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Metro Weekly - 12-15-11 - Coverboy of the Year: Tyler

Metro Weekly - 12-15-11 - Coverboy of the Year: Tyler

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Metro Weekly's Special Annual Issue: Coverboy of the Year.
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DECEMBER 15, 2011 4 METROWEEKLY

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Accusation of Outing
GOProud attack on Perry pollster leads to Breitbart resignation
Barron and LaSalvia
by Chris Geidner
t
exas Gov. riCk Perry’s
“strong” presidential pri-
mary advertisement, which
has more than 664,000 “dis-
likes” on youtube, went on the attack
against President obama and the repeal
of “don’t ask, don’t tell.”
But it was the attack by the two
co-founders of gay conservative group
GoProud on one of Perry’s top pollsters
and strategists that has raised questions
about outing in 2011 and the brash tac-
tics of the outspoken organization.
on dec. 7, following the launch of
the ad, GoProud executive director
Jimmy Lasalvia tweeted, “i’ve just
about had it with faggots who line their
pockets with checks from anti-gay
homophobes while throwing the rest of
us under the bus.”
in case there was any doubt, about
two hours later, Lasalvia added, “i was
talking about rick Perry’s pollster/
strategist.”
Whether or not GoProud board
Chairman Chris Barron and Lasalvia
outed Perry pollster and strategist tony
fabrizio, as some have claimed, their
actions led andrew Breitbart, one of the
most prominent conservative support-
ers of the organization, to cut his ties
with the group dec. 10, resigning from
the advisory board.
talking about the decision dec. 12,
Breitbart tells Metro Weekly, “it appeared
to me that this was an outing. i could not
have been more clear with Chris and
Jimmy that that tactic, which emanated
from the political aids wars of the ’80s
– this isn’t subtle for me. i cannot be on
an advisory council and not be advised
that somebody is going to be attacking a
person in this type of way.”
Muddying the waters, however, was
the claim from Barron, who told Metro
Weekly dec. 8, “We didn’t think that
there was any question about tony
fabrizio’s sexual orientation,” and the
fact that fabrizio has a long history of
involvement with pro-LGBt organiza-
tions, including Log Cabin republicans
and the Gill foundation.
fabrizio conducted polling for LCr
and other organizations in 2007 regard-
ing marriage, the military and employ-
ment nondiscrimination – a time when
Barron was the political director of
LCr. fabrizio also has appeared as
a speaker at outGiving, an event for
LGBt donors that is organized by the
Gill foundation.
of the reason for their outspoken
comments about fabrizio, Barron told
Metro Weekly dec. 8, “Perry’s pollster
and strategist tony fabrizio has lined
his pockets with gay money (from folks
like [the] Gill [foundation]) for years
and now he sits back and watches as
Perry unfolds a designed strategy to
demonize gay people to score political
points.”
When asked why he considers this
situation to be an outing, Breitbart says,
“outing is not simply just exposing to
the greater public that a person who
is closeted is gay. it’s the act of acting
punitively against that person because
that person doesn’t conform to what
you think is the proper politics that a
certain group should have. regardless
of whether he was publicly out, this had
the hallmark of outing.”
Because Breitbart says he has a “zero
tolerance” policy regarding outing, he
says, “it made it impossible for me to
stand by the group. … i want to draw a
bright line in the conservative world,
and hopefully in the gay conservative
world, that we do not adopt these evil
tactics.” He added, however, that he
holds no ill will toward GoProud and
hopes that they can move beyond this
incident to advance the role of gay con-
servatives in the conservative move-
ment.
asked to respond, Barron would
only say on the record, “i’m not autho-
rized by my board to say anything about
the situation. the last statement that
we put out is the last statement of the
organization on this matter.”
in that statement, released in both
Barron and Lasalvia’s name, they said,
“from the time this organization was
founded we have been clear in our
opposition to outing. We would never
intentionally out anyone. However, in
the case of tony fabrizio, top pollster
and chief strategist for the Presidential
campaign of texas Governor rick
Perry, we did not believe there was any
question about his sexual orientation
– nor did the reporters who called us
to ask about his involvement in Perry’s
anti-gay campaign strategy.”
Barron noted, however, that no other
advisory board members have resigned
L
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Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Behind the Scenes at the
2011 Coverboy of the Year at the 9:30 Club
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METROWEEKLY 6 DECEMBER 15, 2011
report in a compromise reached the eve-
ning of dec. 12. a provision in the aa senate
version of the ndaa that would have ndaa ndaa
repealed the military’s sodomy prohibi-
tion, however, was not included in the
conference report.
one of the dropped House provisions,
proposed by rep. vicky Hartzler (r-Mo.),
“reaffrm[ed] the policy of section 3 of the
defense of Marriage act.” the amend-
ment – made applicable to the ndaa by ndaa ndaa
referencing department of defense rules,
regulations and employees – also repeats
section 3’s policy of defning “marriage”
and “spouse” as relating only to opposite-
sex marriages.
the other, offered by rep. todd akin
(r-Mo.), would have expanded upon the
current restrictions of doMa by effec aa -
tively banning same-sex marriages from
being performed at military bases or
by military employees. akin’s amend-
ment would have prohibited weddings
from taking place on military installa-
tions, such as bases, or other defense
department property if they don’t com-
ply with doMa. it also would have
prohibited chaplains or other defense
employees from performing non-doMa-
compliant marriages while “acting in an
offcial capacity.”
servicemembers Legal defense
network executive director aubrey sarvis
said in a statement, “We congratulate the
House and senate conference commit-
tee for having struck the correct bal-
ance on the chaplains provisions. Clearly,
there was no place for the restrictive
akin language as the defense department
continues to move forward on effective
implementation of open service in our
military. this report demonstrates that a
majority in Congress remains committed
to, and in lock step with the Pentagon, in
ensuring that we stay on the repeal course
adopted by the last Congress and signed
off on by the secretary of defense and the
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs. there was
no back tracking in the conference report
on this front.”
evan Wolfson, president of freedom
to Marry, also noted the move, saying in
a statement, “anti-gay attacks and infu-
sion of the so-called defense of Marriage
act have no place in legislation designed
to support all the brave men and women
who fght to defend this nation. Gay
and lesbian servicemembers risk their
lives every day and freedom to Marry
is pleased that the conference commit-
tee agreed with us and voted to remove
and that a board meeting was scheduled
for dec. 13. Liz Mair is an advisory board
member for GoProud and a consultant
to the Perry campaign, and it appears at
this time that she will continue in both
roles. another GoProud advisory board
member, Lisa de Pasquale, told the daily
Caller’s Matt Lewis that she has no inten-
tion of leaving the board.
somewhat lost in the debate over
Barron and Lasalvia’s words has been
their initial criticism, which was about
the confict between the role that fabrizio
has played in attempting to advance
LGBt equality initiatives and his cur-
rent leadership role in a campaign that
has gone from an aggressive economic
focus to one focused repeatedly on social
issues, particularly LGBt issues.
although the Huffington Post’s
sam stein reported dec. 8 that fabrizio,
“called [the ad] ‘nuts,’ according to an
email sent from fabrizio to the ad’s main
creator, longtime GoP operative nelson
Warfeld,” Barron and Lasalvia had
responded by saying that, even if that was
so, fabrizio should resign from the Perry
campaign. fabrizio did not respond to a
request for comment from Metro Weekly.
on the question of the strategic tra-
jectory of the Perry campaign, at least,
Breitbart appears to be in agreement
with Barron and Lasalvia. of the ad,
Breitbart says, “i think that the politi-
cal left and the media framing anyone
that agrees with traditional marriage as
a hater or who disagrees with gays in the
military as a hater is wrong-headed. that
said, i found the ad to be clumsy and inef- found the ad to be clumsy and inef found the ad to be clumsy and inef
fective and unnecessary – and desperate.
and pandering.” l
Compromising
Matters
Anti-marriage measures dropped
from House version of defense bill,
while Senate version loses repeal
of sodomy
by Chris Geidner
BotH aMendMents oPPosed By
LGBt advocates in the House version
of the national defense authorization
act were dropped from the conference
LGBTNews
these discriminatory anti-gay provisions
from the bill.”
sarvis said of the decision on the sod
omy provision: “However, we are very
disappointed that the conferees voted to
keep the sodomy provisions in article 125
[of the Uniform Code of Military Justice].
… the senate was right to take this action,
and it is unfortunate that their attempt to
end article 125 did not prevail. sLdn
will continue to work with the senate,
House, and department of defense to
bring about this needed change.”
sarvis also noted, “additionally, our
initial reading of the committee’s deci-
sion to update the provisions for rape
and sexual assault in article 120 of the
Uniform Code of Military Justice is also
positive.” l
Clean Break
Divorce bill would grant same-sex
couples married in D.C. right to
divorce without residency
by John riley
desPite a ControversiaL Wa WW Lk-
up to the passage of d.C. marriage equal-
ity in 2009, a recently introduced bill
before the City Council that would per-
mit same-sex spouses who were married
in the district but reside elsewhere to
divorce isn’t attracting much attention.
the measure, introduced in october
by Councilmember Phil Mendelson (d-at
Large) and co-sponsored by eight other
councilmembers, would allow same-sex
couples residing in other states who were
legally married in the district to dissolve
their marriages without having to estab-
lish d.C. residency. typically, a legal
marriage is recognized in any part of the
country. Most states, however, do not
recognize legal marriages between mem-
bers of the same-sex, and will therefore
not grant such couples divorces.
in other words, a same-sex couple
married in d.C., but residing in texas
and who hope to divorce would not be
able to do so in texas. the proposed bill
would allow such a couple to dissolve
their d.C. marriage through d.C. chan
nels while remaining in texas.
at a dec. 8 oversight hearing held
by the Committee of the Judiciary,
Mendelson, the committee’s chairman,
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LGBTNews
METROWEEKLY 8 DECEMBER 15, 2011
HRC Releases
2012 CEI
Local businesses earn perfect scores
on latest equality index
by John riley
in tHe d.C. area, LGBt-friendLy
corporate practices aren’t just a sop to
appease a special interest group. rather,
local businesses say it’s a bargaining
chip that helps them recruit and retain
top talent.
“at the end of the day, it’s good busi-
ness practice,” says John stickeler, work-
place diversity director for the quasi-gov-
ernmental mortgage lender freddie Mac,
headquartered in McLean. “it shows our
company’s commitment to inclusion.”
freddie Mac was one of 12 Washington-
area businesses that earned perfect 100
percent scores on the Human rights
Campaign’s 2012 Corporate equality
index (Cei), an annually administered
survey that grades a number of Fortune
magazine’s 1,000 largest publicly traded
heard testimony from only two witness-
es: local LGBt activists Bob summersgill
and richard J. rosendall, who both testi-
fed in favor of the bill.
summersgill, an anC commis-
sioner from Ward 3 who emphasized
he was not speaking in any official
capacity, cited the case of Margaret
Chambers and Cassandra ormiston, a
lesbian couple from rhode island who
sought a divorce after being married in
Massachusetts in 2004. in a 3-2 deci-
sion, the rhode island supreme Court
ruled they could not receive a divorce
since same-sex marriage is not legal in
rhode island. as a result, the only way
for the women to divorce would be for
one of them to move to Massachusetts,
establish residency there for at least
six months and then seek to dissolve
the marriage.
“this bill flls the gap in the law cre-
ated by our being ahead of the histori-
cal curve,” rosendall said. “none of us
celebrates the dissolution of a marriage,
but equality under the law must extend
to every contingency. the lack of a clear
legal mechanism for divorce can make
an unhappy situation much worse for all
involved.” l
companies, American Lawyer magazine’s
top 200 revenue-grossing law frms, and
a few hundred businesses with more
than 500 full-time employees – 636 in
all – on measures including health care
parity and domestic partner benefts for
LGBt employees.
now in its 10th year, the Cei has
recently adopted more stringent crite
ria when grading businesses, including
whether a company provides transgen-
der-specifc benefts and protections,
demonstrates public commitment to the
LGBt community through philanthropy
and has in place culturally competent
programs or training.
in addition to freddie Mac, other
local businesses earning 100 percent
ratings under the new criteria included
consulting frm Booz allen Hamilton
inc., Capital one financial Corp., both
based in McLean; defense frm Lockheed
Martin Corp. of Bethesda; Gaithersburg-
based food industry giant sodexo inc.;
and Choice Hotels international of silver
spring. also earning perfect scores were
local law frms dLa Piper of Baltimore aa
and fve d.C.-based frms: akin, Gump,
staruss, Hauer & feld LLP; Covington
& Burling LLP; Crowell & Moring LLP;
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LGBTNews
METROWEEKLY 10 DECEMBER 15, 2011
than just abide by what is required by
state or local law.
overall, fidas says, most companies
have been quite proactive in not only
completing the survey, but trying to earn
a full 100 percent score by adopting poli-
cies or programs that meet the criteria.
fidas says this occurs across all employ-
ment felds, though in terms of sheer
numbers law frms remain the leaders
in offering such benefts to their LGBt
employees.
stickeler, the diversity director for
freddie Mac, says his frm has specifcal-
ly gone out of its way to change its corpo-
rate culture regarding LGBt employees.
Just four years ago, the mortgage giant
did not earn 100 percent on the index.
in fact, stickeler says, he knows of at
least three highly qualifed candidates
who were offered positions at freddie
Mac but turned down the offers, pre-
cisely because the company didn’t have a
100 percent rating on the Cei.
Chuck stephens, senior associate for
diversity and inclusion at Booz allen
Hamilton, says he fnds LGBt inclusion
to be one of the company’s “core values.”
“it’s very accepting,” he says. “after
Hogan Lowells Us LLP; and Wilmer
Culter Pickering Hale & dorr LLP.
“this has really become part of the
mainstream protocol of operating a suc-
cessful business,” says deena fidas, depu-
ty director of the Human rights Campaign
foundation Workplace Project. “it’s not
just a coastal phenomenon.”
in contrast, only four local companies
earned a rating of zero on the Cei survey:
amerigroup Corp. of virginia Beach, va.;
nii Holdings of reston; smithfeld foods
inc., of smithfeld, va.; and the d.C.-
based Washington Post Company.
fidas says that the Cei survey makes
note of frms that have not responded to
inquiries about their benefts packages
and LGBt-related corporate policies,
but also said that HrC tries to collect
data from publicly available sources and
other avenues to gain insight into a frm’s
practices. if there is no evidence of any
such policies, only then would a company
receive a zero rating.
for companies in the district, fidas
says they are required to adhere to the
district’s Human rights Law. But, she
adds, in order to receive a positive rating
on the Cei, a company needs to do more
all, why does who you love impact your
ability to get the job done?”
stephens specifcally cites the com
pany’s policies in offering benefts and
health care parity to transgender employ
ees, and says the company, which has
scored 100 percent on the last three C
surveys, had offered domestic partner
benefts and transgender-friendly ben-
efts prior to its participation in the Cei
survey three years ago.
stephens also said that by provid-
ing LGBt-friendly benefts and engaging
with the local LGBt community through
fundraising for aids Walks or partici-
pating in the LGBt pride parades sends a
message to potential employees that the
company values all forms of diversity,
which gives the company a “competitive
advantage” in recruiting.
“it’s an absolute asset,” stephens says
of the company’s LGBt-friendly cor-
porate culture, especially in contrast to
the public sector in a state like virginia.
“We’re doing things above and beyond
– from an employee-value proposition –
what the law requires. … so it’s absolutely
a differentiator for us to recruit top talent
and be an employer of choice.” l
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13 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
Us Helping Us
Awards Reception
Saturday, Dec. 3
Arena Stage
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
14 SEE PHOTOS fROM THiS EvENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
15 METROWEEKLY.COM
marketplace - real estate
DECEMBER 15, 2011 16 METROWEEKLY
marketplace - real estate
17 METROWEEKLY.COM
18 SEE MORE PHOTOS fROM THiS EvENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
“Big Give” beneft
for SMYAL
Saturday, Dec. 10
Universal Gear
PhotograPhy by
dylan CoMstoCk
scene
19 METROWEEKLY.COM
20 SEE MORE PHOTOS fROM THiS EvENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
GLOV Awards
Tuesday, Dec. 6
Duplex Diner
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
21 METROWEEKLY.COM
DECEMBER 15, 2011 22 METROWEEKLY
DC THiRTY SOMeTHiNG social group (dinners,
concerts, etc.) for gay guys in their 30s meets.
To join/more information, send name and email
address to dcthirtysomething@yahoo.com.
DiGNiTY NORTHeRN ViRGiNiA sponsors
Mass for LGBT community, family and friends.
6:30 p.m., Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606
Seminary Road, Alexandria. All welcome. 703-
912-1662, dignitynova@gmail.com.
DC SeNTiNeLS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave.
NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or
straight. teamdcbasketball.org.
US HeLpiNG US hosts Exercise Group:
Stretching and Low Impact Aerobics, 10-11 a.m.,
3636 Georgia Ave. NW. $15. 202-446-1100.
Sunday, December 18
ADVeNTURiNG outdoors group hosts annual
“Winter Solstice Poetry Hike,” Sugarloaf
Mountain. Bring poem to share, lunch, beverages
and few dollars. Carpool 10 a.m. from Grosvenor-
Strathmore Metro. Joe, 703-931-8746.
adventuring.org.
WEEkly EvEnts
The LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MeMORiAL
epiSCOpAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at
8:30 a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral
Ave. NW. For information or additional services,
call 202-232-4244 or visit allsoulsdc.org.
BeLieVeRS COVeNANT FeLLOWSHip Sunday
worship, meets 10:45 a.m., Worship and Ministry
Center, 8201 Greensboro Drive, Suite 300,
McLean. bcfchurch.us.
BeTHeL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 240-582-7092, betheldc.org.
FiRST CONGReGATiONAL UNiTeD CHURCH
OF CHRiST welcomes all to 1 p.m. service, First
Trinity Lutheran Church, 501 4th St. NW.
fccuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
FReeDOM FeLLOWSHip CHRiSTiAN
CHURCH, Christ-centered, affrming church,
offers worship service, 10 a.m., 4649 Nannie
Helen Burroughs Ave. NE. Visit ffccdc.org.
MeTROpOLiTAN COMMUNiTY CHURCH OF
NORTHeRN ViRGiNiA services at 11 a.m., led by
Rev. Kharma Amos. Children’s Sunday School,
11 a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-
0930, mccnova.com.
NATiONAL CiTY CHRiSTiAN CHURCH, inclu-
sive church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel
worship, 8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11
a.m. 5 Thomas Circle NW. 202-232-0323,
nationalcitycc.org.
RAiNBOW FAMiLieS DC’s “Maybe Baby” series
for LGBT singles and couples considering parent-
hood meets 3-5 p.m. info@rainbowfamiliesdc.org.
RiVeRSiDe BApTiST CHURCH, a Christ-
centered, interracial, welcoming-and-affrming
church, offers service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW.
202-554-4330, riverside-dc.org.
HiV TeSTiNG at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
SMYAL’S ReC NiGHT provides a social atmo-
sphere for GLBT and questioning youth, featur-
ing dance parties, movie nights and game nights.
Leandrea.Gilliam@smyal.org.
TRANSGeNDeR HeALTH eMpOWeRMeNT
“Diva Chat” support group. 6-8 p.m., 1414 North
Capitol St. NE. Snacks provided. 202-636-1646.
Saturday, December 17
BURGUNDY CReSCeNT VOLUNTeeRS help
at Lost Dog & Cat Rescue Foundation, PetSmart,
Falls Church. burgundycrescent.org.
CHRYSALiS arts & culture group visits National
Archives. Free, all welcome. Lunch follows. Meet
11 a.m. inside Constitution Avenue lobby between
7th & 9th Streets NW. Jeff, 301-775-9660,
jeffreyhughes@me.com.
WASHiNGTON-Lee HiGH SCHOOL GSA hosts
youth dance. 6-9 p.m. $2. Clarendon Presbyterian
Church. 1305 North Jackson St., Arlington.
703-527-9513.
WEEkly EvEnts
ANDROMeDA TRANSCULTURAL HeALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedahealthcenter.org.
BeT MiSHpACHAH, founded by members of
the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning
Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush
luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
BRAziLiAN GLBT GROUp, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For loca-
tion/time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
DC AqUATiCS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNeRS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk;
or 10 a.m. for fun run. info@dcfrontrunners.org or
dcfrontrunners.org.
thurSday, December 15
SpeCiAL LiAiSON DiViSiON, which includes
Gay & Lesbian Liaison Unit, of Metropolitan
Police, holds Sixth District open house. 6 p.m.,
100 42nd St. NE. Sgt. Carlos Mejia, 202-506-0742.
gllu.org.
WEEkly EvEnts
DC LAMBDA SqUAReS gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30
p.m. Casual dress. Email info@dclambdasquares.
org, call 301-257-0517 or visit
dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLeS TRiANGLeS Northern Virginia
social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in
Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-foor
bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. Email info@dullestri-
angles.com or visit dullestriangles.com.
iDeNTiTY offers free and confdential HIV test-
ing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and
in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or
Takoma Park at 301-422-2398.
Friday, December 16
ADVeNTURiNG outdoors group joins Team DC
for a Holiday Party at Cobalt. 6:30 p.m., 1639 R St.
NW. Free. All welcome. adventuring.org.
GeRTRUDe STeiN DeMOCRATiC CLUB 35th
Annual Holiday Celebration. 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, 1520 14th St. NW.
$25. steindemocrats.org.
WEEkly EvEnts
BeT MiSHpACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30
p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529
16th St. NW. betmish.org.
GAY DiSTRiCT, a non-church-affliated discus-
sion and social group for GBTQ men, 18 to 35,
meets 8:30 p.m., St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church,
1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. gd@gaydistrict.org or
gaydistrict.org.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the
gay community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities.
Event information should be sent by e-mail to calendar@metroweek-
ly.com; by fax to 202-638-6831; or by mail to Metro Weekly, Attn:
Community Calendar, 1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209, Washington, D.C.
20005. Deadline for inclusion is noon on the Friday before publication.
“Announcement” submissions that are not date-specifc may run for two
weeks, with the option for listing organizations to resubmit if appropriate.
Questions about the calendar can be directed to the Metro Weekly offce
at 202-638-6830.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
marketplace - professional services
23 METROWEEKLY.COM
UNiTARiAN CHURCH OF ARLiNGTON, an
LGBTQ welcoming-and-affrming congregation,
offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU
Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. contactvaruum@
yahoo.com.
UNiVeRSALiST NATiONAL MeMORiAL
CHURCH, is a welcoming and inclusive church of
the UUAC. GLBT Interweave social/service group
meets monthly. Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque
sanctuary. 1810 16th St. NW. 202-387-3411,
universalist.org.
Monday, December 19
WEEkly EvEnts
GeTeqUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
KARiNG WiTH iNDiViDUALiTY (K.i.) SeRViCeS,
3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
MeTROpOLiTAN COMMUNiTY CHURCH OF
WASHiNGTON, D.C., sponsors an HIV-positive
support group. 7 p.m., 474 Ridge St. NW. Open to
all. Matt, ndc20003@yahoo.com.
WASHiNGTON WeTSKiNS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van
Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swim-
ming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504;
secretary@wetskins.org; or wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HiV/AiDS SUppORT
GROUp for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7
p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
tueSday, December 20
WEEkly EvEnts
ASiANS AND FRieNDS weekly happy hour, with
dinner afterward, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Cobalt/30
Degrees Lounge, 1639 R St. NW. afwashington.net.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MeN’S HeALTH
AND WeLLNeSS/STD CLiNiC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
THe HiV WORKiNG GROUp of THe CeNTeR
hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
SUppORT GROUp FOR LGBTq YOUTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-7 p.m. Leandrea
Gilliam, 202-546-5940, ext. 116, or
leandrea.gilliam@smyal.org.
WedneSday, December 21
TOM DAVOReN SOCiAL BRiDGe CLUB meets,
7:30 p.m., Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE. No partner
needed. lambdabridge.com.
DECEMBER 15, 2011 24 METROWEEKLY
25 METROWEEKLY.COM
SpeCiAL LiAiSON DiViSiON, which includes Gay
& Lesbian Liaison Unit, of Metropolitan Police,
holds Seventh District open house. 6 p.m., 2455
Alabama Ave SE. Sgt. Carlos Mejia, 202-506-0742.
gllu.org.
WEEkly EvEnts
AD LiB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
CAReeR DeVeLOpMeNT is offered at The
Center, 1318 U St. NW. 3 p.m. Advance registration
required. 202-682-2245, careerdevelopment@
thedccenter.org.
DC SWiNG! rehearses 7-9:30 p.m., at Reformation
Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill. Contact
membership@dcdd.org.
pRiMe TiMeRS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment, for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
hivprevention@smyal.org.
US HeLpiNG US hosts “A Positive U” support
group for black gay men living with HIV/AIDS, 7-9
p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.
WASHiNGTON WeTSKiNS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m., Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van
Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swim-
ming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504
or secretary@wetskins.org. wetskins.org.
thurSday, December 22
NORTHeRN ViRGiNiA AiDS MiNiSTRY, hosts
“Stand Up. Speak Out.” talent show. 5-7 p.m.
