experience. The
writing here has a simple elegance and
unforced honesty that work with the
intricate pick work to create a sense of
urgency. Here there’s a radical optimism
that’s at the core of the entire album, a
refusal to believe that dreams are better
deferred than pursued.
A banjo leads into the chorus, where
the song seems to break loose, like a car
careening on a twisted back road: “I want
you to run / All night long / ’Til we are so
from home / I want you to run.”
The song cries of freedom restrained.
The verses work with the chorus to snap
the music back like a wild dog on a leash.
It sounds like one of those songs that
simply had to come out.
As a whole, the album recalls Mumford
& Sons among its Americana peers.
But Dream distinguishes itself by being
unique to the Cerny Brothers. They
previously released albums under the
name Planning the Rebellion, and
this 47-minute record has a narrative
maturity and coherence. It feels like
Robert’s and Scott’s attempt – a mostly
successful one – to weave a tapestry
sketching their journey from rural Illinois
(they’re originally from Sherrard) to the
Quad Cities to Los Angeles, where they’re
Radical Optimism
The Cerny Brothers, December 23 at the Redstone Room
by Mick Parsons
mickp@gmx.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
What’s Happenin’
Music
Mike Garson
First Presbyterian Church
of Davenport
Saturday, December 10, 4 p.m.
P
erforming in a December 10
concert at Davenport’s First
Presbyterian Church, the latest guest in
Quad City Arts’ Visiting Artist Series
is acclaimed pianist/composer Mike
Garson, and according to his Web-site
bio at MikeGarson.com, he’s a musician
“to whom the word ‘no’ is quickly
transformed into the word ‘now.’” Which
is funny, because that’s exactly what
happens whenever I say ‘no’ around here
... although it’s always my editor Jeff who
transforms it into ‘now.’
Alas, that word swap and our
shared first name are about all I have
in common with Garson, whose
prodigious talents have consistently
thrilled audiences and collaborators
for nearly four decades. With Garson’s
touring appearances including concerts
at UCLA’s Royce Hall, the Tanglewood
Jazz Festival, and the Kennedy
Center, his exhilarating, frequently
improvisational wizardry on the keys
has earned him fans nationwide, as
have his dozen-plus albums, with 2008’s
Conversations with My Family receiving
four-and-a-half (out of five) stars from
Downbeat magazine.
Yet while trained in classical music
and particularly fluent in jazz, there
appears to be no genre in which Garson
isn’t extraordinarily accomplished. The
composer of, no kidding, more than 4,000
individual pieces of music to date, he has
worked alongside such varied musicians
as Seal, Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor, the
Smashing Pumpkins’ Billy Corgan, and
the members of the L.A. Philharmonic,
while his piano and compositional skills
have been heard on the soundtracks to
such films as Basquiat, Stigmata, and
Se7en.
However, he might be best known
for being a longtime pianist for David
Bowie, with whom Garson has recorded
and toured since 1972 (appearing on
Saturday Night Live with the man in
1997), and who apparently has nothing
but his highest praise for Quad City
Arts’ latest visiting artist. Calling
Garson “exceptional” and a musician
who “naturally understand[s] the
movement and free-thinking necessary
to hurl themselves into experimental or
traditional areas of music,” Bowie sums up
his collaborator’s talents by stating simply,
“It is pointless to talk about his ability
as a pianist.” Boy, David ... wish you had
mentioned that 350 words ago ... .
Davenport’s First Presbyterian Church
is located at 1702 Iowa Street, and more
information on Garson’s public concert
is available by calling (309)793-1213 or
visiting QuadCityArts.com.
Theatre
All I Really Need to Know I
Learned by Being in a Bad Play
Davenport Junior Theatre
Sunday, December 11, 2 & 4 p.m.
F
or Davenport Junior Theatre’s annual
holiday production, artistic director
Daniel D.P. Sheridan is trying something experimental
this year: the presentation of a 40-minute show that will
be designed, rehearsed, and performed during a single,
unbroken 30-hour period, with the play’s student actors
even staying in the theatre overnight to get the job done.
The first one of you to crack a Kathie Lee Gifford joke
will no longer be allowed to read the What’s Happenin’
pages. (Besides, as Sheridan asserts, “For generations,
Junior Theatre students have been dying to figure out a
way to stay at Junior Theatre overnight.”)
Written by Werner Trieschmann
and titled All I Really Need to Know I
Learned by Being in a Bad Play, this
Junior Theatre outing examines the
business behind “show business” ...
with the show in question boasting a
snooty narrator, a passive-aggressive
stage manager, an on-stage meeting
of the Small Part Support Group, and
a misguided interpretation of Romeo
& Juliet in a Starbucks. In short, a bad
play, and one that Sheridan believes will delight both
audiences and his Junior Theatre participants.
“I would not have picked this show two years ago,”
says Sheridan, who also directs the production, “because
it is a bit of a satire making fun of theatre and the
process. But these kids have really become a company
over the last three years ... . I know these students
appreciate theatre, each other, and what being at Junior
Theatre means, so I think we can now pause and poke
fun at it, too!”
And, it should go without saying, also work hard
to pull it off. While the students will have their lines
memorized in advance, they – like the show’s director,
designers, and set builders – will have just 30 hours
to bring All I Really Need to Know from first staging
rehearsal to completion, and will also be shadowing the
comedy’s professional team through every aspect of play
production.
“All in all,” says Sheridan, “it will be extremely
challenging. However, there are great benefits to only
having 30 hours. There is no time to dilly-dally ... . This
project forces everyone to be decisive.” Plus, he adds,
“It will be nice to only focus on one thing for 30 hours.”
Which, I’m guessing, is exactly what Kathie Lee thought
when ... .
Oh, come on! You were thinking that joke way I was!
All I Really Need to Know I Learned by Being in a Bad
Play will be performed at 2 and 4 p.m. on December
11, tickets are $3 at the door, and more information
is available by calling (563)326-7862 or visiting
DavenportJuniorTheatre.com.
Exhibit
In a Nutshell: The Worlds of
Maurice Sendak
Moline Public Library
Wednesday, December 28,
through Friday, February 24
O
n December 28, the Moline Public
Library will play host to the special traveling
exhibition In a Nutshell: The Worlds of Maurice
Sendak. For those of you who may be confused by the
accompanying image, Sendak is the guy in the middle.
The world-renowned Sendak, of course, is the author
and illustrator of Where the Wild Things Are, the beloved
fantasy adventure that has been a touchstone for young
– and no-longer-young – readers since its original
publication in 1963. Yet as the
library’s exhibition will explore
in great detail, Sendak was, and
continues to be, fascinating far
beyond the fame he acquired for this
seminal children’s book.
Born to Polish immigrants in 1928,
many of whose relatives perished
in the Holocaust, Sendak became
interested in themes of Jewish culture
and history, geography, and mortality
at a very early age. And as the In a Nutshell exhibit will
display, those themes are visualized time and again in
Sendak’s art, as seen in his vivid, signature illustrations in
more than 100 picture books published between 1947 and
the present day.
The recipient of such esteemed prizes as the National
Book Award, the National Medal of Arts, and the Hans
Christian Andersen Award for children’s book illustration,
Sendak also holds the distinction of collaborating with
such literary masters as Isaac Bashevis Singer and Angels
in America author Tony Kushner. He also served as a
designer for numerous operas – among them Mozart’s
The Magic Flute, Prokofiev’s Love for Three Oranges, and a
1979 stage version of his own Where the Wild Things Are
– and was even on the National Board of Advisors for the
Children’s Television Workshop during the developmental
stages of Sesame Street.
And if all that isn’t enough to establish Sendak’s
coolness, try this on for size: In North Hollywood,
California, there’s actually an elementary school named
after him.
So bring on the exhibit! Or, to put it in more Sendak-ian
terms: “Let the wild rumpus start!”
In a Nutshell: The Worlds of Maurice Sendak runs
through February 24, and information on the exhibit
is available by calling (309)524-2470 or visiting
MolineLibrary.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1
of you are somehow not yet in the mood
– try matching these seven numbers from
Sixties Hits with the artists who originally
made them famous:
For tickets to The Midtown Men’s
December 17 concert, call (800)745-3000 or
visit AdlerTheatre.com.
Music
The Midtown Men
Adler Theatre
Saturday, December 17, 7:30 p.m.
P
erforming an evening of
unforgettable ’60s tunes under
the moniker The Midtown Men,
four stars of the original Broadway
production of Jersey Boys – Michael
Longoria, Daniel Reichard, J. Robert
Spencer, and Tony Award recipient
Christian Hoff – will take the Adler
Theatre stage on December 17. As
someone who can occasionally go
long weeks with nothing but Jersey
Boys in his car’s CD player, this is kind
of like God Himself coming to town ...
if God treated us to His renditions of
“Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Sherry.”
