.

Overview

1

1–1

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§1.1.

§1.2. §1.3.

§1.4.

§1.5. §1.6. §1.7.

§1. §1. §1.

Where This Material Fits §1.1.1. Computational Mechanics . . . . . . §1.1.2. Statics vs. Dynamics . . . . . . . §1.1.3. Linear vs. Nonlinear . . . . . . . . §1.1.4. Discretization Methods . . . . . . §1.1.5. FEM Variants . . . . . . . . . . What Does a Finite Element Look Like? The FEM Analysis Process §1.3.1. The Physical FEM . . . . . . . . §1.3.2. The Mathematical FEM . . . . . . . §1.3.3. Synergy of Physical and Mathematical FEM Interpretations of the Finite Element Method §1.4.1. Physical Interpretation . . . . . . . §1.4.2. Mathematical Interpretation . . . . . Keeping the Course *What is Not Covered *Historical Sketch and Bibliography §1.7.1. Who Invented Finite Elements? . . . . §1.7.2. G1: The Pioneers . . . . . . . . §1.7.3. G2: The Golden Age . . . . . . . . §1.7.4. G3: Consolidation . . . . . . . . §1.7.5. G4: Back to Basics . . . . . . . . §1.7.6. Precursors . . . . . . . . . . . §1.7.7. Recommended Books for Linear FEM . . §1.7.8. Hasta la Vista, Fortran . . . . . . . Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1–3 1–3 1–4 1–4 1–4 1–5 1–5 1–7 1–7 1–8 1–9 1–10 1–11 1–11 1–12 1–12 1–13 1–13 1–13 1–14 1–14 1–14 1–15 1–16 1–16 1–17 1–18 1–19

1–2

1–3

§1.1

WHERE THIS MATERIAL FITS

New technologies spawn new ways to tell old stories. FEM is “old” by electronic age standards. This book is an introduction to the analysis of linear elastic structures by the Finite Element Method (FEM). This Chapter presents an overview of where the book fits, and what finite elements are. §1.1. Where This Material Fits The field of Mechanics can be subdivided into three major areas: Theoretical Applied Computational

Mechanics

(1.1)

Theoretical mechanics deals with fundamental laws and principles of mechanics studied for their intrinsic scientific value. Applied mechanics transfers this theoretical knowledge to scientific and engineering applications, especially as regards the construction of mathematical models of physical phenomena. Computational mechanics solves specific problems by simulation through numerical methods implemented on digital computers.
Remark 1.1. Paraphrasing an old joke about mathematicians, one may define a computational mechanician

as a person who searches for solutions to given problems, an applied mechanician as a person who searches for problems that fit given solutions, and a theoretical mechanician as a person who can prove the existence of problems and solutions.

§1.1.1. Computational Mechanics Several branches of computational mechanics can be distinguished according to the physical scale of the focus of attention:   Nanomechanics and micromechanics   Solids and Structures  Computational Mechanics Continuum mechanics Fluids   Multiphysics   Systems

(1.2)

Nanomechanics deals with phenomena at the molecular and atomic levels of matter. As such it is closely linked to particle physics and chemistry. Micromechanics looks primarily at the crystallographic and granular levels of matter. Its main technological application is the design and fabrication of materials and microdevices. Continuum mechanics studies bodies at the macroscopic level, using continuum models in which the microstructure is homogenized by phenomenological averages. The two traditional areas of application are solid and fluid mechanics. The former includes structures which, for obvious reasons, are fabricated with solids. Computational solid mechanics takes an applied sciences approach, whereas computational structural mechanics emphasizes technological applications to the analysis and design of structures. Computational fluid mechanics deals with problems that involve the equilibrium and motion of liquid and gases. Well developed subsidiaries are hydrodynamics, aerodynamics, acoustics, atmospheric physics, shock, combustion and propulsion. 1–3

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–4

Multiphysics is a more recent newcomer. This area is meant to include mechanical systems that transcend the classical boundaries of solid and fluid mechanics, as in interacting fluids and structures. Phase change problems such as ice melting and metal solidification fit into this category, as do the interaction of control, mechanical and electromagnetic systems. Finally, system identifies mechanical objects, whether natural or artificial, that perform a distinguishable function. Examples of man-made systems are airplanes, buildings, bridges, engines, cars, microchips, radio telescopes, robots, roller skates and garden sprinklers. Biological systems, such as a whale, amoeba, inner ear, or pine tree are included if studied from the viewpoint of biomechanics. Ecological, astronomical and cosmological entities also form systems.1 In the progression of (1.2) system is the most general concept. A system is studied by decomposition: its behavior is that of its components plus the interaction between components. Components are broken down into subcomponents and so on. As this hierarchical breakdown process continues, individual components become simple enough to be treated by individual disciplines, but component interactions get more complex. Consequently there is a tradeoff art in deciding where to stop.2 §1.1.2. Statics vs. Dynamics Continuum mechanics problems may be subdivided according to whether inertial effects are taken into account or not: Statics Continuum mechanics (1.3) Dynamics In dynamics actual time dependence must be explicitly considered, because the calculation of inertial (and/or damping) forces requires derivatives respect to actual time to be taken. Problems in statics may also be time dependent but with inertial forces ignored or neglected. Accordingly static problems may be classed into strictly static and quasi-static. For the former time need not be considered explicitly; any historical time-like response-ordering parameter, if one is needed, will do. In quasi-static problems such as foundation settlement, metal creep, rate-dependent plasticity or fatigue cycling, a realistic measure of time is required but inertial forces are still neglected. §1.1.3. Linear vs. Nonlinear A classification of static problems that is particularly relevant to this book is Statics Linear Nonlinear (1.4)

Linear static analysis deals with static problems in which the response is linear in the cause-andeffect sense. For example: if the applied forces are doubled, the displacements and internal stresses also double. Problems outside this domain are classified as nonlinear.
1

Except that their function may not be clear to us. “The usual approach of science of constructing a mathematical model cannot answer the questions of why there should be a universe for the model to describe. Why does the universe go to all the bother of existing? Is the unified theory so compelling that it brings about its own existence? Or does it need a creator, and, if so, does he have any other effect on the universe? And who created him?” (Stephen Hawking). Thus in breaking down a car engine for engineering analysis, say, the decomposition does not usually proceed beyond the components you can buy at a parts shop.

2

1–4

1–5 §1.1.4. Discretization Methods

§1.2

WHAT DOES A FINITE ELEMENT LOOK LIKE?

A final classification of CSM static analysis is based on the discretization method by which the continuum mathematical model is discretized in space, i.e., converted to a discrete model with a finite number of degrees of freedom:   Finite Element (FEM)    Boundary Element (BEM)   Finite Difference (FDM) Spatial discretization method   Finite Volume (FVM)   Spectral   Meshfree

(1.5)

In CSM linear problems finite element methods currently dominate the scene as regards space discretization.3 Boundary element methods post a strong second choice in specific application areas. For nonlinear problems the dominance of finite element methods is overwhelming. Space finite difference methods in solid and structural mechanics have virtually disappeared from practical use. This statement is not true, however, for fluid mechanics, where finite difference discretization methods are still important. Finite-volume methods, which directly address the discretization of conservation laws, are important in difficult problems of fluid mechanics, for example high-Re gas dynamics. Spectral methods are based on transforms that map space and/or time dimensions to spaces (for example, the frequency domain) where the problem is easier to solve. A recent newcomer to the scene are the meshfree methods. These combine techniques and tools of finite element methods such as variational formulation and interpolation, with finite difference features such as non-local support. §1.1.5. FEM Variants The term Finite Element Method actually identifies a broad spectrum of techniques that share common features outlined in subsequent Chapters. Two subclassifications that fit well applications to structural mechanics are4   Displacement Stiffness  Equilibrium FEM Formulation FEM Solution Flexibility (1.6)  Mixed  Mixed (a.k.a. Combined) Hybrid Using the foregoing classification, we can state the topic of this book more precisely: the computational analysis of linear static structural problems by the Finite Element Method. Of the variants listed in (1.6), emphasis is placed on the displacement formulation and stiffness solution. This combination is called the Direct Stiffness Method or DSM.
3 4

There are finite element discretizations in time, but they are not so widely used as finite differences. The distinction between these subclasses require advanced technical concepts, which cannot be covered in an introductory treatment such as this book.

1–5

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–6
(b)
4 3 2

(a) r d

(c)
4

(d) 2r sin(π/n)

5

1

5

i
2π/n

j r

6 7

8

Figure 1.1. The “find π ” problem treated with FEM concepts: (a) continuum object, (b) a discrete approximation by inscribed regular polygons, (c) disconnected element, (d) generic element.

§1.2. What Does a Finite Element Look Like? The subject of this book is FEM. But what is a finite element? The term admits of two interpretations, as discussed later. For now the underlying concept will be partly illustrated through a truly ancient problem: find the perimeter L of a circle of diameter d. Since L = π d, this is equivalent to obtaining a numerical value for π . Draw a circle of radius r and diameter d = 2r as in Figure 1.1(a). Inscribe a regular polygon of n sides, where n = 8 in Figure 1.1(b). Rename polygon sides as elements and vertices as nodes. Label nodes with integers 1, . . . 8. Extract a typical element, say that joining nodes 4–5, as shown in Figure 1.1(c). This is an instance of the generic element i– j pictured in Figure 1.1(d). The element length is L i j = 2r sin(π/n). Since all elements have the same length, the polygon perimeter is L n = n L i j , whence the approximation to π is πn = L n /d = n sin(π/n).
Table 1.1. Rectification of Circle by Inscribed Polygons (“Archimedes FEM”) n 1 2 4 8 16 32 64 128 256 πn = n sin(π/n) 0.000000000000000 2.000000000000000 2.828427124746190 3.061467458920718 3.121445152258052 3.136548490545939 3.140331156954753 3.141277250932773 3.141513801144301 Extrapolated by WynnExact π to 16 places

3.414213562373096 3.141418327933211 3.141592658918053 3.141592653589786 3.141592653589793

Values of πn obtained for n = 1, 2, 4, . . . 256 are listed in the second column of Table 1.1. As can be seen the convergence to π is fairly slow. However, the sequence can be transformed by Wynn’s algorithm5 into that shown in the third column. The last value displays 15-place accuracy. Some key ideas behind the FEM can be identified in this example. The circle, viewed as a source mathematical object, is replaced by polygons. These are discrete approximations to the circle. The sides, renamed as elements, are specified by their end nodes. Elements can be separated by
5

A widely used lozenge extrapolation algorithm that speeds up the convergence of many sequences. See, e.g, [273].

1–6

1–7

§1.3

THE FEM ANALYSIS PROCESS

disconnecting nodes, a process called disassembly in the FEM. Upon disassembly a generic element can be defined, independently of the original circle, by the segment that connects two nodes i and j. The relevant element property: side length L i j , can be computed in the generic element independently of the others, a property called local support in the FEM. The target property: the polygon perimeter, is obtained by reconnecting n elements and adding up their length; the corresponding steps in the FEM being assembly and solution, respectively. There is of course nothing magic about the circle; the same technique can be be used to rectify any smooth plane curve.6 This example has been offered in the FEM literature, e.g. in [172], to aduce that finite element ideas can be traced to Egyptian mathematicians from circa 1800 B.C., as well as Archimedes’ famous studies on circle rectification by 250 B.C. But comparison with the modern FEM, as covered in following Chapters, shows this to be a stretch. The example does not illustrate the concept of degrees of freedom, conjugate quantities and local-global coordinates. It is guilty of circular reasoning: the compact formula π = limn→∞ n sin(π/n) uses the unknown π in the right hand side.7 Reasonable people would argue that a circle is a simpler object than, say, a 128-sided polygon. Despite these flaws the example is useful in one respect: showing a fielder’s choice in the replacement of one mathematical object by another. This is at the root of the simulation process described below. §1.3. The FEM Analysis Process Processes using FEM involve carrying out a sequence of steps in some way. Those sequences take two canonical configurations, depending on (i) the environment in which FEM is used and (ii) the main objective: model-based simulation of physical systems, or numerical approximation to mathematical problems. Both are reviewed below to introduce terminology used in the sequel. §1.3.1. The Physical FEM A canonical use of FEM is simulation of physical systems. This requires models. Consequenty the methodology is often called model-based simulation. The process is illustrated in Figure 1.2. The centerpiece is the physical system to be modeled. Accordingly, this configuration is called the Physical FEM. The processes of idealization and discretization are carried out concurrently to produce the discrete model. The solution step is handled by an equation solver often customized to FEM, which delivers a discrete solution (or solutions).
6 7

Ideal Mathematical model
CONTINUIFICATION

occasionally relevant

SOLUTION

Physical system

FEM

Discrete model
VERIFICATION

Discrete solution

IDEALIZATION & DISCRETIZATION

solution error

simulation error: modeling & solution error
VALIDATION

Figure 1.2. The Physical FEM. The physical system (left) is the source of the simulation process. The ideal mathematical model (should one go to the trouble of constructing it) is inessential.

A similar limit process, however, may fail in three or more dimensions. This objection is bypassed if n is advanced as a power of two, as in Table 1.1, by using the half-angle recursion 1− 1 − sin2 2α, started from 2α = π for which sin π = −1.

2 sin α =

1–7

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–8

Figure 1.2 also shows an ideal mathematical model. This may be presented as a continuum limit or “continuification” of the discrete model. For some physical systems, notably those well modeled by continuum fields, this step is useful. For others, such as complex engineering systems (say, a flying aircraft) it makes no sense. Indeed Physical FEM discretizations may be constructed and adjusted without reference to mathematical models, simply from experimental measurements. The concept of error arises in the Physical FEM in two ways. These are known as verification and validation, respectively. Verification is done by replacing the discrete solution into the discrete model to get the solution error. This error is not generally important. Substitution in the ideal mathematical model in principle provides the discretization error. This step is rarely useful in complex engineering systems, however, because there is no reason to expect that the continuum model exists, and even if it does, that it is more physically relevant than the discrete model. Validation tries to compare the discrete solution against observation by computing the simulation error, which combines modeling and solution errors. As the latter is typically unimportant, the simulation error in practice can be identified with the modeling error. In real-life applications this error overwhelms the other two.8 One way to adjust the discrete model so that it represents the physics better is called model updating. The discrete model is given free parameters. These are determined by comparing the discrete solution against experiments, as illustrated in Figure 1.3. Inasmuch as the minimization conditions are generally nonlinear (even if the model is linear) the updating process is inherently iterative.

Physical system

Experimental database

FEM

Parametrized discrete model simulation error

Discrete solution

EXPERIMENTS

Figure 1.3. Model updating process in the Physical FEM.

§1.3.2. The Mathematical FEM The other canonical way of using FEM focuses on the mathematics. The process steps are illustrated in Figure 1.4. The spotlight now falls on the mathematical model. This is often an ordinary or partial differential equation in space and time. A discrete finite element model is generated from a variational or weak form of the mathematical model.9 This is the discretization step. The FEM equations are solved as described for the Physical FEM. On the left Figure 1.4 shows an ideal physical system. This may be presented as a realization of the mathematical model. Conversely, the mathematical model is said to be an idealization of this system. E.g., if the mathematical model is the Poisson’s PDE, realizations may be heat conduction or an electrostatic charge-distribution problem. This step is inessential and may be left out. Indeed Mathematical FEM discretizations may be constructed without any reference to physics.
8 9

“All models are wrong; some are useful” (George Box) The distinction between strong, weak and variational forms is discussed in advanced FEM courses. In the present book such forms will be largely stated (and used) as recipes.

1–8

1–9
Mathematical model
IDEALIZATION REALIZATION

§1.3

THE FEM ANALYSIS PROCESS

Discretization & solution error

FEM
SOLUTION

VERIFICATION

Ideal physical system

Discrete model
IDEALIZATION & DISCRETIZATION

Discrete solution

VERIFICATION

solution error ocassionally relevant

Figure 1.4. The Mathematical FEM. The mathematical model (top) is the source of the simulation process. Discrete model and solution follow from it. The ideal physical system (should one go to the trouble of exhibiting it) is inessential.

The concept of error arises when the discrete solution is substituted in the “model” boxes. This replacement is generically called verification. As in the Physical FEM, the solution error is the amount by which the discrete solution fails to satisfy the discrete equations. This error is relatively unimportant when using computers, and in particular direct linear equation solvers, for the solution step. More relevant is the discretization error, which is the amount by which the discrete solution fails to satisfy the mathematical model.10 Replacing into the ideal physical system would in principle quantify modeling errors. In the Mathematical FEM this is largely irrelevant, however, because the ideal physical system is merely that: a figment of the imagination. §1.3.3. Synergy of Physical and Mathematical FEM The foregoing canonical sequences are not exclusive but complementary. This synergy11 is one of the reasons behind the power and acceptance of the method. Historically the Physical FEM was the first one to be developed to model complex physical systems such as aircraft, as narrated in §1.7. The Mathematical FEM came later and, among other things, provided the necessary theoretical underpinnings to extend FEM beyond structural analysis. A glance at the schematics of a commercial jet aircraft makes obvious the reasons behind the Physical FEM. There is no simple differential equation that captures, at a continuum mechanics level,12 the structure, avionics, fuel, propulsion, cargo, and passengers eating dinner. There is no reason for despair, however. The time honored divide and conquer strategy, coupled with abstraction, comes to the rescue.
10 11

This error can be computed in several ways, the details of which are of no importance here. Such interplay is not exactly a new idea: “The men of experiment are like the ant, they only collect and use; the reasoners resemble spiders, who make cobwebs out of their own substance. But the bee takes the middle course: it gathers its material from the flowers of the garden and field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own.” (Francis Bacon). Of course at the (sub)atomic level quantum mechanics works for everything, from landing gears to passengers. But it would be slightly impractical to represent the aircraft by, say, 1036 interacting particles modeled by the Schr¨ dinger o equations. More seriously, Truesdell and Toupin correctly note that “Newtonian mechanics, while not appropriate to the corpuscles making up a body, agrees with experience when applied to the body as a whole, except for certain phenomena of astronomical scale” [253, p. 228].

12

1–9

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–10

First, separate the structure out and view the rest as masses and forces. Second, consider the aircraft structure as built up of substructures (a part of a structure devoted to a specific function): wings, fuselage, stabilizers, engines, landing gears, and so on. Take each substructure, and continue to break it down into components: rings, ribs, spars, cover plates, actuators, etc. Continue through as many levels as necessary. Eventually those components become sufficiently simple in geometry and connectivity that they can be reasonably well described by the mathematical models provided, for instance, by Mechanics of Materials or the Theory of Elasticity. At that point, stop. The component level discrete equations are obtained from a FEM library based on the mathematical model.
at hem Matmodel ical

NT ONE MP EL CO EV L
en pon Comations equ t

ary Libr t onen FEM omp e
C iscret d del mo

TEM SYS EL LEV e
plet Com tion solu em Syst ete r disc del mo

l sica Phy tem sys

Figure 1.5. Combining physical and mathematical modeling through multilevel FEM. Only two levels (system and component) are shown for simplicity.

The system model is obtained by going through the reverse process: from component equations to substructure equations, and from those to the equations of the complete aircraft. This system assembly process is governed by the classical principles of Newtonian mechanics, which provide the necessary inter-component “glue.” The multilevel decomposition process is diagramed in Figure 1.5, in which intermediate levels are omitted for simplicity
Remark 1.2. More intermediate decomposi-

tion levels are used in systems such as offshore and ship structures, which are characterized by a modular fabrication process. In that case multilevel decomposition mimics the way the system is actually fabricated. The general technique, called superelements, is discussed in Chapter 11.
Remark 1.3. There is no point in practice in going beyond a certain component level while considering the complete system. The reason is that the level of detail can become overwhelming without adding relevant information. Usually that point is reached when uncertainty impedes further progress. Further refinement of specific components is done by the so-called global-local analysis technique outlined in Chapter 10. This technique is an instance of multiscale analysis.

Physical System

member support joint IDEALIZATION

Idealized and Discrete System

;; ;;

Figure 1.6. The idealization process for a simple structure. The physical system — here a roof truss — is directly idealized by the mathematical model: a pin-jointed bar assembly. For this particular structure idealized and discrete models coalesce.

For sufficiently simple structures, passing to a discrete model is carried out in a single idealization and discretization step, as illustrated for the truss roof structure shown in Figure 1.6. Other levels are unnecessary in such cases. Of course the truss may be viewed as a substructure of the roof, and the roof as a a substructure of a building. 1–10

;; ;;

1–11

§1.4

INTERPRETATIONS OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

§1.4. Interpretations of the Finite Element Method Just like there are two complementary ways of using the FEM, there are two complementary interpretations for teaching it. One stresses the physical significance and is aligned with the Physical FEM. The other focuses on the mathematical context, and is aligned with the Mathematical FEM. §1.4.1. Physical Interpretation The physical interpretation focuses on the flowchart of Figure 1.2. This interpretation has been shaped by the discovery and extensive use of the method in the field of structural mechanics. The historical connection is reflected in the use of structural terms such as “stiffness matrix”, “force vector” and “degrees of freedom,” a terminology that carries over to non-structural applications. The basic concept in the physical interpretation is the breakdown (≡ disassembly, tearing, partition, separation, decomposition) of a complex mechanical system into simpler, disjoint components called finite elements, or simply elements. The mechanical response of an element is characterized in terms of a finite number of degrees of freedom. These degrees of freedoms are represented as the values of the unknown functions as a set of node points. The element response is defined by algebraic equations constructed from mathematical or experimental arguments. The response of the original system is considered to be approximated by that of the discrete model constructed by connecting or assembling the collection of all elements. The breakdown-assembly concept occurs naturally when an engineer considers many artificial and natural systems. For example, it is easy and natural to visualize an engine, bridge, aircraft or skeleton as being fabricated from simpler parts. As discussed in §1.3, the underlying theme is divide and conquer. If the behavior of a system is too complex, the recipe is to divide it into more manageable subsystems. If these subsystems are still too complex the subdivision process is continued until the behavior of each subsystem is simple enough to fit a mathematical model that represents well the knowledge level the analyst is interested in. In the finite element method such “primitive pieces” are called elements. The behavior of the total system is that of the individual elements plus their interaction. A key factor in the initial acceptance of the FEM was that the element interaction can be physically interpreted and understood in terms that were eminently familiar to structural engineers. §1.4.2. Mathematical Interpretation This interpretation is closely aligned with the flowchart of Figure 1.4. The FEM is viewed as a procedure for obtaining numerical approximations to the solution of boundary value problems (BVPs) posed over a domain . This domain is replaced by the union ∪ of disjoint subdomains (e) called finite elements. In general the geometry of is only approximated by that of ∪ (e) . The unknown function (or functions) is locally approximated over each element by an interpolation formula expressed in terms of values taken by the function(s), and possibly their derivatives, at a set of node points generally located on the element boundaries. The states of the assumed unknown function(s) determined by unit node values are called shape functions. The union of shape functions “patched” over adjacent elements form a trial function basis for which the node values represent the generalized coordinates. The trial function space may be inserted into the governing equations and the unknown node values determined by the Ritz method (if the solution extremizes a variational 1–11

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–12

principle) or by the Galerkin, least-squares or other weighted-residual minimization methods if the problem cannot be expressed in a standard variational form.
Remark 1.4. In the mathematical interpretation the emphasis is on the concept of local (piecewise) approximation. The concept of element-by-element breakdown and assembly, while convenient in the computer implementation, is not theoretically necessary. The mathematical interpretation permits a general approach to the questions of convergence, error bounds, trial and shape function requirements, etc., which the physical approach leaves unanswered. It also facilitates the application of FEM to classes of problems that are not so readily amenable to physical visualization as structures; for example electromagnetics and heat conduction. Remark 1.5. It is interesting to note some similarities in the development of Heaviside’s operational meth-

ods, Dirac’s delta-function calculus, and the FEM. These three methods appeared as ad-hoc computational devices created by engineers and physicists to deal with problems posed by new science and technology (electricity, quantum mechanics, and delta-wing aircraft, respectively) with little help from the mathematical establishment.13 Only some time after the success of the new techniques became apparent were new branches of mathematics (operational calculus, distribution theory and piecewise-approximation theory, respectively) constructed to justify that success. In the case of the finite element method, the development of a formal mathematical theory started in the late 1960s, and much of it is still in the making.

§1.5. Keeping the Course The first Part of this book, covered in Chapters 2 through 10, stresses the physical interpretation of FEM within the framework of the Direct Stiffness Method (DSM). This is done on account of its instructional advantages. Furthermore the computer implementation becomes more transparent because the sequence of operations can be placed in close correspondence with the DSM steps. Chapters 11 through 19 deal specifically with element formulations. Ingredients of the mathematical interpretation are called upon whenever it is felt proper and convenient to do so. Nonetheless excessive entanglement with the mathematical theory is avoided if it may obfuscate the physics. In Chapters 2 and 3 the time is frozen at about 1965, and the DSM presented as an aerospace engineer of that time would have understood it. This is not done for sentimental reasons, although that happens to be the year in which the writer began thesis work on FEM under Ray Clough. Virtually all commercial codes are now based on the DSM and the computer implementation has not essentially changed since the late 1960s.14 What has greatly improved since is “marketing sugar”: user interaction and visualization.
§1.6.

*What is Not Covered
Elements based on equilibrium, mixed and hybrid variational formulations. Flexibility and mixed solution methods. Plate and shell elements.

The following topics are not covered in this book: 1. 2. 3.
13

Oliver Heaviside took heavy criticism from the lotus eaters, which he returned with gusto. His legacy is a living proof that “England is the paradise of individuality, eccentricity, heresy, anomalies, hobbies and humors” (George Santayana). Paul Dirac was luckier: he was shielded as member of the physics establishment and eventually received a Nobel Prize. Gilbert Strang, the first mathematician to dwelve in the real FEM (the one created by engineers) was kind to the founders. With the gradual disappearance of Fortran as a “live” programming language, noted in §1.7.7, changes at the implementation level have recently accelerated. E.g., C++, Python, Java and Matlab “wrappers” are becoming more common.

14

1–12

1–13
4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

§1.7 *HISTORICAL SKETCH AND BIBLIOGRAPHY Variational methods in mechanics. General mathematical theory of finite elements. Buckling and stability analysis. General nonlinear response analysis. Structural optimization. Error estimates and problem-adaptive discretizations. Non-structural and multiphysics applications of FEM. Designing and building production-level FEM software and use of special hardware (e.g. vector and parallel computers)

Topics 1–5 belong to what may be called “Advanced Linear FEM”, whereas 6–7 pertain to “Nonlinear FEM”. Topics 8–10 fall into advanced applications, whereas 11 is an interdisciplinary topic that interweaves with computer science. §1.7.

*Historical Sketch and Bibliography

This section summarizes the history of structural finite elements since 1950 to date. It functions as a hub for chapter-dispersed historical references. For exposition convenience, structural “finitelementology” may be divided into four generations that span 10 to 15 years each. There are no sharp intergenerational breaks, but noticeable change of emphasis. The following summary does not cover the conjoint evolution of Matrix Structural Analysis into the Direct Stiffness Method from 1934 through 1970. This was the subject of a separate essay [89], which is also given in Appendix H. §1.7.1. Who Invented Finite Elements? Not just one individual, as this historical sketch will make clear. But if the question is tweaked to: who created the FEM in everyday use? there is no question in the writer’s mind: M. J. (Jon) Turner at Boeing over the period 1950–1962. He generalized and perfected the Direct Stiffness Method, and forcefully got Boeing to commit resources to it while other aerospace companies were mired in the Force Method. During 1952–53 he oversaw the development of the first continuum based finite elements. In addition to Turner, major contributors to current practice include: B. M. Irons, inventor of isoparametric models, shape functions, the patch test and frontal solvers; R. J. Melosh, who recognized the Rayleigh-Ritz link and systematized the variational derivation of stiffness elements; and E. L. Wilson, who developed the first open source (and widely imitated and distributed) FEM software. All of these pioneers were in the aerospace industry at least during part of their careers. That is not coincidence. FEM is the confluence of three ingredients, one of which is digital computation. And only large industrial companies (as well as some government agencies) were able to afford mainframe computers during the 1950s. Who were the popularizers? Four academicians: J. H. Argyris, R. W. Clough, H. C. Martin, and O. C. Zienkiewicz are largely responsible for the “technology transfer” from the aerospace industry to a wider range of engineering applications during the 1950s and 1960s. The first three learned the method from Turner directly or indirectly. As a consultant to Boeing in the early 1950s, Argyris, a Force Method expert then at Imperial College, received reports from Turner’s group, and weaved the material into his influencial 1954 serial [8]. To Argyris goes the credit of being the first in constructing a displacement-assumed continuum element [8,p. 62]. Clough and Martin, then junior professors at U.C. Berkeley and U. Washington, respectively, spent “faculty internship” summers at Turner’s group during 1952 and 1953. The result of this seminal collaboration was a celebrated paper [255], widely considered the start of the present FEM. Clough baptized the method in 1960 [40] and went on to form at Berkeley the first research group to propel the idea into Civil Engineering applications. Olek Zienkiewicz, originally an expert in finite difference methods who learned the trade from Southwell, was convinced in 1964 by Clough to try FEM. He went on to write the first textbook on the subject [277] and to organize another important Civil Engineering research group in the University of Wales at Swansea.