Busboys & Poets, 4251 S Campbell Ave., Arlington.
Free. 703-533-5505, bjackson@novam.org.
Saturday, December 24
BURGUNDY CReSCeNT VOLUNTeeRS help at
Food & Friends, and at Saint Elizabeths Hospital.
burgundycrescent.org. l
DECEMBER 15, 2011 26 METROWEEKLY
FOR MORe CALeNDAR LiSTiNGS
pLeASe ViSiT
WWW.MeTROWeeKLY.COM
27 METROWEEKLY.COM
advertiseMent
DECEMBER 15, 2011 28 METROWEEKLY
29 METROWEEKLY.COM
My Life ended
on an early
december evening
in 1987 when one
of my fraternity
brothers came into
my frat-house bed-
room and asked
me, “are you a
homosexual?”
this was the opening move in a
plan that, i soon found out, had been
crafted over a number of days since
a non-fraternity friend had betrayed
my confdence to my closest fraternity
brothers. While i was being questioned,
two other brothers whom i had inad-
vertently implicated were being cross-
examined. Long, painful story short,
there was much yelling and screaming,
culminating with someone i had once
thought of as a friend standing menac-
ingly outside my door with a bat.
the situation didn’t devolve into
violence, though i still felt beaten. not
everyone was against me, but the sup-
port i had was vanishingly small. i was
given a simple message: “Get out.”
the deal was that i would move out
after Christmas break, which left me
with two agonizing weeks living in the
house. someone i had considered my
best friend, a fellow journalism student
who lived at the other end of the hall,
never looked me in the eye again. He
did, however, loudly declare a “hetero-
sexuals only” table when i entered the
dining room to grab a plate to take back
to my room.
this was a friend — i’ll simply call
him G.a., for “grievous asshole” — who
i had simply assumed would be a friend
forever. that’s what fraternities were
about, after all. instead, he was a hard
lesson for me in what it means to be
confronted with an overfowing hate. i
re-created my life and found friends who
would actually last me a lifetime, but that
particular scar will always be there.
Moving forward 24 years, i found
myself sitting on an early december
evening in 2011 in a thai restaurant
on 14th street, having dinner with my
college-junior cousin, Wilson, who’s in
town for a congressional internship,
and his aunt, renee. i knew that renee
had worked at the same southern news-
paper where G.a. had landed not long
after college, so i asked if she’d worked
with him.
in fact, she said, she had. and my
family name had popped up in some
roundabout discussion, leading G.a. to
ask if that was the same family that
“sean Bugg” was from. He relayed some
version of the story of our frat days,
admitting with some understatement
that they had been “pretty mean” to me.
and the whole time i’m hearing this,
in the safety of my openly gay adult life,
i’m feeling the bottom drop out of my
stomach, the pounding of my heart, the
faint shaking of my hands, all the same
things i felt a quarter-century ago when
someone came into my room and asked,
“are you a homosexual?”
i’m not telling this because it’s some
version of “it Gets Better,” although
it could be. after all, my cousin that
evening was totally at ease discuss-
ing his love for sports, his girlfriend,
his fraternity, and his gay friends. and
that was a highlight of the night for
me, to hear that from a younger rela-
tive who’s a product of the same rural
kentucky upbringing i had and to know
that things are different now.
and i’m not telling a story where i
see some grand narrative of forgiveness
or redemption, because i don’t. some
wounds are way too deep and the better
angels of my nature will only take me
so far. there are things in life that are
unforgivable.
i’m telling it because when i’ve writ-
ten about it in the past, i’ve done so
glancingly or jokingly, without fully
seeing what remained of the past inside
me. sitting at that table with my hus-
band and my family, something that
makes me very happy in a way i never
expected in 1987, i was able to see that
and move just a little bit further beyond
it. it doesn’t give me what other people
think of as closure. What it gives me is a
little bit of peace. l
Past Imperfect
Almost exactly 24 years later, a painful experience from the past
can feel just as hurtful when remembered in the present
DeCeMBeR 15, 2011
VOLUMe 18 / iSSUe 33
pUBLiSHeRS
Sean Bugg, Randy Shulman
EdiToRiaL
eDiTOR-iN-CHieF
Randy Shulman
ART DiReCTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGiNG eDiTOR
Will o’Bryan
SeNiOR pOLiTiCAL WRiTeR
Chris Geidner
STAFF WRiTeR
John Riley
SeNiOR pHOTOGRApHeR
Ward Morrison
CONTRiBUTiNG pHOTOGRApHeRS
dylan Comstock, Brian Walker
CONTRiBUTiNG WRiTeRS
Chris Heller, Carrie Megginson, Jonathan Padget,
Troy Petenbrink, Richard Rosendall,
doug Rule, Kate Wingfeld
WeBMASTeR
david Uy
MULTiMeDiA
aram Vartian
ADMiNiSTRATiVe / pRODUCTiON ASSiSTANT
Julian Vankim
adVERTiSiNG & SaLES
DiReCTOR OF SALeS
Randy Shulman
SALeS exeCUTiVe
dylan Comstock
NATiONAL ADVeRTiSiNG RepReSeNTATiVe
Rivendell Media Co.
212-242-6863
DiSTRiBUTiON MANAGeR
dennis Havrilla
pATRON SAiNT
Paul Varnell
COVeR pHOTOGRApHY
Julian Vankim
MeTRO WeeKLY
1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209
Washington, dC 20005
202.638.6830 fax: 202.638.6831
www.metroweekly.com
All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be
reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publishers. Metro Weekly assumes no
responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject
to editing and will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Metro Weekly is supported by many fine advertisers, but we cannot accept responsibility for claims
made by advertisers, nor can we accept responsibility for materials provided by advertisers or
their agents. Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization in articles or
advertising in Metro Weekly is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of
such person or organization.
© 2011 Jansi LLC.
LGBTopinion
by sean Bugg
tHe aMeriCan
family association
is mad at Banana
republic. they’re
also mad at family
dollar and radio
shack and a hand-
ful of others. seems
these companies
are in the afa woodshed for not suff-
ciently celebrating Christmas. ironically,
sears gets a “Christmas-friendly” pass
from the afa, while also getting a top
100 rating on the latest Human rights
Campaign Corporate equality index.
amazon, also on the Christmas-friendly
list, is a platform for ordering the likes of
1972’s hardcore Behind The Green Door,
advising customers on how to get deliv-
ery by Christmas.
it’s all hooey, really. if there was a
will boycott your business or otherwise
recognize your bigotry once they learn
you’d prefer the law to recognize them
as merely second-class citizens.
years ago, at the other end of the
spectrum i found myself overwhelmed
by Christmas. i’d been raised with the
tradition, but felt uneasy with it after
leaving Christianity. i hadn’t grasped
how utterly Christmas-cuckoo the coun-
try becomes until standing outside the
red and green bubble. i would give gifts,
but they were new year’s gifts, i insist-
ed. i’d be grateful for the day off, but
little more observant than that. i would
only wish you happy holidays, regardless
of your own beliefs.
i have come to realize, however, that
in our beautifully diverse nation, it’s not
all about me.
My husband sets up a nativity scene
given to him by his devout mother.
that’s just fne with me, reminding me
of my own mother’s nativity scene with
its ceramic Mary whose broken-off hair
was replaced with clay. We even put up
a Christmas tree a few years in a row.
the year the city neglected to collect our
curbside tree – which rolled in and out of
the gutter during the weeklong window
of possible pickup – was our last with
that festive tradition. still, there’s plenty
about Christmas i enjoy, if only for nos-
talgia’s sake.
and, if i know you are a Christian, i will
wish you a Merry Christmas. similarly,
i won’t wish you one if i know you’re
Jewish, but i will wish you a Happy
Hanukkah. When in doubt, just willy-
nilly wishing everyone a Merry Christmas
would be like wishing everyone a happy
birthday on my birthday. Unless you’re
among only your fellow congregants, your
default should be Happy Holidays. it’s
wonderfully inclusive.
that seems to be the point that drives
the afa nuts: a greeting inclusive of
all belittles the rest. it’s the same value
system that holds that marriage equality
belittles more exclusive marriage laws.
in a nation of 300 million people, of
every possible background and belief,
those are sadly outdated and disrespect-
ful values.
instead, i’m wishing a warm Merry
Christmas to my Christian pals, a Happy
Hanukkah to my menschen, and a belated
eid Mubarak to the Muslims i know (all
of whom are queer and progressive). to
the rest – particularly my fellow non-the-
ists (with a touch of taoism), i’m wishing
you happiest of holidays. Because, unlike
the afa, i respect you all. l
holiday war, it was between Christmas
and saturnalia. Christmas won. yet we
have these Christmas martyrs acting as
though the holiday that prompts radio
stations to dedicate their entire playlists
to Christmas music, starbucks to break
out the Christmas Blend and borderline
heathens to head to midnight services is
being buried.
Granted, the phrase “Happy Holidays”
has gained some traction. it’s a perfect ft
for a society as diverse as america. in
this country, we celebrate Christmas.
and Hanukkah, eid al-adha, kwanzaa,
winter solstice and the new year. “Happy
Holidays” as a seasonal greeting is a good
thing (as Martha stewart might say while
arranging some perfectly proportioned
cinnamon-scented pinecones).
the sense of entitlement of the Merry
Christmas – or else – crowd is akin to
those who vote against marriage equal-
ity while claiming they’re bullied by
gays. “Bullied” in this particular usage
generally means fearing that gay people
DECEMBER 15, 2011 30 METROWEEKLY
LGBTopinion
Xmas Column
Christmas is nice, but holidays are better
by Will o’Bryan
marketplace - professional services
31 METROWEEKLY.COM
33 METROWEEKLY. METROWEEKLY.COM
S
o MayBe He
overshared a bit. overshared overshared
in his Cover-
boy profle last
May, tyler Cof-
fey revealed the
most unusual
place he’s had
sex. “a lifeguard station in
south Beach,” he responded.
“no, it’s not the worst thing
to have published,” tyler says
now. “i’m out to my family, but
there are some things family
doesn’t need to know.”
“one of my aunts over
thanksgiving congratu-
lated me and told me that
she read the entire article,”
he says. Meanwhile, his dad
heard about the Coverboy of
the year competition from a
facebook post by tyler’s twin
brother. “He was like, ‘oh, you
did this?’ He thought it was
really cool.”
tyler decided to pose as a
Coverboy in the frst place as a
reward for putting in so much
time working out. “i got a little
more serious about going to
the gym a couple of years ago,”
he says. “after doing it for a
From techie to triathlete  ,
Tyler Coffey is blazing all kinds of trails
by Doug Rule
Photographed Saturday, Dec. 10,  at the 9
:
30 Club by Julian Vankim
2011 Coverboy of the Year:
Tyler Coffey
DECEMBER 15, 2011 34 METROWEEKLY
few months, i needed something
long-term to motivate myself.”
the 27-year-old stands at 5’7”
and weighs a lean and mean 155
pounds, but he once topped the
scales at 185 pounds.
“i wouldn’t say i was fat, but
i was defnitely heavy,” he says.
“i didn’t grow up eating terribly
well. i’ve learned all that since.”
though he still breaks for dessert
— chocolate, cookies and espe-
cially ice cream — to feed what he
calls his “inner fat girl.”
“anybody who has watched
me eat can attest to the fact that
she exists,” he says.
tyler grew up in Maine in a
conservative southern Baptist
household. yes, southern Baptist
in Maine. “there are pockets of
real conservatism in Maine, and
my parents happen to fall into
one of those,” he explains, refer-
ring to his mother and stepfather.
(His dad and stepmom are “very
liberal, the complete opposite.”)
“My mom became born again
when i was 13. ... When it comes
to gay issues, our relationship is
tenuous.”
When tyler was 16, he
expanded his horizons by apply-
ing to study in Germany for a year
through the Congress-Bundestag
youth exchange program. “that
really became the cornerstone
of thinking independently for
myself,” tyler says. once he
returned, he realized he wanted
to live in a big city. He opted
to study international affairs and
German language and literature
at George Washington University,
and ended up loving d.C. so much
he’s lived here longer than any-
where else. His two-bedroom
condo is just a block north of the
U street Metro.
studying in Germany also
helped tyler establish his own
identity apart from his identical
twin brother, dan.
“We hated each other grow-
ing up,” he says. “a lot of people
who aren’t twins don’t under-
stand this, but you’re fghting
for the same identity. if you look
the same, [and] you sound the
same – we were in a small town,
so we had the same friends and
the same interests.” Many people
didn’t even bother to distinguish
between the two, he explains.
“[But] as soon as we stopped liv-
ing together in the same place, we
became very close friends. and
we’re very close now.”
their differing sexual orien-
tation also helps set them apart
as adults. “People say he’s the
straight version of me,” says
tyler. “if he went to the gym a
little bit more and dressed himself
a little bit better, then we would
be the same person, at least by
appearance.”
in fact, tyler, who’s only a
semester away from earning his
MBa from american University,
is planning to start a part-time
Web-design business with his
brother, a Web programming
student at Harvard University.
Perhaps they’ll call it Pi, after
the Greek numerical value. the
Coffey twins were, after all, born
March 14, “like all good dorks.”
tyler has little free time
between going to school, dream-
ing up business ideas and serving
as a contractor offering informa-
tion technology support to three
different organizations. if you do
fnd him out and about, it’ll most
likely be at nellie’s, duplex diner
or the Chi Cha Lounge.
or at the gym.
“results is where it all hap-
pened,” he says, referring to the
U street nW location that is now
a vida. He met his current boy-
friend over the summer at the
gym. and he’s always there with
his workout partner, Brien.
tyler is also increasingly par-
ticipating in races, from triathlons
to obstacle courses to 10-milers.
“i need a goal when i work out,”
he concedes. “i’m very competi-
tive. it happens when you’re a
twin.”
and the sibling rivalry is still
on: tyler says he just talked his
brother into doing a triathlon
next year.
tyler smiles, “i can’t let him
rest on his laurels.” l
37 METROWEEKLY.COM
A
s far as kory davis is ConCerned, Life’s
all about openness and honesty. the frank, outgo-
ing 25-year-old tells it like it is.
“i just speak my mind,” he says, not mincing
words. “i’m just me and i’m honest. once you are
yourself, things just come across easier, much more
naturally. you listen to what someone is saying and
give your input. and if i don’t like something, i’m
going to tell them i don’t like it. at the end of the day, they can
either take it or leave it.”
But lest you think he’s cocky or arrogant, there’s a softer, more
humble side to this virgin islands native.
“i come across as very confdent, and i am,” kory confrms.
“But i think i’m more shy when it comes to me getting involved
with somebody. i’m a little more reserved, and i hold back all my
boisterous qualities that i would have in a regular conversation
with someone else.”
once he establishes a relationship with someone, or, in the short
term, gains a little liquid inspiration from his favorite drink – apple
martini with three cherries, thank you very much – that shyness
disappears.
“i’m a go-getter,” he says. “so if i know you’re in my league, i’ll
go after you, defnitely. Most of the time i get what i want.”
so what’s the ideal man for this newly single “go-getter?”
“Be abreast of what’s going on in the world. if we’re going out,
we need to be able to have a conversation, talk about things. Be
adventurous.”
While he might be adventurous, “intriguing” is probably more
precise when it comes to describing this kory. for one thing, he’s
got 43 tattoos, each with its own meaning. at the time of his initial
Coverboy feature in february, the count was 42.
“i only got one extra one, on my left leg. it says ‘sex sells,’” kory
says. “it’s true. it might sound bad, but you’re not going to be a
news anchor if you have pimples or you’re not well put together. so
your presentation, once you step out of the house, you need to be at
least put together for yourself.”
along with the external – being clean-cut and presentable – kory
also has a charitable streak. Prompted by a conversation with a
homeless man about the importance of keeping one’s feet warm and
dry, kory recently held a “sock drive” for homeless people, netting
50 packs of new socks. that’s on top of the 75 pounds of canned
goods he just collected for the local charity so others May eat.
kory is also helping others back in his childhood home of st.
thomas by organizing the island’s frst gay pride celebration. He
communicates weekly with a committee of seven others back on
the island to carry out the preparations. the celebration is sched-
uled to take place in october. He was inspired to plan the celebra-
tion after attending another gay pride celebration in trinidad and
tobago, which he says is much less accepting of homosexuality
than the U.s. virgin islands, where same-sex marriages are regu-
larly performed.
asked what he thinks about being a Metro Weekly Coverboy
of the year fnalist, kory says he’s grateful for his supporters. He
credits his mother and his two best friends with running his online
campaign, reaching out to people in the d.C. area and the virgin
islands to vote for him.
kory also says he’s been impressed by the local outpouring of
support, particularly from other members of the black community.
He’s even gotten some star treatment, getting placed in the viP sec-
tion at Love nightclub being and recognized by fans at other bars.
“i went out to the fireplace the day the top 10 came out. a lot aa
of people saw it and said, ‘oh, you’re the guy from Coverboy,’ and
i got kind of shy. But i was happy.” l
kory davis prefers
Straightforward Over Straight
by john riley
Photographed Saturday, Dec. 10, 
at the 9
:
30 Club by Julian Vankim
first runner
-
up
Kory Davis
39 METROWEEKLY.COM
T
Here Was a tiMe WHen yoUnG Moises
navarrete might have shied from the spotlight. a few aa
years ago, the attention the northern virginia native
was attracting was entirely unwelcome.
“i was bullied in middle school and that really
hurt me,” he shares. “it was the most horrible time
of my life.” Moises, however, turned the tables when
high school began.
“i don’t know how i turned it around, but i did beat up a kid
freshman year,” he admits. “He was calling me names. i was fed up
with it, so i punched him in his face and made him cry.”
and that put an end to the bullying?
“Pretty much,” Moises says.
While some might frown on Moises’s use of violence, they’ve
got to grant that his furious fsts might deserve some of the credit
for his assessment of his years at alexandria’s thomas a. edison
High school as the best of his life so far.
at just 18 years old, Moises has plenty of time to make even bet-
ter years, but he really did make the most of high school. He came
out during his sophomore year. He was edison’s – openly gay –
prom king in 2011. He even became a bit of an activist.
“i was the president of [edison’s] Gay-straight alliance,” says
Moises. “What i did then was pretty much try to educate people
about the LGBt community and then set up fundraisers because
we didn’t have any sponsors like the other clubs. that’s what i did
in my senior year.”
as a sort of LGBt liaison, however, Moises faced a tough
challenge at home. His mother has somewhat accepted her son’s
sexual orientation, though the topic remains more or less “don’t
ask, don’t tell” with his dad. that’s not to say that all family ties
are strained. Moises’s two sisters and an aunt are accepting and
supportive – and, along with his friends, part of his Coverboy of
the year campaign machinery. “they were really, really happy
for me [when i made the top 10],” he says. “everybody was send-
ing me text messages about how excited they were. it felt really
good to know that they were there for me.”
Moises was also excited by the whole Coverboy experience. He
certainly has his stash of Metro Weekly issues from oct. 17, when
his initial feature ran.
“there are actually two [Metro Weekly here are actually two [ here are actually two [ boxes] on my way to
work. i grabbed whatever was left in one and put them in my bag,
walked a couple blocks [to the next box] and took ‘em. then who-
ever wanted them could come over, or i’d drop them off. i signed a
couple of them. i’ve got like 20 left.”
obviously, Moises has let himself get at least a little caught up in
the contest. so much so, he says, that he’ll admit to a hint of disap-
pointment if he doesn’t win the top spot.
“i’ll be a little upset, maybe for like fve minutes,” he says. “But
then i’ll get on with my life. to get this far is good enough for
me.”
for Moises, getting on with his life means earning a degree in
photography at virginia Commonwealth University in richmond.
knocking out some freshman credits now at northern virginia
Community College, he plans to transfer in 2012.
although Moises’s focus these days may be on college, the
Coverboy of the year contest had a lesson of its own to teach him:
the value of his friends and family.
“i used to think that they just liked me just to have around,”
Moises says of his close community. “But to see how much they
care about me really made me feel good about myself, like i must
be doing something right.” l
Moises NavarRete learns a
Coverboy lesson of community
by Will O
'
Bryan
Photographed Saturday, Dec. 10, 
at the 9
:
30 Club by Julian Vankim
SECOND runner
-
up
Moises navarRete
DECEMBER 15, 2011 40 METROWEEKLY
WINNER
$500 Cash • 18th & U Duplex Diner — $100 Gift Card • 9:30 Club — 2 Tickets to The Darkness with Foxy Shazam • Annie’s —
$300 Dinner Certifcate • Arena Stage — 2 Tickets to Opening Night and Post-Show Reception for The Normal Heart • The Normal Heart The Normal Heart Black Fox
Lounge — $75 Gift Certifcate • Blowoff — 2 Admissions for all 2012 Dates at 9:30 Club • Capital Queer Prom — 2 Tickets to the
2012 Prom • Caramel Boutique — $50 Gift Certifcate • Centaur Entertainment — 10 CD Package • Cobalt — $100 Gift Certificate
• DC Eagle — $50 Gift Certifcate/Bar Tab • Fireplace DC — $25 Bar Tab • FIT — 2 Full Personal Training Sessions • Freddie’s
Beach Bar — Sunday Buffet Brunch for 2 • GALA Hispanic Theatre — 2 Tickets to a Mainstage Production • Hollywood Tans
DC — 3 Month Unlimited Tanning Package in HT54 Stand-Up Booth • HRC Store — $100 Shopping Spree at D.C. Store • Image
Entertainment — BluRay Copy of Bette Midler’s The Showgirl Must Go On • JR.’s — $100 Bar Tab • Kennedy Center — 2 Tickets
to La Cage aux Folles and 2 Tickets to La Cage aux Folles La Cage aux Folles Pal Joey • Pal Joey Pal Joey Landmark Theatres — 4 Passes • Leather Rack — $75 Gift Certifcate • Level
One — $100 Gift Certifcate • MAL Weekend 2012 — 1 Weekend Run Packet • Miss Gay DC America 2012 — 4 VIP Tickets •
Nectar Skin Bar — Custom Facial and 1 Waxing Service • Omega DC — $50 Drink Tickets • Round House Theatre — 4 Tickets
to Next Fall • Next Fall Next Fall Ruff Plastic Surgery — Microderm Oxygen Facial, Vector 3D Imaging, Visia Skin Analysis and Consult With Clinician
• Signature Theatre — 2 Tickets to Xanadu • Xanadu Xanadu SKIN Cosmetic Dermatology of Georgetown — $200 of Professional Skin Care
Products • State Theatre — 4 Tickets to Any Show of Choice and State Theatre Gift Pack • Studio Theatre — 3-Play Package: Time
Stands Still, Stands Still Stands Still Sucker Punch, and Bachelorette Plus Bonus Pair of Tickets to Bachelorette Bachelorette Bust and 2 Free Drink Coupons • Bust Bust Tattoo Paradise — $50
Gift Certifcate • Team DC — 4 Tickets to Fashion Show and 2 Tickets to Night OUT at the Wizards • Town Danceboutique — Free
Admission (Plus 1 Guest) for Any Night the Club Is Open (Except When Admission Is Being Donated to Charity) • West End Cinema
- 4 Passes • WSC Avant Bard — 2 Tickets to Each of the Final 3 Shows of Season • Ziegfeld’s/Secrets — $50 Cash
FIRST RUNNER
-
UP
$250 Cash • 18th & U Duplex Diner — $50 Gift Card • Annie’s — $150 Dinner Certifcate • Arena Stage — 2 Tickets to The
Normal Heart (Preview Week) • Normal Heart Normal Heart Black Fox Lounge — $50 Gift Certifcate • Blowoff — 2 Admissions to Event on Jan. 14 at the 9:30
Club • Caramel Boutique — $25 Gift Certificate • Centaur Entertainment — 5 CD Package • Cobalt — $50 Gift Certifcate • DC
Eagle — $25 Gift Certifcate/Bar Tab • FIT — 2 Half-Hour Personal Training Sessions • Freddie’s — Saturday Brunch for 2 • GALA
Hispanic Theatre — 2 Tickets to a Mainstage Production • Hollywood Tans DC — 1 Month Unlimited Tanning Package in HT54
Stand-Up Booth • HRC Store — $50 Shopping Spree at D.C. Store • Image Entertainment — DVD of Bette Midler’s The Showgirl
Must Go On • JR.’s — $25 Bar Tab • Landmark Theaters — 4 Passes Leather Rack — $50 Gift Certifcate • Level One — $50 Gift
Certifcate • MAL Weekend 2012 — 1 Reaction Dance Ticket • Miss Gay DC America 2012 — 2 VIP Tickets • Omega DC — $50
Drink Tickets • Round House Theatre — 2 Tickets to Next Fall • Next Fall Next Fall Ruff Plastic Surgery — Vector 3D Imaging, Visia Skin Analysis and
Consult With Clinician • SKIN — $150 of Professional Skin Care Products • State Theatre — 4 Tickets to Zoso - The Ultimate Led
Zeppelin Experience • Studio Theatre — 2 Tickets to Bust and 2 Free Drink Coupons • Bust Bust Tattoo Paradise — $50 Gift Certifcate •
Team DC — 4 Tickets to Fashion Show • Town Danceboutique — $50 in Drink Tickets Good for Fridays or Saturdays • West End
Cinema — 2 Passes • WSC Avant Bard — 2 Tickets to 1 of the Final 3 Shows of Season • Ziegfeld’s/Secrets — $50 Cash
SECOND RUNNER SECOND RUNNER
--
UP UP
$175 Cash $175 Cash • • 18th & U Duplex Diner 18th & U Duplex Diner — $25 Gift Card • — $25 Gift Card • Annie’s Annie’s — $75 Dinner Certifcate • — $75 Dinner Certifcate • Arena Stage Arena Stage — 2 Tickets to — 2 Tickets to The Normal The Normal
Heart Heart (Preview Week) • (Preview Week) • Heart Heart Heart Heart Black Fox Lounge Black Fox Lounge — $25 Gift Certifcate • — $25 Gift Certifcate • Blowoff Blowoff — 2 Admissions to Event on Jan. 14 at the 9:30 Club — 2 Admissions to Event on Jan. 14 at the 9:30 Club
• • Caramel Boutique Caramel Boutique — $25 Gift Certifcate • — $25 Gift Certifcate • Centaur Entertainment Centaur Entertainment — 5 CD Package • — 5 CD Package • Cobalt Cobalt — $25 Gift Certifcate • — $25 Gift Certifcate • DC Eagle DC Eagle
— $25 Gift Certifcate/Bar Tab • — $25 Gift Certifcate/Bar Tab • FIT FIT — 2 Half-Hour Personal Training Sessions • — 2 Half-Hour Personal Training Sessions • Freddie’s Freddie’s — Freddie’s T-Shirt • — Freddie’s T-Shirt • Hollywood Tans Hollywood Tans
DC DC — 1 Free Week of Tanning in HT60 Booth • — 1 Free Week of Tanning in HT60 Booth • HRC Store — HRC Store — $25 Shopping Spree at DC Store $25 Shopping Spree at DC Store • • Image Entertainment Image Entertainment — DVD — DVD
of Bette Midler’s of Bette Midler’s The Showgirl Must Go On The Showgirl Must Go On • • JR.’s JR.’s — $25 Bar Tab • — $25 Bar Tab • Leather Rack Leather Rack — $25 Gift Certifcate • — $25 Gift Certifcate • Level One Level One — $25 Gift — $25 Gift
Certifcate • Certifcate • MAL Weekend 2012 MAL Weekend 2012 — 1 Reaction Dance Ticket — 1 Reaction Dance Ticket • Miss Gay DC America 2012 • Miss Gay DC America 2012 — 1 VIP Ticket • — 1 VIP Ticket • Nectar Skin Bar Nectar Skin Bar — —
Custom Facial • Custom Facial • Round House Theatre Round House Theatre — 2 Tickets to — 2 Tickets to Next Fall Next Fall • • Next Fall Next Fall Next Fall Next Fall Ruff Plastic Surgery Ruff Plastic Surgery — Vector 3D imaging, Visia Skin Analysis — Vector 3D imaging, Visia Skin Analysis
and Consult With Clinician • and Consult With Clinician • SKIN SKIN — $100 of Professional Skin Care Products • — $100 of Professional Skin Care Products • State Theatre State Theatre — 4 Tickets to Zoso - The Ultimate — 4 Tickets to Zoso - The Ultimate