With the New York Daily News
raving that “The Midtown Men sound
as crisp as their Rat Pack-inspired
suits,” Hoff, Longoria, Reichard,
and Spencer are sure to deliver an
incredible night of musical favorites
during their Davenport engagement.
Yet in addition to tunes from Jersey
Boys’ Tony- and Grammy-winning
salute to Frankie Valli & the Four
Seasons, The Midtown Men’s
performance will find its exceptional
vocalists harmonizing to some of the
most adored pop standards by other
famed artists of the 1960s, among
them numerous songs featured on the
quartet’s 2011 CD Sixties Hits.
To help get yourself in the mood
for this special concert event – if any
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
What Else
Is Happenin’
Continued On Page 18
MUSIC
Thursday, December 8
– The Chordbusters’ Third-Annual
Christmas Festival. Concert
featuring the area barbershop
performers, the Trinity Lutheran
choirs, the Assumption High School
Jazz Choir, the Three Guys with Soule
quartet, an organ/trumpet duet,
and more. Trinity Lutheran Church
(1122 West Central Park Avenue,
Davenport). 7 p.m. $5, ages 12 and
under free. For information, visit
TheChordbusters.com.
Thursday, December 8
– Christmas at the Speakeasy.
Holiday favorites performed by
members of the Circa ’21 Dinner
Playhouse’s Nuncrackers and the
theatre’s performing wait staff, the
Bootleggers. Circa ’21 Speakeasy
(1818 Third Avenue, Rock Island).
7 p.m. $10-12. For tickets and
information, call (309)786-7733
extension 2 or visit Circa21.com
Thursday, December 8 – Black
Hawk College Holiday Choral
Concert. Annual wintertime
presentation with the college’s choirs.
First Congregational Church (2201
Seventh Avenue, Moline). 7:30 p.m.
Free admission. For information, call
(309)796-5478 or visit BHC.edu.
Theatre
All I Really Need to Know I
Learned by Being in a Bad Play
Davenport Junior Theatre
Sunday, December 11, 2 & 4 p.m.
F
or Davenport Junior Theatre’s annual
holiday production, artistic director
Daniel D.P. Sheridan is trying something experimental
this year: the presentation of a 40-minute show that will
be designed, rehearsed, and performed during a single,
unbroken 30-hour period, with the play’s student actors
even staying in the theatre overnight to get the job done.
The first one of you to crack a Kathie Lee Gifford joke
will no longer be allowed to read the What’s Happenin’
pages. (Besides, as Sheridan asserts, “For generations,
Junior Theatre students have been dying to figure out a
way to stay at Junior Theatre overnight.”)
Written by Werner Trieschmann
and titled All I Really Need to Know I
Learned by Being in a Bad Play, this
Junior Theatre outing examines the
business behind “show business” ...
with the show in question boasting a
snooty narrator, a passive-aggressive
stage manager, an on-stage meeting
of the Small Part Support Group, and
a misguided interpretation of Romeo
& Juliet in a Starbucks. In short, a bad
play, and one that Sheridan believes will delight both
audiences and his Junior Theatre participants.
“I would not have picked this show two years ago,”
says Sheridan, who also directs the production, “because
it is a bit of a satire making fun of theatre and the
process. But these kids have really become a company
over the last three years ... . I know these students
appreciate theatre, each other, and what being at Junior
Theatre means, so I think we can now pause and poke
fun at it, too!”
And, it should go without saying, also work hard
to pull it off. While the students will have their lines
memorized in advance, they – like the show’s director,
designers, and set builders – will have just 30 hours
to bring All I Really Need to Know from first staging
rehearsal to completion, and will also be shadowing the
comedy’s professional team through every aspect of play
production.
“All in all,” says Sheridan, “it will be extremely
challenging. However, there are great benefits to only
having 30 hours. There is no time to dilly-dally ... . This
project forces everyone to be decisive.” Plus, he adds,
“It will be nice to only focus on one thing for 30 hours.”
Which, I’m guessing, is exactly what Kathie Lee thought
when ... .
Oh, come on! You were thinking that joke way I was!
All I Really Need to Know I Learned by Being in a Bad
Play will be performed at 2 and 4 p.m. on December
11, tickets are $3 at the door, and more information
is available by calling (563)326-7862 or visiting
DavenportJuniorTheatre.com.
Exhibit
In a Nutshell: The Worlds of
Maurice Sendak
Moline Public Library
Wednesday, December 28,
through Friday, February 24
O
n December 28, the Moline Public
Library will play host to the special traveling
exhibition In a Nutshell: The Worlds of Maurice
Sendak. For those of you who may be confused by the
accompanying image, Sendak is the guy in the middle.
The world-renowned Sendak, of course, is the author
and illustrator of Where the Wild Things Are, the beloved
fantasy adventure that has been a touchstone for young
– and no-longer-young – readers since its original
publication in 1963. Yet as the
library’s exhibition will explore
in great detail, Sendak was, and
continues to be, fascinating far
beyond the fame he acquired for this
seminal children’s book.
Born to Polish immigrants in 1928,
many of whose relatives perished
in the Holocaust, Sendak became
interested in themes of Jewish culture
and history, geography, and mortality
at a very early age. And as the In a Nutshell exhibit will
display, those themes are visualized time and again in
Sendak’s art, as seen in his vivid, signature illustrations in
more than 100 picture books published between 1947 and
the present day.
The recipient of such esteemed prizes as the National
Book Award, the National Medal of Arts, and the Hans
Christian Andersen Award for children’s book illustration,
Sendak also holds the distinction of collaborating with
such literary masters as Isaac Bashevis Singer and Angels
in America author Tony Kushner. He also served as a
designer for numerous operas – among them Mozart’s
The Magic Flute, Prokofiev’s Love for Three Oranges, and a
1979 stage version of his own Where the Wild Things Are
– and was even on the National Board of Advisors for the
Children’s Television Workshop during the developmental
stages of Sesame Street.
And if all that isn’t enough to establish Sendak’s
coolness, try this on for size: In North Hollywood,
California, there’s actually an elementary school named
after him.
So bring on the exhibit! Or, to put it in more Sendak-ian
terms: “Let the wild rumpus start!”
In a Nutshell: The Worlds of Maurice Sendak runs
through February 24, and information on the exhibit
is available by calling (309)524-2470 or visiting
MolineLibrary.com.
A n s w e r s : 1 – C , 2 – E , 3 – D , 4 – A , 5 – F , 6
– G , 7 – B . T o o e a s y a q u i z f o r y o u ? S o r r y .
T h e f r e a k i n ’ J e r s e y B o y s a r e c o m i n g t o
t o w n . I ’ m a l i t t l e d i s t r a c t e d t h e s e d a y s .
1) “Ain’t That Peculiar”
2) “Breaking Up Is Hard to Do”
3) “California Dreamin’”
4) “Can’t Buy Me Love”
5) “Happy Together”
6) “Time of the Season”
7) “Up on the Roof ”
A) The Beatles
B) The Drifters
C) Marvin Gaye
D) The Mamas & the Papas
E) Neil Sedaka
F) The Turtles
G) The Zombies
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1
Thursday, December 8 – Catherine
Russell. Concert with the acclaimed
jazz and blues singer, appearing in a
Hancher Auditorium presentation. The
Mill (120 East Burlington Street, Iowa
City). 7:30 p.m. $10-20. For tickets and
information, call (319)335-1160 or visit
http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu.
Friday, December 9 – Fishbone.
Accalimed alternative-rock musicians
in concert, with an opening set by
Roots of Creation. Rock Island Brewing
Company (1815 Second Avenue,
Rock Island). 9:30 p.m. $15-20. For
information, call (309)793-4060 or
visit RIBCO.com. For a March interview
with Fishbone’s Angelo Moore, visit
RCReader.com/y/fishbone.
Friday, December 9 – Christmas
Showcase Concert. Annual holiday
presentation featuring the school’s
University Chorale, Chamber Singers,
Symphonic Band, SAU-Community
Symphony Orchestra, Jazz Ensemble,
and STAMVOJA. St. Ambrose
University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center
(2101 Gaines Street, Davenport). 7
p.m. Free admission. For information,
call (563)333-6001 or visit SAU.edu.
Friday, December 9 – The Grateful
Dead American Beauty Project. A
musical journey through the classic
Grateful Dead albums American Beauty
and Workingman’s Dead, in a Hancher
Auditorium presentation. Riverside
Casino & Event Center (3184 Highway 22,
Riverside). 9:30 p.m. $10-20. For tickets
and information, call (319)335-1160 or
visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu.
