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2012_TimesReview_Ad_Specifications

2012_TimesReview_Ad_Specifications

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TimesReview 2012 Newspaper Ad Specifications
TimesReview 2012 Newspaper Ad Specifications

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Published by: Timesreview on Dec 16, 2011
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2012 display ad specs

$1 | THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2011 SIREPORTER.COM TOWN OF SHELTER ISLAND • VILLAGE OF DERING HARBOR
RiverheadNewsReview.com

News-Review
NEWS
|

R i ve R h ead

TheSuffolk Times.
WWW .S UFFOLK T IMES.COM | NEWS & INFORMATION FOR THE NORTH FORK | THURSDAY, JUNE 9, 2011 $1.50

SPORTS

|

COMMENTARY

Thursday, July 21, 2011

$1.50

Water quality warning
Environmentalists cite troubling study findings in issuing call for action
BY JENNIFER GUSTAVSON | STAFF WRITER

Summer jumpers ‘Annie Jr.’ cast members at their post-show party at Camp Quinipet last week.

ELEANOR P. LABROZZI PHOTO

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO

Men of mettle

Kilb defends nursery status
Town Board | Former supervisor sees evidence of employees there
BY PETER BOODY | EDITOR

Despite its forlorn and shabby appearance, the foreclosed Shelter Island Nursery property is in active use as a business, according to former Supervisor Alfred Kilb. He came to the Town Board’s work session on Tuesday to report that he’d seen “employees going in and out” and being “issued paychecks by the people on a regular basis” in the “back building” at the pre-existing, non-conforming business on St. Mary’s Road. Referring to an open space preservation deal reached in 2001, he said the town and county “invested a tremendous amount of money in that property and put it in a certain status so it could succeed” and that the town had an interest in seeing the nursery succeed as a business. The deal, initially negotiated by the Peconic Land

Trust, resulted in a 19-acre parcel preserved by the town and county as open space and the four-acre nursery site being kept available as a business property. The operation “is suited to that location,” Mr. Kilb said of the nursery. “To take that use and eliminate it unjustly I think is wrong,” he said, adding that “maybe” it could use a “clean-up.” “No one’s arguing that we take the use away unjustly,” Supervisor Jim Dougherty said. “We’re arguing that we examine the issue. That’s part of our responsibility.” The question of whether or not the business use had been “discontinued,” which legally would mean it could no longer operate in a residential zone, was an overriding issue as the nursery was discussed. Speaking of the bank and creditors that hold liens on the note on the property, Supervisor Jim DoughMORE NURSERY | 17

Voters to decide on reducing terms of council members
BY PETER BOODY | EDITOR

Riverhead Fire Department’s Ironmen drill team — (from left) VJ Chiaramonte, Andre Ceckowski, Branden “Herbie” Ceckowski, Jamie Brooks and Mike Argenti — competes in the all-important buckets drill Saturday afternoon at the 25th Invitational Motorized Drill event, hosted by the Ironmen at the Stotzky Park training facility. Firefighters from 20 Suffolk departments squared off in eight events, culminating in the buckets drill. The Central Islip Hoboes took first place overall with 22.5 points. The Ironmen came in fourth in the motor pump competition and fifth in the B Hose and B Ladder drills. See slide show at RiverheadNewsReview.com.

$85 million in school plans set for vote
Riverhead taxpayers to weigh in Oct. 11 on two big bond propositions
BY VERA CHINESE
|

Voters will be asked to decide this November whether or not the four-year terms of Town Board members should be reduced from four to two years, Town Board members informally agreed at their work session on Tuesday. Discussing a petition signed by about 160 residents and submitted to the board last week by Richard Kelly, the four board members at the work session all said they’d support a vote on the question even though they did not necessarily favor a cutback in the term of council members. If approved, the reduction would affect only
MORE TERMS | 14