Led Zeppelin Experience • Led Zeppelin Experience • Studio Theatre Studio Theatre — 2 Tickets to — 2 Tickets to Bust Bust • • Bust Bust Bust Bust Team DC Team DC — 4 Tickets to Fashion Show • — 4 Tickets to Fashion Show • Town Danceboutique Town Danceboutique
— $50 in Drink Tickets Good for Fridays or Saturdays • — $50 in Drink Tickets Good for Fridays or Saturdays • West End Cinema West End Cinema — 2 Passes • — 2 Passes • WSC Avant Bard WSC Avant Bard — 2 Tickets to 1 of the — 2 Tickets to 1 of the
Final 3 Shows of Season • Final 3 Shows of Season • Ziegfeld’s/Secrets Ziegfeld’s/Secrets — $50 Cash — $50 Cash
Our thanks to all those nightspots, restaurants, businesses and performing arts venues who graciously provided prizes to this year’s
Coverboy winners. Certain restrictions may apply to some prizes. Prizes are non-transferable.
The 2011 Coverboy of the Year was photographed on location at the Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW, in Washington, D.C. Visit 930.com.
Watch our behind-the-scenes video of the 2011 Coverboy of the Year Shoot, hosted by Ebone Bell, at youtube.com/MetroWeekly.
2011 Coverboy of the Year Prize Packages
41 METROWEEKLY.COM
2011 Coverboy of the Year Prize Packages
DECEMBER 15 - 22, 2011
SPotLiGht
A JOHN WATeRS CHRiSTMAS
In what’s now become an annual event, legendary
Baltimore flmmaker John Waters returns to the
Birchmere with a one-man show motivated by a gen-
uine love for Christmas. In fact, the show explores
the gay and sexual possibilities of the holiday. As he
told Metro Weekly in 2009: “Is Santa erotic? That is a
question with the bear movement. Is he a silver fox?
Is he a bear? Suppose you are attracted to Santa —
does that make you a Santa hag? Can you have sex in
a chimney? Are you a fue queen? There are all sorts
of possibilities that I talk about.” Sunday, Dec. 18, at
7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave.,
Alexandria. Tickets are $45. Call 703-549-7500 or
visit birchmere.com.
ATLAS SOUND
Bradley Cox, the queer lead singer of the hipster
band Deerhunter, has released his third intriguing
album under his solo moniker Atlas Sound. The
trippy, haunting Parallax is Cox’s most accessible set
yet. Tuesday, Dec. 20. Doors at 8 p.m. Black Cat, 1811
14th St. NW. Tickets are $15. Call 202-667-4490 or
visit blackcatdc.com.
CeNTeRSTAGe’S HOLiDAY CABAReT
Baltimore’s CenterStage theater offers several per-
formances this weekend of a multi-genre cabaret
starting with a Klezmer band and a calypso steel
drum orchestra. But the highlight will be D.C.-area
jazz vocalist Felicia Carter and bassist Amy Shook.
Carter has an expressive, brassy voice similar to
Judy Garland, even Billie Holiday, and Shook offers
the perfect deep accompaniment with her skill on
the upright bass. The Divine Voices of Praise Gospel
Choir will also perform. Thursday, Dec. 15, start-
ing at 6 p.m., Friday, Dec. 16, and Saturday, Dec. 17,
starting at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 18, starting at 1
p.m. Center Stage, 700 North Calvert St., Baltimore.
Tickets are $20 to $30. Call 410-986-4000 or visit
centerstage.org.
COLDpLAY
“Every teardrop is a waterfall,” Chris Martin sings
on the frst hit from the weirdly named Mylo Xyloto.
And if you’re a Coldplay fan, you just might cry a
waterfall if you don’t jump on getting tickets this
weekend for next summer’s show at Verizon Center.
Seriously, tickets are likely to sell out quickly, so
don’t delay the clocks. Tickets through Ticketmaster.
com starting this Saturday, Dec. 17, at 10 a.m., for the
show Sunday, July 8, at 7 p.m. Verizon Center, 601
F St. NW. Tickets are $49.50 to $110. Call 202-628-
3200 or visit verizoncenter.com.
eATWeLLDC’S DiNe OUT NiGHT FOR S.O.M.e.
Gay-owned local restaurant chain EatWell DC will
host a quarterly Dine Out Night at all of its restau-
rants — Logan Tavern, Commissary, The Heights
and Grillfsh — with 10 percent of dinner proceeds
benefting the homeless-serving community organi-
zation So Others Might Eat. In addition, Commissary
and The Heights will collect canned foods for the
Capital Area Food Bank and Grillfsh and Logan
DECEMBER 15, 2011 42 METROWEEKLY
Compiled by Doug Rule
P
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Holiday Hilarity
Michael Stebbins gives the gift of Sedaris satire
r
iGHt oUt of HiGH sCHooL, i Wore a Lot of oranGe sPandex
and spangles,” says Michael stebbins, laughing at the memory. the actor,
who grew up in Wisconsin, got his start in show business singing and dancing
on cruise ships and at six flags theme parks. (Just ask him about auto World
in flint, Mich.)
this weekend at Columbia, Md.’s rep stage, stebbins will read three essays
from david sedaris’s acerbic, hilarious Holidays On Ice collection. now in its
third year, the sedaris readings have become its signature holiday offering.
stebbins, rep stage’s producing artistic director, reads the essays in the style
in which sedaris frst presented them on nPr. “What i love about [sedaris] is
that he reads them rather straight, so to speak, and let’s the images and stories
themselves reach out to the audience.” so stebbins simply stands at a lectern,
or sits in a chair, and reads aloud. among the featured essays is “seasons
Greetings to our friends and family,” a holiday letter from the dunbar family,
which now includes a 22-year-old vietnamese prostitute, the love child of the
family patriarch, a vietnam vet.
stebbins also calls theatergoers up onstage to show off their many gaudy
Christmas fashions and win prizes as most “festively” dressed. and he plays
the Christmas music he grew up with, firestone albums by Julie andrews and
robert Goulet. “it becomes a very little festive evening,” he says, “a nice alter-
native to all the Nutcrackers and all the Messiahs.
“i’m sort-of one of those seasonal geeks,” he continues, conceding he won’t
actually be one of those in costume. His showy days are over. —Doug Rule
Holidays on ice readings are Friday, Dec. 17, at 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec.18,
at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 19, at 2 p.m. Rep Stage,
10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Md. Tickets are $12 at the door.
Call 443-518-1500 or visit repstage.org.
43 METROWEEKLY.COM
Tavern will accept gifts for Toys for Tots all month
long. Monday, Dec. 19. Visit eatwelldc.com.
JeWMONGOUS
Ex-Rockapella star Sean Altman (creator of the
theme song to PBS’s Where In The World Is Carmen
Sandiego?) offers a comedy song concert featuring
acoustic rock songs about being Jewish. It’s “Jewish
hipster comedy,” according to the Philadelphia
Daily News. Wednesday, Dec. 21, at 7:30 p.m. The
Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria.
Tickets are $25. Call 703-549-7500 or visit
birchmere.com
JUDY COLLiNS
The legendary folk singer returns for a show just
before Christmas. Now that’s the spirit! Wednesday,
Dec. 21, 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. Rams Head On Stage, 33
West St., Annapolis. Tickets are $55. Call 410-268-
4545 or visit ramsheadonstage.com.
peNGUiN pRiSON
The 9:30 Club presents an early show at U Street
Musical Hall of Penguin Prison, Chris Glover’s elec-
tro-pop/neo-disco band, inspired by Holy Ghost! and
Hot Chip, among others. Conrad Stern-Ascher and
Ernesto Karolys make the otherwise one-man band a
trio live. Stick around afterwards for Will Eastman’s
popular regular dance party Bliss, starting at 10 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 17. Doors at 7 p.m. U Street Music
Hall, 1115A U St. NW. Tickets are $12. Call 202-588-
1880 or visit ustreetmusichall.com.
SiGNATURe’S HOLiDAY FOLLieS
Conceived and directed by Signature’s Matthew
Gardiner, this year’s annual seasonal cabaret fea-
tures Florrie Bagel, Priscilla Cuellar, Jake Odmark,
Alan Wiggins, Weslie Woodley and Steven Walker
— plus special guest performers appearing for each
show. To Dec. 23. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell
Ave., Arlington. Tickets are $41 each. Call 703-820-
9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.
THe GiRLS FROM RUpAUL’S
DRAG RACe’S xMAS SpeCTACULAR
Alexis Mateo, Yara Sofa and Mariah Balenciaga
— all from the third season of RuPaul’s Drag Race —
will perform along with other female impersonators
at a holiday show at the Mansion on O Street. If your
holiday has been a drag so far this year — this just
might be the thing to perk it up. Tuesday, Dec. 20.
Doors at 5:30 p.m., show at 8:30 p.m. The Mansion
on O Street, 2020 O St. NW. Tickets are $10. Call or
visit omuseum.org/spectacular.
THe KiNSeY SiCKS’ OY VeY iN A MANGeR
Winnie (Erwin Keller), Ben Schatz (Rachel), Jeff
Manabat (Trixie) and Trampolina (Spencer Brown)
make up this popular “dragapella beautyshop quar-
tet” specializing in tricky four-part harmony. The
queens return to D.C.’s Theater J for a second year
of its popular holiday-themed show, Oy Vey in a
Manger — with two actual shows on Christmas Day,
if you’re looking for something to do. “This show is
part of our global effort to stamp out holiday cheer,”
says Keller. “I think it’s lifetimes of annoyance with
the holiday season, all just flled into an hour and a
half of displeasure, [intended as] some comeuppance
against the Muzakization of Christmas music.”
Saturday, Dec. 24, at 8 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 25, at 3
p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and Monday, Dec. 26, at 7:30 p.m.
The Aaron & Cecile Goldman Theater, Washington,
D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW.
Tickets are $25 to $60. Call 800-494-TIXS or visit
boxoffcetickets.com.
WiT’S SeASONAL DiSORDeR
Washington Improv Theater’s annual holiday
extravaganza features shows based on audience
suggestions, showing you the good, the bad and the
DECEMBER 15, 2011 44 METROWEEKLY
marketplace
45 METROWEEKLY.COM
Alexandria. Tickets are $45 to $50. Call 800-494-
8497 or visit metrostage.org.
A CHRiSTMAS CAROL
Ford’s Theatre remounts its music-flled produc-
tion of the Dickens classic, adapted by Michael
Wilson and directed by Michael Baron. Edward Gero
returns as Ebenezer Scrooge in this telling featur-
ing imaginative special effects, familiar carols and
themes of giving back and living with grace. To Dec.
31. Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. Tickets are $20
to $85. Call 800-982-2787 or visit fordstheatre.org.
ANN: AN AFFeCTiONATe pORTRAiT
OF ANN RiCHARDS
On seeing Holland Taylor’s portrayal of former
Texas governor Ann Richards for the frst time,
Don Temples cried. “It was as if someone I love
very much, who I know is dead, was suddenly there
again,” says Temple, who used to work for Richards
as well as the Human Rights Campaign. For Taylor,
the Emmy Award-winning actress who plays the
curt and at times caustic grandmother on Two and
a Half Men, and who has hit both gay and lesbian
fan bases with her role on The L Word and in Legally
Blonde, it was Richards who was amazing. Following
Richards’s death in 2006, Taylor decided putting
the governor’s life onstage was the way to go. “I
just had all this energy swirling around about her,”
she says. “Were I a painter, I would have painted
her. Were I a composer, I would have composed a
symphony dedicated to her.” Opens Saturday, Dec.
17, at 7:30 p.m. To Jan. 15, 2012. Kennedy Center
Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are $54 to $95. Call
202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
the Russians. Gary Oldman stars as a veteran agent
who ferrets out the mole in Tomas Alfredson’s flm,
also featuring Colin Firth. Opens Friday, Dec. 16.
Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
YOUNG ADULT
Charlize Theron makes an overdue return to the
big screen in Jason Reitman’s flm about a woman
— and a man, played by Patton Oswalt — who can’t
get high school out of their head. Pity the poor fools.
Specifcally, Theron wants to steal away her high
school sweetheart, played by Patrick Wilson, from
his now-wife. Former classmate Oswalt becomes her
unexpected buddy in a mission to relive their glory
days. For even the most well-adjusted gay, one who
might have even enjoyed high school, this movie
sounds like a stretch. Opens Friday, Dec. 16. Area
theaters. Visit fandango.com.
StaGe
A BROADWAY CHRiSTMAS CAROL
Kathy Feininger’s A Broadway Christmas Show tells
the famous Charles Dickens classic by altering the
lyrics to familiar Broadway tunes, 40 or so in all,
from The Music Man to Sweeney Todd to Annie.
The result is a pretty gay show, especially with the
gay Helen Hayes Award-winning actor Michael
Sharp returning to play Scrooge in the produc-
tion at Alexandria’s MetroStage, alongside Tracey
Stephens as The Woman Who Isn’t Scrooge and
Matt Anderson as The Man Who Isn’t Scrooge. “I
always think of it like the Carol Burnett Show,” says
Sharp, who also serves as director and choreogra-
pher. “[Three] people playing a million different
characters. Sometimes we crack each other up. You
never know what’s going to happen.” Closes this
Sunday, Dec. 18. MetroStage, 1201 North Royal St.,
ugly of the season – all laughs to get you through this
crazy month. Each and every show is different, but
all offer a grab bag of spontaneous ho-ho-ho-induc-
ing comedy. Weekends to Dec. 31. Source Theater,
1835 14th St. NW. Tickets are $10 online in advance,
or $15 at the door. Call 202-204-777- or visit wash-
ingtonimprovtheater.com for details.
FiLM
DUCK SOUp
The E Street Cinema concludes its inaugural “Capital
Classics” series this weekend with the Marx Brothers
spy comedy, focused on Freedonia’s war on nearby
Sylvania. It wasn’t a hit when it was released in 1933,
but it’s now considered one of the Marx Brothers’
fnest. Friday, Dec. 16, and Saturday, Dec. 17, at 12
a.m., and Sunday, Dec. 18, at 11 a.m. Landmark’s E
Street Cinema, 555 11th St. NW. Tickets are $11. Call
202-452-7672 or visit landmarktheatres.com.
THe pUNK ROCK MOVie
The Washington Psychotronic Film Society, dedi-
cated to independent, experimental, low-budget,
off-the-beaten-path flmmaking, presents a week-
ly Monday night screening series, hosted by The
Incorrigible Dr. Schlock. Next week offers the 1978
flm featuring performances by The Clash, The Slits
and more — including Siouxsie and the Banshees.
Peek-a-boo! Monday, Dec. 19, at 8 p.m. McFadden’s,
2401 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Screenings are free but
donations are suggested. Call 202-462-3356 or visit
wpfs.org.
TiNKeR, TAiLOR, SOLDieR, SpY
John Hurt stars as the head of the British spy agency
MI6 in 1970s England, when a Soviet spy within the
organization is uncovering vital British secrets for
DECEMBER 15, 2011 46 METROWEEKLY
BiLLY eLLiOTT THe MUSiCAL
Elton John penned the tunes for the inspiring 2009
Tony Award-winning musical, based on the flm and
focused on the yearnings of a boy who would rather
dance ballet than box, but must muster the courage
to follow that passion and buck expectation and
stereotype. What queer kid can’t relate? To Jan. 15,
2012. Kennedy Center Opera House. Tickets are $25
to $150. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
BUST
HHHHH
A former correspondent on Comedy Central’s The
Daily Show, Lauren Weedman juggles between
Bust’s more than two dozen characters, snapping
back and forth with a frantic mania that’s admirable,
impressive and, more than anything else, intimidat-
ing when you stop to consider its scope. (Or, with
the show’s bare stage in mind, the thrift that plays
against it.) Bust is a semi-autobiographic story, for
all intents and purposes, about telling stories. The
women at the overcrowded Southern California jail
where Weedman eventually volunteers desperately
want to tell theirs — stories of abuse, of innocence,
of regret — but can’t fnd any interested ears. In the
midst of these potentially heavy themes, Bust is very
funny. Weedman is a natural ham, throwing herself
into each performance with enough slapstick that
even her body language draws laughs. Extended
to Dec. 23. Studio Theatre, 14th & P Streets NW.
Tickets are $35 to $60. Call 202-332-3300 or visit
studiotheatre.org. (Chris Heller)
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHiNG
HHHHH
Wince you might at the idea of Much Ado About
Nothing rendered as a 1930s screwball comedy set
in Cuba, but the concept — and more importantly,
the Shakespeare Theatre Company’s execution of
it — “hath indeed better bettered expectation.” This
is the Bard for a modern audience done right. It’s
ridiculously fun and yet utterly and completely about
the language and the wit. And once you get the idea,
it’s inspired. Everyone here, from lead to ensemble,
plays together like the workings of a well-made
watch. Keeping the pace intact and, thankfully,
allowing the breathtaking Derek Smith as Benedick
to work his magic, director Ethan McSweeny is
himself a master of timing, both comic and dramatic.
Bottom line: If you don’t get to this Much Ado, you
should be, in the words of Benedick, hung in a bottle
like a cat and shot at. Extended to Jan. 7, 2012. Sidney
Harman Hall, Harman Center for the Arts, 610 F St.
NW. Call 202-547-1122 or visit shakespearetheatre.
org. (Kate Wingfeld)
pRiDe AND pReJUDiCe
Jane Austen’s world of desperate spinsters, deter-
mined bachelors, nosy neighbors, embarrassing rela-
tives and a smarmy cad or two is brought to life in
this adaptation written by Joseph Hanreddy and
J. R. Sullivan and directed by Blake Robison. The
cast includes Kate Cook, Michael Brusasco and Rick
Foucheux. To Dec. 31. Round House Theatre, 4545
East-West Highway, Bethesda. Tickets are $26 to
$56. Call 240-644-1100 or visit
roundhousetheatre.org.
THe SANTALAND DiARieS
City Artistic Partnerships offers a production of
David Sedaris’s play, as adapted by Joe Mantello.
The show presents a behind-the-scenes look at
becoming an elf in a man-made holiday fantasyland.
Joe Brack stars in this production, directed by Matty
Griffths. Weekends to Dec. 24. The Shop — Fort
Fringe, 607 New York Ave. NW. Tickets are $20. Call
202-213-2474 or visit cityartisticpartnerships.org.
WONDeRFUL LiFe
Yes, Virginia, it’s exactly what it sounds like: A stage
version of the classic black-and-white flm It’s A
Wonderful Life that starred James Stewart. Helen
Pafumi, artistic director of Fairfax’s Hub Theatre,
adapted the story, which is as relevant in today’s
down economy as ever, alongside actor Jason Lott.
In Hub’s version, Wonderful Life is a one-man play,
with Lott playing multiple characters, all residing
in Bedford Falls. Gregg Henry directs. Weekends
to Dec. 27. The John Swayze Theatre at the New
School, 9431 Silver King Court, Fairfax, Va. Tickets
are $25. Call 703-674-3177 or visit
thehubtheatre.org.
MuSiC
BLACK CAT’S GAY/BASH
A few months ago, the Black Cat launched another
new monthly gay party Gay/Bash, with DJs Joshua
and Dean spinning electro/techno/pop tunes, from
edgy and obscure to classic and of-the-moment hits
— all great and catchy. And the gay bear cubs DJs’
energy and enthusiasm is contagious. No wonder
folks from Town’s Bear Happy Hour are increas-
ingly ending their furry night out here — though the
crowd is more mixed mix, and shirts must stay on.
Friday, Dec. 16. Doors at 9:30 p.m. Black Cat, 1811
14th St. NW. Tickets are $5. Call 202-667-4490 or
visit blackcatdc.com.
CHAiSe LOUNGe
This D.C.-based jazz and swing band has been a
staple at hip martini bars around the area, along with
more storied venues such as the Kennedy Center and
Blues Alley. They’ve also performed with the likes
of Natalie Cole and Dizzy Gillespie and at the Lilith
Fair. They perform original tunes as well as swing
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DECEMBER 15, 2011 48 METROWEEKLY
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standards. They return to Blues Alley Thursday, Dec.
22, at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin
Ave. NW. Tickets are $20, plus $10 minimum pur-
chase. Call 202-337-4141 or visit bluesalley.com.
DeVO
The weird and wild ‘80s hitmakers encourage every-
one to “whip it, whip it good” when they stop through
the region on a tour. Yes, the sci-f-inspired Ohioan
New Wavers, partly responsible for Lady Gaga, are
still at it. Thursday, Dec. 15, at 8 p.m. The State
Theatre, 220 North Washington St., Falls Church.
Tickets are $57, or $120 for a “Meet & Greet” ticket.
Call 703-237-0300 or visit thestatetheatre.com.
FOLGeR CONSORT
“O Magnum Mysterium” is this year’s holiday offer-
ing from the Consort, celebrating Christmas music
from 16th Century Spain. Singers Roger Isaacs, Rosa
Lamoreaux, François Loup, William Sharp and
Aaron Sheehan join the consort, along with Piffaro
the Renaissance Band and instrumentalist Joseph
Gascho. Remaining shows Thursday, Dec. 15, at 7:30
p.m., Friday, Dec. 16, at 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 17, at 2
p.m. and 5 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 18, at 2 p.m. and 5
p.m. Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Tickets
are $45. Call 202-544-7077 or visit folger.edu.
JUSTiN TRAWiCK
Cute, local, straight “urban folk” singer Justin
Trawick offers a special Artisphere show to celebrate
the release of You & I, an album that splits the dif-
ference between a live and studio recording: It was
recorded live, in front of just 10 people, at a Virginia
studio. You & I features the Jason Mraz-esque art-
ist’s charming acoustic guitar tunes and amusing
between-song banter — not to mention a little rap.
Fellow local artist Andy Zipf will perform with
Trawick, while Amanda Lee opens. Friday, Dec. 16,
at 7:30 p.m. Artisphere, 1101 Wilson Blvd. Arlington.
Tickets are $12. Call 703-418-4808 or visit artisphere.
com or wscavantbard.org.
LAST TRAiN HOMe
Named Washington’s “Artist of the Year” in 2003,
this roots-rock band — part rock, part blues, part
bluegrass — has since relocated to Nashville, but its
roots are still here, so any local performance prom-
ises to be sweet. And how could it get any sweeter
than free? They return for what’s become an annual
concert on the Millennium Stage. Tuesday, Dec. 20,
at 6 p.m. Kennedy Center Millennium Stage. Tickets
are free. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
LeNA SeiKALY
Have yourself a jazzy little Christmas with local jazz
vocalist Lena Seikaly. Strathmore bills her vocal
stylings of standards, from “Winter Wonderland”
to “White Christmas,” as the type that “would have
made Ella proud.” Certainly sounds intriguing, worth
taking the day off for. Friday, Dec. 16, at 11 a.m. Music
Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North
Bethesda. Tickets are $15. Call 301-581-5100 or visit
strathmore.org.
MATT WiLSON’S CHRiSTMAS TRee-O
Matt Wilson, Jeff Lederer and Paul Sikivie form
this instrumental trio, recreating holiday standards
through the use of drums (Wilson), saxophone,
clarinet, even piccolo and toy piano (Lederer) and
bass (Sikivie). Wednesday, Dec. 21, at 8 p.m. Atlas
Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are
$15 to $25. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
NATiONAL SYMpHONY ORCHeSTRA
Matthew Halls conducts the NSO, guest singers Kiera
Duffy, Matthew Shaw, James Gilchrist, Neal Davies
and the University of Maryland Concert Choir in
its annual tradition of Handel’s Messiah. Hallelujah.
DECEMBER 15, 2011 50 METROWEEKLY
Thursday, Dec. 15, at 7 p.m., Friday, Dec. 16, and
Saturday, Dec. 17, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 18, at 1
p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $20 to
$85. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
NeiL DiAMOND
Just last month the cover band Super Diamond
stopped at the 9:30 Club to pay tribute to the pop
gem. But if what you crave is the “Sweet Caroline”
real thing, then mark your calendars for Thursday,
June 14, 2012, at 8 p.m. — and get your tickets through
Ticketmaster.com starting this Saturday, Dec. 17, at
10 a.m.. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. Tickets are $55
to $120. Call 202-628-3200 or visit
verizoncenter.com.
THe CHORAL ARTS SOCieTY’S
RUSSiAN HOLiDAY CONCeRTS
“Holiday Treasures from Russia” is this year’s annual
holiday program from the Choral Arts Society, this
year featuring Russia’s 80-piece Ural Philharmonic
Orchestra, rarely heard in the U.S. but considered one
of Russia’s fnest. Mezzo-soprano Irina Shishkova
will also join in a program that includes Handel’s
“Hallelujah” chorus, popular standards, audience
sing-a-longs plus Russian classical favorites and folk
tunes. Monday, Dec. 19, and Wednesday, Dec. 21, at 7
p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 24, at 1 p.m. Kennedy Center
Concert Hall. Tickets are $15 to $65. Call 202-467-
4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
THe DANCe pARTY
This quintet from Prince George’s County, Md., with
the generic name churns out party rock that just
might inspire a fan of the Cars or Rick Springfeld or
even Wang Chung — party rock from a generation
ago — ready to shake it up, have fun tonight. And
lead singer Mick Coogan screams and wails like Def
Leppard’s Joe Elliott, a main infuence. Friday, Dec.
23. Doors at 8 p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW.
Tickets are $15. Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com.
WASHiNGTON NATiONAL CATHeDRAL
CHORAL SOCieTY
J. Reilly Lewis leads the society, along with the
18th Street Singers, organist Todd Fickley, carillo-
nist Edward Nassor and the Washington Symphonic
Brass, in “The Joy of Christmas” concert, a perennial
holiday favorite, including sing-along carols and an
advent wreath processional. Monday, Dec. 20, at 8
p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman
Lane, North Bethesda. Tickets are $25 to $85. Call
202-537-5527 or visit cathedralchoralsociety.org.
danCe
MOSCOW BALLeT
‘Tis the season for ballet companies to perform ver-
sions of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker. This compa-
ny’s Great Russian Nutcracker pays tribute to Marius
Petipa, who developed the Nutcracker and Swan
Lake choreography and is credited as “The Father of
Russian Ballet.” Thursday, Dec. 15, and Friday, Dec.
16, at 7:30 p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301
Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. Tickets are $27.50
to $87.50. Call 301-581-5100 or visit strathmore.org.
STep AFRiKA!
Local dance company Step Afrika!, dedicated to the
tradition of stepping, presents its frst-ever holiday
show. Wednesday, Dec. 14, through Saturday, Dec.
17, at 7:30 p.m. Also Saturday, Dec. 17, and Sunday,
Dec. 18, at 2:30 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center,
1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $38. Call 202-399-7993 or
visit atlasarts.org.
OUT ON THe TOWN continues on page 60
dining
51 METROWEEKLY.COM
53 METROWEEKLY.COM
S
taGe and sCreen aCtress eLLen
Greene has long lived with a secret. she’s
even written a poem about it.
“they said don’t let anyone know; it will
cause disgrace,” Greene reads a couplet
from her as-yet unpublished poem Trancy.
“i was so scared for them to see, my secret; i
was so susceptible, afraid of being me.”
Her secret?
“i was an epileptic as a child,” Greene confdes. in fact,
“trancy” is the name Greene gave to her younger self. the
powerful poem she wrote by that name recounts a couple of
the times she suffered petit mal seizures.
Greene credits her struggle with epilepsy as a core reason
she’s become such a strong supporter for causes near and dear
to queer hearts — from the fght against aids to marriage
equality to anti-bullying.
“i don’t like it when someone is treated differently because
of who they are, or when children feel they’re not special,” she
says. “if i didn’t have [epilepsy] as a child, it might not have
colored who i am today.”
“the things that we’re made fun of [as children] are actu-
ally the things that go into making us special,” she adds. she
smiles as she coins a phrase: “i’ve always cared for misplaced
modifers, so it would make sense that i would take up [the gay
rights] cause.”
Greene certainly didn’t feel special as a child. in fact, the
Brooklyn native didn’t actually feel special until she moved
to Manhattan in the 1970s and started performing at gay bars
and cabarets, launching her career. “there’s footage of me at a
gay rally when i was only 21,” she recalls. “Bette [Midler] was
at it, too.”
earlier this week, Greene returned to her roots, so to speak.