Saturday, December 10, and
Sunday, December 11 – Handel’s
Messiah. The holiday masterwork
performed by the 250-member Handel
Oratorio Society and the professional
Handel Oratorio Chamber Orchestra.
Augustana College’s Centennial Hall
(3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island).
Saturday 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $10-
20. For tickets and information, call
(309)794-7306 or visit Augustana.edu.
Saturday, December 10 – Jingle
Bell Rock with Eddie Money, Phil
Gramm, & Mickey Thomas. Holiday
concert with the famed pop and rock
performers. Riverside Casino & Event
Center (3184 Highway 22, Riverside).
8 p.m. $36-46. For tickets and
information, call (877)677-3456 or visit
RiversideCasinoAndResort.com.
Thursday, December 15 – Lessons
& Carols. The Augustana Chamber
Singers and campus ministries present
the story of Christ’s birth in readings
and song. Augustana College’s
Ascension Chapel (3701 Seventh
Avenue, Rock Island). 4 and 8 p.m.
Free admission. For information, call
(309)794-7233 or visit Augustana.com.
Friday, December 16 – The Envy
Corps. Noted indie-rock musicians in
concert. The Redstone Room (129 Main
Street, Davenport). 9 p.m. $8-10. For
tickets and information, call (563)326-
1333 or visit RedstoneRoom.com.
Friday, December 16, and
Saturday, December 17 – A Nova
Christmas. Annual holiday concerts
with the professional vocal ensemble
the Nova Singers. Friday – St. Paul
Lutheran Church (2136 Brady Street,
Davenport); Saturday – First Lutheran
Church (364 East Water Street,
Galesburg). 7:30 p.m. $12-16. For
tickets and information, call (309)341-
7038 or visit http://Departments.Knox.
edu/novasingers/concerts.html.
Wednesday, December 21 – The
Christmas Music of Mannheim
Steamroller. Holiday-themed
multimedia production of rock,
acoustic, and electronic music.
Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street,
Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $39-56. For
tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit
AdlerTheatre.com.
Saturday, December 31
– Remember the King: Elvis Through
the Years. Salute to Elvis Presley’s
music from the 1950s, the 1968
comeback special, and the Las
Vegas years, with party favors and
champagne toast at midnight. Circa
’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third
Avenue, Rock Island). 8-9 p.m. buffet,
9:15 p.m. concert. $65-77. For tickets
and information, call (309)786-7733
extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Saturday, December 31 – A Neil
Diamond Tribute. The story of the
pop legend’s life told through his
own songs from the 1960s, ’70s, and
’80s, starring impersonator Keith
Allynn. Ohnward Fine Arts Center
(1215 East Platt Street, Maquoketa).
7 p.m. $13-25. For tickets and
information, call (563)652-9815 or visit
OhnwardFineArtsCenter.com.
Saturday, December 31 - Dr.
Zhivegas. Popular Midwestern dance
band in concert. Quad-Cities Water-
front Convention Center (1777 Isle
Parkway, Bettendorf ). 8 p.m. $30-
45. For tickets and information, call
(800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf.
isleofcapricasinos.com.
DANCE
Saturday, December 10,
and Sunday, December 11
– The Nutcracker. Ballet Quad Cities’
production of Tchaikovsky’s holiday
classic. Adler Theatre (136 East Third
Street, Davenport). Saturday and
Sunday 2 p.m.; Saturday 8 p.m. $10-35.
For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit
BalletQuadCities.com.
EVENTS
Saturday, December 10 – Help-
Portrait. Local photographer Jesse
Inskeep, working with a team of
other photographers, hairstylists,
and makeup artists, will take
free professional photos as part
of a worldwide volunteer effort.
Connection Church (4374 State Street,
Suite #2, Bettendorf ). 1-4 p.m. For
information and to schedule a photo
shoot, call (309)524-5024.
Sunday, December 11 – Holiday
Magic. Family event featuring a visit
by Santa, holiday-cookie decorating,
craft activities, a live jazz band, a magic
show with Ben Seidman, and more.
Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention
Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ).
Noon. $5-10 for adults, free for military
families and veterans and ages 12 and
under, with toys being collected for
the Marines’ Toys for Tots Program.
For information, call (563)344-2697 or
(563)349-1870 or visit QCUnited.org.
Friday, December 16, and
Saturday, December 17
– Candyland. Visual art, face- and
body-painting, fashion shows, and
more, with artists including Nicole
Cisne Durbin, Heidi Sallows, and
Sarah Robb. The Village Theatre
(2113 East 11th Street, Village of East
Davenport). Friday: Kids’ Night, 5-10
p.m., $5-7. Saturday – Adults’ Night,
6 p.m.-midnight, $15-20. For tickets
and information, call (562)477-4965,
or visit RobbDesignsOnlineGallery.
blogspot.com.
Continued From Page 17
What Else Is Happenin’
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 19
(Editor’s note: The River Cities'
Reader each month will feature an
image or images from the Quad
Cities Photography Club.)
T
his month’s featured photo
was a high-scoring one in the
November competition of
the Quad Cities Photography Club
and was taken by new member Ken
Kester.
This image was taken in Upper
Antelope Canyon in Arizona.
According to Ken, the canyon can
only be accessed with a Navajo
guide, and on all-day photography
tours, visitors are led to the spots
where the light shines into the
canyon, each beam lasting only
about 10 minutes each day. He also
warned that if the wind is blowing,
a plastic bag is needed to cover
the camera, as sand rains into the
canyon.
He shot this at f/16 with a 3.2-
second exposure and an ISO of 100.
The Quad Cities Photography
Club holds digital and print
competitions most months. At its
meetings, members discuss the
images, help each other to improve,
and socialize. The club meets at
6:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the
month September through June at
the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth
Street in Moline. The club also has
special learning workshops and
small groups that meet on specific
photography topics.
For more information on the
club, call (563)332-6522 or visit
QCPhotoClub.com. To see works
by club members, visit QCCC.
SmugMug.com.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photo by Ken Kester
Featured Image from the Quad Cities Photography Club
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 0
Call of Duty: Modern
Warfare 3
I
n its first 24 hours of release, Modern
Warfare 3 – the eighth
Call of Duty-branded
video game – sold $400
million worth of copies, the
highest-grossing launch of
an entertainment product
ever. It is also the most
vicious and morally ugly
game I have ever played.
It is perhaps not a great
fall from the militarism
and glorification of war
found in previous Call of
Duty games to the revelry
in violence of this installment, but it is a fall.
The first Modern Warfare struggled to find
heroics in a war largely devoid of them, but
it tried. Modern Warfare 3 pays lip service
to the grim realities of war but is finally just
sadistic.
Modern Warfare 3 is really two games
built on a shared first-person-shooter (FPS)
foundation: a multi-player game and a
single-player campaign. The multi-player
game follows the model set by the first
Modern Warfare in 2007 and copied with
little change for every Call of Duty since.
Like most FPS games, players compete in
small arenas to kill each other and achieve
objectives.
Call of Duty games add two major
elements to the standard multi-player FPS
template, both of which detract from the
game. First, they add an experience system
whereby points from matches persist and
“level up” players, giving them access to
more powerful weapons and options for all
future matches. Second, Call of Duty games
feature gameplay rewards for killing multiple
opponents without dying, working up to
helicopter attacks and bombing runs against
opponents.
The results of these mechanics are that
early or frequent players have material
advantages, and those doing well in a
match are highly likely to prevail. It’s like a
basketball game in which the hoop starts
bigger for experienced players and gets
bigger for those who score several times
consecutively. Instead of a game of equal
competition, in which more experienced
players usually win but are sometimes upset
by people who perform better, the game
is skewed toward blowouts. For talented
players who have been playing long enough
to receive plenty of advantages, success can
feel unearned. The rest of us typically lose
even when we play better than the other side.
While I found the multi-player frustrating,
by Grant Williams
grant.merlin.williams@gmail.com
War Games
GAMING
Modern Warfare 3’s single-player campaign
genuinely disgusted me. It consists of a
series of highly scripted action set pieces
intercut with non-interactive sequences
depicting a military-thriller
plot of disowned commandos,
Russian terrorists, and an
invasion of the United States.
The gameplay is competent
and reliably entertaining
on a basic level, though
similarly unchanged from its
predecessors and hostile to
the idea of player free will.
The player is positioned not
as a hero but as a sidekick;
much of the time “FOLLOW”
literally appears in large letters
over another character’s head.
Player characters only do interesting things
when the player isn’t in control.