STAFF WRITER

Taxpayers who live within the Riverhead School District will be asked to vote Oct. 11 on a $78.3 million bond proposal for infrastructure upgrades at district buildings and grounds. Residents will also be asked to consider a second proposition to build a $7 million gymnasium at Riverhead High School. After some disagreement among board members

on whether or not to include a new gym in the bond proposal, the school board on Tuesday night unanimously approved putting both measures — which would include new classroom, lavatory, kitchen and cafeteria spaces, new roofs and windows as well as interior renovations at district schools — up for vote. The $78 million plan is the final recommendation of the Community Partnership for Revitalization team, which was made up of community members and district employees. The committee had met twice a month

since last October to put together the proposal. “The CPR team worked very hard to put forth a proposal that is what the district needs with nothing extra,” superintendent Nancy Carney said Friday. Under the $78 million plan presented, a taxpayer who lives in Riverhead Town and owns a medianpriced home would pay on average $185 extra per year for 20 years, according to district officials. A Riverhead Town homeowner whose house is
SCHOOL PLANS | PAGE 29

Long Islanders will face “serious problems” with their drinking water come 2050 if action isn’t taken now to remedy a groundwater contamination dilemma that has significantly increased over the past 18 years, environmentalists warned Monday. Representatives from the Long Island Pine Barrens Society, Citizens Campaign for the Environment, Peconic Baykeeper and the Nature Conservancy met at Camp Olympia near the Carmans River in Yaphank to announce a slate of recommendations for the county to consider as it finalizes the recently completed ‘It’s a sad Suffolk County comprehensive water resources manageday for Long ment plan. The county’s new study, Islanders when comparing 2005 data to that in its 1987 plan, found that these waters nitrogen contamination in become sour.’ both the upper glacial aquifer, the area closest to the Peconic baykeeper land’s surface, and the MagKevin McAllister othy Aquifer, located below the upper glacial aquifer, has increased by more than one milligram per liter. But Long Island Pine Barrens Society executive director Richard Amper said the study fails to “accurately reflect the magnitude” of those statics, because a one milligram per liter increase in nitrates correlates to a 40 percent increase in the upper glacial aquifer and a 200 percent increase in the largely pristine Magothy Aquifer. “We are not saying that people should not drink their tap water,” Mr. Amper said. “But every Long Islander should be concerned about this trend.” In addition to a decrease in drinking water quality, the study also shows that surface waters — such as rivers, lakes and bays — are also deteriorating.
WATER QUALITY | PAGE 31

GARRET MEADE PHOTO

The thrill of victory Mattituck’s Steve Ascher, right, and Travis Zurawski reacted

after the game’s final out made the Tuckers Long Island Class B baseball champions by virtue of their 8-0 defeat of Oyster Bay on Sunday at Farmingdale State College. The Tuckers advanced to a regional final on Tuesday, losing by 9-8 to Briarcliff at Pace University. Coverage starts on page 41.

WHAT'S INSIDE

SUBSCRIBE TODAY | CALL 631-298-3200

AROUND THE ISLAND BRAIN TEASERS CALENDAR CLASSIFIEDS EDITORIAL

35 43 41 54 22

GARDENING LETTERS OBITUARIES OSPREY’S NEST POLICE BLOTTER

46 23 2 44 2

SENIORS SPORTS WHAT’S HAPPENING

42 47 35

Island spotlight: a montage of farm stands for a summer posey. | PAGE 4 Win the fishing license battle just to lose the war? | PAGE 5

Art show meets garden party in Greenport Community

Puppy saved from gang hanging marks Kent shelter milestone Page 6

Riverhead’s Borders to close by September Page 3

Chug along on the LIRR’s new ‘wine train’ Page 12

BUMPS ON PATH TO ETERNITY

Death & taxes are certain, but even funeral homes are feeling the recession’s sting PAGE 16