she tore the roof off Jr.’s, performing as a special guest at the
gay bar’s popular showtunes night. this weekend, Greene
will add luster to the annual holiday concert of the Gay Men’s
Chorus of Washington. Red & Greene will feature a mix of
holiday choral classics and songs from Greene’s repertoire —
including, of course, “suddenly seymour.”
though she’s best known for playing audrey in both the
original 1982 off-Broadway stage and the 1986 Hollywood
film versions of Little Shop of Horrors, Greene earned a
tony nomination years prior for her work in a 1976 produc-
tion of The Threepenny Opera.
Greene will dedicate a couple songs at the concert to her
many gay friends — those fghting for marriage equality and
those she’s lost along the way, chiefy to aids. “i’ve just
buried so many people,” she says. “i’ve had to mourn all that
talent going. in fact, that’s what stopped me from singing for
a long while.” after performing at songwriter Peter allen’s
memorial in 1992, Greene fell silent for more than a decade.
“i just said, ‘that’s it, i can’t sing anymore.’ My heart hurt too
much.”
Greene credits pianist Christian klikovits for getting her
back on track. the two released the album In His Eyes in
2004, a year after they married. now divorced, Greene and
klikovits are starting to collaborate once again. klikovits will
accompany Greene at the GMCW concert, and Greene says
the two plan to record a couple albums next year, including a
Christmas album that will grow out of this concert. she’s also
hoping to return to television as a series regular, similar to her
work on aBC’s Pushing Daisies a couple years ago.
Greene writes a lot of poems and would like to incorporate
them into a future show. she’s eager to adapt Trancy, in par-
ticular, as a short animated/live-action flm. “Her record now
open; a secret revealed, naked; no shame now; she can start
to be healed,” the poem concludes.
“it’s been 30 years since i’ve had a seizure,” says Greene,
“[but] people get stigmatized. for the very reason that people
stay private and don’t come out [as gay], that’s the same reason
that people who love me are very protective. i’m old enough
now that it hopefully won’t hurt me.”
in the end, like many gay people before her, Greene thinks
the risk of being out about her secret is outweighed by the
beneft.
“Who’s to say there’s not some child who has epilepsy
and they feel like a freak — or who’s gay — and they feel like
nobody understands them?” she says. “Well, i do. and maybe
by me exposing something personal, they will feel brave,
too.”
Ellen Greene performs with the Gay Men’s Chorus on Friday,
Dec. 16, Saturday, Dec. 17, at 3 and 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 18, at
3 p.m. Lisner Auditorium, The George Washington University,
730 21st St. NW. Tickets are $25 to $50. Call 202-293-1548 or
visit lisner.org or gmcw.org. l
Actress Ellen Greene reveals why she is such a strong supporter
for causes near and dear to queer hearts
BY DOUG RULE / ELLEN GREENE PHOTOGRAPHED SUNDAY, DEC. 4, BY TODD FRANSON
E
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DECEMBER 15, 2011 54 METROWEEKLY
a
fter six years on
Broadway, national
tours and a splashy
big-screen adaptation,
how much charm could be left
in the Charm City of the musical
Hairspray? More than you might
expect in signature’s new produc-
tion, as long as you don’t expect it
from the usual source: the leads.
that’s right, hon. forget about
edna and tracy turnblad, the
plus-size mother-daughter duo
who burst the seams of their
humdrum lives in 1962 Baltimore
and fnd a way to be fabulous
on their own terms. in one of
the odder only-in-d.C. marketing
stunts you may ever see, direc-
tor eric schaeffer has sacrifced
the role of edna to provide the
musical theater stage debut for
public broadcasting personality
robert aubry davis — Weta’s
Mr. Around Town himself — who,
while not a total train wreck, often
looks as befuddled as you might
be as to why this ever seemed like
a good idea.
surely anyone who would be
drawn to the box offce by davis’s
name would still expect a level
of confdence and competence
that escapes him as he — follow-
ing far, far behind in the foot-
steps of divine (in the 1988 John
Waters flm), Harvey fierstein (in
the 2002 Broadway musical) and
John travolta (in the 2007 movie
version), among others — strug-
gles with his simple choreogra-
phy, songs and line readings.
davis’s performance does
leave a wide berth, though, for
the clearly talented Carolyn Cole
as tracy, the high schooler who
fnds fame, love and a cause (inte-
gration) after she makes her way
onto a teen dance show on local
television. But as skilled as Cole
is, vocally and comedically, she
seems so determined to put her
own stamp on tracy that she
stamps out some of the character’s
most endearing qualities. there is
nary a trace of naivete, vulner-
ability or wide-eyed innocence in
this tracy. no, Cole has a calcu-
lated, knowing, self-satisfed style
that never gives you an underdog
to root for, only a top dog who
smugly cracks jokes and has no
doubt that a happy ending is com-
ing her way.
thankfully, there are stel-
lar supporting performances
that make up for the missteps.
as the black record store owner
Motormouth Maybelle, nova y.
Payton may be reason enough
to see this Hairspray, given her
showstopping rendition of the
gospel-tinged anthem of racial
struggles, “i know Where i’ve
Been.” But there’s also the cha-
risma and sex appeal of James
Hayden rodriguez as Maybelle’s
son, seaweed, and Patrick thomas
Cragin as Link Larkin, the teen
idol in training on The Corny
Collins Show.
rodriguez is well-matched
with Lauren Williams as a neu-
rotically funny Penny Pingleton,
tracy’s best friend and seaweed’s
racial-barrier-crossing love inter-
est. and the references to Link
as Baltimore’s elvis actually ring
more true in Cragin’s sensual
swagger than they did in the ang-
sty heartthrob approach taken by
Matthew Morrison on Broadway
and by Zac efron in the ’07 flm.
yes, Charm City via shirlington
may have its limits, but it’s still
a fun destination populated with
enough talent that it doesn’t feel
like slumming.
noW, if soMePLaCe inter-
national is more to your liking,
you’ll want to head to southwest
Washington, where arena stage’s
fichandler has been turned into
an ancient roman arena for amy
freed’s heady historical comedy,
You, Nero.
in the waning days of his
reign, the destructive, egomania-
Forget Hairspray’s casting stunt, it’s the supporting cast that gives it life,
while Nero would work much better as a one act
Secondary stars: Cole and Davis
HAIRSPRAY
HHHHH
To Jan. 29
Signature Theatre
4200 campbell Ave.
Arlington
$63-$86
703-573-SeAT
signature-theatre.org
YOU, NERO
HHHHH
To Jan. 1
Arena Stage
1101 Sixth St. SW
$40-$85
202-488-3300
arenastage.org
Big Hair
Jonathan Padget STAGe
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DECEMBER 15, 2011 56 METROWEEKLY
a
LittLe edGy, a Lit-
tle existential and a lot
funny, second City’s
Spoiler Alert: Everybody
Dies, is a high-energy riff on the
idea, more or less, that we are all
fated to the lives we wind up lead-
ing. Whether you fnd the concept
circular or profound doesn’t real-
ly matter: it’s all still an evening of
educated, inventive, wildly silly,
sometimes potent comedy deliv-
ered by a talented ensemble ready
to gnaw at the idea from every
conceivable angle.
However, if you care to look
closer it also pays to note that
this is a collaborative effort
between second City and Woolly
Mammoth. the cross-fertiliza-
tion has injected the piece with
freshness and favor. though the
revue-style sketches, songs and
moments of improv are all present
(as expected), there runs a deeper
thematic feel to the piece, some-
thing that drills down beneath
the clever humor and begins to
rummage around in the psyche. in
other words, it’s not just about the
run for the punch line or the tal-
ented clowning (although there’s
plenty of that). it’s also about the
creation of character, mood, and
an exploration of the human con-
dition (yes, that thing), all via a
kind of metaphorical slang instead
of big words. and, generally, it
works, even as the laughs come
fast and furious.
Pacing with fair the sketches,
segues and musical interludes
(delivered with wit by musical
director Matthew Loren Cohen),
director Billy Bungeroth delivers
essential continuity and yet gives
the players the space they need
to bring it somewhere beyond the
usual snap-characterizations of
typical sketch comedy. and if
the tremendous momentum of the
frst half of the program falls off
somewhat in act two, it is more
a matter of content than rhythm.
for even though the second half
has some clever improv (involv-
ing some minor audience torture)
and several other bright spots,
the humor begins to lag and the
theme wavers and wanders. By
the fnale, the proceedings leave
off with more of a whimper than
a bang. Spoiler Alert knows where
it wants to go but hasn’t quite fg-
ured out how to get there.
academics aside, Spoiler Alert
is an extremely entertaining eve-
ning and a wonderful ensemble
piece. Carrying the comedy with
the greatest of ease and natu-
ral timing are aaron Bliden and
travis turner who, with very dif-
ferent styles, make anything seem
funny, whether it be macabre,
ridiculous, or totally thin on the
ground. fully centered and unas-
suming, Bliden simply waits for
his moments and then blithely,
joyously attacks. He is fresh, hilar-
ious and utterly natural. Bursting
with presence and born for irony,
turner completely owns his char-
acters and makes them positively
sparkle with wit.
though not a comedy-exud-
er in the manner of Bliden and
turner, delivering an excellent
straight man with a seriously good
deadpan, James t. alfred brings
his own special magic. He offers
something more than just good
comedy — he brings the gravi-
tas of someone with dramatic
chops, lending the piece much of
its depth. Poised but ready-for-
anything, Maribeth Monroe pro-
vides a cornerstone of solid comic
technique but also clearly rel-
ishes the more abstract, questing
aspect of this production. she’s
not so much about “being” funny
as she about “creating” funny. a
Woolly company member, Jessica
frances dukes carries some of
the more solemn moments with
authenticity. Completely at home,
if very slightly more obvious, scott
Montgomery, a seasoned writer in
his own right, offers some mem-
orable improv and many of the
Spoiler Alert is an evening of educated, inventive, wildly silly,
sometimes potent comedy delivered by a talented ensemble
Human condition ha-ha: Aaron Bliden
SPOILER ALERT:
EVERYBODY
DIES
HHHHH
To Jan. 8
Woolly mammoth
641 D St. NW
$30-$60
202-393-3939
woollymammoth.net
Comedy Accompli
Kate Wingfield STAGe
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57 METROWEEKLY.COM
W
Ho’s yoUr fav-
orite pop diva?
Well, as long as
it’s not Madonna
or robyn or rihanna — or, God
help you, ke$ha — chances are,
she’s got a concert dvd she’s try-
ing to sell you as a perfect stock-
ing stuffer for your friends. or
maybe just for you — some gifts
are too good to give away.
Beyoncé, Britney spears,
shakira, Cyndi Lauper — all pres-
ent and accounted for. the high-
est profle? Lady Gaga, of course.
the best? Well, that depends in
part of what you’re looking for.
But it’s probably not Gaga. in fact,
my biggest surprise in review-
ing the latest crop of diva dvds
is that Gaga’s Monster Ball dvd
doesn’t even offer the greatest
spectacle.
i don’t mean to suggest Gaga’s
show isn’t a spectacle. from her
outrageous and ever-changing
costumes, to the splashy special
effects, to the aggressively erotic
moves and appeal of her dancers,
to the way she belts out tunes or
pounds and straddles her piano
— Gaga is a master (a monster) at
grabbing your attention and beat-
ing it for all it’s worth.
But Gaga doesn’t really offer
anything more than what you
probably already saw on HBo —
the only “bonus content” is a rath-
er bland backstage documentary,
just 11 minutes long. the black
and white short doesn’t even
come to life with a visit from Liza
Minnelli, in which the two battle
to see who can stroke the other’s
ego the hardest.
so unless you or yours is abso-
lutely goo-goo for Gaga and must
have this as a souvenir, you’ll get
more satisfying spectacle per min-
ute from a certain aussie, woeful-
ly underappreciated in america.
in fact, for the longest time i
underappreciated kylie Minogue
— until i saw her perform at the
Patriot Center over the summer.
Minogue has far more vocal power
than i had been led to believe.
Her high-pitched voice can be
a little shrill and sharp live, but
the fact that she doesn’t lip-synch
or stammer was revelatory. and
while she’s not a hyper-active club
dancer in the style of Madonna
or Gaga, Minogue moves around
the stage with grace, in elegant
costumes designed by dolce &
Gabbana. she leads a large crew of
limber, artful dancers with fnesse
— and i should also note that the
male dancers are often dressed in
various stages of leather, when
not in speedos.
Aphrodite Les Folies is yet
another revelation: this is not
simply a keepsake of Minogue’s
american tour. shot at London’s
massive 02 arena, the dvd cap-
tures the ancient Greece-inspired
show’s far-more extravagant
european staging, with various
moving parts and a secondary
thrust stage connected to the main
stage by two catwalks. there are
more aerial performers on dvd
than there were in d.C., too, and
water comes splashing and shoot-
ing from jets at various points
in the show. the dvd is sure to
leave you all wet — and i didn’t
even mention the high-defnition
camera angles, often showing you
the action from on high.
those gays of a certain age
are likely to fnd favor with Bette
Midler’s The Showgirl Must Go
On. the dvd captures Bathhouse
Bette’s three-year run of her
high-production ribald show in
Las vegas. she relates her 40-year
career through her standard “salty
songs and dirty jokes” — as well as
a few borderline treacly ballads
you no doubt know.
But would you believe adele
gives Midler a run for her money
as the funniest diva at the moment?
yes, the funniest. oh sure, one
can’t say enough about the British
superstar’s voice or her dazzling,
dramatic tunes — both of which
are in full effect on Live at the
Royal Albert Hall. the dvd was
recorded in september, or about
a month before adele suffered
vocal hemmoraging that led to
chances are your favorite diva has got a concert DVD to sell you
this year, but only one can be the best
ADELE
Live at the royal
Albert Hall
HHHHH
KYLIE MINOGUE
Aphrodite Les Folies
HHHHH
LADY GAGA
The monster ball Tour
at madisoan Square
Garden
HHHHH
BETTE MIDLER
The Showgirl must
Go On
HHHHH
A Diva DVD Christmas
doug Rule MUSiC
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DECEMBER 15, 2011 58 METROWEEKLY
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DECEMBER 15, 2011 60 METROWEEKLY
cal emperor nero has enlisted a faded
playwright, scribonius, to pen a work that
will make nero’s subjects sympathetic
toward him. But can theater ever triumph
in a society that has been conditioned to
embrace the “reality shows” of the time
— where limbs are lopped off and blood
fows freely?
the dialogue is consistently crisp and
quippy, and the characters are drawn
quite broadly in director nicholas Martin’s
staging — right down to a fun visual style
(including costumes by Gabriel Berry and
wigs by Cookie Jordan) that evokes four-
ishes of mid-20th-century animation and
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to
the Forum-style Broadway showmanship.
By the second act, though, you realize
that freed’s points about mixing pol-
itics and culture, and about a society
that turns its back on art, were pret-
ty much made loud and clear early on.
danny scheie’s nero — fey and famboy-
ant (think Carson kressley with more
bloodlust) — wears thin, Jeff McCarthy’s
sort-of suave scribonius goes nowhere
interesting, and lively performances such
as nancy robinette as nero’s incestuous
mother and susannah schulman as his
scheming sexpot wife similarly trail off in
crowd-pleaser moments.
When it comes down to it, whether
you achieve deep thoughts on destiny or
not, with this much comic talent in one
place, it’s about sitting back, taking advan-
tage of Woolly’s relaxed beverage rules,
and having a good, solid, educated laugh
at the expense of pretty much everybody.
including yourself. l
surgery and a prolonged silent recovery
period, likely to last many more months.
What you might not expect is just how
bawdy and hysterical the 23-year-old is,
or how comfortable the notoriously stage-
shy singer seems bantering, even badger-
ing the capacity crowd in the huge audi-
torium in her London hometown. “royal
albert ‘fucking’ Hall” she says early,
then apologizes for her language. Later
she playfully fips off the crowd, which
includes a couple of her best friends since
childhood. she relates funny anecdotes
about them, softening any zingers with
her regular contagious bursts of laughter.
there may not be much spectacle to
speak of, save for a confetti drop at the
end, but in every way adele’s dvd/Cd set
shines as the best of the diva lot this year.
nothing else approaches the unalloyed
power of watching her perform her ach-
ingly personal songs. you’re as likely to
be in tears as she is after hearing the fully
engaged crowd sing perfectly back to her
“someone Like you.”
sometimes dreams do come true. l
a diffuse narrative.
rome wasn’t built in a day, as they say,
but You, Nero would have been more sol-
idly built in one act. l
OUT ON THe TOWN continued from page 50
THe WASHiNGTON BALLeT
Yet another version of The Nutcracker, this one
American-themed. Eight years ago, The Washington
Ballet’s Septime Webre refashioned The Nutcracker
to be a tribute to the nation’s capital, starring George
Washington as the heroic Nutcracker and England’s
King George III as the villainous Rat King, all against
a backdrop of cherry blossoms and other D.C. scenes.
The company’s production includes over 350 danc-
ers. To Dec. 24. Warner Theatre, 513 13th St. NW.
Tickets are $40 to $110. Call 202-397.7328 or visit
washingtonballet.org.
CoMedy
ARLiNGTON DRAFTHOUSe’S OpeN MiC NiGHT
Every Saturday night, the Arlington Cinema and
Drafthouse offers the chance for up to 15 budding
stand-up comics to show their skills at the venue’s
new Old Arlington Grill. Every Saturday at 10:30 p.m.
Arlington Cinema N’ Drafthouse, 2903 Columbia
Pike, Arlington. Free admission. Call 703-486-2345
or visit arlingtondrafthouse.com.
eRiN JACKSON
Hoping to follow in the footsteps of fellow D.C.-bred
comics Wanda Sykes, Dave Chappelle and Martin
Lawrence, Erin Jackson has garnered some national
credibility with appearances as a semi-fnalist on
Last Comic Standing and The Ellen DeGeneres Show.
Jackson, according to DC Improv’s biography, “is
looking forward to the day when she becomes famous
enough to move to Hollywood, buy a mansion and
marry a white woman - the ultimate symbol of
success for black celebrities.” Wednesday, Dec. 21,
through Friday, Dec. 23, at 8 p.m. DC Improv, 1140
Connecticut Ave. NW. Tickets are $15 to $17. Call
202-296-7008 or visit dcimprov.com.
GaLLerieS
ANDY WARHOL exHiBiTS AT HiRSHHORN, NGA
Not one but two local museums are offering exhibits
focused on the work of Andy Warhol. The Hirshhorn
presents “Andy Warhol: Shadows 1978,” comprising
102 silkscreened and hand-painted canvases featur-
ing distorted photographs of shadows generated in
the famed PopArt artist’s studio. Meanwhile, the
National Gallery of Art presents “Warhol: Headlines,”
featuring works that the famed gay artist created
largely on headlines from tabloid news, documenting
his ahead-of-the-curve fascination with sensational
news. Both exhibits through Jan. 15, 2012. Hirshhorn
Museum, Independence Avenue and 7th Street SW.
Call 202-633-1000 or visit hirshhorn.si.edu. National
Gallery of Art, East Building, Constitution Avenue
and 3rd Street NW. Call 202-737-4215 or visit
nga.gov.
CORCORAN GALLeRY OF ART
“30 Americans” is a wide-ranging survey of works by
many of the most important African-American con-
temporary artists of the last three decades, including
several gay artists: the late Jean-Michel Basquiat,
Glenn Ligdon and Kalup Linzy. Through Feb. 2, 2012.
Corcoran Gallery, 500 17th St. NW. Admission is $10.
Call 202-639-1700 or visit corcoran.org.
DeL RAY ARTiSANS GALLeRY
“It’s All About The Little Things” features small,
affordable works of art — maximum size 8”x10” —
perfect for holiday giving and enjoying. Closes this
Sunday, Dec. 18. Del Ray Artisans, 2704 Mt. Vernon
Ave. Alexandria. Visit thedelrayartisans.org.
GALLeRY pLAN B
“Holiday Art ‘Bizarre” is an exhibition of works in
various media by a selection of gallery artists, intend-
ed as great gift ideas for the holiday season. Through
Dec. 24. Gallery Plan B, 1530 14th St. NW. Call 202-
234-2711 or visit galleryplanb.com.
NATiONAL GeOGRApHiC MUSeUM
“Big Cats: Vanishing Icons” is a photography exhi-
bition showcasing the grandeur and plight of the
world’s endangered big cat species — lions, tigers,
cheetahs, leopards, jaguars, snow leopards, clouded
leopards and mountain lions. All are victims of con-
ficts with humans and habitat loss or degrada-
tion. Through April 8, 2012. National Geographic
Museum, 1145 17th St. NW. Free. Call 202-857-7588
or visit ngmuseum.org.
NATiONAL MUSeUM OF THeAMeRiCAN iNDiAN
“Conversations with the Earth: Indigenous Voices
on Climate Change” is a frst-of-its-kind exhibition
devoted to indigenous science, providing a native
perspective on global climate change. Through pho-
tographs, video and audio of tribal communities from
the Arctic to Brazil, the environmental impact of pol-
lution is found in the stories of imposed mitigation
and its consequences on local livelihoods. Through
Jan. 2, 2012. National Museum of the American
Indian, Independence Avenue and 4th Street SW.
Call 202-633-1000 or visit nmai.si.edu.
NATiONAL pORTRAiT GALLeRY
“Seeing Gertrude Stein: Five Stories” features more
than 50 artifacts and 100 works by artists from across
Europe and the U.S. detailing Stein’s life and work
as an artist, collector and distinctive style-maker.
Through Jan. 22, 2012. National Portrait Gallery,
8th and F Streets. NW. Call 202-633-8300 or visit
npg.si.edu.
p.B. GROSzMANN AT THe DC CeNTeR
“Juxtapositions” is a photography exhibition by queer
artist P.B. Groszmann, whose work explores the
LGBT experience through topics such as “Gaiety,”
“Joy,” “Memories” and “Histories/Herstories.”
Through Jan. 2, 2012. The DC Center for the LGBT
Community, 1318 U St. NW. Call 202-682-2245 or
visit thedccenter.org. l
FOR MORe OUT ON THe TOWN LiSTiNGS
pLeASe ViSiT
WWW.MeTROWeeKLY.COM
61 METROWEEKLY.COM
night
life
63 METROWEEKLY.COM
LISTINGS
Destinations on page 70
THURSDAY, 12.15.11
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-
7pm • $4 Small Plates,
$4 Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis •
Upstairs open 5-10pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
• $1 Vodka Drinks,
9-11pm • Underwear
Contest hosted by Lena
Lett and Ba’Naka, mid-
night • $200 in cash and
prizes • DJ Chord Bezerra
• DJ MadScience • No
Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power Hour:
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Gear Night: Men
in full gear get extra spe-
cials, 2nd foor • Leather,
Shirtless, Uniform, Hanky
Code Specials • Club Bar:
DC Eagle Poster Project
FIREPLACE
Any Absolut or Bacardi
$4 from 10pm-Midnight •
VJ Dina
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • POZ
DC, 8-10pm (Upstairs) •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
t
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Shirtless men drink free
(rail & domestic), 10-11pm
and Midnight to 12:30am
• All nude male dancers •
Dancing w/ DJ tim-e, 9pm-
close • Cover
FRIDAY, 12.16.11
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for
a step-up from rail) • $3
Rail Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close
• Rockin’ Retro Night •
Glee Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Active Duty Military Night
• Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
PHASE 1
Karaoke starting at 7pm •
DJ LS or Drag King hosted
• 21+ • No cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
• DJ Randy White and
DJ Keenan Orr, 10pm •
Free vodka drinks, 11pm-
midnight • $8 • 21+
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town
Bear Happy Hour,
6-11pm • $3 Rail, $3
Draft, $3 Bud Light, $7
Pitchers • Free Pizza, 7pm
• DJ Christian Gerard •
Hosted by Charger Stone
• No cover before 9:30pm
• 21+
DC EAGLE
Power Hour: $1 off Rail
and Domestic, 4-6pm
• People in Leather,
Uniform or Rubber get free
Kamikazes, 9pm-midnight
• Club Bar: SigMa
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
FUEGO SALVAJE
@Cafe Asia
720 I St. NW
New location, New Night
• Open 10:30pm-3am •
Holiday Special: 50• off
cover, only $5 to get in •
fuegosalvaje.com
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
All-U-Can-Drink Smirnoff
Buffet, $16, 10-11:30pm •
Pop Goes the World, 10pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Holiday Show, 11pm •
Karaoke, 9pm-1am in
Karaoke Bar • Doors at
10pm
JR.’S
$6 Cornita Buckets and $4
Skyy Highballs, 9pm-close
• $6 Red Bull and Vodka,
$4 Corona all night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Della Volta • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • $3 drinks after
midnight • No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Luz • Dancing, 9pm-
close • $5 cover • 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half price burgers and
fries
TOWN
The NiteCamp Dancers,
10:30pm • Upstairs: DJ
Wess • Downstairs: DJ
BacK2bACk • Doors open
10pm • Drag Show starts
at 10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka
• $3 rail drinks from
10-11pm • For 21+, $5
from 10-11pm and $10
after 11pm • For 18-20,
$10 all night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
in Secrets • DJ Don T
in Ziegfeld’s • Ladies of
Illusion with host Kristina
Kelly, 11pm • Cover
65 METROWEEKLY.COM
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties, and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page 70.
t
Cobalt
Saturday, Dec. 10
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
SATURDAY, 12.17.11
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
COBALT/30 DEGREES
How the Grinch Stole Bare
• DJ Rosie and DJ Keenan
• $7 before midnight, $10
after • Doors at 10pm
• 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour Leather
Specials • Power Hour
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Club Bar: Beltway
Bears
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke and/or live enter-
tainment, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
Beat the Clock Specials
on Rolling Rock and Rail
Vodka starting at $1 •
All-U-Can-Drink Bacardi
Buffet, $18, 10pm-2am
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
DJ Keith Hoffman •
Dance bar open at 10pm •
Karaoke, 10pm-2am
JR.’S
$3 Coors Light, $4 vodka
highballs, $6 Red Bull and
Vodka, all day and night •
Showtunes from 4-9pm
NELLIE’S
Zing Zang Bloody Marys,
Nellie Beer, House Rail
Drinks and Mimosas, $4,
11am-5pm • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • $3 drinks after
midnight • No Cover
OMEGA
DJ Tre • Pool Tournament
at 9pm
PHASE 1
DJ LS • Dancing, 9pm-
close
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
MetroWeekly Coverboy of
the Year Party and Model
Search • Audition to be a
coverboy, 10:30pm-1am,
upstairs • Meet the
coverboys, 10:30pm •
Hosted by Lena Lett and
Ebone Bell • DJ Mike Cruz
• Doors open at 10pm
• Downstairs: DJ Wess
• The Ladies of Town
at 10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
DECEMBER 15, 2011 66 METROWEEKLY
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka
• Live Performances by
The Dance Camp • $3 rail
drinks, 10-11pm • $8 from
10-11pm, $12 after 11pm
• 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers •
The Ladies of Illusion host-
ed by Ella Fitzgerald, frst
show at 11pm • DJ Spyke
in Ziegfelds • Cover
SUNDAY, 12.18.11
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Karaoke, 6:30pm-close •
Emceed by Zoe
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Martini Madness • $5
martinis all day and
night, 4pm • Homowood
Karaoke • $4 rail drinks &
domestic beers, 10pm •
No cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 2pm • Tailgate Party