Despite its lack of agency, I appreciated
the first Modern Warfare’s single-player
campaign for its attempt to be a military-
themed FPS that tempered the inevitable
mining of war for pleasure and fun with a
somber tone that acknowledged the horror of
its source material. Melancholy quotes from
famous soldiers and politicians accompanied
failure. In its most memorable sequence,
the player experienced the slow death of a
protagonist after a futile rescue mission.
Modern Warfare 3’s single-player, on the
other hand, resembles a Michael Bay movie,
sprinting from one massive, ludicrous,
heavily choreographed action sequence to
another. I can enjoy games that make warfare
ridiculous – I still routinely play Valve’s
preposterous multi-player FPS Team Fortress
2 – but Modern Warfare 3 also continues the
use of serious quotes and, increasingly as the
game continues, appropriates and trivializes
controversial subject matter.
At first I interpreted this as evidence
of a gaping tonal dissonance between the
high-octane absurdity of the plot and action
sequences and the occasional intrusions of
“seriousness.” Early on, the player is in an
African country torn apart by civil war and
genocide. The man the player is instructed to
“FOLLOW” says they can’t intervene to save
the civilians being executed – a moment that
seems to be striving for defeatist pragmatism
but, in the context of the impossible feats the
player has previously accomplished, instead
comes across as appalling indifference.
The game follows up its trivialization of
African strife with, among other things, a
mission that blows up the Eiffel Tower in a
rush of patriotic fervor and epic music, and
one that gleefully murders a child in slow
motion. The game warns beforehand that the
Continued On Page 21
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Grant Williams
grant.merlin.williams@gmail.com
GAMING
latter sequence might be “offensive” and can
be skipped, but it’s hard to escape the feeling
that it’s not so much a warning as excited
foreshadowing: Pay attention, because the
good stuff is coming.
After all of this, I could
only conclude that Modern
Warfare 3 is not tonally
schizophrenic; it is simply a
game of bloodlust, delighting
in death and destruction. It
is not interested, however
haphazardly, in “seriousness,”
or even in entertainment
through absurdity, but
in how controversially
violent it can get without
compromising its sales
figures.
Ultimately it has more in common with
the Saw films than the lightweight spectacles
made by Bay. Its protagonists don’t care
about saving the world – in “heroics,”
however trite that term is in the context of
video games – but about hunting down a
man to torture him to death. That’s hate, not
duty.
Battlefield 3
B
attlefield 3 is EA’s answer to Modern
Warfare 3; its slogan, after all, is
“Above and Beyond the Call.” Like
Call of Duty, Battlefield 3 consists of two
almost entirely separate multi- and single-
player portions. (The PC version of the game
requires EA’s new Origin service, currently
a mostly inferior version of Valve’s Steam
game manager/store and, according to vari-
ous reports, spyware that reports data un-
related to your games back to the company.
The console versions lack any integration
with Origin.)
Battlefield 3’s single-player campaign plays
like an off-brand, low-quality imitation of a
Call of Duty game – which is exactly what it
is. “FOLLOW” again appears over the head
of your escort, but Battlefield’s scripting is
much more arbitrary and opaque. In Modern
Warfare 3, at least I always felt like I knew what
I was supposed to be doing.
The single-player also frequently uses
“quick-time events,” largely non-interactive
sequences in which the player is occasionally
prompted to hit an arbitrary key, with failure
usually resulting in death. It’s like watching a
film and being told you have a half-second to
push a button on the remote control to make
the film continue, or else the film resets to five
minutes earlier.
The single-player campaign is not offensive
like Modern Warfare 3, although its central
plot of Iranian nuclear terrorists and a U.S.
invasion of Iran struck me as a little close
for comfort. Ironically, it’s the relative lack
of excess that feels out-of-place. Modern
Warfare 3 is grotesque but full of energy;
Battlefield 3 feels not just clumsy but rote.
Every gameplay sequence and
line of dialogue is familiar to
the point of staleness; even
those sequences with solid
execution feel like the result of
a focus group. It’s hard to get
involved with a game that has
no identity of its own.
Battlefield 3’s copying
extends to direct
appropriations. It borrows the
device of the player switching
among multiple characters
between missions – as well as
occasionally killing off those characters – from
Call of Duty games. It mimics the flashback
narrative structure of Call of Duty: Black Ops.
It also shares a Russian ex-Spetsnaz
player character and a massive, destructive
set piece in Paris with Modern Warfare 3,
though the games’ near-concurrent releases
make it difficult to determine if one game
“inspired” the other or if those are simply eerie
coincidences.
Battlefield 3’s multi-player game is the one
aspect of either of these games I appreciate. It
bolts on Call of Duty’s persistent experience
system, but this is less egregious in Battlefield
due to the nature of the game. While it features
traditional team FPS modes, the heart of
Battlefield has always been its “Conquest”
mode, which takes place on vast outdoor maps
with up to 64 players and features controllable
trucks, tanks, helicopters, fighter jets, and even
warships. Theoretically, “Conquest” can be
played as a tense strategic battle between two
teams – the members of each coordinating
toward common objectives – and the game
provides tactical options such as “squads” that
are meant to aid in organizing such a battle.
In practice, people jump in a truck and drive
full-throttle through weak walls and launch
themselves off hills, trampling anyone who
gets in their way. They grab a jet and scream
through the sky, occasionally dropping bombs
on hapless players below. They get into a sniper
duel with another player halfway across the
map, both sides hunkering down and peeping
out infrequently to take shots. It is an entirely
non-strategic experience.
The significant entertainment of Battlefield
3’s multi-player game comes from its glorious
stupidity. It’s a game not about hate, or even
duty, but fun.
Grant Williams is a developer at Sedona
Technologies who hijacked an English degree to
study video games.
Continued From Page 20
War Games
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
as a cakewalk for Paul.
One word of warning for pro-war
Republicans: If you fail to nominate Ron Paul
and instead nominate an establishment neo-
conservative such as Romney or Gingrich,
expect Paul to run on a third-party ticket.
And because of the reasons outlined above,
expect him to win a higher percentage of the
overall vote than Perot did in the 1992 general
election (greater than 18.9 percent). That
would undoubtedly re-elect Obama.
Is that what you want?
Save your outrage and answer instead this
question: Given your less-than-courteous
opinion of Paul, how can you possibly
explain your sense of entitlement toward his
supporters and their votes? Answer: You can’t.
Besides, even if Ron Paul did not run
third-party, and even if he were to endorse
the neo-conservative Republican nominee,
his supporters wouldn’t necessarily follow his
lead. I know I wouldn’t.
Dave Trotter is a technical communications
manager in central Texas.
This article was originally published at
LewRockwell.com. A hyperlinked version of this
article can be found at RCReader.com/y/paul.
This exhibition features iconic lithographs by prominent
19th-century artists, including Pierre Bonnard, Alphonse Mucha
and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. The posters on view include
promotional materials for cabaret performances at the
Moulin Rouge and large-scale ads for consumer products.

Find a schedule of exhibition programs and events at
www.fggeartmuseum.org
Turn of the Century Posters
from the Krannert Art Museum Collection
through January 8, 2012
Sponsored in part by the River Cities’ Reader
This exhibition and its programs are supported in part by Humanities Iowa and the
National Endowment for the Humanities. The views and opinions expressed by this program do
not necessarily refect those of Humanities Iowa or the National Endowment for the Humanities
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, La loge au mascaron doré, 1894, crayon, brush, and spatter lithograph with
scraper, courtesy of Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion, Estate of William S. Kinkead 1984-44-20
Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804
www.fggeartmuseum.org
Figge Art MuseuM Presents
his principled resistance to interventionism
abroad. But he’s the first to point out that it’s
the current GOP that’s out-of-step with the
traditional Republican party platform, not
him. Those voters whom Paul can’t convert
on morality can also be swayed by fiscal
arguments. Wars cost trillions. The U.S. is
broke. Rationalizations abound.
Either way, expect a giant anti-Obama
Republican turnout in November 2012
– regardless of the GOP nominee. The
advantage with a Paul nomination is that
Republicans can expect Paul supporters to
support the Republican nominee – something
they can’t do if they nominate Romney or
Gingrich.
(8) The Tea Party rallies behind Ron
Paul because his Trillion Dollar Plan is a
perfect ideological match. After all, Ron
Paul supporters are the ones who started the
Tea Party movement in 2007 – the proto-Tea
Party. As far as the electorate recognizes the
problem to be government spending, Ron
Paul is the clear answer.
(9) Ron Paul wins on auditing and ending
the Federal Reserve. Who can claim that
the U.S. has a “free market” despite artificial
price-fixing of interest rates at the very core
of the economy? What free-market advocate
supports crony, secret taxpayer-funded
bailouts of speculators and foreign banks?