1–13

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–14

§1.7.2. G1: The Pioneers The 1956 paper by Turner, Clough, Martin and Topp [255], henceforth abbreviated to TCMT, is recognized as the start of the current FEM, as used in the overwhelming majority of commercial codes. Along with Argyris’ serial [8] they prototype the first generation, which spans 1950 through 1962. A panoramic picture of this period is available in two textbooks [194,205]. Przemieniecki’s text is still reprinted by Dover. The survey by Gallagher [108] was influential at the time but is now difficult to access outside libraries. The pioneers were structural engineers, schooled in classical mechanics. They followed a century of tradition in regarding structural elements as a device to transmit forces. This “element as force transducer” was the standard view in pre-computer structural analysis. It explains the use of flux assumptions to derive stiffness equations in TCMT. Element developers worked in, or interacted closely with, the aircraft industry. (As noted above, only large aerospace companies were then able to afford mainframe computers.) Accordingly they focused on thin structures built up with bars, ribs, spars, stiffeners and panels. Although the Classical Force Method dominated stress analysis during the 1950s [89], stiffness methods were kept alive by use in dynamics and vibration. It is not coincidence that Turner was an world-class expert in aeroelasticity. §1.7.3. G2: The Golden Age The next period spans the golden age of FEM: 1962–1972. This is the “variational generation.” Melosh showed [179] that conforming displacement models are a form of Rayleigh-Ritz based on the minimum potential energy principle. This influential paper marks the confluence of three lines of research: Argyris’ dual formulation of energy methods [8], the Direct Stiffness Method (DSM) of Turner [256–258], and early ideas of interelement compatibility as basis for error bounding and convergence [101,178]. G1 workers thought of finite elements as idealizations of structural components. From 1962 onward a two-step interpretation emerges: discrete elements approximate continuum models, which in turn approximate real structures. By the early 1960s FEM begins to expand into Civil Engineering through Clough’s Boeing-Berkeley connection [48,49] and had been baptized [40,42]. Reading Fraeijs de Veubeke’s famous article [102] side by side with TCMT [255] one can sense the ongoing change in perspective opened up by the variational framework. The first book devoted to FEM appears in 1967 [277]. Applications to nonstructural problems had started in 1965 [276], and were treated in some depth by Martin and Carey [172]. From 1962 onwards the displacement formulation dominates. This was given a big boost by the invention of the isoparametric formulation and related tools (numerical integration, fitted natural coordinates, shape functions, patch test) by Irons and coworkers [144–148]. Low order displacement models often exhibit disappointing performance. Thus there was a frenzy to develop higher order elements. Other variational formulations, notably hybrids [195,200], mixed [130,239] and equilibrium models [102] emerged. G2 can be viewed as closed by the monograph of Strang and Fix [228], the first book to focus on the mathematical foundations. §1.7.4. G3: Consolidation The post-Vietnam economic doldrums are mirrored during this post-1972 period. Gone is the youthful exuberance of the golden age. This is consolidation time. Substantial effort is put into improving the stock of G2 displacement elements by tools initially labeled “variational crimes” [227], but later justified. Textbooks by Hughes [142] and Bathe [15] reflect the technology of this period. Hybrid and mixed formulations record steady progress [13]. Assumed strain formulations appear [162]. A booming activity in error estimation and mesh adaptivity is fostered by better understanding of the mathematical foundations [237]. Commercial FEM codes gradually gain importance. They provide a reality check on what works in the real world and what doesn’t. By the mid-1980s there was gathering evidence that complex and high order elements were commercial flops. Exotic gadgetry interweaved amidst millions of lines of code easily breaks down in new releases. Complexity is particularly dangerous in nonlinear and dynamic analyses conducted by novice users. A trend back toward simplicity starts [164,167].

1–14

1–15
§1.7.5. G4: Back to Basics

§1.7 *HISTORICAL SKETCH AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

The fourth generation begins by the early 1980s. More approaches come on the scene, notably the Free Formulation [27,28], orthogonal hourglass control [96], Assumed Natural Strain methods [17,224], stress hybrid models in natural coordinates [198,206], as well as variants and derivatives of those approaches: ANDES [76,183], EAS [220,221] and others. Although technically diverse the G4 approaches share two common objectives: (i) (ii) Elements must fit into DSM-based programs since that includes the vast majority of production codes, commercial or otherwise. Elements are kept simple but should provide answers of engineering accuracy with relatively coarse meshes. These were collectively labeled “high performance elements” in 1989 [73].

Two more recent trends can be noted: increased abstraction on the mathematical side,15 and canned recipes for running commercial software on the physical side. “Things are always at their best in the beginning,” said Pascal. Indeed. By now FEM looks like an aggregate of largely disconnected methods and recipes. The blame should not be placed on the method itself, but on the community split noted in the book Preface. §1.7.6. Precursors As used today, FEM represents the confluence of three ingredients: Matrix Structural Analysis (MSA), variational approximation theory, and the digital computer. These came together in the early 1950. The reader should not think, however, that they simultaneouly appeared on the table through some alchemy. MSA came on the scene in the mid 1930s when desk calculators became popular, as narrated in Appendix H. And variational approximation schemes akin to those of modern FEM were proposed before digital computers. Three examples: • The historical sketch of [172] says that “Archimedes used finite elements in determining the volume of solids.” The alleged linkage is tenuous. Indeed he calculated areas, lengths and volumes of geometrical objects by dividing them into simpler ones and adding their contributions, passing to the limit as necessary. Where does “variational approximation” come in? Well, one may argue that the volume (area, length) measure of an object is a scalar functional of its geometry. Transmute “measure” into “energy” and “simpler objects” into “elements” and you capture one of the FEM tenets: the energy of the system is the sum of element energies. But for Archimedes to reach modern FEM “long is the way, and hard,” since physical energy calculations require derivatives and Calculus would not be invented for 20 centuries. In his studies leading to the creation of variational calculus, Euler divided the interval of definition of a one-dimensional functional into finite intervals and assumed a linear variation over each, defined by end values [155, p. 53]. Passing to the limit he obtained what is now called the Euler-Lagrange differential equation of variational calculus. Thus Euler deserves credit for being the first to use a piecewise linear function with discontinuous derivatives at nodes to produce, out of the hat, an ODE with second derivatives. He did not use those functions, however, to obtain an approximate value of the functional.16 In the early 1940s Courant wrote an expository article [55] advocating the variational treatment of partial differential equations. The Appendix of this article contains the first FEM-style calculations on a triangular net for determining the torsional stiffness of a hollow shaft. He used piecewise linear interpolation over each triangle as Rayleigh-Ritz trial functions, and called his idea “generalized finite differences.”

15 16

“If you go too far up, abstraction-wise, you run out of oxygen.” (Joel Spolsky). That would have preceded the invention of direct variational methods (Rayleigh-Ritz) for over one century, while representing also the first FEM-style calculation. A near miss indeed.

1–15

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–16

• •

A direct variational approach similar to Courant’s was continued by Synge and Prager in the context of functional analysis [203] and exposed in Synge’s book [236] as the “hypercircle” method.17 The seminal paper by Turner et al [255] cites two immediate DSM precursors, both dated 1953, by Levy [159] and Schuerch [217]. (Only the former is available as a journal article; both have “delta wings” in the title.) From [255, p. 806]: “In a recent paper Levy has presented a method of analysis for highly redundant structures that is particularly suited to the use of high-speed digital computing machines. . . . The stiffness matrix for the entire structure is computed by simple summation of of the stiffness matrices of the elements of the structure.”

Precursors prior to 1950 had no influence on the rapid developments of Generation 1 outlined in §1.7.2. Two crucial pieces were missing. First, and most important, was the programmable digital computer. Without computers FEM would be a curiosity, worth perhaps a footnote in an arcane book. Also missing was a driving application that could get the long-term attention of scientists and engineers as well as industrial resources to fund R&D work. Aerospace structural mechanics provided the driver because the necessary implementation apparatus of MSA was available since the late 1930s [105]. Matrix procedures had to be moved from desk calculators and punched-tape accounting machines to digital computers, which affluent aerospace companies were able to afford amidst Cold War paranoia. Can you imagine defense funds pouring into hypercircles? Once all pieces were in place, synergy transformed the method into a product, and FEM took off. §1.7.7. Recommended Books for Linear FEM The literature is vast: over 200 textbooks and monographs have appeared since 1967. Some recommendations for readers interested in further studies within linear FEM are offered below. Basic level (reference): Zienkiewicz and Taylor [280]. This two-volume set is a comprehensive upgrade of the previous edition [278]. Primarily an encyclopœdic reference work that gives a panoramic coverage of FEM applications, as well as a comprehensive list of references. Not a textbook or monograph. Prior editions suffered from loose mathematics, largely fixed in this one. A three-volume fifth edition has appeared recently. Basic level (textbook): Cook, Malkus and Plesha [50]. The third edition is comprehensive in scope although the coverage is more superficial than Zienkiewicz and Taylor. A fourth edition has appeared recently. Intermediate level: Hughes [142]. It requires substantial mathematical expertise on the part of the reader. Recently (2000) reprinted as Dover edition. Mathematically oriented: Strang and Fix [228]. Still the most readable mathematical treatment for engineers, although outdated in several subjects. Out of print. Best value for the $$$: Przemieniecki’s Dover edition [205], list price $15.95 (2003). A reprint of a 1966 McGraw-Hill book. Although woefully outdated in many respects (the word “finite element” does not appear except in post-1960 references), it is a valuable reference for programming simple elements. Contains a fairly detailed coverage of substructuring, a practical topic missing from the other books. Comprehensive bibliography in Matrix Structural Analysis up to 1966. Most fun (if you appreciate British “humor”): Irons and Ahmad [148]. Out of print. For buying out-of-print books through web services, check the metasearch engine in www3.addall.com (most comprehensive; not a bookseller) as well as that of www.amazon.com. A newcomer is www.campusi.com

17

Curiously this book does not mention, even in passing, the use of digital computers that had already been commercially available for several years. The few numerical examples, all in 2D, are done by hand via relaxation methods.

1–16

1–17
§1.7.8. Hasta la Vista, Fortran

§1. Notes and Bibliography

Most FEM books that include programming samples or even complete programs use Fortran. Those face an uncertain future. Since the mid-1990s, Fortran is gradually disappearing as a programming language taught in USA engineering undergraduate programs. (It still survives in Physics and Chemistry departments because of large amounts of legacy code.) So one end of the pipeline is drying up. Low-level scientific programming is moving to C and C++, mid-level to Java, Perl and Python, high-level to Matlab, Mathematica and their free-source Linux equivalents. How attractive can a book teaching in a dead language be? To support this argument with some numbers, here is a September-2003 snapshot of ongoing open source software projects listed in http://freshmeat.net. This conveys the relative importance of various languages (a mixed bag of newcomers, going-strongs, have-beens and never-was) in the present environment. Lang Projects Perc Ada 38 0.20% Assembly 170 0.89% C 5447 28.55% Cold Fusion 10 0.05% Dylan 2 0.01% Erlang 11 0.06% Forth 15 0.08% Java 2332 12.22% Logo 2 0.01% Object Pascal 9 0.05% Other 160 0.84% Pascal 38 0.20% Pike 3 0.02% PROGRESS 2 0.01% Rexx 7 0.04% Simula 1 0.01% Tcl 356 1.87% Xbasic 1 0.01% Total Projects: 19079 Notes and Bibliography Here is Ray Clough’s personal account of how FEM and DSM emerged at Boeing in the early 1950s.
“ My involvement with the FEM began when I was employed by the Boeing Airplane Company in Seattle during summer 1952 as a member of their summer faculty program. When I had joined the civil engineering faculty at Berkeley in 1949, I decided to take advantage of my MIT structural dynamics background by taking up the field of Earthquake Engineering. So because the Boeing summer faculty program offered positions with their structural dynamics unit, I seized on that as the best means of advancing my preparation for the earthquake engineering field. I was particularly fortunate in this choice of summer work at Boeing because the head of their structural dynamics unit was Mr. M. J. Turner — a very capable man in dealing with problems of structural vibrations and flutter. When I arrived for the summer of 1952, Jon Turner asked me to work on the vibration analysis of a delta wing structure. Because of its triangular plan form, this problem could not be solved by procedures based on standard beam theory; so I spent the summer of 1952 trying to formulate a delta wing model built up as an assemblage of one-dimensional beams and struts. However, the results of deflection analyses based on this type of mathematical model were in very poor agreement with data obtained from laboratory tests of a scale model of a delta wing. My final conclusion was that my summer’s work was a total failure—however, at least I learned what did not work. Spurred by this disappointment, I decided to return to Boeing for the summer faculty program in 1953. During the winter, I stayed in touch with Jon Turner so I was able to rejoin the structural dynamics unit in June. The

Lang Projects Perc Lang Projects APL 3 0.02% ASP 25 Awk 40 0.21% Basic 15 C# 41 0.21% C++ 2443 Common Lisp 27 0.14% Delphi 49 Eiffel 20 0.10% Emacs-Lisp 33 Euler 1 0.01% Euphoria 2 Fortran 45 0.24% Haskell 28 JavaScript 236 1.24% Lisp 64 ML 26 0.14% Modula 7 Objective C 131 0.69% Ocaml 20 Other Scripting Engines 82 0.43% Perl 2752 14.42% PHP 2020 PL/SQL 58 0.30% Pliant 1 Prolog 8 0.04% Python 1171 Ruby 127 0.67% Scheme 76 Smalltalk 20 0.10% SQL 294 Unix Shell 550 2.88% Vis Basic 15 YACC 11 0.06% Zope 34

Perc 0.13% 0.08% 12.80% 0.26% 0.17% 0.01% 0.15% 0.34% 0.04% 0.10% 10.59% 0.01% 6.14% 0.40% 1.54% 0.08% 0.18%

1–17

Chapter 1: OVERVIEW

1–18

most important development during the winter was that Jon suggested we try to formulate the stiffness property of the wing by assembling plane stress plates of either triangular or rectangular shapes. So I developed stiffness matrices for plates of both shapes, but I decided the triangular form was much more useful because such plates could be assembled to approximate structures of any configuration. Moreover, the stiffness properties of the individual triangular plates could be calculated easily based on assumptions of uniform states of normal stress in the X and the Y directions combined with an uniform state of shear stress. Then the stiffness of the complete structure was obtained by appropriate addition of the contributions from the individual pieces. The Boeing group called this procedure the direct stiffness method. The remainder of the summer of 1953 was spent in demonstrating that deflections calculated for structures formed as assemblages of triangular elements agreed well with laboratory measurements on the actual physical models. Also, it became apparent that the precision of the calculated results could be improved asymptotically by continued refinement of the finite element mesh. The conclusions drawn from that summer’s work were presented in a paper given by Jon Turner at the annual meeting of the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences in January 1954. However, for reasons I never understood Jon did not submit the paper for publication until many months later. So this paper, which often is considered to be the first published description of the FEM, was not published until September 1956 — more than two years after the verbal presentation. It is important to note that the basic purpose of the work done by Jon Turner’s structural dynamics unit was vibration and flutter analysis. They were not concerned with stress analysis because that was the responsibility of the stress analysis unit. However, it was apparent that the model formed by the direct stiffness method could be used for stress analysis as well as for vibration analysis, and I made plans to investigate this stress analysis application as soon as possible. However, because of my other research responsibilities, I was not able to spend any significant time on the stress analysis question until I went on my sabbatical leave to Trondheim, Norway in September 1956. Then, when I arrived in Norway all I could do was to outline the procedures for carrying out the analysis, and to do calculations for very small systems using a desk calculator because the Norwegian Institute of Technology did not yet have an automatic digital computer. The presentation of the paper to the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences was the first introduction of the principles of the FEM to a technical audience; although some of the basic concepts of the method were stated a short time later in a series of articles published in Aircraft Engineering by Dr. John H. Argyris during October 1954 to May 1955. However, the rectangular element presented in those articles is only a minor part of that contribution. The Argyris work came to my attention during my sabbatical leave in Norway, and I considered it then (as I still do now) to be the most important series of papers ever published in the field of Structural Mechanics. I credit that work for extending the scope of my understanding of structural theory to the level it eventually attained. From my personal point of view, the next important event in finite element history was the coining of the name FEM. My purpose in choosing that name was to distinguish clearly the relatively large size pieces of the structure that make up a finite element assemblage as contrasted with the infinitesimal contributions that go into evaluation of the displacements of a structure in a typical virtual work analysis. The name first appeared in a publication that was written to demonstrate the finite element procedure for the civil engineering profession. A much more significant application of the method was presented at the Symposium on the use of Computers in Civil Engineering, held in Lisbon, Portugal in 1962, where it was used to evaluate the stress concentrations developed in a gravity dam that had cracked at its mid-section.”

References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R. Partly sorted.

1–18

1–19
Homework Exercises for Chapter 1 Overview

Exercises

EXERCISE 1.1 [A:15] Work out Archimedes’ problem using a circumscribed regular polygon, with n =

1, 2, 4, . . . 256. Does the sequence converge any faster?

EXERCISE 1.2 [D:20] Select one of the following vehicles: truck, car, motorcycle, or bicycle. Draw a two

level decomposition of the structure into substructures, and of selected components of some substructures.
EXERCISE 1.3 [D:30] In one of the earliest articles on the FEM, Clough [42] writes:

“When idealized as an assemblage of appropriately shaped two- and three-dimensional elements in this manner, an elastic continuum can be analyzed by standard methods of structural analysis. It should be noted that the approximation which is employed in this case is of physical nature; a modified structural system is substituted for the actual continuum. There need be no approximation in the mathematical analysis of this structural system. This feature distinguishes the finite element technique from finite difference methods, in which the exact equations of the actual physical system are solved by approximate mathematical procedures.” Discuss critically the contents of this paragraph while placing it in the context of time of writing (early 1960s). Is the last sentence accurate?

1–19

Introduction to FEM

Overview

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Course Coverage
This course consists of three Parts: I. Finite Element Basic Concepts

II. Formulation of Finite Elements III. Computer Implementation of FEM

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Where the Course Fits
The field of Mechanics can be subdivided into 3 major areas:

 
Mechanics

Theoretical Applied Computational

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Computational Mechanics
Branches of Computational Mechanics can be distinguished according to the physical focus of attention

 
Computational Mechanics

Nano and Micromechanics Continuum Mechanics: Solids and Structures Fluids Multiphysics Systems

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics
A convenient subdivision of problems in Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics (CSM) is

Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics (CSM)

  

Statics

Dynamics

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

CSM Statics
A further subdivision of problems in CSM Statics is

 
CSM Statics

Linear

Nonlinear

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

CSM Linear Statics
For the numerical simulation on the computer we must now chose a spatial discretization method:

  

Finite Element Method Finite Difference Method Boundary Element Method Finite Volume Method Spectral Method Mesh-Free Method

CSM Linear Statics

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

CSM Linear Statics by FEM
Having selected the FEM for discretization, we must next pick a formulation and a solution method:

 
Formulation of FEM Model

  

Displacement Equilibrium Mixed Hybrid Stiffness Flexibility Mixed

Solution of FEM Model

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Summarizing: This Course Covers
Computational structural mechanics Linear static problems Spatially discretized by displacement-formulated FEM Solved by the stiffness method

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

What is a Finite Element?
Archimedes' problem (circa 250 B.C.): rectification of the circle as limit of inscribed regular polygons
3 4 2 4

r d
5 1 5

2r sin(π/n) i
2π/n 6 7 8

j r

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Computing π "by Archimedes FEM"

n 1 2 4 8 16 32 64 128 256

πn = n sin(π/n) 0.000000000000000 2.000000000000000 2.828427124746190 3.061467458920718 3.121445152258052 3.136548490545939 3.140331156954753 3.141277250932773 3.141513801144301

Extrapolated by Wynn-ε

Exact π to 16 places

3.414213562373096 3.141418327933211 3.141592658918053 3.141592653589786 3.141592653589793

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

The Idealization Process for a Simple Structure
member

Roof Truss

support

joint

Physical Model IDEALIZATION & DISCRETIZATION Mathematical and Discrete Model

; ; ;

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 12

; ; ;

Introduction to FEM

Two Interpretations of FEM for Teaching
Mathematical
Numerical approximation of a Boundary Value Problem by Ritz-Galerkin discretization with functions of local support Emphasized in Part II

Physical
Breakdown of structural system into components (elements) and reconstruction by the assembly process Emphasized in Part I

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

FEM in Modeling and Simulation: Physical FEM
Ideal Mathematical model
CONTINUIFICATION

generally irrelevant

SOLUTION

Physical system

FEM

Discrete model
VERIFICATION

Discrete solution

IDEALIZATION & DISCRETIZATION

solution error

simulation error= modeling + solution error
VALIDATION

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

FEM in Modeling and Simulation: Mathematical FEM
Mathematical model
IDEALIZATION REALIZATION

Discretization + solution error

FEM
SOLUTION

VERIFICATION

Ideal physical system

Discrete model
IDEALIZATION & DISCRETIZATION

Discrete solution

VERIFICATION

solution error generally irrelevant

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Model Updating in Physical FEM

EXPERIMENTS Physical system Experimental database

FEM

Parametrized discrete model simulation error

Discrete solution

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Synergy Between Mathematical and Physical FEM
E PON COMEVEL L
ent pon Comations equ

NT

ic mat athe del M mo

al

(Intermediate levels omitted)

FEM

Li

y brar

ent pon Comcrete dis del mo

TEM SYS EL LEV e
plet Com tion lu so em Syst ete iscr el d d mo

l sica Phy tem ys s

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Recommended Books for Linear FEM
Basic level (reference): Zienkiewicz & Taylor (1988), Vols I (1988), II (1993). A comprehensive upgrade of the 1977 edition. Primarily an encyclopedic reference work that provides a panoramic coverage of FEM, as well as a comprehensive list of references. Not a textbook. A fifth edition has appeared. Basic level (textbook): Cook, Malkus & Plesha (1989); this third edition is fairly comprehensive in scope and up to date although the coverage is more superficial than Zienkiewicz & Taylor. Intermediate level: Hughes (1987). It requires substantial mathematical expertise on the part of the reader Recently reprinted by Dover.. Mathematically oriented: Strang & Fix (1973). Most readable mathematical treatment although outdated in several subjects. Most fun (if you like British "humor"): Irons & Ahmad (1980) Best value for the $$$: Przemieniecki (Dover edition 1985, ~$16). Although outdated in many respects (e.g. the word "finite element" does not appear in this reprint of the original 1966 book), it is a valuable reference for programming simple elements. Comprehensive web search engine for out-of print books: http://www3.addall.com

IFEM Ch 1–Slide 18

.

The Direct Stiffness Method I

2

2–1

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§2.1. §2.2. §2.3. §2.4. §2.5. §2.6. §2.7.

§2.8.

§2. §2. §2.

Why A Plane Truss? Truss Structures Idealization Members, Joints, Forces and Displacements The Master Stiffness Equations The DSM Steps Breakdown §2.7.1. Disconnection . . . . . . . . . . §2.7.2. Localization . . . . . . . . . . §2.7.3. Computation of Member Stiffness Equations Assembly: Globalization §2.8.1. Coordinate Transformations . . . . . §2.8.2. Transformation to Global System . . . . Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2–3 2–3 2–4 2–4 2–6 2–7 2–7 2–7 2–8 2–8 2–9 2–9 2–11 2–12 2–12 2–13

2–2

2–3

§2.2

TRUSS STRUCTURES

This Chapter begins the exposition of the Direct Stiffness Method (DSM) of structural analysis. The DSM is by far the most common implementation of the Finite Element Method (FEM). In particular, all major commercial FEM codes are based on the DSM. The exposition is done by following the DSM steps applied to a simple plane truss structure. The method has two major stages: breakdown, and assembly+solution. This Chapter covers primarily the breakdown stage. §2.1. Why A Plane Truss? The simplest structural finite element is the 2-node bar (also called linear spring) element, which is illustrated in Figure 2.1(a). Perhaps the most complicated finite element (at least as regards number of degrees of freedom) is the curved, three-dimensional “brick” element depicted in Figure 2.1(b). Yet the remarkable fact is that, in the DSM, the simplest and most complex elements are treated alike! To illustrate the basic steps of this democratic method, it makes educational sense to keep it simple and use a structure composed of bar elements.
(a) (b)

Figure 2.1. From the simplest through a highly complex structural finite element: (a) 2-node bar element for trusses, (b) 64-node tricubic, “brick” element for three-dimensional solid analysis.

A simple yet nontrivial structure is the pin-jointed plane truss.1 Using a plane truss to teach the stiffness method offers two additional advantages: (a) Computations can be entirely done by hand as long as the structure contains just a few elements. This allows various steps of the solution procedure to be carefully examined and understood before passing to the computer implementation. Doing hand computations on more complex finite element systems rapidly becomes impossible. (b) The computer implementation on any programming language is relatively simple and can be assigned as preparatory computer homework before reaching Part III. §2.2. Truss Structures Plane trusses, such as the one depicted in Figure 2.2, are often used in construction, particularly for roofing of residential and commercial buildings, and in short-span bridges. Trusses, whether two or three dimensional, belong to the class of skeletal structures. These structures consist of elongated structural components called members, connected at joints. Another important subclass of skeletal structures are frame structures or frameworks, which are common in reinforced concrete construction of buildings and bridges. Skeletal structures can be analyzed by a variety of hand-oriented methods of structural analysis taught in beginning Mechanics of Materials courses: the Displacement and Force methods. They can also be analyzed by the computer-oriented FEM. That versatility makes those structures a good choice
1

A one dimensional bar assembly would be even simpler. That kind of structure would not adequately illustrate some of the DSM steps, however, notably the back-and-forth transformations from global to local coordinates.

2–3

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–4
member support

joint
Figure 2.2. An actual plane truss structure. That shown is typical of a roof truss used in building construction.

to illustrate the transition from the hand-calculation methods taught in undergraduate courses, to the fully automated finite element analysis procedures available in commercial programs. In this and the next Chapter we will go over the basic steps of the DSM in a “hand-computer” calculation mode. This means that although the steps are done by hand, whenever there is a procedural choice we shall either adopt the way that is better suited towards the computer implementation, or explain the difference between hand and computer computations. The actual computer implementation using a high-level programming language is presented in Chapter 4. To keep hand computations manageable in detail we use just about the simplest structure that can be called a plane truss, namely the three-member truss illustrated in Figure 2.3. The idealized model of the example truss as a pin-jointed assemblage of bars is shown in Figure 2.4(a), which also gives its geometric and material properties. In this idealization truss members carry only axial loads, have no bending resistance, and are connected by frictionless pins. Figure 2.4(b) shows idealized support conditions as well as the applied point loads applied on truss joints.

Figure 2.3. The three-member example truss.

It should be noted that as a practical structure the example truss is not particularly useful — the one depicted in Figure 2.2 is far more common in construction. But with the example truss we can go over the basic DSM steps without getting mired into too many members, joints and degrees of freedom. §2.3. Idealization Although the pin-jointed assemblage of bars (as depicted in Figure 2.4) is sometimes presented as an actual problem, it actually represents an idealization of a true truss structure. The axially-carrying members and frictionless pins of this structure are only an approximation of a real truss. For example, building and bridge trusses usually have members joined to each other through the use of gusset plates, which are attached by nails, bolts, rivets or welds. See Figure 2.2. Consequently members will carry some bending as well as direct axial loading. Experience has shown, however, that stresses and deformations calculated for the simple idealized problem will often be satisfactory for overall-design purposes; for example to select the cross section of the members. Hence the engineer turns to the pin-jointed assemblage of axial force elements and uses it to carry out the structural analysis. This replacement of true by idealized is at the core of the physical interpretation of the finite element method discussed in §1.4. 2–4

2–5

§2.4

MEMBERS, JOINTS, FORCES AND DISPLACEMENTS

(a)
L E A
(3)

fy3, u y3
3 √

fx3, u x3

(b)

f y3 = 1
3

(3) (3)

= 10 2 √ = 200 2 (3) (2)

f x3 = 2

L = 10 E (2) A (2) = 50

(2)

y fx1, u x1
1

y fx2, u x2
2

;; ;; ;;
2–5

fy1, u y1

L = 10 E (1) A(1) = 100

(1)

fy2, u y2

Figure 2.4. Pin-jointed idealization of example truss: (a) geometric and elastic properties, (b) support conditions and applied loads.

§2.4. Members, Joints, Forces and Displacements The idealization of the example truss, pictured in Figure 2.4, has three joints, which are labeled 1, 2 and 3, and three members, which are labeled (1), (2) and (3). These members connect joints 1–2, 2–3, and 1–3, respectively. The member lengths are denoted by L (1) , L (2) and L (3) , their elastic moduli by E (1) , E (2) and E (3) , and their cross-sectional areas by A(1) , A(2) and A(3) . Note that an element number superscript is enclosed in parenthesis to avoid confusion with exponents. Both E and A are assumed to be constant along each member. Members are generically identified by index e (because of their close relation to finite elements, see below). This index is placed as superscript of member properties. For example, the cross-section area of a generic member is Ae . The member superscript is not enclosed in parentheses in this case because no confusion with exponents can arise. But the area of member 3 is written A(3) and not A3 . Joints are generically identified by indices such as i, j or n. In the general FEM, the names “joint” and “member” are replaced by node and element, respectively. The dual nomenclature is used in the initial Chapters to stress the physical interpretation of the FEM. The geometry of the structure is referred to a common Cartesian coordinate system {x, y}, which is called the global coordinate system. Other names for it in the literature are structure coordinate system and overall coordinate system. The key ingredients of the stiffness method of analysis are the forces and displacements at the joints. In a idealized pin-jointed truss, externally applied forces as well as reactions can act only at the joints. All member axial forces can be characterized by the x and y components of these forces, denoted by f x and f y , respectively. The components at joint i will be identified as f xi and f yi , respectively. The set of all joint forces can be arranged as a 6-component column vector called f. The other key ingredient is the displacement field. Classical structural mechanics tells us that the displacements of the truss are completely defined by the displacements of the joints. This statement is a particular case of the more general finite element theory. The x and y displacement components will be denoted by u x and u y , respectively. The values of u x and u y at joint i will be called u xi and u yi . Like joint forces, they are arranged into a 6-component vector called u. Here are the two vectors

;; ;; ;;

x

(1)

1

x

2

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–6

of nodal forces and nodal displacements, shown side by side:     f x1 u x1  f y1   u y1      f x2   u  f= u =  x2  . ,  f y2   u y2      f x3 u x3 f y3 u y3

(2.1)

In the DSM these six displacements are the primary unknowns. They are also called the degrees of freedom or state variables of the system.2 How about the displacement boundary conditions, popularly called support conditions? This data will tell us which components of f and u are actual unknowns and which ones are known a priori. In pre-computer structural analysis such information was used immediately by the analyst to discard unnecessary variables and thus reduce the amount of hand-carried bookkeeping. The computer oriented philosophy is radically different: boundary conditions can wait until the last moment. This may seem strange, but on the computer the sheer volume of data may not be so important as the efficiency with which the data is organized, accessed and processed. The strategy “save the boundary conditions for last” will be followed here also for the hand computations.
Remark 2.1. Often column vectors such as (2.1) will be displayed in row form to save space, with a transpose

symbol at the end. For example, f = [ f x1 f y1 f x2 f y2 f x3 f y3 ]T and u = [ u x1 u y1 u x2 u y2 u x3 u y3 ]T .