DIK BAR
Happy Hour, all night •
Rail Drinks and Select
Beers, $3 • Absolut and
Premium Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch Buffet,
10am-3pm • Crazy Hour,
4-8pm • Drag Show host-
ed by Destiny B. Childs,
featuring performances
by a rotating cast, 9pm •
Karaoke follows show •
No cover
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
$3 Smirnoff (all favors) •
Trailer Park Karaoke with
Mama, 9:30pm
JR.’S
$2 SKYY Highballs and
$2 Coors Light, all day
and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-
3pm • $20 Brunch Buffet
• House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
Church Lady Bingo with
Kristina Kelley • $4 House
Vodka
PHASE 1
Live Music all night •
$3.50 Coronas and Bud
Lights • Drag King show
every second Sunday, 9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Happy Hour all night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Retro Night • Retro videos
• Complimentary drinks
with trivia quiz • All nude
male dancers upstairs in
Secrets • Drink and Beer
specials • Cover
MONDAY, 12.19.11
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Open Mike, 7pm-close •
Emceed by Zoe • $3 off all
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• 21+ • No cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • New Specials
• Monday Night Football
• $1 Drafts (Bud and Bud
Light)
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4pm-close •
Karaoke, 9:30pm • Queer
Pong, 8pm-Midnight •
$8 Pitchers and $2 Drafts
(Upstairs)
JR.’S
Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close
• DJ Jamez • $3 Pints
and $6 Absolut Highballs
Happy Hour 4 to 9pm •
Buy 1 get 1 free on rail,
Skyy highballs, domestic
bottles and draft beer
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour 4 - 9
Rouge Show • Different
performers each week •
Drink Specials
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia competi-
tion • 75 cents off bottles
and drafts
TUESDAY, 12.20.11
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour, all
night • $3 rail margaritas,
rail drinks and domestic
beers • $3.95 Cuervo mar-
garitas • Gordon Kent on
the Piano, 7:30pm-close
67 METROWEEKLY.COM
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Wednesday Night
Karaoke at Cobalt, 10pm
• $5 Absolut & Smirnoff
favors • $8 • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power
Hour $1 off Rail and
Domestic, 4-6pm •
Wooden Nickel Night,
9pm-close
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FIREPLACE
Hump Day • $3 Domestic
beer, all night