The Tea Party and the entire GOP field now
parrot Ron Paul on the Federal Reserve.
But there’s yet more upside here for Paul:
The Occupy movement makes a special point
to protest crony capitalism and the abuses of
a corrupt, insider financial oligarchy. If Paul
can tap that sentiment, which clearly overlaps
with his arguments against crony capitalism
and the lack of transparency of the Federal
Reserve system, he can convert a portion of
those Occupy voters into voting Paulistinians.
Rest assured, Paul volunteers are already
performing this outreach on the ground.
(10) Ron Paul wins on torture and
the Bill of Rights. Let Obama attempt
to characterize water-boarding as
something other than torture, as his neo-
con counterparts have, and Ron Paul will
provide a stark contrast – an iconic symbol of
authentic, principled “hope and change.” As
for the Bill of Rights in general, Ron Paul wins
clearly with any voter who cherishes the idea
of not having to present his or her papers at
random checkpoints; for whom government
surveillance of citizens is anathema; who
cherishes the idea that the government is
the slave to the people and not the other way
around; or, in particular relevance to the
Obama record, to anyone who cherishes the
idea that we have a right to be left alone.
(11) Circumstances and current events
in November 2012 will play right into
Ron Paul’s wheelhouse. This one is the
clincher. After repeated, nefarious inflations
of the money supply through bailouts and
Fed treasury purchases, Obamaflation will
be unmistakable at the grocery store, the
doctor’s office, and the fuel pump. Gold will
be well over $2,200 an ounce. And after an
11-year string of templated, bankrupting, and
needless interventionist wars abroad, voters
won’t be easily convinced that high gas prices
are solely Iran’s fault. Ron Paul is expertly
capable of clearly articulating the causation
between interventionist foreign policy and
poor economic circumstances at home
– including the inflation that will be hitting
voters right smack in their wallets as they
head to the voting booths.
So there you have it. If only Ron Paul can
win the Republican nomination, global and
domestic current events in November 2012
will assure that a Ron Paul victory in the
general election is a very high probability.
Compared to the primary fight, some might
even describe that general-election matchup
Electability: Ron Paul Soundly Defeats Obama for These 11 Reasons
by Dave Trotter
davetrottercrs@gmail.com
COVER STORY
Continued From Page 7
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
coercion does not foster results.
Furthermore, if states want to deal with health
care on a state level, it should be their exclusive
domain, because states know their own needs
better than the federal government. The federal
government is ill-equipped, evidenced by the
fiscal mismanagement of both Medicare and
Medicaid. What better proof do Americans
need that these welfare/entitlement systems
are unsustainable as currently designed? What
the MSM never explains is that Paul’s Restore
America Plan specifically grandfathers all current
recipients of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social
Security, as well as veterans’ benefits. It is a bald-
faced lie to say anything else.
The corruption that goes with foreign-aid
expenditures knows no bounds. Billions in cash
have gone missing in both Iraq and Afghanistan
alone. Private war contractors receive $150 billion
annually, $60 billion of which qualifies as either
fraud or waste, according to the recently released
waste, fraud, and abuse report by the Commission
on War Contracting. Nearly half of the money
allocated to this particular portion of defense
spending is either waste and/or fraud. Even worse
is that the waste, fraud, and abuse are putting our
own military personnel in harm’s way!
Every American should watch the C-SPAN
hearings the commission held to report its
findings to Congress. This is true “reality
TV.” Understanding the danger that war
Congressman Paul demonstrates fearless
clarity in informing Americans that regardless
of the expenditure, government has to borrow
almost half the money. In other words, for every
dollar of expense, 40 cents of it is borrowed, with
interest. Recall that Dr. Paul originally exposed
both parties’ disingenuous claims of spending
cuts as merely decreases in the automatic
increases that plague the government’s annual
budgets. He is one of the few candidates willing
to tell Americans that regardless of the economy,
government budgets enjoy annual automatic
increases. One of the most underreported facts is
that any recent proposed cuts were only for lower
automatic spending increases, resulting in zero
actual spending cuts. Zero. It is complete spin,
and only Paul has had the integrity to say so.
The MSM minimizes Paul’s candidacy with
accusations of extremism, including claims that
Paul’s advocacy of limited government intervention
in health care and welfare would starve the poor
and allow sick people to perish. The record shows
quite the opposite. In Paul’s medical practice alone,
he literally treats the poor for free. He makes this
decision as a physician not beholden to mandates
from the government. His position is that, in the
absence of government coercion, society and
the private sector have always stepped up to take
care of those who cannot take care of themselves
– much more efficiently and less costly than the
government, specifically because government
Ron Paul Personifies Iowa GOP Party Platform
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
contractors alone pose to our troops will boil
your blood. Most are basically unaccountable,
and receive billions more for the same jobs. It is
unconscionable.
Paul recognizes the inanity of these programs
and policies. Obama ran on the promise of
eliminating the 100,000 war-contract personnel
deployed when Bush left office, instead increasing
the number to 200,000 in the following 18 months.
That number promises to grow exponentially
again once troops are pulled from Iraq.
Even globalist Council on Foreign Relations
president emeritus Les Gelb acknowledges:
“The real shocker was how all those candidates,
save for Paul and Huntsman, almost totally
neglected the now-central economic dimension
of international affairs. Only those two noted
the new reality of world politics – that economic
strength matters more than military might.”
Consider that if Paul’s Restore America Plan
were implemented and militarism (nation
building, interventionism, and nearly 900
military facilities) was cut from the budget, our
defense budget would still be larger than all other
countries’ military budgets combined!
Finally, Dr. Paul is the only candidate whose
voting record bears witness to his upholding
his oath to protect the U.S. Constitution. He
has never disappointed the American people
by waffling on this sacred duty. His strength
of character is rare, indeed. While Paul is not
as telegenic as a Romney, he also doesn’t need
a teleprompter. Interviewers can’t trip him up
because his message is always grounded in
truth. He meets all of the Iowa GOP platform’s
moral attributes, both personally and politically.
If personal morals are a barometer for Iowa
caucus-goers, then Gingrich is the quintessential
opposite of Paul, who has been married to his
wife Carol for 54 years. Three marriages, one
after the other? Hardly Iowa values, if voters
stand by the Iowa GOP platform. Former
Speaker Pelosi recently threatened to expose ill
deeds former Speaker Gingrich was investigated
for by the House Ethics Committee. Gingrich’s
response was that if she told, she’d be in violation
of House rules. There’s a confidence builder.
Dr. Paul recognizes that America was founded
as a republic under the rule of common (natural)
law, and recognizes how far afield we’ve gone in
legislating and adjudicating beyond what the U.S.
Constitution allows, corrupting the rule of law
and jeopardizing the very liberty these branches
are tasked to uphold and protect. Unelectable?
Wasn’t Obama also considered unelectable? It is
time to elect a president who, like Paul, respects
the authority of the people as greater than that of
any branch of government – people first, states
second, and the federal government a very distant
third. Please note, Iowa Republicans: These
principles are echoed in numerous planks in your
own platform, as well.
Continued From Page 14
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2011, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the
Advice
Goddess
BY AMY ALKON
prefer it to be somebody named Melanie,
whose interests run the gamut from shoes to
shoes. And yes, she could suddenly decide
to “put the ex back in sex.” But six years
post-breakup, it’s likely her attraction is more
therapeutic – having a longtime friend to
lean on who’s probably helped her dust all the
skeletons hanging in her closets (home, office,
and beyond). Don’t get all wound up in trying
to compete with him or meet her every need;
you just need to meet enough of them and
keep getting to know her. Throw yourself into
your relationship instead of obsessing that it
will end, and try to focus on the merits of their
friendship. This guy enhances her life, and if
her life is enhanced, she’s enhanced, and so is
her life with you … even if that flies in the face
of everything you’ve ever heard about how
love is “supposed” to play out. (Shakespeare
wrote Romeo & Juliet, not Romeo, Juliet, &
Bob.)
Poach Class
Two male friends who know I’m happily
married have made a pass at me recently.
One’s kind of a player, so… whatever. The
other I considered a very good friend (of
seven years), and I find myself remarkably
angry with him. Some friend. I feel like
posting a blog item: “I have never been
unfaithful to my husband and never will be.”