§2.5. The Master Stiffness Equations The master stiffness equations relate the joint forces f of the complete structure to the joint displacements u of the complete structure before specification of support conditions. Because the assumed behavior of the truss is linear, these equations must be linear relations that connect the components of the two vectors. Furthermore it will be assumed that if all displacements vanish, so do the forces.3 If both assumptions hold the relation must be homogeneous and expressable in component form as      K x1x1 K x1y1 K x1x2 K x1y2 K x1x3 K x1y3 u x1 f x1  f y1   K y1x1 K y1y1 K y1x2 K y1y2 K y1x3 K y1y3   u y1        f x2   K x2x1 K x2y1 K x2x2 K x2y2 K x2x3 K x2y3   u x2  (2.2) =  .   f y2   K y2x1 K y2y1 K y2x2 K y2y2 K y2x3 K y2y3   u y2       f x3 K x3x1 K x3y1 K x3x2 K x3y2 K x3x3 K x3y3 u x3 f y3 K y3x1 K y3y1 K y3x2 K y3y2 K y3x3 K y3y3 u y3 In matrix notation: f = K u.
2

(2.3)

Primary unknowns is the correct mathematical term whereas degrees of freedom has a mechanics flavor: “any of a limited number of ways in which a body may move or in which a dynamic system may change” (Merrian-Webster). The term state variables is used more often in nonlinear analysis, material sciences and statistics. This assumption implies that the so-called initial strain effects, also known as prestress or initial stress effects, are neglected. Such effects are produced by actions such as temperature changes or lack-of-fit fabrication, and are studied in Chapter 29.

3

2–6

2–7

§2.7

BREAKDOWN

Here K is the master stiffness matrix, also called global stiffness matrix, assembled stiffness matrix, or overall stiffness matrix. It is a 6 × 6 square matrix that happens to be symmetric, although this attribute has not been emphasized in the written-out form (2.2). The entries of the stiffness matrix are often called stiffness coefficients and have a physical interpretation discussed below. The qualifiers (“master”, “global”, “assembled” and “overall”) convey the impression that there is another level of stiffness equations lurking underneath. And indeed there is a member level or element level, into which we plunge in the Breakdown section.
Remark 2.2. Interpretation of Stiffness Coefficients. The following interpretation of the entries of K is valuable

for visualization and checking. Choose a displacement vector u such that all components are zero except the i th one, which is one. Then f is simply the i th column of K. For instance if in (2.3) we choose u x2 as unit displacement, u = [0 0 1 0 0 0 ]T , f = [ K x1x2 K y1x2 K x2x2 K y2x2 K x3x2 K y3x2 ]T . (2.4)

Thus K y1x2 , say, represents the y-force at joint 1 that would arise on prescribing a unit x-displacement at joint 2, while all other displacements vanish. In structural mechanics this property is called interpretation of stiffness coefficients as displacement influence coefficients. It extends unchanged to the general finite element method.

§2.6. The DSM Steps The DSM steps, major and minor, are summarized in Figure 2.5 for the convenience of the reader. The two major processing steps are Breakdown, followed by Assembly & Solution. A postprocessing substep may follow, although this is not part of the DSM proper.

Breakdown
(Section 2.7)

  

Disconnection Localization Member (Element) Formation Globalization

Merge The first 3 DSM substeps are: (1) disconnection, Assembly & Application of BCs Solution (2) localization, and (3) computation of member Solution stiffness equations. Collectively these form (Secs 2.8, 3.2-3.4) Recovery of Derived Quantities the breakdown. The first two are flagged as conceptual in Figure 2.5 because they are not acpost-processing conceptual processing tually programmed as such: they are implicitly steps steps steps carried out through the user-provided problem definition. Processing actually begins at the Figure 2.5. The Direct Stiffness Method steps. member-stiffness-equation forming substep.

  

§2.7. Breakdown §2.7.1. Disconnection To carry out the first breakdown step we proceed to disconnect or disassemble the structure into its components, namely the three truss members. This task is illustrated in Figure 2.6. To each member e = 1, 2, 3 assign a Cartesian system {x e , y e }. Axis x e is aligned along the axis of the eth member. ¯ ¯ ¯ Actually x e runs along the member longitudinal axis; it is shown offset in that Figure for clarity. ¯ By convention the positive direction of x e runs from joint i to joint j, where i < j. The angle formed ¯ by x e and x is the orientation angle ϕ e . The axes origin is arbitrary and may be placed at the member ¯ midpoint or at one of the end joints for convenience. 2–7

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–8

(a) _ _ fxi , uxi
3
_ (3) _ (3)

_ _ fyi , uyi

_
y

_
x

_ _ fyj , uyj _ _ fxj , uxj j

i k s = EA / L

y

x

Equivalent spring stiffness

(3) y 1 x (1)
_

x (2)

_

(2)
y (2) x(1)
_

(b) −F

i

j F L d

y(1)

_

2

Figure 2.6. Breakdown of example truss into individual members (1), (2) and (3), and selection of local coordinate systems.

Figure 2.7. Generic truss member referred to its local coordinate system {x, y }: (a) idealization as bar element, ¯ ¯ (b) interpretation as equivalent spring.

Systems {x e , y e } are called local coordinate systems or member-attached coordinate systems. In the ¯ ¯ general finite element method they also receive the name element coordinate systems. §2.7.2. Localization Next we drop the member identifier e so that we are effectively dealing with a generic truss member, as illustrated in Figure 2.7(a). The local coordinate system is {x, y }. The two end joints are i and j. ¯ ¯ As shown in that figure, a generic truss member has four joint force components and four joint displacement components (the member degrees of freedom). The member properties are length L, elastic modulus E and cross-section area A. §2.7.3. Computation of Member Stiffness Equations The force and displacement components of the generic truss member shown in Figure 2.7(a) are linked by the member stiffness relations ¯ = K u, ¯ f which written out in full is ¯  ¯   K xi xi f xi ¯  f¯yi   K yi xi  ¯ = ¯ K fx j x j xi ¯y j f ¯ K
y j xi

(2.5)  ¯ K xi y j  u xi  ¯ ¯ yi y j   u yi  K  ¯ ¯ x jyj   ux j  . ¯ K uyj ¯ ¯ Kyjyj

¯ K xi yi ¯ K yi yi ¯ K x j yi ¯ K y j yi

¯ K xi x j ¯ K yi x j ¯ Kx jx j ¯ Kyjx j

(2.6)

¯ Vectors ¯ and u are called the member joint forces and member joint displacements, respectively, f ¯ whereas K is the member stiffness matrix or local stiffness matrix. When these relations are interpreted from the standpoint of the general FEM, “member” is replaced by “element” and “joint” by ”node.” ¯ There are several ways to construct the stiffness matrix K in terms of L, E and A. The most straightforward technique relies on the Mechanics of Materials approach covered in undergraduate 2–8

2–9

§2.8

ASSEMBLY: GLOBALIZATION

courses. Think of the truss member in Figure 2.7(a) as a linear spring of equivalent stiffness ks , an interpretation illustrated in Figure 2.7(b). If the member properties are uniform along its length, Mechanics of Materials bar theory tells us that4 ks = Consequently the force-displacement equation is F = ks d = EA d, L (2.8) EA , L (2.7)

where F is the internal axial force and d the relative axial displacement, which physically is the bar elongation. The axial force and elongation can be immediately expressed in terms of the joint forces and displacements as F = f¯x j = − f¯xi , d = u x j − u xi , ¯ ¯ (2.9) which express force equilibrium5 and kinematic compatibility, respectively. Combining (2.8) and (2.9) we obtain the matrix relation6   ¯  1 f xi EA  0  f¯yi  ¯= f  = −1 f¯x j L 0 f¯y j Hence  0 0 0 0 −1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0   0 u xi ¯ 0   u yi  ¯ ¯ ¯   = K u, 0 ux j ¯ 0 uyj ¯

(2.10)

1 EA  0 ¯ K=  −1 L 0

 −1 0 0 0 . 1 0 0 0

(2.11)

This is the truss stiffness matrix in local coordinates. Two other methods for obtaining the local force-displacement relation (2.8) are covered in Exercises 2.6 and 2.7. §2.8. Assembly: Globalization The first substep in the assembly & solution major step, as shown in Figure 2.5, is globalization. This operation is done member by member. It refers the member stiffness equations to the global system {x, y} so it can be merged into the master stiffness. Before entering into details we must establish relations that connect joint displacements and forces in the global and local coordinate systems. These are given in terms of transformation matrices.
4 5

See for example, Chapter 2 of [19]. Equations F = f¯x j = − f¯xi follow by considering the free body diagram (FBD) of each joint. For example, take joint i as a FBD. Equilibrium along x requires −F − f¯xi = 0 whence F = − f¯xi . Doing the same on joint j yields F = f¯x j . The matrix derivation of (2.10) is the subject of Exercise 2.3.

6

2–9

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–10

(a) Displacement transformation

uyj

_

uyj

uxj

_

(b) Force transformation uxj
_

_

fyj

fyj

_

fxj

y
uyi
_

_

x
_

_

j
ϕ

j
fyi
_

fxj

u yi

y

fyi
x

uxi

fxi

ϕ

i

uxi

i

fxi

Figure 2.8. The transformation of node displacement and force components from the local system {x, y } to the global system {x, y}. ¯ ¯

§2.8.1. Coordinate Transformations The necessary transformations are easily obtained by inspection of Figure 2.8. For the displacements u xi = u xi c + u yi s, ¯ u x j = u x j c + u y j s, ¯ u yi = −u xi s + u yi c, ¯ u y j = −u x j s + u y j c, ¯ . (2.12)

where c = cos ϕ, s = sin ϕ and ϕ is the angle formed by x and x, measured positive counterclockwise ¯ from x. The matrix form of this relation is      u xi ¯ c s 0 0 u xi ¯  u yi   −s c 0 0   u yi  (2.13)  = .  0 0 c s ux j ¯ ux j 0 0 −s c uyj ¯ uyj The 4 × 4 matrix that appears above is called a displacement transformation matrix and is denoted7 by T. The node forces transform as f xi = f¯xi c − f¯yi s, etc., which in matrix form become    f xi c  f yi   s  = 0 fx j 0 fyj −s c 0 0  0 0 0 0   c −s  s c  f¯xi f¯yi  . f¯x j  f¯y j

(2.14)

The 4 × 4 matrix that appears above is called a force transformation matrix. A comparison of (2.13) and (2.14) reveals that the force transformation matrix is the transpose TT of the displacement transformation matrix T. This relation is not accidental and can be proved to hold generally.8

7 8

This matrix will be called Td when its association with displacements is to be emphasized, as in Exercise 2.5. A simple proof that relies on the invariance of external work is given in Exercise 2.5. However this invariance was only checked by explicit computation for a truss member in Exercise 2.4. The general proof relies on the Principle of Virtual Work, which is discussed later.

2–10

2–11

§2.8

ASSEMBLY: GLOBALIZATION

Remark 2.3. Note that in (2.13) the local system (barred) quantities appear on the left-hand side, whereas in

(2.14) they show up on the right-hand side. The expressions (2.13) and and (2.14) are discrete counterparts of what are called covariant and contravariant transformations, respectively, in continuum mechanics. The continuum counterpart of the transposition relation is called adjointness. Colectively these relations, whether discrete or continuous, pertain to the subject of duality.
Remark 2.4. For this particular structural element T is square and orthogonal, that is, TT = T−1 . But this

property does not extend to more general elements. Furthermore in the general case T is not even a square matrix, and does not possess an ordinary inverse. However the congruent transformation relations (2.15)–(2.17) do hold generally.

§2.8.2. Transformation to Global System From now on we reintroduce the member (element) index, e. The member stiffness equations in global coordinates will be written (2.15) f e = K e ue . The compact form of (2.13) and (2.14) for the eth member is ¯ ue = Te ue ,
e f fe = (Te )T ¯ .

(2.16)

e e ¯ Inserting these matrix expressions into ¯ = K ue and comparing with (2.15) we find that the member f ¯e stiffness in the global system {x, y} can be computed from the member stiffness K in the local system {x, y } through the congruent transformation9 ¯ ¯

¯e Ke = (Te )T K Te . Carrying out the matrix multiplications in closed form (Exercise 2.8) we get c2 E A  sc Ke =  2 −c Le −sc
e e

(2.17)

sc s2 −sc −s 2

−c2 −sc c2 sc

 −sc −s 2  , sc s2

(2.18)

in which c = cos ϕ e , s = sin ϕ e , with e superscripts of c and s suppressed to reduce clutter. If the angle is zero we recover (2.10), as may be expected. Ke is called a member stiffness matrix in global coordinates. The proof of (2.17) and verification of (2.18) is left as Exercise 2.8. The globalized member stiffness matrices for the example truss can now be easily obtained by inserting appropriate values into (2.18). For member (1), with end joints 1–2, angle ϕ (1) = 0◦ and the member properties given in Figure 2.4(a) we get  f (1)   x1 1 (1)  f y1   0    f (1)  = 10  −1 x2 (1) 0 f y2
9

0 0 0 0

  u (1)  x1 −1 0  u (1)  0 0   y1  .  1 0  u (1)  x2 0 0 u (1) y2

(2.19)

Also known as congruential transformation and congruence transformation in linear algebra books.

2–11

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–12

For member (2), with end joints 2–3, and angle ϕ (2) = 90◦ :  f (2)   x2 0 (2)  f y2  0    f (2)  = 5  0 x3 (2) 0 f y3  f (3)   x1 0.5 (3)  f y1   0.5    f (3)  = 20  −0.5 x3 (3) −0.5 f y3   u (2)  x2 0 0 0  u (2)  1 0 −1   y2  .  0 0 0  u (2)  x3 −1 0 1 u (2) y3   u (3)  x1 0.5 −0.5 −0.5 (3) 0.5 −0.5 −0.5   u y1  .  −0.5 0.5 0.5  u (3)  x3 −0.5 0.5 0.5 u (3) y3

(2.20)

Finally, for member (3), with end joints 1–3, and angle ϕ (3) = 45◦ :

(2.21)

In the following Chapter we will complete the main DSM steps by putting the truss back together through the merge step, and solving for the unknown forces and displacements.
Notes and Bibliography The Direct Stiffness Method has been the dominant FEM version since the mid-1960s, and is the procedure followed by all major commercial codes in current use. The general DSM was developed at Boeing in the early 1950s, through the leadership of Jon Turner [254–257], and had defeated its main competitor, the Force Method, by 1970 [88]. All applications-oriented FEM books cover the DSM, although the procedural steps are sometimes not clearly delineated. In particular, the textbooks recommended in §1.7.6 offer adequate expositions. Trusses, also called bar assemblies, are usually the first structures treated in Mechanics of Materials books written for undergraduate courses in Aerospace, Civil and Mechanical Engineering. Two widely used books at this level are [19] and [200]. Steps in the derivation of stiffness matrices for truss elements are well covered in a number of early treatment of finite element books, of which Chapter 5 of Przemieniecki [204] is a good example. Force and displacement transformation matrices for structural analysis were introduced by G. Kron [152]. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

2–12

2–13
Homework Exercises for Chapter 2 The Direct Stiffness Method I

Exercises

EXERCISE 2.1 [D:10] Explain why arbitrarily oriented mechanical loads on an idealized pin-jointed truss

structure must be applied at the joints. [Hint: idealized truss members have no bending resistance.] How about actual trusses: can they take loads applied between joints?
EXERCISE 2.2 [A:15] Show that the sum of the entries of each row of the master stiffness matrix K of any

plane truss, before application of any support conditions, must be zero. [Hint: apply translational rigid body motions at nodes.] Does the property hold also for the columns of that matrix?
EXERCISE 2.3 [A:15] Using matrix algebra derive (2.10) from (2.8) and (2.9). Note: Place all equations in

matrix form first and eliminate d and F by matrix multiplication. Deriving the final form with scalar algebra and rewriting it in matrix form gets no credit.
EXERCISE 2.4 [A:15] By direct multiplication verify that for the truss member of Figure 2.7(a), ¯ u = F d. f ¯
T

Intepret this result physically. (Hint: what is a force times displacement in the direction of the force?)
EXERCISE 2.5 [A:20] The transformation equations between the 1-DOF spring and the 4-DOF generic truss

member may be written in compact matrix form as ¯ d = Td u, ¯ = F Tf , f (E2.1)

T f ¯ where Td is 1 × 4 and T f is 4 × 1. Starting from the identity ¯ u = F d proven in the previous exercise, and T using compact matrix notation, show that T f = Td . Or in words: the displacement transformation matrix and the force transformation matrix are the transpose of each other. (This can be extended to general systems)

EXERCISE 2.6 [A:20] Derive the equivalent spring formula F = (E A/L) d of (2.8) by the Theory of Elasticity

relations e = d u(x)/d x (strain-displacement equation), σ = Ee (Hooke’s law) and F = Aσ (axial force ¯ ¯ ¯ definition). Here e is the axial strain (independent of x) and σ the axial stress (also independent of x). Finally, ¯ ¯ u(x) denotes the axial displacement of the cross section at a distance x from node i, which is linearly interpolated ¯ ¯ ¯ as x ¯ x ¯ u(x) = u xi 1 − ¯ ¯ ¯ (E2.2) + ux j ¯ L L

Justify that (E2.2) is correct since the bar differential equilibrium equation: d[A(dσ/d x)]/d x = 0, is verified ¯ ¯ for all x if A is constant along the bar. ¯
EXERCISE 2.7 [A:20] Derive the equivalent spring formula F = (E A/L) d of (2.8) by the principle of

Minimum Potential Energy (MPE). In Mechanics of Materials it is shown that the total potential energy of the axially loaded bar is
L

=

1 2 0

A σ e d x − Fd, ¯

(E2.3)

where symbols have the same meaning as the previous Exercise. Use the displacement interpolation (E2.2), the strain-displacement equation e = d u/d x and Hooke’s law σ = Ee to express as a function (d) of the ¯ ¯ relative displacement d only. Then apply MPE by requiring that ∂ /∂d = 0. ¯ ¯ K u = ¯ by an appropriate matrix). Then check by hand that using that formula you get (2.18). Falk’s scheme f is recommended for the multiplications.10
e e e 10

¯ ¯ EXERCISE 2.8 [A:20] Derive (2.17) from K ue = ¯ , (2.15) and (2.17). (Hint: premultiply both sides of f
e e

This scheme is useful to do matrix multiplication by hand. It is explained in §B.3.2 of Appendix B.

2–13

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–14

EXERCISE 2.9 [D:5] Why are disconnection and localization labeled as “conceptual steps” in Figure 2.5? EXERCISE 2.10 [C:20] (Requires thinking) Notice that the expression (2.18) of the globalized bar stiffness matrix may be factored as

c2 E A  sc Ke =  −c2 Le −sc
e e

sc s2 −sc −s 2

−c2 −sc c2 sc

−sc −c −s 2   −s  E e Ae = [ −c sc   c  L e s s2

−s

c

s]

(E2.4)

Interpret this relation physically as a chain of global-to-local-to-global matrix operations: global displacements → axial strain, axial strain → axial force, and axial force → global node forces.

2–14

Introduction to FEM

The Direct Stiffness Method Part I

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

The Direct Stiffness Method (DSM)
Importance: DSM is used by all major commercial FEM codes A democratic method, works the same no matter what the element:

Bar (truss member) element, 2 nodes, 4 DOFs

Tricubic brick element, 64 nodes, 192 DOFs

Obvious decision: use the truss to teach the DSM

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Model Based Simulation
(a simplification of diagrams of Chapter 1)

IDEALIZATION

DISCRETIZATION

SOLUTION

Physical system

Mathematical model

FEM

Discrete model

Discrete solution

Solution error Discretization + solution error Modeling + discretization + solution error
VERIFICATION & VALIDATION

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Idealization Process
Physical System
member support joint

IDEALIZATION

;; ;; ;;

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 4

;; ;; ;;

Introduction to FEM

DSM: Breakdown Steps
FEM model:

;; ;;
Remove loads & supports: Disassemble:

;; ;;
battens longerons diagonals longerons

Localize: Generic element:

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

DSM: Assembly & Solution Steps
Form elements: Globalize:
battens longerons diagonals longerons

Merge:

Apply loads and supports:

; ;
Solve for joint displacements:

; ;
IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 6

; ;

; ;

Introduction to FEM

The Direct Stiffness Method (DSM) Steps Starting with: Idealization Breakdown (Chapter 2)

  Disconnection 
Localization Member (Element) Formation

Assembly & Solution (Chapter 3)

  

Globalization Merge Application of BCs Solution Recovery of Derived Quantities

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

A Physical Plane Truss

member support joint

Too complicated to do by hand. We will use a simpler one to illustrate DSM steps

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

The Example Truss: Physical Model (Loads not shown)

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

The Example Truss - FEM Model: Nodes, Elements and DOFs
fy3, u y3
3 L E A
(3)

fx3, u x3

(3) (3)

√ = 10 2 √ = 200 2 (3) (2)

L = 10 E (2) A (2) = 50

(2)

y fx1, u x1
1

x
L
(1)

(1)

fx2, u x2
2

fy1, u y1

= 10 (1) (1) E A = 100

fy2, u y2

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

The Example Truss - FEM Model BCs: Applied Loads and Supports Saved for Last
f y3 = 1
3

f x3 = 2

y

;; ;; ;;

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 11

;; ;; ;;

1

x

2

Introduction to FEM

Master (Global) Stiffness Equations
    f=   
Linear structure:    f x1 K x1x1  f y1   K y1x1     f  K  x2  =  x2x1  f  K  y2   y2x1  f  K x3 x3x1 f y3 K y3x1

 f x1 f y1   f x2   f y2   f x3  f y3 K x1y1 K y1y1 K x2y1 K y2y1 K x3y1 K y3y1

 u x1  u y1    u  u =  x2  u   y2  u  x3 u y3  K x1x2 K y1x2 K x2x2 K y2x2 K x3x2 K y3x2 K x1y2 K y1y2 K x2y2 K y2y2 K x3y2 K y3y2 K x1x3 K y1x3 K x2x3 K y2x3 K x3x3 K y3x3   K x1y3 u x1 K y1y3   u y1    K x2y3   u x2    u  K y2y3   y2  K x3y3   u x3  K y3y3 u y3

Nodal forces

Master stiffness matrix
or

f = Ku

Nodal displacements

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Member (Element) Stiffness Equations
¯ = Ku ¯ f
¯  f¯   K xi xi xi ¯  f¯yi   K yi xi   ¯ = ¯ fx j K x j xi f¯y j ¯ K
y j xi

_

¯ K xi yi ¯ K yi yi ¯ K x j yi ¯ K y j yi

¯ K xi x j ¯ K yi x j ¯ Kx jx j ¯ Kyjx j

 ¯ K xi y j  u xi  ¯ ¯ K yi y j   u yi   ¯  ¯ ¯ Kx jyj  ux j uyj ¯ ¯ Kyjyj

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

First Two Breakdown Steps: Disconnection and Localization
3

y (3)

_

x (3) (3)
_

_

x(2) (2) y(2) x(1)
_

_

y 1 x

y(1) (1) 2

_

These steps are conceptual (not actually programmed)

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

The 2-Node Truss (Bar) Element
_ _ fyi , uyi _ _ fxi , uxi
i (e)

_
y

_
x j

_ _ fyj , uyj _ _ fxj , uxj ks = EA / L Equivalent spring stiffness

−F
L d

F

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Truss (Bar) Element Formulation by Mechanics of Materials (MoM)
F = ks d = EA d, L F = f¯x j = − f¯xi , ¯ d = u x j − u xi ¯

 1  f¯  xi EA  0  f¯yi  =   ¯  −1 fx j L 0 f¯y j
from which

Exercise 2.3 0 −1 0   u xi  ¯ 0 0 0   u yi  Element stiffness ¯   equations in local 0 1 0 ux j ¯ coordinates 0 0 0 uyj ¯
0 0 0 0 −1 0 1 0 0 0  0 0

 1 EA  0 K=  −1 L 0

Element stiffness matrix in local coordinates

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Where We Are So Far in the DSM

  Disconnection Breakdown (Chapter 2)  Localization

we are done with this ...

Member (Element) Formation

we finish Chapter 2 with

Assembly & Solution (Chapter 3)

  

Globalization Merge Application of BCs Solution Recovery of Derived Quantities

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Globalization: Displacement Transformation
uyj
_

uyj

uxj

_

y y
uyi
_

_

x
_

_

j
ϕ

uxj

u yi

uxi uxi

x

i Node displacements transform as
u xi = u xi c + u yi s, ¯ u x j = u x j c + u y j s, ¯

u yi = −u xi s + u yi cγ ¯ u y j = −u x j s + u y j cγ ¯

in which

c = cos ϕ

s = sin ϕ

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Displacement Transformation (cont'd)
In matrix form uxi _ u yi _ uxj _ uyj
_

c −s = 0 0

s c 0 0

0 0 c −s

0 0 s c

uxi uyi uxj uyj Note: global on RHS, local on LHS

or

u

_e

=

Te u e

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Globalization: Force Transformation
_

fyj

fyj

_

fxj

y

_

j
fyi
_

fxj

fyi

fxi

ϕ

x

i

fxi
_

Node forces transform as f xi c −s 0 s c 0 f yi = 0 0 c fx j 0 0 s fyj or

0 0 −s c

f_xi f_yi f_x j fyj

Note: global on LHS, local on RHS

f

e

= (T ) f

_ e T e

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 20

Introduction to FEM

Globalization: Congruential Transformation of Element Stiffness Matrices
K ue = f

¯

¯

e

¯

e

u e = T e ue

f e = ( T e) T f e

¯

Exercise 2.8

K e = ( T e )T K T e  c2  sc  2 −c −sc sc s2 −sc −s 2 −c2 −sc c2 sc −sc  −s 2   sc s2

¯

e

E e Ae Ke = Le

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 21

Introduction to FEM

The Example Truss - FEM Model (Recalled for Convenience)
fy3, u y3
3 L E A
(3)

fx3, u x3

(3) (3)

√ = 10 2 √ = 200 2 (3) (2)

L = 10 E (2) A (2) = 50

(2)

y fx1, u x1
1

x
L
(1)

(1)

fx2, u x2
2

fy1, u y1

= 10 E (1) A(1) = 100

fy2, u y2

Insert the geometric & physical properties of this model into the globalized member stiffness equations

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 22

Introduction to FEM

We Obtain the Globalized Element Stiffness Equations of the Example Truss
 f (1)   1 0 −1 0   u (1)  x1 x1 (1)  f y1   (1)    = 10  0 0 0 0   u y1     f (1)  −1 0 1 0  u (1)  x2 x2 (1) (1) 0 0 0 0 f y2 u y2  f (2)   0 0 0 0   u (2)  x2 x2 In the next class (2)  (2)   u y2  f y2 we will put these  = 5  0 1 0 −1       (2)    f (2)  to good use 0 0 0 0 u x3 x3 (2) 0 −1 0 1 f y3 u (2) y3  (3)   f (3)   0.5 0.5 −0.5 −0.5  u x1 x1 (3) (3)  f y1  0.5 −0.5 −0.5   u y1   0.5     (3)   f (3)  = 20  −0.5 −0.5 0.5 0.5  u x3  x3 (3) −0.5 −0.5 0.5 0.5 f y3 u (3) y3

IFEM Ch 2 – Slide 23

2–15
Homework Exercises for Chapter 2 The Direct Stiffness Method I — Solutions

Solutions to Exercises

EXERCISE 2.1 Loads applied between truss joints will generally have components acting transversely to the

member axis. Transversal components cause bending, which by hypothesis cannot be resisted by the members of an idealized truss. (Members of actual trusses do have finite bending resistance but it is better not to call upon this property in the design process, except to resist own weight.)
EXERCISE 2.2 Take as node displacements u xi = u yi = 1 for i = 1, 2, . . . N , where N is the number of truss

joints (nodes). Each force component in f = Ku is then a K row sum. This force must vanish because those displacements are associated with a translational rigid body motion: {u x = 1, u y = 1} of the free-free truss structure.11 Answering for the example truss or a single element is OK.