FOR VALOR Fire chief wins special medal PAGE 4

DEMS: HE’S BEST QUALIFIED Party says trustee candidate’s 2009 DWI arrest has no bearing on his ability to serve PAGE 3

VOLUME 53, NUMBER 8

AD FACTS

PRODUCTION SURCHARGES

PUBLICATION DATES

• Rates are cost per insertion in applicable paper(s). • Frequency is number of insertions in contract period. • Volume is number of pages purchased in contract period. • Volume/frequency rate earned in one paper applies to all papers in which ads run. • Combination discount rates are based on running the same ad the same week in each paper. • Display ads are sold in stated unit sizes only. • An ad running two or more consecutive weeks without copy changes is eligible for the 13X rate. • Political and special-interest ads are billed at open rate, or applicable contract rate. Payment due with order. Ads must contain funding source. • Not-for-profit advertisers are eligible for 6X rate. • Reverse type may not exceed 1/3 of ad area.
AD SIZES AND DIMENSIONS:

• Preferred placement (full pages only) 15% surcharge per insertion; 25% for section back pages. • Color: 4-color: Rates upon request • Scans: One free scan per ad. Additional scans $10 each. • Production: $50/hour charged for production time beyond 1 hour.
DISPLAY DEADLINES:

The Suffolk Times, Riverhead NewsReview and Shelter Island Reporter are published every Thursday.
TERMS & CONDITIONS

• Space reservations & copy: 4 p.m. Monday. (C.O.D due.) • Camera-ready (digital) ads: 4 p.m. Monday. • Proof requests: 5 p.m. Thursday of week prior to publication.

Full page (4 column) 9.75" (w) x 13.75" (h) Half long (2 column) 4.75" (w) x 13.75" (h) Half 3x9 (3 column) 7.25" (w) x 9" (h) Half horizontal (4 column) 9.75" (w) x 6.75" (h)

Quarter long (1 column) 2.25" (w) x 13.75" (h) Quarter vertical (2 column) 4.75" (w) x 6.75" (h) Quarter horizontal (3 column) 7.25" (w) x 4.5" (h) Sixth (2 column) 4.75" (w) x 4.5" (h)

Eighth vertical (1 column) 2.25" (w) x 6.75" (h) Eighth horizontal (2 column) 4.75" (w) x 3.25" (h) Sixteenth vertical (1 column) 2.25" (w) x 3.25" (h) Sixteenth horizontal (2 column) 4.75" (w) x 1.5" (h)

• Contracts: A signed contract is required to earn discounted contract rates. • Broken contracts: Failure to meet contract terms results in revising previous billings to higher rates based on actual volume. • Payment: All advertising is payable in advance until credit has been established. • Insertion orders: Signed insertion orders are required with space reservations. • Cancellations: Cancellations must be made prior to the week’s advertising deadline or ad (or placeholder ad) will run and account will be billed. • Net rates: Local display rates are net. • Errors: Responsibility for our errors made in connection with the production of an ad is limited to the printed space involved. For multiple insertions of the same ad, credit is limited to first insertion. Liability for errors in ads booked after deadline is at publisher’s discretion. • Rate guarantee: Rates subject to change with 30 days’ notice but are guaranteed for 2012. • Billing: Statements are issued the last Thursday of each month. Balances carried to next bill are subject to a 1.5% late fee.

Contact the Times/Review sales representative in your area: m Orient Point to Peconic: m Cutchogue to Route 105 Janice Robinson 631.354.8034 jrobinson@timesreview.com Tina Volinski 631.354.8053 tvolinski@timesreview.com Bill Peters 631.354.8032 bpeters@timesreview.com

m Route 105 to Wading River Joe Tumminello 631.354.8043 jtumminello@timesreview.com

m Shelter Island and South Fork Ken Allan 631.749.1000 sales@sireporter.com

631.298.3200 | Fax: 631.298.0410 | www.timesreview.com
7785 Main Road, P.O. Box 1500, Mattituck, NY 11952

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