– Betrayed
When one dog tries to hump another,
it generally isn’t because he finds the other
dog ethically sketchy. I get that you aren’t a
chihuahua with computer privileges, but there’s
a good chance the thought process for these
guys was dog-humping-ly deep. I had you send
me your photo, and you’re gorgeous. Men make
passes at women who are blindingly attractive
– and not necessarily because they devalue
them as friends or think they’ll be quick to
toss their wedding ring on another man’s night
table. Sometimes, impulse, dirty martinis,
desperation, and seven years of a woman’s hot-
itude just come to a head. This isn’t to say you
should excuse what these guys did or continue
being friends with them if that’s painful, but
it may help to understand that the calculation
here may not have involved a comprehensive
risk/benefit analysis … beyond you’re beautiful
and they’re drunk, and if they’re going to be
relegated to meaningless anonymous sex, they’d
like it to be with you.
Her Best Friend’s
Waiting
My girlfriend’s best friend is her ex.
They broke up six years ago (upon mutual
agreement). She swears she’s much happier
being his friend and says they both feel they
weren’t meant to be romantic partners. Well,
she clearly adores the hell out of him, and
he’s her go-to guy for her problems (family,
career, and probably any issues with me).
She respects my opinion, but sometimes I
feel she only asks for it so I won’t feel second
banana to him. We’ve only been dating eight
months, and I feel she believes what she says
about their friendship, but part of me worries
that she’s still in love with him but not aware
of it. During one of their long phone chats,
if he said he wanted to be with her after all, I
suspect I’d be dumped fast.
– Second Best
If this were a chick flick, you’d be the plot
device – the guy the girl’s with just so she can
figure out that she should marry the other guy.
(Start worrying if you roll over in bed and see
a couple of prop men unplugging your lamp.)
Of course it’s hard for you to believe that
a guy who once wanted her body now just
wants her ear. Their insistence that they’re just
friends does run contrary to the wisdom of the
noted therapist Billy Crystal, who warned in
his seminal work, When Harry Met Sally, that
“men and women can’t be friends because the
sex part always gets in the way.” Sure it does
– mainly when they have yet to have sex with
each other. But these two have been there,
done each other (and done each other and
then some). Chances are, the thrill of the chase
really has given way to the thrill of getting on
the phone so they can cluck like two excitable
hens.
People commonly think love is only
supposed to come in groups of two, like on the
ark. But this “two-topia” – the notion that one
person will meet your every emotional, sexual,
and career-counseling need (while leading you
in a killer ashtanga workout) – is actually an
impossible ideal. The truth is, in addition to
your romantic partner, you can have another
deeply important person in your life – a
friend-plus! – whom you love more than a
typical friend but whom you don’t love naked
(or don’t love naked anymore).
And sure, if your girlfriend has a BFF, you’d
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
“symphony of flavors,” and “party in your
mouth.” I understand the reluctance of any
serious wordsmith to resort to such predictable
language in crafting an appraisal of restaurant
fare, but I don’t mind borrowing it to hint at
your immediate future. What you experience
may be more like a “party in your head” than
a “party in your mouth,” and “crazy delicious”
may describe events and adventures rather
than flavors, per se. But I think you’re in for a
yummilicious time.

VIRGO (August 23-September 22):
In “Nan You’re a Window Shopper,”
British recording artist Lily Allen
sings, “The bottom feels so much
better than the top.” She means it ironically; the
person she’s describing in the song is neurotic
and insecure. But in using that declaration as
a theme for your horoscope this week – the
bottom feels so much better than the top – I
mean it sincerely. What you have imagined as
being high, superior, or uppermost may turn
out to be mediocre, illusory, or undesirable.
Conversely, a state of affairs that you once
considered to be low, beneath your notice, or not
valuable could become rather interesting. And
if you truly open your mind to the possibilities,
it may even evolve into something that’s quite
useful.

LIBRA (September 23-October 22):
Emily Rubin invited authors to write
about a specific theme for a literary reading
she organized in New York last September:
stains. “What is your favorite stain?” she asked
prospective participants, enticing them to
imagine a stain as a good thing, or at least as an
interesting twist. Included in her own list were
chocolate, candle wax, lipstick, grass, mud, wine,
and tomato sauce. What are yours, Libra? This
would be an excellent time to sing the praises of
your best-loved or most provocative blotches,
splotches, and smirches – and have fun stirring
up some new ones.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): Mickey Mouse is a Scorpio, born
November 18, 1928. Bugs Bunny is
a Leo, coming into the world on July 27, 1940.
In their long and storied careers, these two
iconic cartoon heroes have made only one joint
appearance. It was in the film Who Framed
Roger Rabbit. They got equal billing and spoke
the same number of words. I’m predicting that
a comparable event will soon take place in your
world, Scorpio: a conjunction of two stars, a
blend of two strong flavors, or a coming together
of iconic elements that have never before mixed.
Sounds like you’re in for a splashy time.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22-
December 21): Harvey Ball was
a commercial artist who dreamed
up the iconic image of the smiley face. He
whipped it out in ten minutes one day in 1963.
Unfortunately for him, he didn’t trademark or
copyright his creation, and as a result made only
$45 from it, even as it became an archetypal
image used millions of times all over the world.
Keep his story in the back of your mind during
the coming weeks, Sagittarius. I have a feeling
you will be coming up with some innovative
moves or original stuff, and I would be sad if
you didn’t get proper credit and recognition for
your work.

CAPRICORN (December 22-
January 19): There are 501 possible
solutions to your current dilemma. At
least ten of them would bring you a modicum of
peace, a bit of relief, and a touch of satisfaction.
Most of the rest wouldn’t feel fantastic, but
would at least allow you to mostly put the angst
behind you and move on with your life. But
only one of those potential fixes can generate a
purgative and purifying success that will extract
the greatest possible learning from the situation
and give you access to all of the motivational
energy it has to offer. Be very choosy.

AQUARIUS (January 20-
February 18): The quality of your
consciousness is the single most influential thing
about you. It’s the source of the primary impact
you make on other human beings. It changes
every situation you interact with, sometimes
subtly and other times dramatically. So here’s
my first question: How would you characterize
the quality of your consciousness? The answer is
complicated, of course. But there must be eight
to ten words that capture the essence of the vibes
you beam out wherever you go. Now comes my
second question: Are you satisfied with the way
you contribute to life on earth with the quality
of your consciousness? It’s an excellent time to
contemplate these primal matters.

PISCES (February 19-March 20): Some
martial artists unleash a sharp percussive
shout as they strike a blow or make a
dramatic move – a battle cry that helps channel
their will into an explosive, concise expression
of force. The Japanese term for this is kiai. A few
women’s tennis players invoke a similar sound
as they smack the ball with their racquet. Maria
Sharapova holds the record for loudest shriek
at 105 decibels. The coming weeks would be an
excellent time for you to call on your own version
of kiai, Pisces. As you raise your game to the
next level, it would make perfect sense for you to
get your entire body involved in exerting some
powerful, highly-focused master strokes.

Homework: Show me why I might enjoy following
you on Twitter by sending some of your sample
tweets to Truthrooster@gmail.com. And find me on
Twitter at Twitter.com/FreeWillAstro.
ARIES (March 21-April 19): What’s
the most beautiful thing you’ve ever
seen in your life? To answer that
question is your first assignment. It’s OK if you
can’t decide between the three or four most
beautiful things. What’s important is to keep
visions of those amazements dancing in the back
of your mind for the next few days. Play with
them in your imagination. Feel the feelings they
rouse in you as you muse about the delights they
have given you. Regard them as beacons that will
attract other ravishing marvels into your sphere.
Now here’s your second assignment: Be alert for,
and go hunting for, a new “most beautiful thing.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Not
to dream boldly may turn out to be
irresponsible,” said educator George
Leonard. I certainly think that will be
true for you in the coming months, Taurus.
In my astrological opinion, you have a sacred
duty not only to yourself, but also to the people
you care about, to use your imagination more
aggressively and expressively as you contemplate
what might lie ahead for you. You simply cannot
afford to remain safely ensconced within your
comfort zone, shielded from the big ideas and
tempting fantasies that have started calling and
calling and calling to you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Researchers at the University of Oregon
claim that in certain circumstances,
they can make water flow uphill (tinyurl.
com/UphillFlow). I’m not qualified to evaluate
their evidence, but I do know that in the coming
week you will have the power to accomplish
the metaphorical equivalent of what they say
they did. Don’t squander this magic on trivial
matters, please, Gemini. Use it to facilitate a
transformation that’s important to your long-
term well-being.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Dear
Rob: Is there any way to access your
horoscope archives going back to
1943? I’m writing a novel about
World War II and need to see your astrological
writings from back then. - Creative Cancerian.”