Since K is symmetric, the same conclusion applies to columns.
EXERCISE 2.3 Start from (2.9), which is reproduced here:

F = f¯x j = − f¯xi ,

d = u x j − u xi , ¯ ¯

(E2.5)

in which F and d are connected by (2.8), namely F = (E A/L)d. Express the foregoing two equations in matrix form bringing up also the y nodal displacements by introducing zeros as appropriate in the vectors: ¯  f¯        −1 −1 u xi ¯ xi EA  0 ¯  f¯yi   0   ux j  ¯ ¯ (E2.6)  f¯  =  1  F =  1  d, d = u x j − u xi = [ −1 0 1 0 ]  u  . ¯xj L xj 0 0 uyj ¯ f¯y j and combine theses two as matrix product:  f¯    −1 xi  f¯yi  E A  0   f¯  =  1  [ −1 0 1 L xj 0 f¯y j u xi ¯ 1 ¯  ux j  E A  0 = 0]  −1 ux j  ¯ L 0 uyj ¯

0 0 0 0

−1 0 1 0

0 u xi ¯ 0   ux j  ¯ , ¯ 0   ux j  0 uyj ¯



(E2.7)

which is equation (2.10). This “Mechanics of Materials” matrix-flavored technique is used in Chapter 5 to derive other structural elements.
EXERCISE 2.4

¯ T u = f¯xi u xi + f¯yi u yi + f¯x j u x j + f¯y j u y j = F(u x j − u xi ) = Fd. f ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
T

(E2.8)

This equation expresses the invariance of external energy in two different bases.
EXERCISE 2.5 If ¯ = FT f = T f F, transposing both sides gives ¯ = FTT . Then f f f

¯T u = FTT u, f ¯ f ¯
T

¯ Fd = FTd u.

(E2.9)

Imposing energy invariance ¯ u = Fd, checked in the last exercise, we equate the right hand sides of the two f ¯ previous expressions: ¯ FTT u = FTd u. (E2.10) f ¯ ¯ Because F and u are arbitrary we must have TT = Td , f or
T T f = Td .

(E2.11)

11

Recall that the master stiffness equations of a plane truss relates node forces and displacements of a structure with all supports removed. Such “floating structure” may experience rigid body motions in the {x, y} plane.

2–15

Chapter 2: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD I

2–16

EXERCISE 2.6 The bar equilibrium equation is satisfied by a constant Aσ . Because A is constant, so are

the axial stress σ and axial strain e = σ/E = d u/d x. Therefore the displacement u must vary linearly in x, ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ and the interpolation (E2.2) is correct. Differentiating it gives e = (u x j − u xi )/L = d/L, which combined with σ = Ee = Ed/L and F = Aσ = E Ad/L = ks d yields ks = E A/L. [This argument may be reversed: assume (E2.2) is correct; it gives constant strain e and constant stress σ = Ee; thus it satisfies the bar equations identically.] ¯ ¯ EXERCISE 2.7 From (E2.2) one gets e = d u/d x = (u x j − u xi )/L = d/L. Hooke’s law gives σ = Ee = Ed/L. Both e and σ do not depend on x. Substitution into (E2.3) gives ¯
L

(d) = Applying the MPE yields

1 2 0

EA 2 EA 2 d d x − Fd = ¯ d 2 L 2L 2

L

d x − Fd = ¯
0

EA 2 d − Fd. 2L

(E2.12)

∂ EA = d − F = 0, ∂d L

(E2.13)

whence F = (E A/L) d follows.
e ¯e ¯ EXERCISE 2.8 Premultiply both sides of K ue = ¯ by (Te )T : f e ¯e¯ (Te )T ¯ = (Te )T K ue . f

(E2.14)

e ¯ f Using the transformation equations in (2.16), namely ue = Te ue and f e = (Te )T ¯ , the preceding equation becomes def ¯e f e = [(Te )T K Te ] ue = Ke ue . (E2.15)

Identifying Ke with the triple matrix product in brackets yields (2.17). For the truss member the transformation matrices are (2.13) and (2.14). The triple product involved in the congruent transformation may be conveniently carried out through Falk’s scheme (Appendix B):

1 E e Ae  0  −1 Le 0

  

0 0 0 0 −s c 0 0

−1 0 1 0 0 0 c s

0 0 0 0 0 0 −s  c

 

c  −s  0 0

s c 0 0 s 0 −s 0 sc s2 −sc −s 2

0 0 c −s −c 0 c 0 −c2 −sc c2 sc

0 0 s c

= Te

c s 0 0

 

c  0  −c 0

−s 0 s 0


× E e Ae ¯e = K Te e L (E2.16)

c2  sc  −c2 −sc

−sc E e Ae −s 2  e  × e =K , sc L s2

which agrees with (2.18).
EXERCISE 2.9 Those steps are not part in the computer implementation of FEM. They exist only in the

analyst’s mind.

2–16

.

The Direct Stiffness Method II

3

3–1

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§3.1. §3.2.

§3.3.

§3.4.

§3.5.

§3.6.

§3. §3. §3. §3.

The Remaining DSM Steps Assembly: Merge §3.2.1. Governing Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . §3.2.2. Hand Assembly by Augmentation and Merge . . Solution §3.3.1. Applying Displacement BCs by Reduction . . . . §3.3.2. Solving for Displacements . . . . . . . . PostProcessing §3.4.1. Recovery of Reaction Forces . . . . . . . . §3.4.2. Recovery of Internal Forces and Stresses . . . . §3.4.3. *Reaction Recovery: General Case . . . . . . *Computer Oriented Assembly and Solution §3.5.1. *Assembly by Freedom Pointers . . . . . . §3.5.2. *Applying DBC by Modification . . . . . . . Prescribed Nonzero Displacements §3.6.1. Application of Nonzero-DBCs by Reduction . . §3.6.2. *Application of Nonzero-DBCs by Modification . . §3.6.3. *Matrix Forms of Nonzero-DBC Application Methods Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solutions to Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3–3 3–3 3–3 3–4 3–6 3–6 3–7 3–7 3–7 3–8 3–9 3–9 3–10 3–10 3–11 3–11 3–12 3–13 3–14 3–14 3–16 3–18

3–2

3–3 §3.1. The Remaining DSM Steps

§3.2

ASSEMBLY: MERGE

Chapter 2 covered the initial stages of the DSM. The three breakdown steps: disconnection, localization and formation of member stiffness take us down all the way to the generic truss element: the highest level of fragmentation. This is followed by the assembly process. Assembly involves merging the stiffness equations of each member into the global stiffness equations. For this to make sense, the member equations must be referred to a common coordinate system, which for a plane truss is the global Cartesian system {x, y}. This is done through the globalization process covered in §2.8. On the computer the formation, globalization and merge steps are done concurrently, member by member. After all members are processed we have the free-free master stiffness equations. Next comes the solution. This process embodies two substeps: application of boundary conditions and solution for the unknown joint displacements. To apply the BCs, the free-free master stiffness equations are modified by taking into account which components of the joint displacements and forces are given and which are unknown. The modified equations are submitted to a linear equation solver, which returns the unknown joint (node) displacements. As discussed under Notes and Bibliography, on some FEM implementations — especially programs written in the 1960s and 1970s — one or more of the foregoing operations are done concurrently. The solution step completes the DSM proper. Postprocessing steps may follow, in which derived quantities such as internal forces and stresses are recovered from the displacement solution. §3.2. Assembly: Merge §3.2.1. Governing Rules The key operation of the assembly process is the “placement” of the contribution of each member to the master stiffness equations. The process is technically called merge of individual members. The merge operation can be physically interpreted as reconnecting that member in the process of fabricating the complete structure. For a truss structure, reconnection means inserting the pins back into the joints. See Figure 3.1. Merge logic is mathematically governed by two rules of structural mechanics:
(3) y 1 x (1) 2 (2) 3

Figure 3.1. The disconnected example truss prior to merge. All member stiffness equations are in the global system. Reconnecting the truss means putting the pins back into the joints.

1. 2.

Compatibility of displacements: The displacement of all members meeting at a joint are the same. Force equilibrium: The sum of forces exerted by all members that meet at a joint balances the external force applied to that joint. (3.1)

3–3

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–4

(a)
− f(3) 3

3
− f(2) 3

f3

(b)
f(3) 3

3
f(2) 3

(3)

(2)

Figure 3.2. The force equilibrium of joint 3 of the example truss, depicted as a free body diagram in (a). Here f3 is the known external joint force applied on the joint. Joint forces f(2) and f(3) are applied by the joint on the members, as illustrated in (b). Consequently 3 3 the forces applied by the members on the joint are −f(2) and −f(3) . These forces would 3 3 act in the directions shown in (a) if both members (2) and (3) were in tension. The free-body equilibrium statement is f3 − f(2) − f(3) = 0 or f3 = f(2) + f(3) . This translates 3 3 3 3 (2) (3) (2) (3) into the two component equations: f x3 = f x3 + f x3 and f y3 = f y3 + f y3 , of (3.2).

The first rule is physically obvious: reconnected joints must move as one entity. The second one can be visualized by considering a joint as a free body, although care is required in the interpretation of joint forces and their signs. Notational conventions to this effect are explained in Figure 3.2 for joint 3 of the example truss, at which members (2) and (3) meet. Application of the foregoing rules at this particular joint gives Rule 1: Rule 2: u (2) = u (3) , x3 x3 u (2) = u (3) . y3 y3

(2) (3) (1) (2) (3) f y3 = f y3 + f y3 = f y3 + f y3 + f y3 . (3.2) (1) (2) (3) (1) (2) (3) The addition of f x3 to f x3 + f x3 and of and f y3 to f y3 + f y3 , respectively, changes nothing because member (1) is not connected to joint 3. We are just adding zeros. But this augmentation enables us to write the key matrix relation:

(2) (3) (1) (2) (3) f x3 = f x3 + f x3 = f x3 + f x3 + f x3 ,

f = f(1) + f(2) + f(3) . §3.2.2. Hand Assembly by Augmentation and Merge

(3.3)

To directly visualize how the two rules (3.1) translate to merging logic, we first augment the member stiffness relations by adding zero rows and columns as appropriate to complete the force and displacement vectors. For member (1):         
(1)  f x1  10 (1)  f y1   0 (1) f x2   −10   (1)  =  f y2   0   (1) 0 f x3  0 (1) f y3

0 0 0 0 0 0

−10 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3–4

 u (1) x1 0  (1)  0   u y1    (1)  0   u x2   . 0   u (1)  y2  (1)   0 u  x3 0 u (1) y3 

(3.4)

3–5 For member (2):          For member (3):         
(3)  f x1  10 (3)  f y1   10 (3) f x2   0   (3)  =  f y2   0   (3) −10 f x3  −10 (3) f y3 (2)  f x1  0 (2)  f y1   0 (2) f x2   0   (2)  =  f y2   0   (2) 0 f x3  0 (2) f y3

§3.2  (2)   u x1 0  (2)  0   u y1    (2)  0   u x2   . −5   u (2)  y2   0  u (2)  x3 5 (2) u y3

ASSEMBLY: MERGE

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 5 0 −5

0 0 0 0 0 0

(3.5)

10 10 0 0 −10 −10

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

−10 −10 0 0 10 10

 (3)   u x1 −10  (3)  −10   u y1    (3)  0   u x2   . 0   u (3)  y2   10  u (3)  x3 10 u (3) y3

(3.6)

According to the first rule, we can drop the member identifier in the displacement vectors that appear in the foregoing matrix equations. Hence the reconnected member equations are  (1)  f x1    10 0 −10 0 0 0 u x1 (1)   f y1 0 0 0 0 0   u y1    0     f (1)    x2   −10 0 10 0 0 0   u x2  (3.7) ,   (1)  =  0 0 0 0 0   u y2   f y2   0  (1)     u x3 0 0 0 0 0 0 f  x3 u y3 0 0 0 0 0 0 (1) f y3  (2)  f x1    0 0 0 0 0 0 u x1 (2)   f y1   0 0 0 0 0 0   u y1      f (2)    x2   0 0 0 0 0 0   u x2  (3.8) ,   (2)  =   f y2   0 0 0 5 0 −5   u y2   (2)     u x3 0 0 0 0 0 0 f  x3 u y3 0 0 0 −5 0 5 (2) f y3  (3)  f x1    10 10 0 0 −10 −10 u x1 (3)   f y1 10 0 0 −10 −10   u y1    10     f (3)   0 0 0 0 0   u x2   x2   0 (3.9) .   (3)  =  0 0 0 0 0   u y2   f y2   0  (3)     u x3 −10 −10 0 0 10 10 f  x3 u y3 −10 −10 0 0 10 10 (3) f y3 These three equations can be represented in direct matrix notation as f(1) = K(1) u, f(2) = K(2) u, 3–5 f(3) = K(3) u. (3.10)

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–6

According to the second rule, expressed in matrix form as (3.3), we have f = f(1) + f(2) + f(3) = K(1) + K(2) + K(3) u = K u, (3.11)

so all we have to do is add the three stiffness matrices that appear above, and we arrive at the master stiffness equations:          f x1 20 f y1   10   f x2   −10 = f y2   0   f x3 −10 f y3 −10 10 10 0 0 −10 −10 −10 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 −5 −10 −10 0 0 10 10   −10 u x1 −10   u y1    0   u x2   . −5   u y2    u x3 10 u y3 15

(3.12)

Using this technique member merging becomes simply matrix addition. This explanation of the assembly process is conceptually the easiest to follow and understand. It is virtually foolproof for hand computations. However, this is not the way the process is carried out on the computer because it would be enormously wasteful of storage for large systems. A computer-oriented procedure is discussed in §3.5. §3.3. Solution Having formed the master stiffness equations we can proceed to the solution phase. To prepare the equations for a linear solver we need to separate known and unknown components of f and u. In this Section a technique suitable for hand computation is described. §3.3.1. Applying Displacement BCs by Reduction If one attempts to solve the system (3.12) numerically for the displacements, surprise! The solution “blows up” because the coefficient matrix (the master stiffness matrix) is singular. The mathematical interpretation of this behavior is that rows and columns of K are linear combinations of each other (see Remark 3.1 below). The physical interpretation of singularity is that there are unsuppressed rigid body motions: the truss still “floats” in the {x, y} plane. To eliminate rigid body motions and render the system nonsingular we must apply the physical support conditions as displacement boundary conditions. From Figure 2.4(b) we observe that the support conditions for the example truss are u x1 = u y1 = u y2 = 0, whereas the known applied forces are f x2 = 0, f x3 = 2, f y3 = 1. (3.14) (3.13)

When solving the overall stiffness equations by hand, the simplest way to account for support conditions is to remove equations associated with known joint displacements from the master system. To apply (3.13) we have to remove equations 1, 2 and 4. This can be systematically 3–6

3–7

§3.4

POSTPROCESSING

accomplished by deleting or “striking out” rows and columns number 1, 2 and 4 from K and the corresponding components from f and u. The reduced three-equation system is 10 0 0 0 10 10 0 10 15 u x2 u x3 u y3 = f x2 f x3 f y3 = 0 2 . 1 (3.15)

Equation (3.15) is called the reduced master stiffness system. The coefficient matrix of this system is no longer singular.
r = 3 and a rank deficiency of d = N − r = 6 − 3 = 3 (these concepts are summarized in Appendix C.) The dimension of the null space of K is d = 3. This space is spanned by three independent rigid body motions: the two rigid translations along x and y and the rigid rotation about z.
Remark 3.2. Conditions (3.13) represent the simplest type of support conditions, namely specified zero displacements. More general constraint forms, such as prescribed nonzero displacements and multifreedom constraints, are handled as described in §3.6 and Chapters 8–9, respectively. Remark 3.1. In mathematical terms, the free-free master stiffness matrix K in (3.12) has order N = 6, rank

§3.3.2. Solving for Displacements Solving the reduced system by hand (for example, via Gauss elimination) yields u x2 u x3 u y3 = 0 0.4 . −0.2 (3.16)

This is called a partial displacement solution (also reduced displacement solution) because it excludes known displacement components. This solution vector is expanded to six components by including the three specified values (3.13) in the appropiate slots:    u x1 0  u y1   0      u   0  u =  x2  =  .  u y2   0      0.4 u x3 −0.2 u y3  This is the complete displacement solution, or simply the displacement solution. §3.4. PostProcessing The last processing step of the DSM is the solution for joint displacements. But often the analyst needs information on other mechanical quantities; for example the reaction forces at the supports, or the internal member forces. Such quantities are said to be derived because they are recovered from the displacement solution. The recovery of derived quantities is part of the so-called postprocessing steps of the DSM. Two such steps are described below. 3–7

(3.17)

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–8

§3.4.1. Recovery of Reaction Forces Premultiplying the complete displacement solution (3.17) by K we get      20 10 −10 0 −10 −10 0 −2 10 0 0 −10 −10   0   −2   10      0 10 0 0 0 0   0  −10 f = Ku =  (3.18)  =  0 0 5 0 −5   0   1   0      0.4 2 −10 −10 0 0 10 10 −0.2 1 −10 −10 0 −5 10 15 This vector recovers the known applied forces (3.14) as can be expected. Furthermore we get three reaction forces: f x1 = f y1 = −2 and f y2 = 1 that are associated with the support conditions (3.13). It is easy to check that the complete force system is in self equilibrium for the free-free structure; this is the topic of Exercise 3.1. For a deeper look at reaction recovery, study §3.4.3. §3.4.2. Recovery of Internal Forces and Stresses Often the structural engineer is not so much interested in displacements as in internal forces and stresses. These are in fact the most important quantities for preliminary structural design. In pinjointed trusses the only internal forces are the axial member forces. For the example truss these forces, denoted by F (1) , F (2) and F (3) , are depicted in Figure 3.3. The average axial stress σ e is obtained on dividing F e by the cross-sectional area of the member. 3 The axial force F e in member e can be obtained as follows. Extract the displacements of member e from the complete displacement solution u to form ue . Then F (3) ¯ recover local joint displacements from ue = Te ue . F (2) Compute the member elongation d e (relative axial displacement) and recover the axial force from the equivalent spring constitutive relation: E e Ae e ¯x ¯ xi Fe = d . (3.19) d e = ue j − ue , Le ¯y Note that u e and u e j are not needed in computing d e . ¯ yi

1

F (1)

2

Figure 3.3. Internal forces for the example truss are the member axial forces F (1) , F (2) and F (3) . Force arrow directions shown pertain to tension.

the global displacements of the member from (3.17): u(2) = [ u x2 u y2 u x3 u y3 ]T = [ 0 0 0.4 −0.2 ]T . ¯ Convert to local displacements using u(2) = T(2) u(2) :

Example 3.1. Recover F (2) in example truss. Member (2) goes from node 2 to node 3 and ϕ (2) = 90◦ . Extract

u x2 ¯ cos 90◦ sin 90◦ 0 0 u x2 0 ¯ 0 0   u y2   −1  u y2   − sin 90◦ cos 90◦ = u  =  ¯ x3 0 0 cos 90◦ sin 90◦   u x3   0 u y3 ¯ 0 0 − sin 90◦ cos 90◦ u y3 0 ¯ ¯ The member elongation is d (2) = u x3 − u x2 compressive axial force.

0 0 0 0 0   0  = . 1   0.4   −0.2  0 −0.2 −0.4 (3.20) = −0.2 − 0 = −0.2, whence F (2) = (50/10) × (−0.2) = −1, a



1 0 0 0

0 0 0 −1



strain, σ e = E e ee as (average) axial stress, and F e = Ae σ e as the axial force. This is more in tune with the Theory of Elasticity viewpoint discussed in Exercise 2.6.

Remark 3.3. An alternative interpretation of (3.19) is to regard ee = d e /L e as the (average) member axial

3–8

3–9

§3.5 *COMPUTER ORIENTED ASSEMBLY AND SOLUTION

§3.4.3. *Reaction Recovery: General Case Node forces at supports recovered from f = Ku, where u is the complete displacement solution, were called reactions in §3.4.1. Although the statement is correct for the example truss, it oversimplifies the general case. To cover it, consider f as the superposition of applied and reaction forces: K u = f = fa + fr. (3.21)

Here f a collects applied forces, which are known before solving, whereas f r collects unknown reaction forces to be recovered in post-processing. Entries of f r that are not constrained are set to zero. For the example truss,  f  0  f   −2   0   −2  x1 x1  f y1   0   f y1   −2   0   −2   0   0   0  upon recovery  0  0  0  upon assembly           ⇒ f= ⇒ f=  f y2  =  0  +  f y2   1  =  0  +  1  . (3.22)             2 0 2 2 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 a r There is a clean separation in (3.22). Every nonzero entry in f comes from either f or f . This allows us to r r r interpret f x1 = f x1 , f y1 = f y1 and f y2 = f y2 as reactions. If nonzero applied forces act directly on supported freedoms, however, a reinterpretation is in order. This often occurs when distributed loads such as pressure or own weight are lumped to the nodes. The adjustment can be more easily understood by following the simple example illustrated in Figure 3.4.

;; ;;

;;

(a) E, A constant
L

(b)
x
1 qL/4 1
L/2

q (uniform)

2 qL/2

2

3 qL/4

(c) qL 1 qL/4

2 qL/2

3 qL/4

L/2

Figure 3.4. A simple problem to illustrate reaction recovery of support reactions when nonzero applied loads act on supports. (a) bar under distributed load; (b) two-element FEM idealization; (c) free body diagram showing applied node forces in blue and support reaction in red.

The fixed-free prismatic bar pictured in Figure 3.4(a) is subjected to a uniformly line load q per unit length. The bar has length L, elastic modulus E and cross-section area A. It is discretized by two equal-size elements as shown in Figure 3.4(b). The three x node displacements u 1 = u x1 , u 2 = u x2 and u 3 = u x3 are taken as degrees of freedom. The line load is converted to node forces f 1a = 1 q L, f 2a = 1 q L and f 3a = 1 q L at 4 2 4 nodes 1, 2 and 3, respectively, using the EbE method discussed in Chapter 7. The master stiffness equations configured as per (3.21) are 1 −1 0 u1 fr 1 qL 1 (3.23) u2 = f = f a + f r = −1 2 −1 2 + 0 . 4 u3 0 0 −1 1 1 Applying the displacement BC u 1 = 0 and solving gives u 2 = 3q L/(8E A) and u 3 = q L/(2E A). Force recovery yields 2E A L −3 −q L q L −3 qL 1 . (3.24) 2 , fr = f − fa = 2 − 2 = 0 4 4 1 1 1 0 The fixed-end reaction emerges as f 1r = −q L, the correctness of which may be verified on examining the FBD of Figure 3.4(c). Note that taking f 1 = −3q L/4 as reaction would be in error by 25%. This general recovery procedure should always be followed when reaction values are used in the design of structural supports. f = Ku = qL 4

3–9

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–10

§3.5.

*Computer Oriented Assembly and Solution

§3.5.1. *Assembly by Freedom Pointers The practical computer implementation of the DSM assembly process departs significantly from the “augment and add” technique described in §3.2.2. There are two major differences: (I) Member stiffness matrices are not expanded. Their entries are directly merged into those of K through the use of a “freedom pointer array” called the Element Freedom Table or EFT.

(II) The master stiffness matrix K is stored using a special format that takes advantage of symmetry and sparseness. Difference (II) is a more advanced topic that is deferred to the last part of the book. For simplicity we shall assume here that K is stored as a full square matrix, and study only (I). For the example truss the freedom-pointer technique expresses the entries of K as the sum
3

K pq =
e=1

K iej

for i = 1, . . . 4, j = 1, . . . 4, p = EFTe (i), q = EFTe ( j).

(3.25)

denote the entries of the 4 × 4 globalized member stiffness matrices in (2.19) through (2.21). Entries Here K pq that do not get any contributions from the right hand side remain zero. EFTe denotes the Element Freedom Table for member e. For the example truss these tables are K iej EFT(1) = {1, 2, 3, 4}, EFT(2) = {3, 4, 5, 6}, EFT(3) = {1, 2, 5, 6}. (3.26)

Physically these tables map local freedom indices to global ones. For example, freedom number 3 of member (2) is u x3 , which is number 5 in the master equations; consequently EFT(2) (3) = 5. Note that (3.25) involves three nested loops: over e (outermost), over i, and over j. The ordering of the last two is irrelevant. Advantage may be taken of the symmetry of Ke and K to roughly halve the number of additions. Exercise 3.5 follows the scheme (3.25) by hand. The assembly process for general structures using this technique is studied in Chapter 25. §3.5.2. *Applying DBC by Modification In §3.3.1 the support conditions (3.13) were applied by reducing (3.12) to (3.15). Reduction is convenient for hand computations because it cuts down on the number of equations to solve. But it has a serious flaw for computer implementation: the equations must be rearranged. It was previously noted that on the computer the number of equations is not the only important consideration. Rearrangement can be as or more expensive than solving the equations, particularly if the coefficient matrix is stored in sparse form or on secondary storage.1 To apply support conditions without rearranging the equations we clear (set to zero) rows and columns corresponding to prescribed zero displacements as well as the corresponding force components, and place ones on the diagonal to maintain non-singularity. The resulting system is called the modified set of master stiffness equations. For the example truss this approach yields

1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0  0 0 10 0  0 0 0 1 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 10 10

0 u x1 0 0   u y1   0  0   u x2   0    =  , 0   u y2   0      u x3 10 2 u y3 15 1



 

(3.27)

1

On most modern computers, reading a floating-point number from memory at a random address takes 100 to 1000 times as long as performing a floating-point arithmetic operation on numbers that are already in registers.

3–10

3–11

§3.6

PRESCRIBED NONZERO DISPLACEMENTS

in which rows and columns for equations 1, 2 and 4 have been cleared. Solving this modified system produces the complete displacement solution (3.17) directly.
Remark 3.4. In a “smart” stiffness equation solver the modified system need not be explicitly constructed by

storing zeros and ones. It is sufficient to mark the equations that correspond to displacement BCs. The solver is then programmed to skip those equations. However, if one is using a standard solver from, say, a library of scientific routines or a commercial program such as Matlab or Mathematica, such intelligence cannot be expected, and the modified system must be set up explicitly. fy3 = 1

§3.6. Prescribed Nonzero Displacements The support conditions considered in the example truss resulted in the specification of zero displacement components; for example u y2 = 0. There are cases, however, where the known value is nonzero. This happens, for example, in the study of settlement of foundations of ground structures such as buildings and bridges, and in the analysis of motion-driven machinery components. Mathematically these are called non-homogenous boundary conditions. The treatment of this generalization of the FEM equations is studied in the following subsections.

3

fx3 = 2

u y1 = −0.5 going down

u y2 = +0.4 going up

;; ;;
1
u y2 = 0.4

ux1 = 0 no horizontal motion

Figure 3.5. The example truss with prescribed nonzero vertical displacements at joints 1 and 2.