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• DJ Erik Lars Evans •
2-4-1 rail drinks • 21+ •
No cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $2 Rail and
Domestic, 4pm-midnight •
APA Pool League, 7:30pm
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices, 4pm-
close • FUK!T Packing
Party, 7-9pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Showtune Video Madness,
7:45pm-12:30am • VJ
Brian Mongeon • Best of
Hollywood and Broadway
Showtunes
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 4pm-midnight
• Buy 1, Get 1 Free on rail,
SKYY highballs, domestic
bottles and draft beer •
Glee Night • Retro Music
MAJESTIC V3
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
Crazy Tuesday • Drink
Specials, 10-11pm • Show
hosted by Jocelyn Carrillo
and her stars, 12:30am •
18/21 • Cover
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag BINGO hosted by Shi-
Queeta Lee, 8pm
OMEGA
2 for 1 Drinks, 4pm-close
• Bear Night • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • $3
Drafts, $4 House Vodka •
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 12.21.11
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Happy Hour, all night •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
7:30pm-close
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices, 4pm-
Close • Queer Pong, 8pm-
midnight
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Christmas Gift Box Bingo,
8:30pm • 20 Mystery
gift boxes will be given
away • Cash Prizes and
Progressive Cash Jackpot
Game
JR.’S
Happy Hour 4 to 9pm •
Buy 1 get 1 free on rail,
Skyy highballs, domestic
bottles and draft beer •
1st and 3rd Wednesday of
every month is Trivia Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Shirtless Men Drink Free
House and Domestics,
10-11pm • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • Pool
Tournament, 9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
New Meat Night • Dancer
auditions • Happy Hour
Prices, all night • All nude
male dancers • DJ tim-e,
9pm-close • Drink and
Beer Specials • Cover l
DECEMBER 15, 2011 68 METROWEEKLY
DECEMBER 15, 2011 70 METROWEEKLY
VIRGINIA
FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
MAJESTIC V3
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
301-802-8878
HRC
ACTION CENTER
& STORE
1633 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 232-8621
Dupont Circle Metro
DESTINATIONS
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
FUEGO SALVAJE
Cafe Asia
1720 I St. NW
www.clubfuegodc.com
m d t
GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW
(behind 1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d
NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
D.C.
18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
9:30 CLUB
815 V Street NW
(202) 265-0930
U Street / Cardozo Metro
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d
OMEGA
2122 P Street NW (rear)
(202) 223-4917
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
PHASE ONE
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street/Cardozo Metro
m d v t
ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
MARYLAND
CLUB HIPPO
1 West Eager Street
Baltimore, MD
(410) 547-0069
THE LODGE
21614 National Pike
Boonsboro, MD
(301) 591-4434
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855-N Washington, Blvd.
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-4840
BARS & CLUBS
RETAIL
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
71 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
Cobalt
Saturday, Dec. 10
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
DECEMBER 15, 2011 72 METROWEEKLY
T
HE NAME
just kind of
rolls off your
t o n g u e , ”
says Joey-O
with a laugh.
“It almost
sounds like
a cheerleader — ‘Go gay go!’”
Instead of cheerleaders,
though, the hosts at Joey-O’s
new monthly party goGAYgo at
Wonderland Ballroom are drag
queens Donna Dupree and
Tallulah Widebody Fox. Both
work to rally the crowd in the
upstairs dancing space, but not
by putting on a standard drag
show. “It’s be something dif-
ferent,” he says.
The party, which launched
last month, replaces a former
monthly gay party called Pink
Sock hosted at the Columbia
Heights location, once known
as the legendary black gay bar
Nob Hill. “The staff is really
cool, the owners are just fantas-
tic,” says Joey-O, well known
as the longtime manager of the
now-shuttered Apex. “They’ve
pretty much just given me a
lot of   exibility to do what I’ve
done for 20 years.”
Joey-O came up with the
name to distinguish the party
from others at the straight
Wonderland. Still, he is hoping
for a mixed crowd. “[The party
is for] the gay community and
Joey-O
launches a new
gay party at
Wonderland Ballroom
in Columbia Heights
By Doug Rule
Joey-O photographed
Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011
by Julian Vankim
G
A
Y
W
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73 METROWEEKLY.COM
all of their friends — guys,
girls,” he says. “It’s a neigh-
borhood bar. I’d love for it to
be a really mixed club kind of
atmosphere. A gay party, but
straight-friendly.”
GoGAYgo is the first party
Joey-O has thrown outside
of Apex, yet another step in
his efforts to make a name
for himself as a DJ, spinning
around town practically every
night. Currently, he’s a regular
at Ziegfeld’s, Omega, Tabaq
and Cobalt, playing his blend
of funky house, even a lit-
tle hip-hop, in addition to the
more standard club hits. On
Friday, Dec. 30, he’ll debut at
The Lodge in Boonsboro, Md.
“I’m really looking forward to
that,” he says, joking, “I’ve
never played for mountain
people before.”
The restaurant at
Wonderland Ballroom serves
a full menu until 11:30 p.m.
Tuesdays are taco night, when
tacos can be had for $1. “They
are the bomb,” effuses Joey-O.
He’s planning to throw theme
parties and offer drink specials
as the party takes off, and will
eventually bring in guest DJs
and surprise entertainers.
“I can guarantee that
goGAYgo will always be good
music, great drinks and a fun
atmosphere,” he says. “And
it’s always going to be free.”