Dear Creative: To be honest, I wasn’t writing
horoscopes back in 1943, since I wasn’t
anywhere near being born yet. On the other
hand, I give you permission to make stuff up for
your novel and say I wrote it back in 1943. Most
of you Cancerians have good imaginations about
the past, and you’re currently going through a
phase when that talent is amplified. While you’re
tinkering with my history, have fun with yours,
too. This is an excellent time for members of
your tribe to breath new life and fresh spin into a
whole slew of your own personal memories.

LEO (July 23-August 22): At Chow.
com, food critic L. Nightshade gathered
“The 78 Most Annoying Words to
Read in a Restaurant Review.” Among the worst
offenders: “meltingly tender,” “yummilicious,”
“crazy delicious,” “orgasmic,” “I have seen God,”
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Brezsny
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
November 23 Answers: Right
CHARACTER REFERENCES - DEC. , 011
ACROSS
1. Bud
4. Vandalize
10. Candy brand
14. Einstein’s wife
18. Norse god
19. Some stage shows
20. Jai _
21. Beef cut
22. Charles Dickens creation: 2 wds.
24. Ian Fleming creation: 2 wds.
26. Trojan War hero
27. Posed
28. Mayday!
29. Feeds a furnace
30. Sandwich relative
32. Serious
34. Stash
35. Luxury brand
39. At once
40. USS Voyager or Enterprise
44. Netsuke material
45. _ _ on the ground floor
47. Fissure
48. Santa _
49. Infrequent
50. Oscar Wilde creation: 2 wds.
52. Discard
54. Former union org.
55. Dial-up essential
56. Sepal anagram
58. British composer
59. City in Pennsylvania
61. Pour out
64. More nimble
66. Things avoided
67. Arboreal animal
68. Hunch
69. Farm tool
71. Held
72. Seismic events
75. Lock up
76. Clip
78. Supporting structure
80. _ _ fault
81. Aside
83. Gustave Flaubert creation: 2
wds.
86. Thunderstrike
87. Kinsman: abbr.
88. Anchor position
90. White poplar
91. Broadside
92. Giveaways
94. Cap
95. See 24-Across: 2 wds.
97. Stuff to wear
98. Rounded mass
100. Diviner
101. Paris Opera dancer
104. Sailor
105. Legal matter
107. Lowercase
111. Mark Twain creation: 2 wds.
113. Herman Melville creation:
2 wds.
115. Jazz group
116. “_ Flux”
117. Achieve
118. Raiment
119. Abbr. on an envelope
120. Eli’s school
121. Snuggle
122. Denouement
DOWN
1. Mast
2. Consanguineous
3. Ball of fire: 2 wds.
4. Ventral’s opposite
5. Liable
6. Narrow street
7. Songs
8. City in North Carolina
9. Round number: abbr.
10. Field of study
11. Welladay!
12. Computer component
13. Catnaps
14. Patch locations
15. Behold!
16. Trig function
17. Connectives
18. Mauna _
23. Primitive
25. Things sometimes predicted
28. Baste
31. Pyramidal structures
33. City on the Rhine
34. Stops
35. In about
36. Benefit
37. L. Frank Baum creation: 2 wds.
38. Waxy bill part
40. Influence
41. J.K. Rowling creation: 2 wds.
42. Pointless
43. Kind of trail
46. Mark with an office gadget:
hyph.
47. Sub maneuver: 2 wds.
50. Recipients
51. A muscle, for short
53. Ricochet
55. Crepuscular creature
57. Lost animal, formerly
60. Horse opera
62. Plant life
63. Pro
65. Limerick
68. Sound systems
69. Kerchief
70. Edible flower bud
71. Tractor-trailers
73. City on the Seine
74. _ Domingo
77. Toast start
79. Undisguised
82. _ rasa
84. Curved handle
85. Hardened in feelings
86. Supply problem
89. Channel for water
91. Mug
93. The Wizard of Menlo Park
94. Toss
96. French writer
98. Carried
99. Clans
101. Singer James or Jones
102. Act of wrongdoing
103. Neglect
104. An earth sci.
106. On the double
108. Larger- _ -life
109. Something greasy
110. Wane
112. Spoken vote
113. Where Ont. is
114. Afflict
November Crossword Answers
Applicants
now being
accepted for
Voss Brothers
Lofts
Located at: 219 21st St.
Rock Island, IL
A community for
individuals & families.
Call 309-788-7940
To request an
application.
Certain Income
Restrictions Apply
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2011/12/08 (Thu)
A Party to Go DJ & Karaoke Night -The
Gallery Lounge, 3727 Esplanade Ave.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Christmas at the Speakeasy -The Circa
‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Club Hancher: Catherine Russell -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Res-
taurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St
Moline, IL
Hot Club of Davenport -The Muddy Wa-
ters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Item & the Mad Hatters -Caterwaulla,
Iowa City Yacht Club, 135. Linn St.,
Iowa City, IA
Jam Sessions with John O’Meara and
Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Jazz Jam with The North Scott Jazz
Combo -RME Community Stage, 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Just Chords -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke & Retro DJ w/ BMAX Enter-
tainment -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady
St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighbor-
hood Gri l l - Davenpor t, 3005 W.
Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104
State St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night -The Lucky Frog Bar and
Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA
Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar &
Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. I owa
City, IA
Open Mi c Ni ght w/ Kung Fu Tofu
-Sti ckman’s, 1510 N. Harri son St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ The Dukes of Hag-
gard -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th
St Moline, IL
Rock ‘N the House Karaoke -Uptown
Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340
Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Seth Bradley & the Personnel -Kilken-
ny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Avey Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow
Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
2011/12/09 (Fri)
3 Years Hollow - 1152 - As Big As A
Mouse - 1380 -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
Big Al -The Odeon, 8025 Avenue N.
Clinton, IA
Christmas with the Quad City Singers
-Lavender Crest Winery, 5401 US
Highway 6 Colona, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riv-
erfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port
Byron, IL
DJ BOJ -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Everymen - Hellwater -Rozz-Tox, 2108
3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Fishbone - Roots of Creation -RIBCO,
1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Heatbox - Roster McCabe - Chasing
Shade -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Jazz After Five w/ Eric Thompson and
the Talented Tenth (5:30pm) -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Jazz Dinner Service featuring Pianist
Mark Spengler -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Jeffrey Foucault -CSPS/Legion Arts,
1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Justin Payne -Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night (members only) -Moose
Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rocking-
ham Rd Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar
& Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night -Stickman’s, 1510 N.
Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Biscuits Bar
& Grill, 600 Front St Buffalo, IA
Kevin Presbrey -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Mike Blumme Trio (6pm) -Toucan’s
Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st
Street Milan, IL
Mike Dillon’s GoGo Jungle - 5 in a
Hand -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
My Beautiful Mistake - Above All
Grounds - Moral Belief - Kings
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Night People -Blueport Junction, 6605
W River Dr Davenport, IA
Open Mic Coffeehouse -First Lutheran
Church of Rock Island Parish House,
1600 20th St Rock Island, IL
Rachel Kramer West: A Christmas
Celebration -Orpheum Theatre, 57
S. Kellogg St. Galesburg, IL
Richie Lee -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resor t, 3184 Hi ghway 22 Ri ver-
side, IA
Ron LaPuma Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) - Dirt Road
Rockers (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Smooth Groove -Edje Nightclub at
Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 &
Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ
-Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St
Moline, IL
The Fry Daddies -The Pub, 4320 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
The Grateful Dead American Beauty
Project -Riverside Casino Event Cen-
ter, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The
Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
This Must Be the Band -RME Com-
munity Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Dav-
enport, IA
Troy Harris, pianist (6pm) -Phoenix,
111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
2011/12/10 (Sat)
3 on the Tree -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Barlowe & James -The Grape Life Wine
Emporium - Davenport, 3402 Elmore
Ave. Davenport, IA
Carnage the Executioner- Ion- Im-
perfekt- Johndope- Gravity- DJ
Omatic - DJ Rich Rok- Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St., Iowa City, IA
Christmas with the Quad City Singers
-Lavender Crest Winery, 5401 US
Highway 6 Colona, IL
Cosmic -Mound Street Landing, 1029
Mound St. Davenport, IA
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
Deja Vu Rendezvous featuring Keep Off
the Grass -The Redstone Room, 129
Main St Davenport, IA
Dirt Road Rockers -The Rusty Nail, 2606
W Locust Davenport, IA
DJ Scott Keller & Karaoke -Greenbriar
Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th
St Moline, IL
James Armstrong -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Jazz Dinner Service featuring Pianist
Earle Johnson -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Jingle Bell Rock featuring Eddie Mon-
ey, Lou Gramm, & Mickey Thomas
-Riverside Casino Event Center, 3184
Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Ca-
manche Ave Clinton, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar
& Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Kevin Presbrey -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar &
Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Leftwitch - The Binjers -Rascals Live,
1418 15th St. Moline, IL
Limbs -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa
City, IA
Live Lunch w/ Austin Vallejo (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Mike Garson (4pm) -First Presbyterian
Church of Davenport, 1702 Iowa St.