§3.6.1. Application of Nonzero-DBCs by Reduction We describe first a matrix reduction technique, analogous to that used in §3.3.1, which is suitable for hand computations. Recall the master stiffness equations (3.12) for the example truss:      20 10 −10 0 −10 −10 u x1 f x1 10 0 0 −10 −10   u y1   f y1   10      −10 0 10 0 0 0   u x2   f x2   (3.28)   =  0 0 5 0 −5   u y2   f y2   0      −10 −10 0 0 10 10 u x3 f x3 −10 −10 0 −5 10 15 u y3 f y3 Suppose that the applied forces are again (3.14) but the prescribed displacements change to u x1 = 0, u y1 = −0.5, (3.29)

This means that joint 1 goes down vertically whereas joint 2 goes up vertically, as depicted in Figure 3.5. Inserting the known data into (3.28) we get      20 10 −10 0 −10 −10 0 f x1 10 0 0 −10 −10   −0.5   f y1   10      0 10 0 0 0   u x2   0   −10 (3.30) =     0 0 5 0 −5   0.4   f y2   0      −10 −10 0 0 10 10 2 u x3 u y3 −10 −10 0 −5 10 15 1 3–11

;; ;;

2

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–12

The first, second and fourth rows of (3.30) are removed, leaving only   0  −0.5  −10 0 10 0 0 0    u  −10 −10 0 0 10 10  x2  =  0.4  −10 −10 0 −5 10 15   u x3 u y3

0 2 1

(3.31)

Columns 1, 2 and 4 are removed by transferring all known terms from the left to the right hand side: 0 −3 . −2 (3.32) These are the reduced stiffness equations. Note that its coefficient matrix of (3.32) is exactly the same as in the reduced system (3.15) for prescribed zero displacements. The right hand side, however, is different. It consists of the applied joint forces modified by the effect of known nonzero displacements. These are called the modified node forces or effective node forces. Solving the reduced system yields 0 u x2 (3.33) u x3 = −0.5 . u y3 0.2 10 0 0 10 0 10 0 10 15 u x2 u x3 u y3 = − = Filling the missing entries with the known values (3.29) yields the complete displacement solution (listed as row vector to save space): u = [0 −0.5 0 0.4 −0.5 0.2 ]T . (3.34) 0 2 1 (−10) × 0 + 0 × (−0.5) + 0 × 0.4 (−10) × 0 + (−10) × (−0.5) + 0 × 0.4 (−10) × 0 + (−10) × (−0.5) + (−5) × 0.4

Taking the solution (3.34) and going through the postprocessing steps discussed in §3.4, we can find that reaction forces and internal member forces do not change. This is a consequence of the fact that the example truss is statically determinate. The force systems (internal and external) in such structures are insensitive to movements such as foundation settlements.
§3.6.2. *Application of Nonzero-DBCs by Modification The computer-oriented modification approach follows the same idea outlined in §3.5.2. As there, the main objective is to avoid rearranging the master stiffness equations. To understand the process it is useful to think of being done in two stages. First equations 1, 2 and 4 are modified so that they become trivial equations, as illustrated for the example truss and the displacement boundary conditions (3.29):

1  0  −10   0  −10 −10

0 0 1 0 0 10 0 0 −10 0 −10 0

0 0 0 u x1 0 0 0 0   u x2   −0.5  0 0 0   u x2   0    =   1 0 0   u y2   0.4      u x3 0 10 10 2 u y3 −5 10 15 1




(3.35)

The solution of this system recovers (3.30) by construction (for example, the fourth equation is simply 1×u y2 = 0.4). In the next stage, columns 1, 2 and 4 of the coefficient matrix are cleared by transferring all known terms

3–12

3–13

§3.6 PRESCRIBED NONZERO DISPLACEMENTS

to the right hand side, following the same procedure explained in (3.33). We thus arrive at

1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0  0 0 10 0  0 0 0 1 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 10 10

0 u x1 0 0   u x2   −0.5  0   u x2   0    =   0   u y2   0.4      u x3 10 −3 u y3 15 −2




(3.36)

As before, these are called the modified master stiffness equations. Note that (3.36) retains the original number and order as well as matrix symmetry. Solving this system yields the complete displacement solution (3.34). If all prescribed displacements are zero, forces on the right hand side are not modified, and one would get (3.27) as may be expected.
Remark 3.5. The modification is not actually programmed as discussed above. First the applied forces

in the right-hand side are modified for the effect of nonzero prescribed displacements, and the prescribed displacements stored in the reaction-force slots. This is called the force modification step. Second, rows and columns of the stiffness matrix are cleared as appropriate and ones stored in the diagonal positions. This is called the stiffness modification step. It is essential that the procedural steps be executed in the indicated order, because stiffness terms must be used to modify forces before they are zeroed out. §3.6.3. *Matrix Forms of Nonzero-DBC Application Methods The reduction and modification techniques for applying DBCs can be presented in compact matrix form. First, the free-free master stiffness equations Ku = f are partitioned as follows: K11 K21 K12 K22 u1 u2 = f1 . f2 (3.37)

In this matrix equation, subvectors u2 and f1 collect displacement and force components, respectively, that are known, given or prescribed. Subvectors u1 and f2 collect force and displacement components, respectively, that are unknown. Forces in f2 represent reactions on supports; consequently f2 is called the reaction vector. On transferring the known terms to the right hand side the first matrix equation becomes K11 u1 = f1 − K12 u2 . (3.38)

This is the reduced master equation system. If the support B.C.s are homogeneous (that is, all prescribed displacements are zero), u2 = 0, and we do not need to change the right-hand side: K11 u1 = f1 . Examples that illustrate (3.38) and (3.39) are (3.32) and (3.27), respectively. The computer-oriented modification technique retains the same joint displacement vector as in (3.38) through the following rearrangement: K11 0 u1 f − K12 u2 = 1 . (3.40) u2 u2 0 I This modified system is simply the reduced equation (3.38) augmented by the trivial equation Iu2 = u2 . This system is often denoted as Ku = ˆ f. (3.41) Solving (3.41) yields the complete displacement solution including the specified displacements u2 . (3.39)

3–13

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–14

For the computer implementation it is important to note that the partitioned form (3.37) is only used to allow use of compact matrix notation. In actual programming the equations are not explicitly rearranged: they retain their original numbers. For instance, in the example truss u1 = u x1 u y1 u y2 ≡ DOF #1 DOF #2 DOF #4 , u2 = u x2 u x3 u y3 ≡ DOF #3 DOF #5 DOF #6 . (3.42)

The example shows that u1 and u2 are generally interspersed throughout u. Thus, matrix operations such as K12 u2 involve indirect (pointer) addressing so as to avoid explicit array rearrangement. Notes and Bibliography The coverage of the assembly and solution steps of the DSM, along with globalization and application of BCs, is not uniform across the wide spectrum of FEM books. Authors have introduced “quirks” although the overall concepts are not affected. The most common variations arise in two contexts: (1) Some treatments apply support conditions during merge, explicitly eliminating known displacement freedoms as the elements are processed and merged into K. The output of the assembly process is what is called here a reduced stiffness matrix.2 In the frontal solution method of Irons [146,147], assembly and solution are done concurrently. More precisely, as elements are formed and merged, displacement boundary conditions are applied, and Gauss elimination and reduction of the right hand side starts once the assembler senses (by tracking an “element wavefront”) that no more elements contribute to a certain node.

(2)

Both variants appeared in FEM programs written during the 1960s and 1970s. They were motivated by computer resource limitations of the time: memory was scarce and computing time expensive.3 On the negative side, interweaving leads to unmodular programming (which easily becomes “spaghetti code” in lowlevel languages such as Fortran). Since a frontal solver has to access the element library, which is typically the largest component of a general-purpose FEM program, it has to know how to pass and receive information about each element. A minor change deep down the element library can propagate and break the solver. Squeezing storage and CPU savings on present computers is of less significance. Modularity, which simplifies scripting in higher order languages such as Matlab is desirable because it increases “plug-in” operational flexibility, allows the use of built-in solvers, and reduces the chance for errors. These priority changes reflect economic reality: human time is nowadays far more expensive than computer time. A side benefit of modular assembly-solution separation is that often the master stiffness must be used in a different way than just solving Ku = f; for example in dynamics, vibration or stability analysis. Or as input to a model reduction process. In those cases the solution stage can wait. Both the hand-oriented and computer-oriented application of boundary conditions have been presented here, although the latter is still considered an advanced topic. While hand computations become unfeasible beyond fairly trivial models, they are important from a instructional standpoint. The augment-and-add procedure for hand assembly of the master stiffness matrix is due to H. Martin [170]. The general-case recovery of reactions, as described in §3.4.3, is not covered in any FEM textbook.
2 3

For the example truss, the coefficient matrix in (3.15) is a reduced stiffness whereas that in (3.27) is a modified one. As an illustration, the first computer used by the writer, the “classical mainframe” IBM 7094, had a magnetic-core memory of 32,768 36-bit words (≈ 0.2 MB), and was as fast as an IBM PC of the mid 1980s. One mainframe, with the processing power of a cell phone, served the whole Berkeley campus. Ph.D. students were allocated 2 CPU hours per semester. Getting a moderately complex FE model through involved heavy use of slower secondary storage such as disk or tape in batch jobs.

3–14

3–15
References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

§3.

References

3–15

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–16

Homework Exercises for Chapter 3 The Direct Stiffness Method II
EXERCISE 3.1 [A:15] Draw a free body diagram of the nodal forces (3.18) acting on the free-free truss structure, and verify that this force system satisfies translational and rotational (moment) equilibrium. EXERCISE 3.2 [A:15] Using the method presented in §3.4.2 compute the axial forces in the three members √ of the example truss. Partial answer: F (3) = 2 2. EXERCISE 3.3 [A:20] Describe an alternative method that recovers the axial member forces of the example truss from consideration of joint equilibrium, without going through the computation of member deformations. Can this method be extended to arbitrary trusses? EXERCISE 3.4 [A:20] Suppose that the third support condition in (3.13) is u x2 = 0 instead of u y2 = 0. Rederive the reduced system (3.15) for this case. Verify that this system cannot be solved for the joint displacements u y2 , u x3 and u y3 because the reduced stiffness matrix is singular.4 Offer a physical interpretation of this failure. EXERCISE 3.5 [N:20] Construct by hand the free-free master stiffness matrix of (3.12) using the freedom-

pointer technique (3.25). Note: start from K initialized to the null matrix, then cycle over e = 1, 2, 3.

f y2 = 0
u y2

2
E, A(1)

u x2

f x2 = P

(1)

H

y x

(2)

E, A(2)

;;
1
(a) (b) (c) (d)
4

S/2

S/2

S

Figure E3.1. Truss structure for Exercises 3.6 and 3.7.

;;
3

S = 8, height H = 3, elastic modulus E = 1000, cross section areas A(1) = 2 and A(2) = 4, and horizontal crown force P = f x2 = 12. Using the DSM carry out the following steps:

EXERCISE 3.6 [N:25] Consider the two-member arch-truss structure shown in Figure E3.1. Take span

Assemble the master stiffness equations. Any method: augment-and-add, or the more advanced “freedom pointer” technique explained in §3.5.1, is acceptable. Apply the displacement BCs and solve the reduced system for the crown displacements u x2 and u y2 . Partial result: u x2 = 9/512 = 0.01758. Recover the node forces at all joints including reactions. Verify that overall force equilibrium (x forces, y forces, and moments about any point) is satisfied. Recover the axial forces in the two members. Result should be F (1) = −F (2) = 15/2.

A matrix is singular if its determinant is zero; cf. §C.2 of Appendix C for a “refresher” in that topic.

3–16

3–17
EXERCISE 3.7 [N:20] Resolve items (a) through (c) —

Exercises

omitting (d) — of the problem of Exercise 3.6 if the vertical right support “sinks” so that the displacement u y3 is now prescribed to be −0.5. Everything else is the same. Use the matrix reduction scheme of §3.6.1 to apply the displacement BCs. Consider the truss problem defined in Figure E3.2. All geometric and material properties: L, α, E and A, as well as the applied forces P and H , are to be kept as variables. This truss has 8 degrees of freedom, with six of them removable by the fixed-displacement conditions at nodes 2, 3 and 4. Unlike previous examples, this structure is statically indeterminate as long as α = 0. (a) Show that the master stiffness equations are
EXERCISE 3.8 [A/C:25]

    EA   L    

2cs 2

0 1 + 2c3

−cs 2 c2 s cs 2

c2 s −c3 −c2 s c3

0 0 0 −1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

; ; ; ; ; ;
x 2 L
(1)

y

3 α
(2)

4 α
(3)

E and A same for all three bars 1 P
Figure E3.2. Truss structure for Exercise 3.8.

H

−cs 2 −c2 s 0 0 0 0 cs 2

symm

−c2 s u x1 H 3 −c   u y1   −P  0   u x2   0      0   u y2   0    =  , 0   u x3   0      0   u y3   0  u   0  c2 s x4 u y4 c3 0



(E3.1)

in which c = cos α and s = sin α. Explain from physics why the 5th row and column contain only zeros. (b) (c) (d) Apply the BCs and show the 2-equation modified stiffness system. Solve for the displacements u x1 and u y1 . Check that the solution makes physical sense for the limit cases α → 0 and α → π/2. Why does u x1 “blow up” if H = 0 and α → 0? Recover the axial forces in the three members. Partial answer: F (3) = −H/(2s) + Pc2 /(1 + 2c3 ). Why do F (1) and F (3) “blow up” if H = 0 and α → 0?

3–17

Introduction to FEM

The Direct Stiffness Method Part II

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 1

Introduction to FE

The Direct Stiffness Method (DSM) Steps
(repeated here for convenience)

  

Breakdown

Disconnection Localization Member (Element) Formation Globalization Merge Application of BCs Solution Recovery of Derived Quantities processing steps post-processing steps

Assembly & Solution

  

conceptual steps

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Rules That Govern Assembly
1. Compatibility: The joint displacements of all members meeting at a joint must be the same 2. Equilibrium: The sum of forces exerted by all members that meet at a joint must balance the external force applied to that joint.

To apply these rules in assembly by hand, it is convenient to expand or augment the element stiffness equations as shown for the example truss on the next slide.

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Expanded Element Stiffness Equations of Example Truss
                          
(3) f x1 (3) f y1 (3) f x2 (3) f y2 (3) f x3 (3) f y3 (1)   f x1 10 (1) f y1   0   (1)  f x2   −10  (1)  = f y2   0    0 (1)  f x3 0 f (1) (2)   f x1 0 (2) f y1   0   (2)  f x2   0  (2)  = f y2   0   0 (2) f x3  0 f (2) y3

y3

10   10       0 =   0   −10  −10

  u(1)  x1 0 −10 0 0 0 (1)   u y1  0 0 0 0 0    u(1)  0 10 0 0 0   x2    0 0 0 0 0   u(1)    y2  0 0 0 0 0   u(1)  x3 0 0 0 0 0 u (1) y3  (2)   u x1 0 0 0 0 0  u(2)  0 0 0 0 0   y1    0 0 0 0 0   u (2)    x2  0 0 5 0 −5   u(2)    y2  0 0 0 0 0   u(2)  x3 0 0 −5 0 5 u (2) y3   u (3)  x1 10 0 0 −10 −10 (3)   u y1  10 0 0 −10 −10      u (3)  0 0 0 0 0   x2    0 0 0 0 0   u(3)    y2  −10 0 0 10 10   u(3)  x3 −10 0 0 10 10 u (3)
y3

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 4

                          
(3) f x1 (3) f y1 (3) f x2 (3) f y2 (3) f x3 (3) f y3

(1)   f x1 10 (1) f y1   0   (1)  f x2   −10  (1)  = f y2   0    0 (1) f x3  0 f (1) (2)   f x1 0 (2) f y1   0   (2) f x2   0   (2)  =  f y2   0   (2) 0 f x3  0 f (2) y3

y3

10   10       0 =   0   −10  −10

u  x1 0 −10 0 0 0  u y1  0 0 0 0 0     u x2  0 10 0 0 0   u  0 0 0 0 0   y2    0 0 0 0 0u  x3 0 0 0 0 0 u y3 u  x1 0 0 0 0 0  u y1  0 0 0 0 0     0 0 0 0 0   u x2    0 0 5 0 −5   u y2    0 0 0 0 0 u  x3 0 0 −5 0 5 u y3 u x1 10 0 0 −10 −10   u y1 10 0 0 −10 −10    0 0 0 0 0   u x2  0 0 0 0 0   u y2  −10 0 0 10 10   u x3 −10 0 0 10 10 u
y3

Reconnecting Members by Enforcing Compatibility Rule

Introduction to FEM

To apply compatibility, drop the member index from the nodal displacements

f (1) = K(1) u f (2) = K (2) u
        

f (3) = K (3) u

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Next, Apply Equilibrium Rule
3

(3) f3

f3 − f3
(2)

3
(3) f3 (2) f3

(3)

(2) Be careful with + directions of internal forces!

Applying this to all joints (see Notes):

f = f (1) + f + f (3)

(2)

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Forming the Master Stiffness Equations through Equilibrium Rule f = f (1) + f + f = (K + K + K ) u = K u
(3) (1) (2) (2) (3)

       

  20 f x1 f y1   10   f x2   −10 = f y2   0   f x3   −10 −10 f y3

10 10 0 0 −10 −10

−10 0 0 0 10 0 0 5 0 0 0 −5

−10 −10 0 0 10 10

  u x1 −10 −10   u y1      u x2  0   −5   u y2      u x3  10 15 u y3

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Applying Support and Loading Boundary Conditions to Example Truss
1 Recall:
3

2 Displacement BCs:
u x1 = u y1 = u y2 = 0

Force BCs:
f x2 = 0, f x3 = 2, f y3 = 1

;; ;;

;; ;;
IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 8

1

2

Introduction to FEM

Where Do Boundary Conditions Go?
u x1 = u y1 = u y2 = 0
Recall

f x2 = 0, 0 0 0 5 0 −5 −10 −10 0 0 10 10

f x3 = 2, 

f y3 = 1          =       f x1 f y1 f x2 f y2 f x3 f y3        

20  10   −10   0   −10 −10

10 −10 10 0 0 10 0 0 −10 0 −10 0

u x1 −10 −10   u y1  0   u x2  −5   u y2  10   u x3 15 u y3

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Reduced Master Stiffness Equations for Hand Computation
Strike out rows and columns pertaining to known displacements:
 10  0 0       u x2 0 0 f x2 0 10 10   u x3  =  f x3  =  2  10 15 1 u y3 f y3

or

^ ^ ^ K u = f

Reduced stiffness equations

Solve by Gauss elimination for unknown node displacements

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Solve for Unknown Node Displacements and Complete the Displacement Vector
   u x2 0  u x3  =  0.4  −0.2 u y3 

0  0     0   u=   0     0.4  −0.2

Expand with known displacement BCs 

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Recovery of Node Forces Including Reactions
20  10   −10 f = Ku =  0   −10 −10  10 10 0 0 −10 −10 −10 0 0 0 10 0 0 5 0 0 0 −5 −10 −10 0 0 10 10
1

  0 −10 −10   0    0  0     0  = −5    10   0.4  −0.2 15
2

 −2  −2     0     1     2  1 

3

Reaction Forces

;; ;; ;; ;;
1 2
IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Recovery of Internal Forces (Axial Forces in Truss Members)
3

For each member (element) e = (1), (2), (3) 1. extract u e from u

F (3) F
1

(2)

2. transform to local (element) displacements _e e e

u = T u

F (1)

2

3. compute elongation d e = u x j − u xi ¯e ¯e 4. compute axial force Fe

direction of arrows is for +F e (tension)

E eA e e = d Le

See Example 3.1 of Notes for a detailed calculation

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Computer Oriented Assembly and Solution in Actual FEM Codes (delayed until Part III of course)
K stored in special sparse format (for example "skyline format") Assembly done by "freedom pointers" (Sec 3.5.1) Equations for supports are not physically deleted (Sec 3.5.2) Next slide explains this for the example truss

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 14

Computer Oriented Modification of Master Stiffness Equations (delayed until Part III of course)
Recall
u x1 = u y1 = u y2 = 0 f x2 = 0,  20  10   −10   0   −10 −10 10 −10 10 0 0 10 0 0 −10 0 −10 0 f x3 = 2, 0 0 0 5 0 −5 −10 −10 0 0 10 10 f y3 = 1

Introduction to FEM

(freedoms 1, 2, 4)

    f x1 −10 0  f y1  −10   0       0    u x2  0       0  =  f y2  −5       2    u x3  10 15 u y3 1

zero out rows and columns 1, 2 and 4 store 1's on diagonal

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Computer Oriented Modification of Master Stiffness Equations (delayed until Part III of course)

1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0  0 0 10 0  0 0 0 1 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 10 10

0   u x1   0  0   u y1   0  0   u x2   0    =   0   u y2   0      u x3 10 2 u y3 15 1
same u as in original equations

Modified master stiffness equations

^ ^ K u= f

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Prescribed Nonzero Displacements in Example Truss
fy3 = 1 3 fx3 = 2

; ;

1

ux1 = 0 no horizontal motion

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 17

; ;

u y1 = −0.5 going down

2

u y2 = +0.4 going up

Introduction to FEM

Prescribed NZ Displacements (cont'd)
Recall the master stiffness equations
 20  10   −10   0   −10 −10 10 10 0 0 −10 −10 −10 0 0 0 10 0 0 5 0 0 0 −5 −10 −10 0 0 10 10    u x1 −10 −10   u y1        u x2   0  = −5   u y2        u x3   10 15 u y3  f x1 f y1   f x2   f y2   f x3  f y3

The displacement B.Cs are now

u x1 = 0,

u y1 = −0.5,

u y2 = 0.4

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Prescribed NZ Displacements (cont'd)
 20 10  10 10   −10 0   0 0   −10 −10 −10 −10 −10 0 0 0 10 0 0 5 0 0 0 −5 −10 −10 0 0 10 10    0 −10 −10   −0.5        u x2   0      0.4  =  −5       u x3   10 15 u y3  f x1 f y1   0   f y2   2  1

Remove rows 1,2,4 but (for now) keep columns   0   −0.5      0 −10 0 10 0 0 0   u x2      −10 −10 0 0 10 10    0.4  = 2  1 −10 −10 0 −5 10 15   u x3  u y3

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Prescribed NZ Displacements (cont'd)
Transfer effect of known displacements to RHS, and delete columns:

    10 0 0 u x2 0  0 10 10   u x3  =  2  − 0 10 15 1 u y3     (−10) × 0 + 0 × (−0.5) + 0 × 0.4 0  (−10) × 0 + (−10) × (−0.5) + 0 × 0.4  =  −3  (−10) × 0 + (−10) × (−0.5) + (−5) × 0.4 −2
Solving gives

   u x2 0  u x3  =  −0.5  u y3 0.2 

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 20

Introduction to FEM

Prescribed NZ Displacements (cont'd)
   u x2 0  u x3  =  −0.5  0.2 u y3 
Complete the displacement vector with known values   0  −0.5     0   u=  0.4     −0.5  0.2

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 21

Introduction to FEM

Prescribed NZ Displacements (cont'd)

Recovery of reaction forces and internal member forces proceeds as before

In summary, the only changes to the DSM is in the application of displacement boundary conditions before solve

IFEM Ch 3 – Slide 22

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–18

Homework Exercises for Chapter 3 The Direct Stiffness Method II – Solutions
EXERCISE 3.1 The complete set of joint forces acting on

f y2 = 1
3

f x3 = 2

the free-free structure, calculated in (3.18), is shown in Figure E3.3. Here is the verification of overall equilibrium. f x ⇒ f x1 + f x2 + f x3 = −2 + 0 + 2 = 0, f y ⇒ f y1 + f y2 + f y3 = −2 + 1 + 1 = 0, Mwr t2 ⇒ f y1 L (1) + f x3 L (2) = −2 × 10 + 2 × 10 = 0. (E3.2) Note: A theorem of classical mechanics says that if a 2D force system is in translational equilibrium and its moment respect to a point is zero, the moment with respect to any other point vanishes. Therefore it is sufficient to verify moment equilibrium respect to just one point, here take to be node 2 for convenience. F (3) = 2 2 (tension).
f x1 = −2
1

2

f x2 = 0 f y2 = −1

f y1 = −2

Figure E3.3. Joint forces on free-free example truss. Forces f x1 , f y1 and f y2 are reactions; the others are applied loads.

EXERCISE 3.2 The computations are very simple, and yield F (1) = 0, F (2) = −1 (compression) and √ EXERCISE 3.3 For the example truss, joint forces may be also recovered from consideration of joint equi-

librium, because the structure is statically determinate. Once the joint displacements (3.17) are known, the joint forces in the local system of member e and the internal (axial) force f e may be recovered from the generic-member equilibrium relation  f¯e    −1 xi e e  f¯yi   0  e ¯ e e ¯ e e e ¯ = e = ¯ f =K u =K T u . (E3.3) f f¯x j 1 0 f¯yej Carrying out the operations for the example truss we get      √  0 1 −2 2 0 ¯(2)  0  , ¯(3)  ¯(1)  0  f = f =  √ , (E3.4) f =  , 0 −1  2 2 0 0 0 √ from which it follows that the member axial forces F (1) , F (2) and F (3) are 0, −1 (compression) and +2 2 (tension), respectively. See Figure E3.3 for physical interpretation. This method is applicable only to statically determinate structures.
EXERCISE 3.4 The reduced system is obtained by deleting the first three equations in (3.12):

5 0 −5

0 10 10

−5 10 15

u y2 u x3 u y3

=

0 2 1

The coefficient matrix of this system is singular because the second row is the sum of the first and third rows. Because of this property, the system cannot be solved for the displacements. Physical interpretation: the support conditions u x1 = u y1 = u x2 = 0 are not sufficient to prevent an (infinitesimal) rigid body rotation about joint 1.

3–18

3–19

Solutions to Exercises

EXERCISE 3.5 Begin by clearing all entries of the 6 × 6 matrix K to zero, so that we effectively start with

the null matrix

0 0 0 0 0 0 K= 0 0 
0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 . 0  0 0

(E3.5)

Merge member 1 (e = 1), for which EFT(1) = {1, 2, 3, 4}. On completing the loops over i and j, we will have

 10  0  −10 K=  0 
0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

−10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0  . 0 0 0 0  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(E3.6)

Note that this is precisely the augmented member stiffness in (3.4). In fact (E3.6) may be viewed as the master stiffness matrix of a 3-node truss that consists of member 1 only. Next we merge member 2 (e = 2), for which EFT(2) = {3, 4, 5, 6}. On completion of the i, j loops we will have

 10  0  −10 K=  0 
0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

−10 0 10 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 −5 0

0 0 0 . −5   0 5

(E3.7)

This is the matrix that would result on adding the expanded matrices in (3.4) and (3.5), and may be interpreted as the master stiffness matrix of a structure that consists of members 1 and 2 only. Finally, upon merging member 3, for which EFT(3) = {1, 2, 5, 6}, we get

 20  10  −10 K=  0 
−10 −10

10 10 0 0 −10 −10

−10 0 0 0 10 0 0 5 0 0 0 −5

−10 −10 0 0 10 10

−10 −10  0 . −5   10 15

(E3.8)

This is the complete free-free master stiffness (3.12).
EXERCISE 3.6

(a)

Recall that the generic member stiffness matrix in global coordinates is c2 e e E A  sc Ke =  −c2 Le −sc

sc s2 −sc −s 2

−c2 −sc c2 sc

−sc −s 2  sc  s2


(E3.9)

where c = cos ϕ e , s = sin ϕ e , E e , Ae and L e are the elastic modulus, cross-section area and length, √ respectively. For member (element) (1): E (1) = 1000, A(1) = 2, L (1) = 42 + 32 = 5, ϕ (1) =

3–19

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–20

arctan (3/4), c = 4/5 = 0.8, s = 3/5 = 0.6. Therefore K(1) 0.64 0.48 1000 × 2  0.48 0.36 =  −0.64 −0.48 5 −0.48 −0.36

−0.64 −0.48 0.64 0.48

−0.48 256 −0.36   192 = 0.48   −256 0.36 −192

192 144 −192 −144

−256 −192 256 192

For member (element) (2): E (2) = 1000, A(2) = 4, L (2) = c = 4/5 = 0.8, s = −3/5 = −0.6. Therefore 0.64 −0.48 1000 × 4  −0.48 0.36 =  −0.64 0.48 5 0.48 −0.36

42 + (−3)2 = 5, ϕ (2)

−192 −144  192  144 (E3.10) = arctan (−3/4),

384 −288  K(2) −384  288 (E3.11) Next the member stiffness equations are augmented by adding zero rows and columns as appropriate to complete the force and displacement vectors. Compatibility is used to drop the member index on the displacements. For member (1):

−0.64 0.48 0.64 −0.48

0.48 512 −0.36   −384 = −0.48   −512 0.36 384

−384 288 384 −288

−512 384 512 −384

   f (1)   256 192 −256 −192 0 0 u x1 x1 (1) 144 −192 −144 0 0   u y1   f y1   192    (1)   −256 −192 256 192 0 0   u x2   f x2       (1)  =  144 0 0   u y2   f y2   −192 −144 192    (1)   f x3 0 0 0 0 0 0   u x3 
(1) f y3

(E3.12)

0

0

0

0

0

0

u y3

For member (2):

 f (2)   0 x1 (2) f y1   0   (2)   0  f x2    (2)  =   f y2   0  (2)   0 f
(2) f y3 x3

0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 512 −384 −512 384

0 0 −384 288 384 −288

0 0 −512 384 512 −384

0 u x1 0   u y1    384   u x2    −288   u y2    −384   u x3  288 u y3



(E3.13)

Adding the two equations and using the force equilibrium condition f = f(1) +f(2) = (K(1) +K(2) )u = Ku, we arrive at the master stiffness equations

 f   256 u  192 −256 −192 0 0 x1 x1 144 −192 −144 0 0   u y1   f y1   192  f x2   −256 −192 768 −192 −512 384   u x2   =    f y2   −192 −144 −192 432 384 −288   u y2      
f x3 f y3 0 0 0 0 −512 384 384 −288 512 −384 −384 288 u x3 u y3 whence

(E3.14)

 256  192 −256 −192 0 0 144 −192 −144 0 0   192  −256 −192 768 −192 −512 384   K=  −192 −144 −192 432 384 −288   
0 0 0 0 −512 384 384 −288 512 −384 −384 288

(E3.15)

3–20

3–21

Solutions to Exercises

The master equations can also be derived using the freedom pointer technique described in §3.5.1, which is the way assembly is actually programmed. For this structure the Element Freedom Tables are EFT(1) = {1, 2, 3, 4} and EFT(2) = {3, 4, 5, 6}. These tables may be used to obtain the same entries of the master stiffness matrix. For hand computations this technique is more prone to error. (b) We apply the displacement boundary conditions: u x1 = u y1 = u x3 = u y3 = 0, f x2 = P = 12, and f y2 = 0, (E3.16)

by removing equations 1, 2, 5, and 6 from the system. This is done by deleting rows and columns 1, 2, 5, and 6 from K, and the corresponding components from f and u. The reduced two-equation system is 768 −192 −192 432 u x2 u y2 = f x2 f y2 = 12 0 (E3.17)

Solving this linear system by any method gives u x2 = (c) 9 512 and u y2 = 1 . 128 (E3.18)

To recover all the joint forces note that the complete displacement vector is u = [ 0 0 9/512 1/128 0 0 ]T . Using the original master stiffness equations (E3.14):

−6 9/2 (E3.19) Overall equilibrium is verified by summing the forces in the {x, y} directions and taking z-moments about any joint: f x3 f y3 0 0 0 0 384 −288 512 −384 0 0 f x ⇒ f x1 + f x2 + f x3 = −6 + 12 − 6 = 0, 9 9 f y ⇒ f y1 + f y2 + f y3 = − + 0 + = 0, 2 2 Mwr t1 ⇒ 4 f y2 − 3 f x2 + 8 f y3 = 0 − 36 + 36 = 0, Mwr t2 ⇒ − 3 f x1 + 4 f y1 − 3 f x3 + 4 f y3 = −18 + 18 − 18 + 18 = 0, Mwr t3 ⇒ 8 f y1 − 4 f y2 − 3 f x2 = 36 − 0 − 36 = 0. (d) Using the method described in §3.4.2 we proceed as follows. For member (1), c = 4/5, s = 3/5, u(1) = [ 0 0 9/512 1/128 ]T . The local joint displacements are recovered by

f   256   0   −6  192 −256 −192 0 0 x1 144 −192 −144 0 0   0   −9/2   f y1   192  f x2   −256 −192 768 −192 −512 384   9/512   12     = . f=  f y2  = Ku =  −192 −144 −192 432 384 −288   1/128   0        
−512 384 −384 288

(E3.20)

 u (1) 
u(1) = 

xi u (1) yi u (1) xj u (1) yj

4/5   −3/5 = 0 0

3/5 4/5 0 0

0 0 4/5 −3/5

0 0 0 0  0   0  = 3/5   9/512   3/160  4/5 1/128 −11/2560




(E3.21)

The elongation is d (1) = 3/160 − 0 = 3/160, from which F (1) = 1000 × 2 × (3/160)/5 = 15/2 = 7.5. The positive sign indicates that member (1) is in tension.