The next goGAYgo is Tuesday,
Dec. 20, from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
at Wonderland Ballroom, 1101
Kenyon St. NW. No cover.
Call 202-232-5263 or visit
thewonderlandballroom.com.
You can follow Joey-O
on his Facebook page at
facebook.com/djJoeyo. l
75 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
Miss queen of
queens pageant
Sunday, Dec. 4
Majestic V3
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
76 SEE PHOTOS fROM THiS EvENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
77 METROWEEKLY.COM
78 SEE MORE PHOTOS fROM THiS EvENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
Freddie’s Beach Bar
Sunday, Dec. 4
PhotograPhy by
dylan CoMstoCk
scene
79 METROWEEKLY.COM
they tweaked the lyrics a
tad, making it clear that
neither of them are the top.
At one point, David accuses
Neil of dancing like a bot-
tom. When NPH asked,
“What does a bottom even
dance like, anyway?” David
quipped, “Have you seen
Adam Shankman?” Oh,
those catty queens....
CRUISING SPEED...
Christmas, or whatever
those wacky Scientologists
celebrate, came a little
early to the Cruise house-
hold this year. Zac Efron
reveals that he got to
spend a bit of alone time
with Tommy. When the
two ran into each other
at a party, Tom asked if
Zac rode motorcycles. Zac
said no, and Cruise said,
“Why don’t you come over
tomorrow and I’ll teach
you how to ride.” Ah, the
old “come over for a ride”
line. According to Efron,
they spent two hours a
deux with Cruise teaching
him various techniques. I
suspect the words, “Hold
on...Tighter!” were shouted
repeatedly....
GIVING SPIRIT... As the
saying goes, it’s better to
give than to receive. I was
thinking about that whilst
reading about AgeUK, a
British charity whose annu-
al Donate a Coat initiative
provides warm clothing for
at-risk elders. Many celebs
have given their old coats,
but Dame Helen Mirren
went one better — she
donated her red bikini! Yes,
the infamous swimsuit that
she was snapped in a cou-
ple of years ago is expect-
ed to bring in thousands of
dollars for the fund. “I’m
saying farewell to it a little
bit regretfully but hope-
fully it will go to someone
who will fill it with as much
aplomb as maybe I did. It
happens to be one of the
best bikinis in the world
because it fits! The min-
ute I bought it I loved it
because it’s so hard to find
a bikini that fits if you’ve
got bosoms like I have,”
said the dame, echo-
ing how I feel about my
Speedo. On a serious note,
she added, “I love the idea
of this little   imsy summer
thing going towards helping
old people stay warm and
comfortable and toasty in
the wintertime”....
MARIO’S UNDIES...
Speaking of scanties, we
were quite intrigued when
we got word that Mario
Lopez was coming out
with his own line of under-
wear. Surely this meant
we’d get photos of him in
the aforementioned undies
— despite his decree that
he was done with shirtless
publicity shots. His line is
called Rated M (perhaps
the M is for Mario) and
has the tagline “For man-
ful men and their special
guests.” I’m not exactly
sure what a “manful man”
is, but “special guests” is
gender neutral enough to
appeal to everyone (unless
the “special guests” is a
new term for one’s pri-
vates). The line is available
exclusively at FreshPair.
com, and I’m told you
can get a variety of styles
delivered in time for the
holidays....
GIFT GIVING... Since we’re
coming down to the wire,
you’d better pay attention
to Billy’s Holiday Gift Giving
Suggestions which focus
on food. My pals David
Muniz and David Lesniak
moved from New York
to England and opened
an American bakery in
London — how’s that for
a specialty niche? Their
shoppe, Outsider Tart, is
so successful that they
published a cookbook,
Baked In America. Since I
had some holiday parties to
go to, I decided to try out
some of the recipes on my
friends. Early favorites are
the Hepburns (Katharine
Hepburn’s personal
brownie recipe), and the
XXX-Rated Chocolate Chip
Cookies (no attribute listed).
The verdict is yum! The
hardcover book is colorful,
has well-written anecdotes,
easy-to-follow recipes, and
is packed with traditional
and rarer fare. You can get
the book at OutsiderTart.
com.
Perhaps you don’t
wanna cook. Well, why
not send someone the
best cupcakes they’ll ever
eat? Those, of course,
would be ScottCakes,
the brainchild of the sexy
Scott Cunningham.
Devotees of this column
will recall my raves about
this Provincetown delicacy,
a sinfully delicious yellow
cupcake with pink but-
ter cream frosting that is
deceptively light and   uffy
and melts in your mouth.
Scott recently started ship-
ping his wares, and just in
time for the holidays. To
order a batch, ring him up
at 508-487-7465 (which
spells PINK, by the way)
and he’ll be happy to take
care of you.
When I’m promoting
underwear and cupcakes,
it’s definitely time for me
to end yet another column.
Now that I’m done with my
California commitments,
time for my pre-holiday
fast as I head back east
for the rest of the year.
But fear not, even from
30,000 feet I am updating
billymasters.com. I’m even
sharing stories about the ex
on Billy’s Boudoir, which I
don’t believe violates any
pending court orders. If you
have a question about any-
one who’s been naughty
or nice, just drop a note
to billy@billymasters.com
and I promise to get back
to you before Tom teaches
Zac to ride bareback.... l
FORTHCOMING
NUPTIALS... I’m sure
you all heard that Rosie
O’Donnell proposed to her
girlfriend Michelle Rounds.
Although they’ve only been
dating for six months,
Ro’s ready for a commit-
ment and said, “When
you’re almost 50, it’s long
enough.” Although it’s
been widely reported that
the couple will wed some-
time over the Christmas
holidays, O’Donnell cor-
rected that misinformation
while chatting with Joy
Behar on her now-can-
celled HLN show. “We’ll
probably wait until the
summer when the show
is on a break. You know,
before we start up next
year.” When Joy asked
if O’Donnell would con-
sider getting married on her
OWN show, Rosie quipped,
“I don’t think so. Maybe
we’ll do a Star Jones and
I’ll get a lot of free stuff.”
Oh, those wacky lesbians.
What’s gotten less
press is that Chaz Bono
is also engaged. He pro-
posed to girlfriend Jennifer
Elia while the couple was
on the top of the Space
Needle in Seattle — and if
that ain’t a phallic symbol, I
don’t know what is! Unlike
Rosie, Chaz had no prob-
lem sharing this good news
on a new OWN special,
Being Chaz....
PDAs... Lesbians and trans-
gender folks ain’t the only
ones in love. Neil Patrick
Harris and David Burtka
may not be tying the knot,
but they have no problem
with public displays of
affection — when it’s for a
good cause. In 2008, they
performed the duet “Take
Me or Leave Me” from
Rent at a benefit for the
LGBT Community Center
in NYC. Last week, the duo
did a spirited rendition of
Cole Porter’s “You’re the
Top” at a benefit for the
Trevor Project. Of course,
DECEMBER 15, 2011 80 METROWEEKLY
B
Y