Davenport, IA
Mommy’s Little Monster -Generations
Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL
Night People -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Nitrix -Hawkeye Tap, 4646 Cheyenne
Ave. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Morning (9am) -Whistle Stop
Java Shop, 400 W. 4th St. Milan, IL
Continued On Page 30
Roots of Creation @ RIBCO - December 9
8 THURSDAY
10 SATURDAY
9 FRIDAY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 0 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Richie Lee -Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Rob Dahms & Detroit Larry Davidson
(6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs
BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL
Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix,
111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Simon Says Uncle -Uptown Neighbor-
hood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills
Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Slip Silo -RME Community Stage, 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Smooth Groove -Edj e Ni ghtcl ub at
Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy
92 Rock Island, IL
Songwriters in the Round (3pm) -RME
Communi ty Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Talking Head Trubute w/ This Must Be
the Band - Nolo Contendre -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
The Birthplace of President Ronald
Reagan Is on Fire - Relentless Ap-
proach - Johnny Has the Keys - As
You Were -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Zither Ensemble (10am) -German Ameri-
can Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
2011/12/11 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606
W Locust Davenport, IA
Daryl Hance-Flannel -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Five Bridges Jazz Band (10:30am)
-Brady Street Chop House, Radisson
QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA
Funday Sunday w/ Dave Ellis (6pm)
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Jazz Brunch w/ Jim Valentine, Earle
Johnson, Drew Morton, & Josh
Duffee ( 10: 30am & 12: 30pm)
-Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Dave Smith (11am)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am) -The
Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
2011/12/12 (Mon)
Jason Carl -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Bier Stube Moline, 417
15th St Moline, IL
Metal Mondays -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
2011/12/13 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke Contest Night -The
Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Daven-
port, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Sup-
per Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock
Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Davenport
Eagl es Lodge, 4401 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke with KO Karaoke -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffee-
house, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Pat Willis -Bier Stube Daven-
port, 2228 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Steve McFate -Salute, 1814
7th St Moline, IL
SAU Jazz Ensemble & STAMVOJA -RME
Communi ty Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McMa-
nus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Stacks Bar, 525
14th St. Moline, IL
2011/12/14 (Wed)
A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar,
525 14th St. Moline, IL
Dirt Road Rockers -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant
and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Drum Circle (6pm) -Teranga House of
Afri ca, 1706 3rd Ave. Rock I sl and,
IL
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102
S Main St Port Byron, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighbor-
hood Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kim-
berly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Nitecrawlers (5:30pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet and Siri
Mason -RME Community Stage, 131 W.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl, Mike, & Doug
-Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Land-
ing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
2011/12/15 (Thu)
A Party to Go DJ & Karaoke Night -The
Gallery Lounge, 3727 Esplanade Ave.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Bebop Night -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant
and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
E11eventh Hour -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Jam Sessions with John O’Meara and
Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Just Chords -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke & Retro DJ w/ BMAX Enter-
tainment -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighborhood
Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kimberly Rd.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104
State St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night -The Lucky Frog Bar and
Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA
Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar &
Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. I owa
City, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Kung Fu Tofu -
Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Dav-
enport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ The Dukes of Hag-
gard -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St
Moline, IL
Rock ‘N the House Karaoke -Uptown
Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340
Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA
The Avey Brothers featuring Jimmy
Lee Adams -Rascals Live, 1418 15th
St. Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow
Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
2011/12/16 (Fri)
Big Al -The Odeon, 8025 Avenue N.
Clinton, IA
Brewgrass Festival: Evergreen Grass
Band - Slewgrass-Burlington Street
Bluegrass Band - St. Anyway -Iowa
City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa
City, IA
Bucktown Revue -Nighswander Theatre,
2822 Eastern Ave Davenport, IA
Buddy Olson (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina
/ Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street
Milan, IL
Communist Daughter -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Daniel & the Lion -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport,
IA
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
Dirt Road Rockers -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
DJ BOJ -Greenbri ar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Eric “Guitar” Davis -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
Final Mix Band -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Funktastic Five -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady
St. Davenport, IA
Gray Wol f Band -Edj e Ni ghtcl ub at
Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy
92 Rock Island, IL
Human Aftertast XXXmas XXXtrava-
ganza -The Peach Pies Burlesque
Show - X+X -Mixtapes, 830 15th Ave.,
East Moline, IL
16 FRIDAY
14 WEDNESDAY
15 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 29
13 TUESDAY
12 MONDAY
11 SUNDAY
Daryl Hance @ The Mill - December 11
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 1 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Cosmic -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st
Ave Coal Valley, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
Final Mix Band -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Gray Wol f Band -Edj e Ni ghtcl ub at
Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy
92 Rock Island, IL
Jazz Dinner Service featuring Pianist
Ron May -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Generations Bar & Grill,
4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Caman-
che Ave Clinton, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar &
Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Karry Outz -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Keep Off the Grass -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar &
Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Lynn Allen -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St.
Moline, IL
Nick Vasquez -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Night Owl Choir - American Dust -Rozz-
Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Nitrix -Crabby’s, 826 W. 1st Ave. Coal
Valley, IL
Open Mic Morning (9am) -Whistle Stop
Java Shop, 400 W. 4th St. Milan, IL
Rude Punch -Mound Street Landing, 1029
Mound St. Davenport, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix,
111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Smooth Groove -Fargo Dance & Sports,
4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL
Jason Elmore and Hoodoo Witch -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
Jazz Dinner Service Featuring Pianist
Jonathan Turner -Bix Bistro, 200 E.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night (members only) -Moose
Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham
Rd Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar &
Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Har-
rison St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Biscuits Bar &
Grill, 600 Front St Buffalo, IA
Nick Vasquez -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
North of 40 -Uptown Nei ghborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) - Wild Oatz
(9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Smooth Groove -Fargo Dance & Sports,
4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Envy Corps -The Redstone Room,
129 Main St Davenport, IA
Troy Harris, pianist (6pm) -Phoenix, 111
West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
We Funk -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
2011/12/17 (Sat)
A Party to Go Karaoke Night -The Gal-
lery Lounge, 3727 Esplanade Ave.
Davenport, IA
Cobalt Blue -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Stuart Matthews -Bleyarts Tap, 2210 E.
11th St. Davenport, IA
Tapped Out -Hero’s Tavern, 208 East Main
St. Morrison, IL
The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina
/ Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street
Milan, IL
The Lustalots -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St.
Davenport, IA
The Midtown Men -Adler Theatre, 136 E.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Premium $ellouts -RIBCO, 1815
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Tri-Polar XXXpress Final Show -Uptown
Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340
Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA
We Funk George Clinton P Funk Tribute
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Wild Oatz -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Zither Ensemble (10am) -German Ameri-
can Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
2011/12/18 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Funday Sunday w/ Dan Peart (6pm)
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Jazz Brunch w/ Manny Lopez, Earle
Johnson, Lee Stofer, and Josh Duffee
(10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Black-
hawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Josephine Foster -The Mill, 120 E Burling-
ton Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
Russ Reyman, Pi ani st (10am) -The
Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hi l l s Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
Terry Hanson Ensemble (10: 30am)
-Brady Street Chop House, Radisson
QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA
2011/12/19 (Mon)
Jason Carl -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Bier Stube Moline, 417
15th St Moline, IL
Metal Mondays -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Ugly Sweater Christmas Party: Daniel
& the Lion -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
2011/12/20 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke Contest Night -The
Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Daven-
port, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Sup-
per Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock
Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Davenport
Eagl es Lodge, 4401 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke with KO Karaoke -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffee-
house, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Pat Willis -Bier Stube Daven-
port, 2228 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McMa-
nus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Stacks Bar, 525
14th St. Moline, IL
2011/12/21 (Wed)
A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar,
525 14th St. Moline, IL
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant
and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102
S Main St Port Byron, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighbor-
hood Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kim-
berly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet and Siri
Mason -RME Community Stage, 131 W.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl, Mike, & Doug
-Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Plume Giant - All the People All the
Time -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Rocktastic 4 -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St.
Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landi ng, 1029 Mound St. Daven-
port, IA
The Christmas Music of Mannheim
Steamroller -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
The Hitman (5:30pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
21 WEDNESDAY
20 TUESDAY
18 SUNDAY
19 MONDAY
17 SATURDAY
Jason Ellmore @ The Muddy Waters - Dec. 16
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 793 • December 8 - 21, 2011 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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