3–21

Chapter 3: THE DIRECT STIFFNESS METHOD II

3–22 1/128 0 0 ]T . The local joint displacements

For member (2), c = 4/5, s = −3/5, u(2) = [ 9/512 are recovered by

 u (2) 
u(2) = 

xi u (2) yi u (2) xj u (2) yj

4/5   3/5 = 0 0

−3/5 4/5 0 0

0 0 4/5 3/5

0 9/512 3/320 0   1/128   43/2560  =  −3/5   0   0 4/5 0 0




(E3.22)

The elongation is d (2) = 0 − 3/320 = −3/320, from which F (2) = 1000 × 4 × (−3/320)/5 = −15/2 = −7.5. The negative sign indicates that member (2) is in compression.
EXERCISE 3.7

(a)

The master stiffness matrix is the same as in the previous Exercise:

 256  192 −256 −192 0 0 144 −192 −144 0 0   192  −256 −192 768 −192 −512 384   K=  −192 −144 −192 432 384 −288   
0 0 0 0 −512 384 384 −288 512 −384 −384 288

(E3.23)

However, now we have a prescribed displacement, u y3 = − 1 : 2

 256  0   f  192 −256 −192 0 0 x1 192 144 −192 −144 0 0   0   f y1    −256 −192 768 −192 −512 384   u x2   12    =   −192 −144 −192 432 384 −288   u y2   0      
0 0 0 0 −512 384 384 −288 512 −384 −384 288 0 −1 2 f x3 f y3

(E3.24)

(b)

For hand computation, reduce the system by removing rows 1, 2, 5 and 6 that pertain to the prescribed displacements:

0 −1 2 Next, columns 1, 2, 5 and 6 are removed by tranferring all known terms from the left to the right hand side: 768 −192 −192 432 which gives 768 −192 Solution by Gausss elimination yields u x2 = u x2 u y2 = (−256)(0) + (−192)(0) + (−512)(0) + (384)(− 1 ) 12 2 − 0 (−192)(0) + (−144)(0) + (384)(0) + (−288)(− 1 ) 2 −192 432 u x2 u y2 = 204 −144 (E3.26)

 0   0  −256 −192 768 −192 −512 384  u x2    = 12 −192 −144 −192 432 384 −288  u y2  0  

(E3.25)

(E3.27)

105 512

and

u y2 = −

31 128

(E3.28)

3–22

3–23
(c)

Solutions to Exercises

To recover all the joint forces we complete the node displacement vector with the known values: uT = [ 0 and use f = Ku to get 0
105 512 31 − 128

0

−1 ] 2

(E3.29)

 f   256   0   −6  192 −256 −192 0 0 x1 9 144 −192 −144 0 0  0  −2   f y1   192  f x2   −256 −192 768 −192 −512 384   105   12    =   512  =   f y2   −192 −144 −192 432   − 31   0  384 −288  128           f x3 0 0 −512 384 512 −384 
f y3 0 0 384 −288 −384 288 0 −1 2 −6
9 2

(E3.30)

Horizontal force equilibrium is verified by f x1 + f x2 + f x3 = −6 + 12 − 6 = 0 and likewise for y-force and moment equilibrium. (E3.31)

3–23

.

Analysis of Example Truss by a CAS

4

4–1

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§4.1.

§4.2. §4.3.

§4.4. §4.5. §4.6. §4.7. §4.8.

§4. §4. §4.

Computer Algebra Systems §4.1.1. Why Mathematica? . . . . . §4.1.2. How to Get It . . . . . . . . §4.1.3. Programming Style and Prerequisites §4.1.4. Class Demo Scripts . . . . . . Program Organization The Element Stiffness Module §4.3.1. Module Description . . . . . §4.3.2. Programming Remarks . . . . . §4.3.3. Case Sensitivity . . . . . . §4.3.4. Testing the Member Stiffness Module Merging a Member into the Master Stiffness Assembling the Master Stiffness Modifying the Master System Recovering Internal Forces Putting the Pieces Together §4.8.1. The Driver Script . . . . . . §4.8.2. Is All of This Worthwhile? . . . Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . .

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4–3 4–3 4–3 4–4 4–5 4–6 4–7 4–7 4–8 4–9 4–9 4–9 4–10 4–11 4–12 4–14 4–14 4–15 4–16 4–17 4–18

4–2

4–3 §4.1. Computer Algebra Systems

§4.1

COMPUTER ALGEBRA SYSTEMS

Computer algebra systems, known by the acronym CAS, are programs designed to perform symbolic and numeric manipulations following the rules of mathematics.1 The development of such programs began in the mid 1960s. The first comprehensive system — the “granddaddy” of them all, called Macsyma (an acronym for Project Mac Symbolic Manipulator) — was developed using the programming language Lisp at MIT’s famous Artificial Intelligence Laboratory over the period 1967 to 1980. The number and quality of symbolic-manipulation programs has expanded dramatically since the availability of graphical workstations and personal computers has encouraged interactive and experimental programming. As of this writing the leading general-purpose contenders are Maple and Mathematica.2 In addition there are a dozen or so more specialized programs, some of which are available free or at very reasonable cost. See Notes and Bibliography at the end of the Chapter. §4.1.1. Why Mathematica? In the present book Mathematica will be used for Chapters and Exercises that develop symbolic and numerical computation for matrix structural analysis and FEM implementations. Mathematica is a commercial product developed by Wolfram Research, web site: http://www.wolfram.com. The version used to construct the code fragments presented in this Chapter is 4.1, which was commercially released in 2001. (The latest version is 7, released in 2009.) The main advantages of Mathematica for technical computing are: 1. 2. 3. 4. Availability on a wide range of platforms that range from PCs and Macs through Unix workstations. Up-to-date user interface. On all machines Mathematica offers a graphics user interface called the Notebook front-end. This is mandatory for serious work. It provides advanced result typesetting. A powerful programming language. Good documentation and abundance of application books at all levels.

One common disadvantage of CAS, and Mathematica is no exception, is computational inefficiency in numerical calculations compared with a low-level implementation in, for instance, C or Fortran. The relative penalty can reach several orders of magnitude. For instructional use, however, the penalty is acceptable when compared to human efficiency. This means the ability to get FEM programs up and running in very short time, with capabilities for symbolic manipulation and graphics as a bonus. §4.1.2. How to Get It Starting 1 August 2007, a free one-year license from CU’s Information Technology Services (ITS) is available. Students may renew this license as long as they are registered. See Figure 1 for the “How to Get It” instructions. If you plan to keep Mathematica for a long time, an academic version is available. Registered students may also purchase the student version for about $150 at the UMC bookstore. You will need to show
1

Some vendors call that kind of activity “doing mathematics by computer.” It is more appropriate to regard such programs as enabling tools that help humans with complicated and error-prone manipulations. Mettle and metal. As of now, only humans can do mathematics. Another commonly used program for engineering computations: Matlab, does only numerical computations although a [poorly done] interface to Maple can be purchased as a toolbox.

2

4–3

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–4

Eligibility: students, faculty, staff and departments of all CU campuses Platforms: Mac OSX, Windows, Linux, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX How to Get It 1) Download and install software as per instructions at http://sitelic.colorado.edu/mathematica, or request an installation CD from the Site Licensing office: sitelic@colorado.edu, 303-492-8995 2) Register your copy online at http://register.wolfram.com/ using campus license number L2437-5121 plus your computer MathID number. Be sure to use your CU mail address. 3) A password (unique to your computer) will be forwarded to you via email from Site Licensing ITS Support Question & tech support problems: send email to sitelic@colorado.edu Periodic hands-on workshops are available for those new to the software, click on Workshops on the Web page given above. Details (for example: what is a MathID?) about licensing & support are posted at the above web site.
Figure 4.1. Instructions to get Mathematica 7 for free from CU-ITS. Also on CAETE Slide 7.

proof you are a bona-fide student at the register.3 If you are not on campus (e.g. a CAETE student) you may purchase it directly at the vendor’s web site http://www.wolfram.com. Again proof of registration must be provided. The student version is cheap, since the standard personal license costs over $1K and company licenses go for over $3K per seat. Unlike other commercial software products, you get the full thing; no capabilities are emasculated. But terms are strict: once installed on your laptop or desktop, it cannot be transferred to another computer since the license is forever keyed to the disk identification. §4.1.3. Programming Style and Prerequisites The following material assumes that you are a moderately experienced user of Mathematica, or are willing to learn to be one. See Notes and Bibliography for a brief discussion of tutorial and reference materials in case you are interested. Practice with the program until you reach the level of writing functions, modules and scripts with relative ease. With the Notebook interface and a good primer it takes only a few hours. When approaching that level you may notice that functions in Mathematica display many aspects similar to C.4 You can exploit this similarity if you are proficient in that language. But Mathematica functions do have some unique aspects, such as matching arguments by pattern, and the fact that internal variables
3 4

Check for discounts when new versions come out; unsold previous-version copies may go for as little as $50. Simple functions can be implemented in Mathematica directly, for instance DotProduct[x ,y ]:=x.y; more complicated functions are handled by the Module construct. These constructs are called rules by computer scientists.

4–4

4–5 are global unless otherwise made local.5

§4.1

COMPUTER ALGEBRA SYSTEMS

Modification of function arguments should be avoided because it may be difficult to trace side effects. The programming style enforced here outlaws output arguments and a function can only return its name. But since the name can be a list of arbitrary objects the restriction is not serious.6 Our objective is to develop a symbolic program written in Mathematica that solves the example plane truss as well as some symbolic versions thereof. The program will rely heavily on the development and use of functions implemented using the Module construct of Mathematica. Thus the style will be one of procedural programming.7 The program will not be particularly modular (in the computer science sense) because Mathematica is not suitable for that programming style.8 The code presented in Sections 4.2–4.7 uses a few language constructs that may be deemed as advanced, and these are briefly noted in the text so that appropriate reference to the Mathematica reference manual can be made. §4.1.4. Class Demo Scripts The cell scripts shown in Figures 4.1 and 4.2 will be used to illustrate the organization of a Notebook file and the “look and feel” of some basic Mathematica commands. These scripts will be demonstrated in class from a laptop.

5

In Mathematica everything is a function, including programming constructs. Example: in C for is a loop-opening keyword, whereas in Mathematica For is a function that runs a loop according to its arguments. Such restrictions on arguments and function returns are closer in spirit to C than Fortran although you can of course modify C-function arguments using pointers — exceedingly dangerous but often unavoidable. The name Module should not be taken too seriously: it is far away from the concept of modules in Ada, Modula, Oberon or Fortran 90. But such precise levels of interface control are rarely needed in symbolic languages. Indeed none of the CAS packages in popular use is designed for strong modularity because of historical and interactivity constraints.

6

7

8

4–5

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–6

Integration example f[x_,α_,β_]:=(1+β*x^2)/(1+α*x+x^2); F=Integrate[f[x,-1,2],{x,0,5}]; F=Simplify[F]; Print[F]; Print[N[F]]; F=NIntegrate[f[x,-1,2],{x,0,5}]; Print["F=",F//InputForm]; 10 + Log[21] 13.0445 F=13.044522437723455
Figure 4.2. Example cell for class demo.

Fa=Integrate[f[z,a,b],{z,0,5}]; Fa=Simplify[Fa]; Print["Fa=",Fa]; Plot3D[Fa,{a,-1.5,1.5},{b,-10,10},ViewPoint->{-1,-1,1}]; Fa=FullSimplify[Fa]; (* very slow but you get *) Print["Fa=",Fa];

Result after Simplify[ ..]
50 0 -50 5 0 -5 -1 -10 0 1

10

Result after FullSimplify[ .. ]

Figure 4.3. Another example cell for class demo. (Note: results shown were obtained with Mathematica version 4.2. Integration answers from versions 5 and up are different.)

4–6

4–7

§4.3

THE ELEMENT STIFFNESS MODULE

User prepared script

Problem Driver

Driver script (not a module)

Cell 7

Stiffness Assembler

Application of Support BCs

Built in Equation Solver

Internal Force Recovery

AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss

ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC

Cell 3

Cell 4

Built in Equation Solver

IntForcesOfExampleTruss

Cell 6

Merge of Bar Stiffness
Derived in Chapter 2

MergeElemIntoMasterStiff

Cell 2

Bar Stiffness

Bar Internal Force

ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar

IntForces2DTwoNodeBar

Cell 1

Cell 5

Element Library

Figure 4.4. Organization of example program by function.

Figure 4.5. Organization of example program by cell and module names.

§4.2. Program Organization The overall organization of the example truss program is shown in Figures 4.4 and 4.5. Figure 4.4 shows the program as divided into functional steps. For example the driver program calls the stiffness assembler, which in turn uses two functions: form bar stiffness and merge into master stiffness. This kind of functional division would be provided by any programming language. On the other hand Figure 4.5 is Mathematica specific. It shows the names of the module that implement the functional tasks and the cells where they reside. (Modules and cells are explained in the sections below.) The following sections proceed to describe the code segments of Figure 4.5, module by module. For tutorial purposes this is done in a “bottom up” fashion, that is, going cell by cell from left to right and bottom to top. §4.3. The Element Stiffness Module As our first FEM code segment, the top box of Figure 4.6 shows a module that evaluates and returns the 4 × 4 stiffness matrix of a plane truss member (two-node bar) in global coordinates. The text in that box of that figure is supposed to be placed on a Notebook cell. Executing the cell, by clicking on it and hitting an appropriate key (<Enter> on a Mac), gives the output shown in the bottom box. The contents of the figure is described in further detail below. §4.3.1. Module Description The stiffness module is called ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar. Such descriptive names are permitted by the language. This reduces the need for detailed comments. The module takes two arguments: { { x1,y1 },{ x2,y2 } } A two-level list9 containing the {x, y} coordinates of the bar end nodes labelled as 1 and 2.10

9

A level-one list is a sequence of items enclosed in curly braces. For example: { x1,y1 } is a list of two items. A level-two list is a list of level-one lists. An important example of a level-two list is a matrix. These are called the local node numbers, and replace the i, j of previous Chapters. This is a common FEM programming practice.

10

4–7

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–8

ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{x1_,y1_},{x2_,y2_}},{Em_,A_}] := Module[{c,s,dx=x2-x1,dy=y2-y1,L,Ke}, L=Sqrt[dx^2+dy^2]; c=dx/L; s=dy/L; Ke=(Em*A/L)* {{ c^2, c*s,-c^2,-c*s}, { c*s, s^2,-s*c,-s^2}, {-c^2,-s*c, c^2, s*c}, {-s*c,-s^2, s*c, s^2}}; Return[Ke] ]; Ke= ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}]; Print["Numerical elem stiff matrix:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm]; Ke= ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{L,L}},{Em,A}]; Ke=Simplify[Ke,L>0]; Print["Symbolic elem stiff matrix:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm];
Numerical elem stiff matrix:

10 10 −10 −10

10 10 −10 −10

−10 −10 10 10

−10 −10 10 10
A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L

Symbolic elem stiff matrix:
A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L

Figure 4.6. Module ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar to form the element stiffness of a 2D 2-node truss element in global coordinates. Test statements (in blue) and test output.

{ Em,A }

A one-level list containing the bar elastic modulus, E and the member cross section area, A. See §4.3.3 as to why name E cannot be used.

The use of the underscore after argument item names in the declaration of the Module is a requirement for pattern-matching in Mathematica. If, as recommended, you have learned functions and modules this language-specific aspect should not come as a surprise. The module name returns the 4×4 member stiffness matrix internally called Ke. The logic that leads to the formation of that matrix is straightforward and need not be explained in detail. Note, however, the elegant direct declaration of the matrix Ke as a level-two list, which eliminates the fiddling around with array indices typical of low-level programming languages. The specification format in fact closely matches the mathematical expression (2.18). §4.3.2. Programming Remarks The function in Figure 4.6 uses several intermediate variables with short names: dx, dy, s, c and L. It is strongly advisable to make these symbols local to avoid potential names clashes somewhere else.11 In the Module[ ...] construct this is done by listing those names in a list immediately after the opening bracket. Local variables may be initialized when they are constants or simple functions of the argument items; for example on entry to the module dx=x2-x1 initializes variable dx to be the difference of x node coordinates, namely x = x2 − x1 .
11

The “global by default” choice is the worst one, but we must live with the rules of the language.

4–8

4–9

§4.4

MERGING A MEMBER INTO THE MASTER STIFFNESS

The Return statement fulfills the same purpose as in C or Fortran 90. Mathematica guides and textbooks advise against the use of that and other C-like constructs. The writer strongly disagrees: the Return statement makes clear what the Module gives back to its invoker and is self-documenting. §4.3.3. Case Sensitivity Mathematica, like most recent computer languages, is case sensitive so that for instance E is not the same as e. This is fine. But the language designer decided that names of system-defined objects such as built-in functions and constants must begin with a capital letter. Consequently the liberal use of names beginning with a capital letter may run into clashes. For example you cannot use E because of its built-in meaning as the base of natural logarithms.12 In the code fragments presented throughout this book, identifiers beginning with upper case are used for objects such as stiffness matrices, modulus of elasticity, and cross section area. This follows established usage in Mechanics. When there is danger of clashing with a protected system symbol, additional lower case letters are used. For example, Em is used for the elastic modulus instead of E because (as noted above) the latter is a reserved symbol. §4.3.4. Testing the Member Stiffness Module Following the definition of ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar in Figure 4.6 there are several statements that constitute the module test script that call the module and print the returned results. Two cases are tested. First, the stiffness of member (3) of the example truss, using all-numerical values. Next, some of the input arguments for the same member are given symbolic names so they stand for variables; for example the elastic module is given as Em instead of 100 as in the foregoing test. The print output of the test is shown in the lower portion of Figure 4.6. The first test returns the member stiffness matrix (2.21) as may be expected. The second test returns a symbolic form in which three symbols appear: the coordinates of end node 2, which is taken to be located at { L,L } instead of {10, 10}, A, which is the cross-section area and Em, which is the elastic modulus. Note that the returning matrix Ke is subject to a Simplify step before printing it, which is the subject of an Exercise. The ability to carry along variables is of course a fundamental capability of any CAS and the main reason for which such programs are used. §4.4. Merging a Member into the Master Stiffness The next fragment of Mathematica code, listed in Figure 4.7, is used in the assembly step of the DSM. Module MergeElemIntoMasterStiff receives the 4 × 4 element stiffness matrix formed by FormElemStiff2DNodeBar and “merges” it into the master stiffness matrix. The module takes three arguments: Ke eftab The 4 × 4 member stiffness matrix to be merged. This is a level-two list. The column of the Element Freedom Table, defined in §3.4.1, appropriate to the member being merged; cf. (3.22). Recall that the EFT lists the global equation numbers for the four member degrees of freedom. This is a level-one list consisting of 4 integers. The incoming 6 × 6 master stiffness matrix. This is a level-two list.

Kinp
12

In retrospect this appears to have been a highly questionable decision. System defined names should have been identified by a reserved prefix or postfix to avoid surprises, as done in Macsyma or Maple. Mathematica issues a warning message, however, if an attempt to redefine a “protected symbol” is made.

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Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS
MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke_,eftab_,Kin_]:=Module[ {i,j,ii,jj,K=Kin}, For [i=1, i<=4, i++, ii=eftab[[i]]; For [j=i, j<=4, j++, jj=eftab[[j]]; K[[jj,ii]]=K[[ii,jj]]+=Ke[[i,j]] ] ]; Return[K] ]; K=Table[0,{6},{6}]; Print["Initialized master stiffness matrix:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm] Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}]; Print["Member stiffness matrix:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm]; K=MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{1,2,5,6},K]; Print["Master stiffness after member merge:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm];
Initialized master stiffness matrix: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Member stiffness matrix: 10 10 −10 −10 10 10 −10 −10 −10 −10 10 10 −10 −10 10 10 Master stiffness after member merge: 10 10 0 0 −10 −10 10 10 0 0 −10 −10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 −10 −10 0 −10 −10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 10 0 10 10

4–10

Figure 4.7. Module MergeElemIntoMasterStiff to merge a 4 × 4 bar element stiffness into the master stiffness matrix. Test statements (in blue) and test output.

MergeElemIntoMasterStiff returns, as module name, the updated master stiffness matrix internally called K with the member stiffness merged in. Thus we encounter here a novelty: an input-output argument. Because a formal argument cannot be modified, the situation is handled by copying the incoming Kin into K on entry. It is the copy which is updated and returned via the Return statement. The implementation has a strong C flavor with two nested For loops. Because the iterators are very simple, nested Do loops could have been used as well. The statements after the module provide a simple test. Before the first call to this function, the master stiffness matrix must be initialized to a zero 6 × 6 array. This is done in the first test statement using the Table function. The test member stiffness matrix is that of member (3) of the example truss, and is obtained by calling ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar. The EFT is { 1,2,5,6 } since element freedoms 1,2,3,4 map into global freedoms 1,2,5,6. Running the test statements yields the listing given in Figure 4.7. The result is as expected. §4.5. Assembling the Master Stiffness The module AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss, listed in the top box of Figure 4.8, makes use of the foregoing two modules: ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar and MergeElemIntoMasterStiff, 4–10

4–11

§4.6

MODIFYING THE MASTER SYSTEM

AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]:= Module[{Ke,K=Table[0,{6},{6}]}, Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,0}},{100,1}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{1,2,3,4},K]; Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{10,0},{10,10}},{100,1/2}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{3,4,5,6},K]; Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{1,2,5,6},K]; Return[K] ]; K=AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]; Print["Master stiffness of example truss:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm];
Master 20 10 −10 0 −10 −10 stiffness of example truss: 10 −10 0 −10 −10 10 0 0 −10 −10 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 −5 −10 0 0 10 10 −10 0 −5 10 15

Figure 4.8. Module AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss that forms the 6 × 6 master stiffness matrix of the example truss. Test statements (in blue) and test output.

to form the master stiffness matrix of the example truss. The initialization of the stiffness matrix array in K to zero is done by the Table function of Mathematica, which is handy for initializing lists. The remaining statements are self explanatory. The module is similar in style to argumentless Fortran or C functions. It takes no arguments. All the example truss data is “wired in.” The output from the test script is shown in the lower box of Figure 4.8. The output stiffness matches that in Equation (3.12), as can be expected if all code fragments used so far work correctly. §4.6. Modifying the Master System Following the assembly process the master stiffness equations Ku = f must be modified to account for single-freedom displacement boundary conditions. This is done through the computer-oriented equation modification process outlined in §3.5.2. Module ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC and ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC carry out this modification for K and f, respectively. These two modules are listed in the top box of Figure 4.9, along with test statements. The logic of both functions is considerably simplified by assuming that all prescribed displacements are zero, that is, the BCs are homogeneous. (The more general case of nonzero prescribed values is treated in Part III of the book.) Function ModifiedMasterStiffnessForDBC has two arguments: pdof K A list of the prescribed degrees of freedom identified by their global number. For the example truss this list contains three entries: {1, 2, 4}. The master stiffness matrix K produced by the assembly process.

The function clears appropriate rows and columns of K, places ones on the diagonal, and returns the modified K as function value. The only slightly fancy thing in this module is the use of the Mathematica function Length to extract the number of prescribed displacement components: Length[pdof] here will return the value 3, which is the length of the list pdof. Similarly nk=Length[K] assigns 6 to nk, which is the order of matrix K. Although for the example truss these values are known a priori, the use of Length serves to illustrate a technique that is heavily used in more general code. 4–11

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4–12

ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[pdof_,K_] := Module[ {i,j,k,nk=Length[K],np=Length[pdof],Kmod=K}, For [k=1,k<=np,k++, i=pdof[[k]]; For [j=1,j<=nk,j++, Kmod[[i,j]]=Kmod[[j,i]]=0]; Kmod[[i,i]]=1]; Return[Kmod] ]; ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[pdof_,f_] := Module[ {i,k,np=Length[pdof],fmod=f}, For [k=1,k<=np,k++, i=pdof[[k]]; fmod[[i]]=0]; Return[fmod] ]; K=Array[Kij,{6,6}]; Print["Assembled master stiffness:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm]; K=ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[{1,2,4},K]; Print["Master stiffness modified for displacement B.C.:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm]; f=Array[fi,{6}]; Print["Force vector:"]; Print[f]; f=ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[{1,2,4},f]; Print["Force vector modified for displacement B.C.:"]; Print[f];
Assembled master stiffness: Kij 1, 1 Kij 1, 2 Kij 1, Kij 2, 1 Kij 2, 2 Kij 2, Kij 3, 1 Kij 3, 2 Kij 3, Kij 4, 1 Kij 4, 2 Kij 4, Kij 5, 1 Kij 5, 2 Kij 5, Kij 6, 1 Kij 6, 2 Kij 6,

3 3 3 3 3 3

Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,

4 4 4 4 4 4

Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,

5 5 5 5 5 5

Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,

6 6 6 6 6 6

Master stiffness modified for displacement B.C.: 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kij 3, 3 0 Kij 3, 5 Kij 3, 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Kij 5, 3 0 Kij 5, 5 Kij 5, 6 0 0 Kij 6, 3 0 Kij 6, 5 Kij 6, 6 Force vector: fi 1 , fi 2 , fi 3 , fi 4 , fi 5 , fi 6 Force vector modified for displacement B.C.: 0, 0, fi 3 , 0, fi 5 , fi 6

Figure 4.9. Modules ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC and ModifiedMasterForceForDBC that modify the master stiffness matrix and force vector of a truss to impose displacement BCs. Test statements (in blue) and test output.

Module ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC has similar structure and logic and need not be described in detail. It is important to note, however, that for homogeneous BCs the modules are independent of each other and may be called in any order. On the other hand, if there were nonzero prescribed displacements present the force modification must be done before the stiffness modification. This is because stiffness coefficients that are cleared in the latter are needed for modifying the force vector. The test statements are purposedly chosen to illustrate another feature of Mathematica: the use of the Array function to generate subscripted symbolic arrays of one and two dimensions. The test output is shown in the bottom box of Figure 4.9, which should be self explanatory. The force vector and its modified form are printed as row vectors to save space. §4.7. Recovering Internal Forces Mathematica provides built-in matrix operations for solving a linear system of equations and multiplying matrices by vectors. Thus we do not need to write application functions for the solution of the 4–12

4–13

§4.7

RECOVERING INTERNAL FORCES

IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{x1_,y1_},{x2_,y2_}},{Em_,A_},eftab_,u_]:= Module[ {c,s,dx=x2-x1,dy=y2-y1,L,ix,iy,jx,jy,ubar,e}, L=Sqrt[dx^2+dy^2]; c=dx/L; s=dy/L; {ix,iy,jx,jy}=eftab; ubar={c*u[[ix]]+s*u[[iy]],-s*u[[ix]]+c*u[[iy]], c*u[[jx]]+s*u[[jy]],-s*u[[jx]]+c*u[[jy]]}; e=(ubar[[3]]-ubar[[1]])/L; Return[Em*A*e] ]; p =IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}, {1,2,5,6},{0,0,0,0,0.4,-0.2}]; Print["Member int force (numerical):"]; Print[N[p]]; p =IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{L,L}},{Em,A}, {1,2,5,6},{0,0,0,0,ux3,uy3}]; Print["Member int force (symbolic):"]; Print[Simplify[p]];
Member int force (numerical): 2.82843 Member int force (symbolic): A Em ( ux3 + uy3) 2L

Figure 4.10. Module IntForce2DTwoNodeBar for computing the internal force in a bar element. Test statements (in blue) and test output.

modified stiffness equations and for the recovery of nodal forces. Consequently, the last application functions we need are those for internal force recovery. Function IntForce2DTwoNodeBar listed in the top box of Figure 4.10 computes the internal force in an individual bar element. It is somewhat similar in argument sequence and logic to ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar of Figure 4.6. The first two arguments are identical. Argument eftab provides the Element Freedom Table array for the element. The last argument, u, is the vector of computed node displacements. The logic of IntForce2DTwoNodeBar is straightforward and follows the method outlined in §3.2.1. ¯ ¯ ¯ Member joint displacements u(e) in local coordinates {x, y } are recovered in array ubar, then the ¯ longitudinal strain e = (u x j − u xi )/L and the internal (axial) force p = E Ae is returned as function ¯ value. As coded the function contains redundant operations because entries 2 and 4 of ubar (that ¯ is, components u yi and u y j ) are not actually needed to get p, but were kept to illustrate the general ¯ backtransformation of global to local displacements. Running this function with the test statements shown after the module produces the output shown in the bottom box of Figure 4.10. The first test is for member (3) of the example truss using the actual nodal displacements (3.17). It also illustrates the use of the Mathematica built in function N to produce output in floating-point form. The second test does a symbolic calculation in which several argument values are fed in variable form. The top box of Figure 4.11 lists a higher-level function, IntForceOfExampleTruss, which has a single argument: u. This is the complete 6-vector of joint displacements u. This function calls IntForce2DTwoNodeBar three times, once for each member of the example truss, and returns the three member internal forces thus computed as a 3-component list. The test statements listed after IntForcesOfExampleTruss feed the displacement solution (3.24) to the module. Running the test produces the output shown in the bottom box of Figure 4.11. The √ internal forces are p (1) = 0, p (2) = −1 and p (3) = 2 2 = 2.82843.