B
I
L
L
Y

M
A
S
T
E
R
S
:
d
i
s
g
u
s
t
i
n
g
l
y

o
f
f
e
n
s
i
v
e

d
i
r
t
,

g
a
r
b
a
g
e
,

a
n
y
t
h
i
n
g

v
i
e
w
e
d

a
s

g
r
o
s
s
l
y

i
n
d
e
c
e
n
t

o
r

o
b
s
c
e
n
e
f
i
l
t
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81 METROWEEKLY.COM
Gov. Perry is right about one thing. there is something wrong in america. But surely
it begins with disloyalty to our brave troops in the feld
and violation of the hard-won separation between church and state which protects all americans.
— Bishop GeNe ROBiNSON, the frst openly gay Episcopalian bishop, takes on Republican presidential candidate
Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s recent anti-gay ad that attacked the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”
(The Washington Post)
Why are you
demonizing gay and lesbian people?”
— An unidentifed heckler at an Iowa coffee shop following remarks by Gov. Rick Perry, who did not respond to the heckler.
(Los Angeles Times)
i learned something: new Hampshire is right, you have to look a man in the eye to get a good answer and
you know what governor? Good luck.
you’re going to need it.”
— BOB GARON, an openly gay and married Vietnam veteran, to Mitt Romney after the Republican presidential candidate gave an
awkward answer to Garon’s question about marriage equality, which prompted a Romney aide to try to cut the encounter short.
(New York Daily News)
[W]hat the government is doing is, we are taking the opportunity to look at all those laws,
and we are referring those laws and provisions to the Malawi Law Commission.
We are hoping that, as a way forward, we can have
specifc recommendations.”
— Malawi Justice Minister epHRAiM CHiUMe on the African nation’s announced review of its anti-homosexuality laws. A gay
couple was sentenced to 14 years in prison last year for getting engaged, though they were later pardoned by Malawi’s president.
(voice of america)
realistically, we just looked at it as a necessity. our executive v.P. said,
‘it’s the right thing to do, it’s something we support and
we have employees who have this need.’”
— Home Depot senior manager FRANTz TiFFeAU on the home-improvement chain’s decision to cover
gender-reassignment surgery in the company’s health insurance policies.
(New York Daily News)
DECEMBER 15, 2011 82 METROWEEKLY





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