4–13

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–14

IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u_]:= Module[{f=Table[0,{3}]}, f[[1]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,0}},{100,1},{1,2,3,4},u]; f[[2]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{10,0},{10,10}},{100,1/2},{3,4,5,6},u]; f[[3]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}, {1,2,5,6},u]; Return[f] ]; f=IntForcesOfExampleTruss[{0,0,0,0,0.4,-0.2}]; Print["Internal member forces in example truss:"];Print[N[f]];
Internal member forces in example truss: {0., -1., 2.82843}

Figure 4.11. Module IntForceOfExampleTruss that computes internal forces in the 3 members of the example truss. Test statements (in blue) and test output.

§4.8. Putting the Pieces Together After all this development and testing effort documented in Figures 4.6 through 4.11 we are ready to make use of all these bits and pieces of code to analyze the example plane truss. This is actually done with the logic shown in Figure 4.12. This particular piece of code is called the driver script. Note that it is not a Module. It uses the seven previously described modules ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar MergeElemIntoMasterStiff AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC IntForce2DTwoNodeTruss IntForcesOfExampleTruss

(4.1)

These functions must have been defined (”compiled”) at the time the driver scripts described below are run. A simple way to making sure that all of them are defined is to put all these functions in the same Notebook file and to mark them as initialization cells. These cells may be executed by picking up Kernel → Initialize → Execute Initialization. (An even simpler procedure would to group them all in one cell, but that would make placing separate test statements messy.) For a hierarchical version of (4.1), see the last CAETE slide. §4.8.1. The Driver Script The code listed in the top box of Figure 4.12 first assembles the master stiffness matrix through AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss. Next, it applies the displacement boundary conditions through ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC and ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC. Note that the modified stiffness matrix is placed into Kmod rather than K to save the original form of the master stiffness for the reaction force recovery later. The complete displacement vector is obtained by the matrix calculation u=Inverse[Kmod].fmod (4.2) which takes advantage of two built-in Mathematica functions. Inverse returns the inverse of its 4–14

4–15

§4.8

PUTTING THE PIECES TOGETHER

f={0,0,0,0,2,1}; K=AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]; Kmod=ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[{1,2,4},K]; fmod=ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[{1,2,4},f]; u=Simplify[Inverse[Kmod].fmod]; Print["Computed nodal displacements:"]; Print[u]; f=Simplify[K.u]; Print["External node forces including reactions:"]; Print[f]; p=Simplify[IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u]]; Print["Internal member forces:"]; Print[p];
Computed nodal displacements: 1 {0, 0, 0, 0, 2 ,− 5 } 5 External node forces including reactions: {-2, -2, 0, 1, 2, 1} Internal member forces: {0, -1, 2 2}

Figure 4.12. Driver script for numerical analysis of example truss and its output.

f={0,0,0,0,fx3,fy3}; K=AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]; Kmod=ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[{1,2,4},K]; fmod=ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[{1,2,4},f]; u=Simplify[Inverse[Kmod].fmod]; Print["Computed nodal displacements:"]; Print[u]; f=Simplify[K.u]; Print["External node forces including reactions:"]; Print[f]; p=Simplify[IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u]]; Print["Internal member forces:"]; Print[p];
Computed nodal displacements: 1 1 {0, 0, 0, 0, 10 (3 fx3 - 2 fy3), 5 (-fx3 + fy3)} External node forces including reactions: {-fx3, -fx3, 0, fx3 - fy3, fx3, fy3} Internal member forces: {0, -fx3 + fy3, 2 fx3}

Figure 4.13. Driver script for symbolic analysis of example truss and its output.

matrix argument13 The dot operator signifies matrix multiply (here, matrix-vector multiply.) The enclosing Simplify function in Figure 4.12 is asked to simplify the expression of vector u in case of symbolic calculations; it is actually redundant if all computations are numerical. The remaining statements recover the node vector including reactions via the matrix-vector multiply f = K.u (recall that K contains the unmodified master stiffness matrix) and the member internal forces p through IntForcesOfExampleTruss. The code prints u, f and p as row vectors to save space. Running the script of the top box of Figure 4.12 produces the output shown in the bottom box of that figure. The results confirm the hand calculations of Chapter 3. §4.8.2. Is All of This Worthwhile? At this point you may wonder whether all of this work is worth the trouble. After all, a hand calculation (typically helped by a programable calculator) would be quicker in terms of flow time. Typing and
13

This is a highly inefficient way to solve Ku = f if this system becomes large. It is done here to keep things simple.

4–15

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–16

debugging the Mathematica fragments displayed here took the writer about six hours (although about two thirds of this was spent in editing and getting the fragment listings into the Chapter.) For larger problems, however, Mathematica would certainly beat hand-plus-calculator computations, the crossover typically appearing for 10 to 20 equations. For up to about 500 equations and using floating-point arithmetic, Mathematica gives answers within minutes on a fast PC or Mac with sufficient memory but eventually runs out of steam at about 1000 equations. For a range of 1000 to about 50000 equations, Matlab, using built-in sparse solvers, would be the best compromise between human and computer flow time. Beyond 50000 equations a program in a low-level language, such as C or Fortran, would be most efficient in terms of computer time.14 One distinct advantage of computer algebra systems emerges when you need to parametrize a small problem by leaving one or more problem quantities as variables. For example suppose that the applied forces on node 3 are to be left as f x3 and f y3 . You replace the last two components of array p as shown in the top box of Figure 4.13, execute the cell and shortly get the symbolic answer shown in the bottom box of that figure. This is the answer to an infinite number of numerical problems. Although one may try to undertake such studies by hand, the likelyhood of errors grows rapidly with the complexity of the system. Symbolic manipulation systems can amplify human abilities in this regard, as long as the algebra “does not explode” because of combinatorial complexity. Examples of such nontrivial calculations will appear throughout the following Chapters.
Remark 4.1. The “combinatorial explosion” danger of symbolic computations should be always kept in mind. For example, the numerical inversion of a N × N matrix is a O(N 3 ) process, whereas symbolic inversion goes as O(N !). For N = 48 the floating-point numerical inverse will be typically done in a fraction of a second. But the symbolic adjoint will have 48! = 12413915592536072670862289047373375038521486354677760000000000 terms, or O(1061 ). There may be enough electrons in this Universe to store that, but barely ...

Notes and Bibliography As noted in §4.1.2 the hefty Mathematica Book [274] is a reference manual. Since the contents are available online (click on Help in topbar) as part of purchase of the full system,15 buying the printed book is optional.16 There is a nice tutorial available by Glynn and Gray [113], list: $35, dated 1999. (Theodore Gray invented the Notebook front-end that appeared in version 2.2.) It can be also purchased on CDROM from MathWare, Ltd, P. O. Box 3025, Urbana, IL 61208, e-mail: info@mathware.com. The CDROM is a hyperlinked version of the book that can be installed on the same directory as Mathematica. More up to date and comprehensive is the recent appeared Mathematica Navigator in two volumes [214,215]; list: $69.95 but used copies are discounted, down to about $20. Beyond these, there are many books at all levels that expound on the use of Mathematica for various applications ranging from pure mathematics to physics and engineering. A web search (September 2003) on www3.addall.com hit 150 book titles containing Mathematica, compared to 111 for Maple and 148 for Matlab. A google search (August 2005) hits 3,820,000 pages containing Mathematica, but here Matlab wins with 4,130,000. Wolfram Research hosts the MathWorld web site at http://mathworld.wolfram.com, maintained by Eric W. Weisstein. It is essentially a hyperlinked, on-line version of his Encyclopœdia of Mathematics [263].
14

The current record for FEM structural applications is about 100 million equations, done on a massively parallel supercomputer (ASCI Red at SNL). Fluid mechanics problems with over 500 million equations have been solved. The student version comes with limited help. The fifth edition, covering version 5, lists for $49.95 but older editions are heavily discounted on the web, some under $2.

15 16

4–16

4–17

§4.

References

To close the topic of symbolic versus numerical computation, here is a nice summary by A. Grozin, posted on the Usenet: “Computer Algebra Systems (CASs) are programs [that] operate with formulas. Mathematica is a powerful CAS (though quite expensive). Other CASs are, e.g., Maple, REDUCE, MuPAD <...>. There are also quite powerful free CASs: Maxima and Axiom. In all of these systems, it is possible to do some numerical calculations (e.g., to evaluate the formula you have derived at some numerical values of all parameters). But it is a very bad idea to do large-scale numerical work in such systems: performance will suffer. In some special cases (e.g., numerical calculations with very high precision, impossible at the double-precision level), you can use Mathematica to do what you need, but there are other, faster ways to do such things. There are a number of programs to do numerical calculations with usual double-precision numbers. One example is Matlab; there are similar free programs, e.g., Octave, Scilab, R, ... Matlab is very good and fast in doing numerical linear algebra: if you want to solve a system of 100 linear equations whose coefficients are all numbers, use Matlab; if coefficients contain letters (symbolic quantities) and you want the solution as formulas, use Mathematica or some other CAS. Matlab can do a limited amount of formula manipulations using its “symbolic toolbox,” which is an interface to a cut-down Maple. It’s a pain to use this interface: if you want Maple, just use Maple.” References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

4–17

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–18

Homework Exercises for Chapter 4 Analysis of Example Truss by a CAS Before doing any of these Exercises, download the Mathematica Notebook file ExampleTruss.nb from the course web site. (Go to Chapter 4 Index and click on the link). Open this Notebook file using version 4.1 or later one. The first eight cells contain the modules and test statements listed in the top boxes of Figures 4.6–13. The first six of these are marked as initialization cells. Before running driver scripts, they should be executed by picking up Kernel → Evaluation → Execute Initialization. Verify that the output of those six cells agrees with that shown in the bottom boxes of Figures 4.6–13. Then execute the driver scripts in Cells 7–8 by clicking on each cell and pressing the appropriate key: <Enter> on a Mac, <Shift-Enter> on a Windows PC. Compare the output with that shown in Figures 4.12–13. If the output checks out, you may proceed to the Exercises.
EXERCISE 4.1 [C:10] Explain why the Simplify command in the test statements of Figure 4.3 says L>0.

(One way to figure this out is to just say Ke=Simplify[Ke] and look at the output. Related question: why does Mathematica refuse to simplify Sqrt[L^2] to L unless one specifies the sign of L in the Simplify command?
EXERCISE 4.2 [C:10] Explain the logic of the For loops in the merge function MergeElemIntoMasterStiff of Figure 4.4. What does the operator += do? EXERCISE 4.3 [C:10] Explain the reason behind the use of Length in the modules of Figure 4.6. Why not simply set nk and np to 6 and 3, respectively? EXERCISE 4.4 [C:15] Of the seven modules listed in Figures 4.3 through 4.8, with names collected in (4.2),

two can be used only for the example truss, three can be used for any plane truss, and two can be used for other structures analyzed by the DSM. Identify which ones and briefly state the reasons for your classification.
EXERCISE 4.5 [C:20] Modify the modules AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss, IntForcesOfExampleTruss and the driver script of Figure 4.9 to solve numerically the three-node, two-member truss of Exercise 3.6. Verify that the output reproduces the solution given for that problem. Hint: modify cells but keep a copy of the original Notebook handy in case things go wrong. EXERCISE 4.6 [C:25] Expand the logic of ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC to permit specified nonzero dis-

placements. Specify these in a second argument called pval, which contains a list of prescribed values paired with pdof.

xynode={{0,0},{10,0},{10,10}}; elenod={{1,2},{2,3},{3,1}}; unode={{0,0},{0,0},{2/5,-1/5}}; amp=5; p={}; For [t=0,t<=1,t=t+1/5, For [e=1,e<=Length[elenod],e++, {i,j}=elenod[[e]]; xyi=xynode[[i]];ui=unode[[i]];xyj=xynode[[j]];uj=unode[[j]]; p=AppendTo[p,Graphics[Line[{xyi+amp*t*ui,xyj+amp*t*uj}]]]; ]; ]; Show[p,Axes->False,AspectRatio->Automatic];

Figure E4.1. Mystery scriptfor Exercise 4.7.

EXERCISE 4.7 [C:20] Explain what the program of Figure E4.1 does, and the logic behind what it does. (You

may want to put it in a cell and execute it.) What modifications would be needed so it can be used for any plane struss?

4–18

Introduction to FEM

Analysis of Example Truss by a CAS

4

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Computer Algebra Systems: What Are They?
Computer tools to help humans solve math problems

Especially: algebra calculus

Why do humans need help?

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

The Three Big Ma's in order of appearance
Macsyma (died 1999, continued as free source) Maple Mathematica

Matlab is not a CAS ("Ma" in Matlab stands for Matrix, not Math) And a host of minor players: Mathcad, Magma, ... etc

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Why Mathematica?
Strong points Implemented on many platforms
(Maple is primarily used under Unix, does not have a Mac version)

Programming facilities Graphics (greatly improved in Versions 6-7) Good documentation & many application books Since 1 August 2007: 1-year renewable campus license, free to students, faculty and staff

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Mathematica vs. Matlab Coverage

MATHEMATICA

Symbolic calculations

Exact numeric calculations

MATLAB Floating-point (a.k.a. inexact) numeric calculations Floating-point (a.k.a. inexact) numeric calculations

Source code (1991): C, then C++

Source code (1980s): Fortran

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Popularity Contest by Number of "Hits" on www3.addall.com Book Search Engine (Sep 2003)

Macsyma Maple Mathematica Matlab

addall google (M) 9 .1 111 2 150 10 148 21

Note: C++ 191, Java 189, Fortran 145 in addall

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Last Major Releases of Mathematica
Version 2.2 1994 Version 3.0 1997 Version 4.0 1999 4.1 2001 4.2 2002 Version 5.0 2003 5.1 2004 5.2 2005 Version 6.0 2007 Version 7.0 2009

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 7

Free Mathematica From CU's OIT

Introduction to FEM

Eligibility: students, faculty, staff and departments of all CU campuses Platforms: Mac OSX, Windows, Linux, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX How to Get It 1) Download and install software as per instructions at http://sitelic.colorado.edu/mathematica, or request an installation CD from the Site Licensing office: sitelic@colorado.edu, 303-492-8995 2) Register your copy online at http://register.wolfram.com/ using campus license number L2437-5121 plus your computer MathID number. Be sure to use your CU mail address. 3) A password (unique to your computer) will be forwarded to you via email from Site Licensing ITS Support Question & tech support problems: send email to sitelic@colorado.edu Periodic hands-on workshops are available for those new to the software, click on Workshops on the Web page given above. Details (for example: what is a MathID?) about licensing & support are posted at the above web site.

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Class Demo Cell #1

Integration example
f[x_,Α_,Β_]:=(1+Β*x^2)/(1+Α*x+x^2); F=Integrate[f[x,-1,2],{x,0,5}]; F=Simplify[F]; Print[F]; Print[N[F]]; F=NIntegrate[f[x,-1,2],{x,0,5}]; Print["F=",F//InputForm];

Input Cell

10 Log 21 13.0445 F 13.044522437723455

Output Cells

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 9

Class Demo Cell #2
1 4 a2 Log 1 4 2 2 Log Log 10 4 10

Introduction to FEM

Fa=Integrate[f[z,a,b],{z,0,5}]; Fa=Simplify[Fa]; Print["Fa=",Fa]; Plot3D[Fa,{a,-1.5,1.5},{b,-10,10},ViewPoint->{-1,-1,1}]; Fa=FullSimplify[Fa]; (* very slow but you get *) Print["Fa=",Fa];
Fa 2 2 10 4 a a2 a a2 a2 2 a 4 4 a2 a2 b 2 4 a 4 a2 b Log 26 a a2 10 4 b Log 10 5a 2 a2 b Log 1 4 a a2 a2 a 4 4 a2 4 a2 2 a2 b Log 1 a a2 a2 b Log a2 b Log 10 10 4 a a2 a2 a 4 4 a2 4 a2 a 4 a2

b Log 1 4 a2 2 b Log

Result after Simplify[ ..]
50 0 -50 5 0 -5 -1 -10 0 1

10

Result after FullSimplify[ .. ]
a 4 a2 a 4 a2 a2 10 a 4 a2 10 a 4 a2

Fa 5 b 2

1 a b Log 26 2 2 a2 b

5a Log 1 Log 1 2 4 Log 1 Log 1

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Example Truss Program Configuration
User prepared script Problem Driver Built in Internal Equation Force Recovery Solver

Stiffness Assembler

Application of Support BCs

Merge of Bar Stiffness Derived in Chapter 2

Bar Stiffness

Bar Internal Force

Element Library

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Example Truss Program Module Names
Driver script (not a module)

Cells 7-8

AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss

ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC

Cell 3

Cell 4

Built in Equation Solver

IntForcesOfExampleTruss

Cell 6

MergeElemIntoMasterStiff

Cell 2

ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar

IntForces2DTwoNodeBar

Cell 1

Cell 5

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 12

Module to Form Element Stiffness Matrix of 2D Two-Node Bar
ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{x1_,y1_},{x2_,y2_}},{Em_,A_}] := Module[{c,s,dx=x2-x1,dy=y2-y1,L,Ke}, L=Sqrt[dx^2+dy^2]; c=dx/L; s=dy/L; Ke=(Em*A/L)* {{ c^2, c*s,-c^2,-c*s}, { c*s, s^2,-s*c,-s^2}, {-c^2,-s*c, c^2, s*c}, {-s*c,-s^2, s*c, s^2}}; Return[Ke] ]; Ke= ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}]; Print["Numerical elem stiff matrix:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm]; Ke= ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{L,L}},{Em,A}]; Ke=Simplify[Ke,L>0]; Print["Symbolic elem stiff matrix:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm];
Numerical elem stiff matrix:

Introduction to FEM

10 10 −10 −10

10 10 −10 −10

−10 −10 10 10

−10 −10 10 10
A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L

Symbolic elem stiff matrix:
A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L A Em 2 2 L

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 13

Module to Merge Element Stiffness into Master Stiffness
MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke_,eftab_,Kin_]:=Module[ {i,j,ii,jj,K=Kin}, For [i=1, i<=4, i++, ii=eftab[[i]]; For [j=i, j<=4, j++, jj=eftab[[j]]; K[[jj,ii]]=K[[ii,jj]]+=Ke[[i,j]] ] ]; Return[K] ]; K=Table[0,{6},{6}]; Print["Initialized master stiffness matrix:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm] Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}]; Print["Member stiffness matrix:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm]; K=MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{1,2,5,6},K]; Print["Master stiffness after member merge:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm];
Initialized master stiffness matrix: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Member stiffness matrix: 10 10 −10 −10 10 10 −10 −10 −10 −10 10 10 −10 −10 10 10 Master stiffness after member merge: 10 10 0 0 −10 −10 10 10 0 0 −10 −10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 −10 −10 0 −10 −10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 10 0 10 10

Introduction to FEM

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Module to Form Master Stiffness Matrix of Example Truss
AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]:= Module[{Ke,K=Table[0,{6},{6}]}, Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,0}},{100,1}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{1,2,3,4},K]; Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{10,0},{10,10}},{100,1/2}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{3,4,5,6},K]; Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{1,2,5,6},K]; Return[K] ]; K=AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]; Print["Master stiffness of example truss:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm];
Master 20 10 −10 0 −10 −10 stiffness of example truss: 10 −10 0 −10 −10 10 0 0 −10 −10 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 −5 −10 0 0 10 10 −10 0 −5 10 15

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 15

Modules to Modify Master Stiffness & Forces for Displacement BC
ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[pdof_,K_] := Module[ {i,j,k,nk=Length[K],np=Length[pdof],Kmod=K}, For [k=1,k<=np,k++, i=pdof[[k]]; For [j=1,j<=nk,j++, Kmod[[i,j]]=Kmod[[j,i]]=0]; Kmod[[i,i]]=1]; Return[Kmod] ]; ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[pdof_,f_] := Module[ {i,k,np=Length[pdof],fmod=f}, For [k=1,k<=np,k++, i=pdof[[k]]; fmod[[i]]=0]; Return[fmod] ]; K=Array[Kij,{6,6}]; Print["Assembled master stiffness:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm]; K=ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[{1,2,4},K]; Print["Master stiffness modified for displacement B.C.:"]; Print[K//MatrixForm]; f=Array[fi,{6}]; Print["Force vector:"]; Print[f]; f=ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[{1,2,4},f]; Print["Force vector modified for displacement B.C.:"]; Print[f];
Assembled master stiffness: Kij 1, 1 Kij 1, 2 Kij 1, 3 Kij 1, 4 Kij 1, 5 Kij 2, 1 Kij 2, 2 Kij 2, 3 Kij 2, 4 Kij 2, 5 Kij 3, 1 Kij 3, 2 Kij 3, 3 Kij 3, 4 Kij 3, 5 Kij 4, 1 Kij 4, 2 Kij 4, 3 Kij 4, 4 Kij 4, 5 Kij 5, 1 Kij 5, 2 Kij 5, 3 Kij 5, 4 Kij 5, 5 Kij 6, 1 Kij 6, 2 Kij 6, 3 Kij 6, 4 Kij 6, 5 Master stiffness modified for displacement B.C.: 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kij 3, 3 0 Kij 3, 5 Kij 3, 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Kij 5, 3 0 Kij 5, 5 Kij 5, 6 0 0 Kij 6, 3 0 Kij 6, 5 Kij 6, 6 Force vector: fi 1 , fi 2 , fi 3 , fi 4 , fi 5 , fi 6 Force vector modified for displacement B.C.: 0, 0, fi 3 , 0, fi 5 , fi 6

Introduction to FEM

Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij Kij

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,

6 6 6 6 6 6

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Module to Compute Internal Force in 2D Two-Node Bar Element
IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{x1_,y1_},{x2_,y2_}},{Em_,A_},eftab_,u_]:= Module[ {c,s,dx=x2-x1,dy=y2-y1,L,ix,iy,jx,jy,ubar,e}, L=Sqrt[dx^2+dy^2]; c=dx/L; s=dy/L; {ix,iy,jx,jy}=eftab; ubar={c*u[[ix]]+s*u[[iy]],-s*u[[ix]]+c*u[[iy]], c*u[[jx]]+s*u[[jy]],-s*u[[jx]]+c*u[[jy]]}; e=(ubar[[3]]-ubar[[1]])/L; Return[Em*A*e] ]; p =IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}, {1,2,5,6},{0,0,0,0,0.4,-0.2}]; Print["Member int force (numerical):"]; Print[N[p]]; p =IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{L,L}},{Em,A}, {1,2,5,6},{0,0,0,0,ux3,uy3}]; Print["Member int force (symbolic):"]; Print[Simplify[p]];
Member int force (numerical): 2.82843 Member int force (symbolic): A Em ux3 uy3 2L

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Module to Compute Internal Forces in Example Truss

IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u_]:= Module[{f=Table[0,{3}]}, f[[1]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,0}},{100,1},{1,2,3,4},u]; f[[2]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{10,0},{10,10}},{100,1/2},{3,4,5,6},u]; f[[3]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{0,0},{10,10}},{100,2*Sqrt[2]}, {1,2,5,6},u]; Return[f] ]; f=IntForcesOfExampleTruss[{0,0,0,0,0.4,-0.2}]; Print["Internal member forces in example truss:"];Print[N[f]];
Internal member forces in example truss: {0., -1., 2.82843}

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Driver Program to Analyze Example Truss with All-Numerical Data
f={0,0,0,0,2,1}; K=AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]; Kmod=ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[{1,2,4},K]; fmod=ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[{1,2,4},f]; u=Simplify[Inverse[Kmod].fmod]; Print["Computed nodal displacements:"]; Print[u]; f=Simplify[K.u]; Print["External node forces including reactions:"]; Print[f]; p=Simplify[IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u]]; Print["Internal member forces:"]; Print[p];
Computed nodal displacements: 2 1 0, 0, 0, 0, , 5 5 External node forces including reactions: 2, 2, 0, 1, 2, 1 Internal member forces: 0, 1, 2 2

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Driver Program to Analyze Example Truss with Symbolic Forces
f={0,0,0,0,fx3,fy3}; K=AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]; Kmod=ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[{1,2,4},K]; fmod=ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[{1,2,4},f]; u=Simplify[Inverse[Kmod].fmod]; Print["Computed nodal displacements:"]; Print[u]; f=Simplify[K.u]; Print["External node forces including reactions:"]; Print[f]; p=Simplify[IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u]]; Print["Internal member forces:"]; Print[p];
Computed nodal displacements: 1 1 0, 0, 0, 0, 3 fx3 2 fy3 , fx3 fy3 10 5 External node forces including reactions: fx3, fx3, 0, fx3 fy3, fx3, fy3 Internal member forces: 0, fx3 fy3, 2 fx3

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 20

Introduction to FEM

Hierarchical Organization of Example Truss Program
TASK

Driver program (samples in Cells 7 & 8) AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss Assembly ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar MergeElemIntoMasterStiff ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC [Solve: by library] IntForcesOfExampleTruss IntForce2DTwoNodeTruss Postprocessing Globalization Merge Apply BCs

IFEM Ch 4 – Slide 21

4–19
Homework Exercises for Chapter 4 Analysis of Example Truss by a CAS – Solutions
EXERCISE 4.1 Not assigned. EXERCISE 4.2 Not assigned. EXERCISE 4.3 Not assigned. EXERCISE 4.4

Solutions to Exercises

ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar MergeElemIntoMasterStiff AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC IntForce2DTwoNodeTruss IntForcesOfExampleTruss

Usable for any plane truss but not other elements Usable for any plane truss but not other elements Usable for example truss only Usable for any structure Usable for any structure Usable for any plane truss but not other elements Usable for example truss only

EXERCISE 4.5 Cells 3, 6 and 7 are modified as shown in Figure E4.2 below. The other cells can be kept

untouched.
Cell 3: module to assemble master stiffness matrix of truss of Exercise 3.6
AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]:= Module[{Ke,K=Table[0,{6},{6}]}, Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{-4,0},{0,3}},{1000,2}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{1,2,3,4},K]; Ke=ElemStiff2DTwoNodeBar[{{ 0,3},{4,0}},{1000,4}]; K= MergeElemIntoMasterStiff[Ke,{3,4,5,6},K]; Return[K] ];

Cell 6: module to get internal forces in members of truss of Exercise 3.6
IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u_]:= Module[{f=Table[0,{2}]}, f[[1]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{-4,0},{0,3}},{1000,2},{1,2,3,4},u]; f[[2]]=IntForce2DTwoNodeBar[{{ 0,3},{4,0}},{1000,4},{3,4,5,6},u]; Return[f] ];

Cell 7: driver program to analyze truss of Exercise 3.6
f={0,0,12,0,0,0}; K=AssembleMasterStiffOfExampleTruss[]; Kmod=ModifiedMasterStiffForDBC[ {1,2,5,6},K]; fmod=ModifiedMasterForcesForDBC[{1,2,5,6},f]; u=Simplify[Inverse[Kmod].fmod]; Print["Computed nodal displacements:"]; Print[u]; f=Simplify[K.u]; Print["External node forces including reactions:"]; Print[f]; p=Simplify[IntForcesOfExampleTruss[u]]; Print["Internal member forces:"]; Print[p];
Computed nodal displacements: 9 1 0, 0, , , 0, 0 512 128 External node forces including reactions: 9 9 6, , 12, 0, 6, 2 2 Internal member forces: 15 15 , 2 2

Figure E4.2. Modified cells to do the truss of Exercise 3.6.

4–19

Chapter 4: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLE TRUSS BY A CAS

4–20

EXERCISE 4.6 Not assigned. EXERCISE 4.7 Not assigned.

4–20

.

Constructing MoM Members

5

5–1

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§5.1. §5.2.

§5.3.

§5.4.

§5. §5. §5.

Introduction Formulation of MoM Members §5.2.1. What They Look Like . . . . . . . . §5.2.2. End Quantities, Degrees of Freedom, Joint Forces §5.2.3. Internal Quantities . . . . . . . . . . §5.2.4. Discrete Field Equations, Tonti Diagram . . . Simplex MoM Members §5.3.1. The Bar Element Revisited . . . . . . . §5.3.2. The Spar Element . . . . . . . . . . §5.3.3. The Shaft Element . . . . . . . . . . *Non-Simplex MoM Members §5.4.1. *Formulation Rules . . . . . . . . . . §5.4.2. *Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5–3 5–3 5–3 5–4 5–4 5–5 5–6 5–6 5–8 5–9 5–10 5–10 5–11 5–12 5–12 5–13

5–2

5–3 §5.1. Introduction

§5.2

FORMULATION OF MOM MEMBERS

The truss member used as example in Chapters 2–4 is an instance of a structural element. Such elements may be formulated directly using concepts and modeling techniques developed in Mechanics of Materials (MoM).1 The construction does not involve the more advanced tools that are required for the continuum finite elements that appear in Part II. This Chapter presents an overview of the technique to construct the element stiffness equations of “MoM members” using simple matrix operations. These simplified equations come in handy for a surprisingly large number of applications, particularly in skeletal structures. Focus is on simplex elements, which may be formed directly as a sequence of matrix operations. Non-simplex elements are presented as a recipe because their proper formulation requires work theorems not yet studied. The physical interpretation of the FEM is still emphasized. Consequently we continue to speak of structures built up of members (elements) connected at joints (nodes). §5.2. Formulation of MoM Members §5.2.1. What They Look Like MoM-based formulations are largely restricted to intrinsically one-dimensional members. These are structural components one of whose dimensions, called longitudinal, is significantly larger than the other two, called the transverse dimensions. Such members are amenable to the simplified structural theories developed in MoM textbooks. This Chapter covers only straight members with geometry defined by the two end joints.2 The member cross sections are defined by the intersection of planes normal to the longitudinal dimension with the member. See Figure 5.1. Note that although the individual member will be idealized as being one-dimensional in its intrinsic or local coordinate system, it often functions as component of a two- or three-dimensional structure. This class of structural components embodies bars, beams, beam-columns, shafts and spars. Although geometrically similar, the names distinguish the main kind of internal forces the member resists and transmits: axial forces for bars, bending and shear forces for beams, axial compression and bending for beam-columns, torsion forces for shafts, and shear forces for spars. Members are connected at their end joints by displacement degrees of freedom. For truss (bar) and spar members those freedoms are translational components of the joint displacements. For other types, notably beams and shafts, nodal rotations are chosen as additional degrees of freedom. Structures fabricated with MoM members are generally three-dimensional. Their geometry is defined with respect to a global Cartesian coordinate system {x, y, z}. Two-dimensional idealizations are useful simplifications should the nature of the geometry and loading allow the reduction of the structural model to one plane of symmetry, which is chosen to be the {x, y} plane. Plane trusses and plane frameworks are examples of such simplifications.
1

Mechanics of Materials was called Strength of Materials in older texts. It covers bars, beams, shafts, arches, thin plates and shells, but only one-dimensional models are considered in introductory undergraduate courses. MoM involves ab initio phenomenological assumptions such as “plane sections remain plane” or “shear effects can be neglected in thin beams.” These came about as the byproduct of two centuries of structural engineering practice, justified by success. A similar acronym (MOM) is used in Electrical Engineering for something completely different: the Method of Moments. Advanced Mechanics of Materials includes curved members. Plane arch elements are studied in Chapter 13.

2

5–3

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–4

z

y ¯

x ¯

x

y

z ¯

Figure 5.1. A Mechanics of Materials (MoM) member is a structural element one of whose dimensions (the longitudinal dimension) is significantly larger than the other two. Local axes {x, y , z } are chosen as indicated. Although ¯ ¯ ¯ the depicted member is prismatic, some applications utilize tapered or stepped members, the cross section of which varies as a function of x. ¯

In this Chapter we study generic structural members that fit the preceding class. An individual member is identified by e but this superscript will be usually suppressed in the equations below to reduce clutter. The local axes are denoted by {x, y , z }, with x along the longitudinal direction. See ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ Figure 5.1. The mathematical model of a MoM member is obtained by an idealization process. The model represents the member as a line segment that connects the two end joints, as depicted in Figure 5.2. §5.2.2. End Quantities, Degrees of Freedom, Joint Forces The set of mathematical variables used to link members are called end quantities or connectors. In the Direct Stiffness Method (DSM) these are joint displacements (the degrees of freedom) and the joint forces. These quantities are related by the member stiffness equations. ¯ The degrees of freedom at the end joints i and j are collected in the joint displacement vector u. This may include translations only, rotations only, or a combination of translations and rotations. ¯ The vector of joint forces ¯ groups components in one to one correspondence with u. Component f pairs must be conjugate in the sense of the Principle of Virtual Work. For example if the x-translation ¯ ¯ f ¯ at joint i: u xi appears in u, the corresponding entry in ¯ is the x-force f¯xi at i. If the rotation about ¯ ¯ ¯ z at joint j: θz j appears in u, the corresponding entry in ¯ is the z-moment m z j . ¯ f ¯ §5.2.3. Internal Quantities Internal quantities are mechanical actions that take place within the member. Those actions involve stresses and deformations. Accordingly two types of internal quantities appear: Internal member forces form a finite set of stress-resultant quantities collected in an array p. They are obtained by integrating stresses over each cross section, and thus are also called generalized stresses in structural mechanics. This set characterizes the forces resisted by the material. Stresses at any point in a section may be recovered if p is known. Member deformations form a finite set of quantities, chosen in one-to one correspondence with internal member forces, and collected in an array v. This set characterizes the deformations experienced by the material. They are also called generalized strains in structural theory. Strains at any point in the member can be recovered if v is known. As in the case of end quantities, internal forces and deformations are paired in one to one correspondence. For example, the axial force in a bar member must be paired either with an average 5–4

5–5

§5.2

FORMULATION OF MOM MEMBERS

End quantities (connectors) are defined at the joints i, j

z

y ¯ i z ¯

(e)

j

x ¯

x

y

Internal quantities are defined within the member and may depend on x. ¯

Figure 5.2. The FE mathematical idealization of a MoM member. The model is one-dimensional in x. The two end joints are the site of end quantities: ¯ joint forces and displacements, that interconnect members. Internal quantities characterize internal forces, stresses and deformations in the member.

axial deformation, or with the total elongation. Pairs that mutually correspond in the sense of the Principle of Virtual Work are called conjugate. Unlike the case of end quantities, conjugacy of internal quantities is not a mandatory requirement although it simplifies some expressions. §5.2.4. Discrete Field Equations, Tonti Diagram ¯ The matrix equations that connect u, v, p and ¯ are called the discrete field equations. There are f three of them. ¯ The member deformations v are linked to the joint displacements u by the kinematic compatibility conditions, also called the deformation-displacement or strain-displacement equations: ¯ v = B u. (5.1)
¯ u

The internal member forces are linked to the member deformations by the constitutive equations. In the absence of initial strain effects those equations are homogeneous: p = S v. (5.2)

Stiffness ¯ ¯ ¯ f=A SBu=Ku
T

¯ f

Kinematic ¯ v=Bu

Equilibrium ¯ f = AT p

Finally, the internal member forces are linked to the joint forces by the equilibrium equations. If the internal forces p are constant over the member, the relation is simply ¯ = AT p. f (5.3)

v

p=Sv
Constitutive

p

Figure 5.3. Tonti diagram of the three discrete field equations (5.1)–(5.3) and the stiffness equation (5.4) for a simplex MoM member. Internal and end quantities appear inside the orange and yellow boxes, respectively.

In (5.3) the transpose of A is used for convenience.3
3

If p is a function of x the relation is of differential type. This form is studied in §5.4. ¯

5–5

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–6

The foregoing equations can be presented graphically as shown in Figure 5.3. This is a discrete variant of the so-called Tonti diagrams, which represent governing equations as arrows linking boxes containing kinematic and static quantities. Tonti diagrams for field (continuum) equations are introduced in Chapter 11. Matrices B, S and A receive the following names in the literature: A S B Equilibrium, leverage Rigidity, material, constitutive4 Compatibility, deformation-displacement, strain-displacement

If the element is sufficiently simple, the determination of these three matrices can be carried out through MoM techniques. If the construction requires more advanced tools, however, recourse to the general methodology of finite elements and variational principles is necessary. §5.3. Simplex MoM Members Throughout this section we assume that the internal quantities are constant over the member length. Such members are called simplex elements. If so the matrices A, B and S are independent of member cross section. For simplex elements the derivation of the element stiffness equations reduces to a straightforward sequence of matrix multiplications. Under the constancy-along-x assumption, elimination of the interior quantities p and v from (5.1)¯ (5.3) yields the element stiffness relation ¯ ¯ ¯ = AT S B u = K u, ¯ f whence the element stiffness matrix is ¯ K = AT S B. (5.5) (5.4)

¯ ¯ If both pairs: {p, v} and {f, u}, are conjugate in the sense of the Principle of Virtual Work, it can be shown that A = B and that S is symmetric. In that case ¯ K = BT SB. (5.6)

is a symmetric matrix. Symmetry is computationally desirable for reasons outlined in Part III.
symmetric even if S is unsymmetric and A = B. However there are more opportunities to go wrong. ¯ ¯ Remark 5.1. If ¯ and u are conjugate (as required in §5..2.2) but p and v are not, K must come out to be f

§5.3.1. The Bar Element Revisited The simplest MoM element is the prismatic bar or truss member already derived in Chapter 2. See Figure 5.4. This qualifies as simplex because all internal quantities are constant. One minor difference in the derivation below is that the joint displacements and forces in the y direction are ¯ omitted in the generic element because they contribute nothing to the stiffness equations. In the
4

The name rigidity matrix for S is preferable. It is a member integrated version of the cross section constitutive equations. The latter are usually denoted by symbol R, as in §5.4.

5–6

5–7

§5.3

SIMPLEX MOM MEMBERS

(a) z −F z ¯ x y

y ¯

Axial rigidity EA, length L

(b) y ¯ f¯ , uxi i xi ¯ EA j f¯ , uxj xj ¯ x ¯

F

x ¯

L

Figure 5.4. The prismatic bar (also called truss) member: (a) individual member shown in 3D space, (b) idealization as generic member.

FEM terminology, freedoms associated with zero stiffness are called inactive. Three choices for internal deformation and force variables are considered next. The results confirm that the element ¯ stiffness equations coalesce, as expected, since the end quantities ¯ and u stay the same. f Derivation Using Axial Elongation and Axial Force. The member axial elongation d is taken as deformation measure, and the member axial force F as internal force measure. Hence v and p reduce to the scalars ≡ d and p ≡ F, respectively. The chain of discrete field equations is easily constructed: d = [ −1 Consequently ¯ K = AT SB = SBT B = S [ −1 1] EA −1 = 1 L 1 −1 −1 . 1 (5.8) 1] u xi ¯ ux j ¯ ¯ = Bu, F= EA d = S d, L ¯= f f¯xi f¯x j = −1 F = AT F. 1 (5.7)

Note that A = B because F and d are conjugate: F d is work. The foregoing equations can be represented graphyically with the discrete Tonti diagram of Figure 5.5.

Stiffness EA 1 −1 _ u f= −1 1 L _ _ u f
_

d=

Kinematic u xi ¯ ¯ = Bu −1 1 ux j ¯ d

¯= f F= EA d = Sd L Constitutive

Equilibrium f¯xi −1 = F = AT F 1 f¯x j

F

Figure 5.5. Tonti diagram for the bar element discrete equations (5.7)–(5.8).

Derivation Using Mean Axial Strain and Axial Force. Instead of d we may use the mean axial strain e = d/L as deformation measure whereas F is kept as internal force measure. The only change ¯ 5–7

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–8

(a) z z ¯ x y

V y ¯ (b) x ¯ y ¯ f¯yi , uyi GA ¯ s (e) i −V
Shear rigidity GA s , length L

f¯yj , u yj ¯ j x ¯

L

Figure 5.6. The prismatic spar (also called shear-web) member: (a) individual member shown in 3D space, (b) idealization as generic member in local system.

is that B becomes [ −1 1 ] /L whereas S becomes E A. Matrix A does not change. The product ¯ AT SB gives the same K as in (5.8), as can be expected. Now AT is not equal to B because F and e are not conjugate, but they differ only by a factor 1/L. ¯ Derivation Using Mean Axial Strain and Axial Stress. We keep the mean axial strain e = d/L ¯ as deformation measure but take the mean axial stress σ = F/A (which is not conjugate to e) as ¯ ¯ internal force measure. Now B = [ −1 1 ] /L, S = E and AT = A [ −1 1 ]. The product AT SB ¯ gives again the same K shown in (5.8). ¯ Transformation to Global Coordinates. Since u yi and u y j are not part of (5.7) and (5.8) the ¯ displacement transformation matrix from local to global {x, y} coordinates is 2 × 4, instead of 4 × 4 as in §2.8.1. On restoring the element identifier e the appropriate local-to-global transformation is  ue xi 0  ue   yi  = Te ue , s  ue j  x e uyj 

¯ ue =

ue ¯ xi ue j ¯x

=

c 0

s 0

0 c

(5.9)

¯ where c = cos ϕ e , s = sin ϕ e , and ϕ e is the angle from x to x, cf. Figure 2.8. The 4 × 4 globalized e e T ¯e e element stiffness matrix K = (T ) K T agrees with (2.18). The extension of (5.9) to 3D is handled as an Exercise. §5.3.2. The Spar Element The spar or shear-web member has two joints (end nodes): i and j. This member can only resist and transmit a constant shear force V in the plane of the web, which is chosen to be the {x, y } plane. ¯ ¯ See Figure 5.6. It is often used for modeling high-aspect aircraft wing structures, as illustrated in Figure 5.7. We consider here only prismatic spar members of uniform material and constant cross section, which thus qualify as simplex. The active degrees of freedom for a generic spar member of length L, as depicted in Figure 5.6(b), ¯ are u yi and u y j . Let G be the shear modulus and As the effective shear area. (A concept developed ¯ in Mechanics of Materials; for a narrow rectangular cross section, As = 5A/6.) The shear rigidity is G As . As deformation measure the mean shear strain γ = V /(G As ) is chosen. 5–8

5–9 The kinematic, constitutive, and equilibrium equations are

§5.3

SIMPLEX MOM MEMBERS

−1 V = AT V, 1 (5.10) Note that A = B because V and γ are not work-conjugate. (This difference is easily adjusted for, however; see Exercise 5.1.) The local stiffness equations follow as γ = 1 [ −1 L 1] ¯ = Bu, V = G As γ = Sγ , ¯= f = ¯= f f¯yi f¯y j ¯ = AT S Bu = G As L 1 −1 −1 1 u yi ¯ uyj ¯ ¯ ¯ = K u. (5.11)

u yi ¯ uyj ¯

f¯yi f¯y j

If the spar member is used in a two dimensional context, the displacement transformation from local to global coordinates {x, y} is  ue xi ue ¯ yi −s c 0 0  u e   yi  = Te ue , ¯ = ue = ue j ¯y 0 0 −s c  u e j  x ue j y (5.12) e e e where c = cos ϕ , s = sin ϕ , and ϕ is the angle from x to x, cf. Figure 2.8. The 4 × 4 globalized ¯ ¯e spar stiffness matrix is then Ke = (Te )T K Te . This is worked out in Exercise 5.2. More often, however, the spar member will be a component in a three-dimensional structural model, e.g. the aircraft wing shown in Figure 5.7. If so the determination of the 2×6 transformation matrix is more involved, as an “orientation node” is required. This is the topic of Exercise 5.5. §5.3.3. The Shaft Element The shaft, also called torque member, has two joints (end nodes): i and j. A shaft can only resist and transmit a constant torque or twisting moment T along its longitudinal axis x, as pictured in ¯ Figure 5.8(a). We consider here only prismatic shaft members with uniform material and constant cross section, which thus qualify as simplex. The active degrees of freedom of a generic shaft member of length L, ¯ ¯ ¯ depicted in Figure 5.8(b), are θxi and θx j . These are the infinitesimal end rotations about x, positive according to the right-hand rule. The associated joint (node) forces are end moments denoted as m xi and m x j . ¯ ¯ The only internal force is the torque T , positive if acting as pictured in Figure 5.8(a). Let G be the shear modulus and G J the effective torsional rigidity.5 As deformation measure pick the relative
5

COVER PLATES SPAR RIB

Figure 5.7. Spar members in aircraft wing (Piper Cherokee). For more impressive aircraft structures see CAETE slides.

J has dimension of (length)4 . For a circular or annular cross section it reduces to the polar moment of inertia about x. ¯ The determination of J for noncircular cross sections is covered in Mechanics of Materials textbooks.

5–9

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–10

(a) y ¯ z _ _ m xi , θxi x y z ¯ T

Torsional rigidity GJ, length L

x ¯ _ _ m xj , θxj T mxi, θxi ¯ ¯ i

(b) y ¯ (e) L GJ ¯ j mxj, θxj

x ¯

Figure 5.8. The prismatic shaft (also called torque member): (a) individual member shown in 3D space, (b) idealization as generic member in the local system.

¯ ¯ twist angle φ = θx j − θxi . The kinematic, constitutive, and equilibrium equations provided by Mechanics of Materials are φ = [ −1 1] ¯ θxi ¯ θx j ¯ = Bu, T = GJ φ = Sγ , L ¯= f m xi ¯ mx j ¯ = −1 T = BT T. 1 (5.13)

From these the local stiffness equations follow as ¯= f m xi ¯ mx j ¯ ¯ = BT S Bu = GJ L 1 −1 −1 1 ¯ θxi ¯ θx j ¯ ¯ = K u. (5.14)

If the shaft is used in a two-dimensional context, the displacement transformation to global coordinates {x, y} within the framework of infinitesimal rotations, is ¯e θxi ¯e θx j
e  θxi e 0  θ yi   = Te θe ,  e s  θx j  e θy j

¯ ue =

=

c 0

s 0

0 c

(5.15)

¯ where as usual c = cos ϕ e , s = sin ϕ e , and ϕ e is the angle from x to x. Note that θe collects only global node rotations components. This operation is elaborated further in Exercise 5.3.
§5.4.

*Non-Simplex MoM Members

The straightforward formulation of simplex MoM elements does not immediately carry over to the case in which internal quantities p and v vary over the member; that is, depend on x. The dependence may be due to ¯ element type, varying cross section, or both. As a result, one or more of the matrices A, B and S depend on x. Such members are called non-simplex. ¯ ¯e The matrix multiplication rule (5.4) cannot be used to construct the element stiffness matrix K of non-simplex T ¯e ¯ ¯ ¯ members. This can be grasped by observing that A(x) S(x)B(x) would depend on x. On the other hand, K ¯ ¯ must be independent of x because it relates the end quantities u and ¯ ¯ f.

5–10

5–11
§5.4.1. *Formulation Rules

§5.4 *NON-SIMPLEX MOM MEMBERS

The derivation of non-simplex MoM elements requires use of the work principles of mechanics, for example the Principle of Virtual Work or PVW. Thus, more care must be exercised in the choice of conjugate internal quantities. The following rules can be justified through the arguments presented in Part II. They are stated here as recipe, and apply only to displacement-assumed elements. Rule 1. Select internal deformations v(x) and internal forces p(x) that are conjugate in the PVW sense. Link ¯ ¯ deformations to node displacements by v(x) = B(x)u. ¯ ¯ Rule 2. From the PVW it may be shown (see Remark 5.2 below) that the force equilibrium equation exists only in a differential sense: f. (5.16) BT dp = d ¯ Here d in dp denotes differentiation with respect to x. The meaning of dp is simply p(x) d x. That is, the ¯ ¯ ¯ differential of internal forces as one passes from cross-section x to a neighboring one x +d x. The interpretation ¯ ¯ ¯ of d ¯ is less immediate because ¯ is not a function of x. It actually means the contribution of that member f f ¯ ¯ See (5.18) and (5.19) below. slice to the building of the node force vector f. Rule 3. The constitutive relation is p = Rv, (5.17)
¯ f=
0 L

¯ u

Stiffness ¯ ¯ BT R B dx u

¯ f

in which R, which may depend on x, must be symmetric. ¯ Note that symbol R in (5.17) replaces the S of (5.2). Matrix R pertains to a specific cross section whereas S applies to the entire member. This distinction is further elaborated in Exercise 5.9. The discrete relations supplied by the foregoing rules are displayed in the discrete Tonti diagram of Figure 5.9. Internal quantities are now eliminated starting from the differential equilibrium relation (5.16):

(at each x-section)

Kinematic

(at each x-section)

Equilibrium

v=Bu ¯

¯ d f = BT dp p=Rv Constitutive p

v

(at each x-section)

Figure 5.9. Discrete Tonti diagram of the equations for a non-simplex MoM member.

¯ ¯ d ¯ = BT dp = BT p d x = BT R v d x = BT R B u d x = BT R B d x u. f ¯ ¯ ¯¯ Integrating both sides over the member length L yields ¯= f
0 L L 0

(5.18)

d¯ = f

¯ ¯ BT R B d x u = K u, ¯ ¯

(5.19)

¯ because u does not depend on x. Consequently the local element stiffness matrix is ¯ ¯ K=
0 L

BT R B d x ¯

(5.20)

The recipe (5.20) will be justified in Part II through energy methods. It will be seen that it generalizes to arbitrary displacement-assumed finite elements in any number of space dimensions. It is used in the derivation of the stiffness equations of the plane beam element in Chapter 12. The reduction of (5.20) to (5.6) when the dependence on x disappears is the subject of Exercise 5.8. ¯
T ¯ ¯ undergoing virtual node displacements δ u and associated deformations δv: d ¯ δ u = dpT δv = dpT (B u) = f ¯ ¯ ¯ f. (BT dp)T δ u. Since δ u is arbitrary, BT dp = d ¯

Remark 5.2. The proof of (5.16) follows by equating expressions of the virtual work of a slice of length d x ¯

5–11

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–12

§5.4.2. *Examples
Example 5.1. A two-node bar element has constant elastic modulus E but a continuously varying area: Ai ,

A j and Am at i, j and m, respectively, where m is the midpoint between end joints i and j. This variation can be fitted by ¯ ¯ ¯ (5.21) A(x) = Ai Ni (x) + A j N j (x) + Am Nm (x). ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ Here Ni (x) = − 1 ξ(1 − ξ ), N j (x) = 1 ξ(1 + ξ ) and Nm (x) = 1 − ξ 2 , with ξ = 2x/L − 1, are interpolating 2 2 polynomials further studied in Part II as “element shape functions.” As internal quantities take the strain e and the axial force p = E Ae, which are conjugate quantities. Assuming the strain e to be uniform over the element (this is characteristic of a displacement assumed element and is justified through the method of shape functions explained in Part II.) the MoM equations are ¯ e = Bu, p = E A(x) e = R(x) e, ¯ ¯ d ¯ = BT dp, f B= 1 [ −1 L 1]. (5.22)

Inserting into (5.20) and carrying out the integration yields ¯ EA ¯ K= L 1 −1 −1 , 1 with ¯ A = 1 (Ai + A j ) + 2 Am . 6 3 (5.23)

Example 5.2. Same as in the previous case but now the strain e is taken to be e = p/(E A), whereas the axial ¯ force p is constant and defined by p = − f¯xi = f¯x j . The integrals become rational functions of x and are best evaluated through Mathematica. The completion of this Example is the matter of an Exercise.

Notes and Bibliography The derivation of MoM elements using straightforward matrix algebra is typical of pre-1962 Matrix Structural Analysis (MSA). The excellent book of Pestel and Leckie [193], unfortunately out of print, epitomizes that approach. Historically this idea interweaved with Generation 1 of FEM, as outlined in §1.5.3. By 1970 simplified derivations had fallen out of favor as yokelish. But these elements do not need improvement. They still work fine: a bar or beam stiffness today is the same as 40 years ago.6 The Mechanics of Materials books by Beer-Johnston [19] and Popov [200] can be cited as being widely used in US undergraduate courses. But they are not the only ones. A September 2003 in-print book search through www3.addall.com on “Mechanics of Materials” returns 99 hits whereas one on “Strength of Materials” (the older name) compiles 112. Folding editions and paper/softback variants one gets about 60 books; by all accounts an impressive number. Spar members are discussed only in MoM books that focus on aircraft structures, since they are primarily used in modeling shear web action. On the other hand, bars, shafts and beams are standard fare. The framework presented here is a tiny part of MSA. A panoramic view, including linkage to continuum formulations from the MSA viewpoint, is presented in [79]. The source of Tonti diagrams is discussed in Chapter 11. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

6

The chief technical difference is the heavier use of differential equations prior to 1962, as opposed to the energy methods in vogue today. The end result for simple one-dimensional models is the same.

5–12

5–13
Homework Exercises for Chapter 5 Constructing MoM Members

Exercises

formulated in §5.3.2, so that A = B. Draw the Tonti diagram with the discrete equations for that choice of v and p, using Figure 5.5 as guide (that is, with the actual matrix equations along the arrows).

EXERCISE 5.1 [A:10] Explain how to select the deformation variable v (paired to V ) of the spar member

EXERCISE 5.2 [A:15] Obtain the 4 × 4 global element stiffness matrix of a prismatic spar member in a two

dimensional Cartesian system {x, y}. Start from (5.11). Indicate where the transformation (5.12) comes from ¯e (Hint: read §2.8). Evaluate Ke = (Te )T K Te in closed form.

EXERCISE 5.3 [A:15] Obtain the 4 × 4 global element stiffness matrix of a prismatic shaft element in a two dimensional Cartesian system {x, y}. Include only node rotation freedoms in the global displacement vector. Start from (5.14). Justify the transformation (5.15) (Hint: infinitesimal rotations transform as vectors). ¯e Evaluate Ke = (Te )T K Te in closed form.

(a)

j (x j , y j , zj ) − uxj − x E, A

(b)

j − y i (x i , yi , z i ) y z − z x
Figure E5.1. Bar element in 3D for Exercise 5.4.

− x

−xi u

L

− y L i

EXERCISE 5.4 [A+N:15(10+5)] A bar element moving in three dimensional space is completely defined

by the global coordinates {xi , yi , z i }, {x j , y j , z j } of its end nodes i and j, as illustrated in Figure E5.1. ¯ The 2 × 6 displacement transformation matrix T, with superscript e dropped for brevity, links ue = Tue . ¯ ¯ ¯ Here ue contains the two local displacements u xi and u x j whereas ue contains the six global displacements u xi , u yi , u zi , u x j , u y j , u z j . (a) From vector mechanics show that T= 1 L x ji 0 y ji 0 z ji 0 0 x ji 0 y ji 0 z ji = cx ji c y ji cz ji 0 0 0 0 0 0 cx ji c y ji cz ji (E5.1)

in which L is the element length, x ji = x j − xi , etc., and cx ji = x ji /L, etc., are the direction cosines of the vector going from i to j. (b) Evaluate T for a bar going from node i at {1, 2, 3} to node j at {3, 8, 6}.

EXERCISE 5.5 [A+N:30(10+15+5)] A spar element in three dimensional space is only partially defined by the global coordinates {xi , yi , z i }, {x j , y j , z j } of its end nodes i and j, as illustrated in Figure E5.2. The problem is that axis y , which defines the direction of shear force transmission, is not uniquely defined by i ¯ 7 and j. Most FEM programs use the orientation node method to complete the definition. A third node k, not
7

The same ambiguity arises in beam elements in 3D space. These elements are covered in Part III.

5–13

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–14
(b) a b h α m i c β L−c j − x

(a)

Orientation node k defines plane −− {x,y} as passing through {i,j,k}

k

k (xk , yk , z k) G, A s − uyi i (x i , yi , z i) y z − z x − y

−yj j (x j , y j , z j) u − x − y

−xi u

L

Figure E5.2. Spar element in 3D for Exercise 5.5.

colinear with i and j, is provided by the user. Nodes {i, j, k} define the {x, y } plane and thus z . The projection ¯ ¯ ¯ of k on line i j is point m. The distance h > 0 from m to k is called h as shown in Figure E5.2(b). The ¯ 2 × 6 displacement transformation matrix T, with superscript e omitted to reduce clutter, relates ue = Tue . e e ¯ ¯ ¯ Here u contains the local transverse displacements u yi and u y j whereas u contains the global displacements u xi , u yi , u zi , u x j , u y j , u z j . (a) Show that T= 1 h xkm 0 ykm 0 z km 0 0 xkm 0 ykm 0 z km = cxkm c ykm czkm 0 0 0 0 0 0 cxkm c ykm czkm (E5.2)

in which xkm = xk − xm , etc., and cxkm = xkm / h, etc., are the direction cosines of the vector going from m to k. (Assume that the position of m is known. That computation is carried out in the next item.) (b) Work out the formulas to compute the coordinates of point m in terms of the coordinates of {i, j, k}. Assume a, b and L are computed immediately from the input data. Using the notation of Figure E5.2(b) p( p − a)( p − b)( p − L) with and elementary trigonometry, show that h = 2A/L, where A = p = 1 (L + a + b) (Heron’s formula), cos α = (L 2 + b2 − a 2 )/(2bL), cos β = (L 2 + a 2 − b2 )/(2a L), 2 c = b cos α, L − c = a cos β, xm = xi (L − c)/L + x j c/L, etc.8 Evaluate T for a spar member going from node i at {1, 2, 3} to node j at {3, 8, 6}. with k at {4, 5, 6}.

(c)

EXERCISE 5.6 [A:20] Explain how thermal effects can be generally incorporated in the constitutive equation

(5.2) to produce an initial force vector for a simplex element.
EXERCISE 5.7 [A:15] Draw the discrete Tonti diagram for the prismatic shaft element. Use 5.5 as a guide (that is, with the actual matrix equations along the arrows). EXERCISE 5.8 [A:15] If the matrices B and R are constant over the element length L, show that expression (5.20) of the element stiffness matrix for a non-simplex member reduces to (5.6), in which S = LR. EXERCISE 5.9 [A:20] Explain in detail the quickie derivation of footnote 6. (Knowledge of the Principle of Virtual Work is required to do this exercise.)
8

An alternative and more elegant procedure, found by a student in 1999, can be sketched as follows. From Figure E5.2(b) obviously the two subtriangles imk and jkm are right-angled at m and share side km of length h. Apply Pythagoras’ theorem twice, and subtract so as to cancel out h 2 and c2 , getting a linear equation for c that can be solved directly.

5–14

5–15

Exercises

EXERCISE 5.10 [A:25(10+5+10)] Consider a non-simplex element in which R varies with x but B = A is ¯

constant. (a) From (5.20) prove that ¯ ¯ K = LBT R B, (b) (c) 1 ¯ with R = L
L

R(x) d x ¯ ¯
0

(E5.3)

¯ Apply (E5.3) to obtain K for a tapered bar with area defined by the linear law A = Ai (1− x/L)+ A j x/L, ¯ ¯ where Ai and A j are the end areas at i and j, respectively. Take B = [ −1 1 ] /L. Apply (E5.3) to verify the result (5.23) for a bar with parabolically varying cross section.

EXERCISE 5.11 [A/C+N:30(25+5)] A prismatic bar element in 3D space is referred to a global coordinate

system {x, y, z}, as in Figure E5.1. The end nodes are located at {x1 , y1 , z 1 } and {x2 , y2 , z 2 }.9 The elastic modulus E and the cross section area A are constant along the length. Denote x21 = x2 − x1 , y21 = y2 − y1 , 2 2 2 z 21 = z 2 − z 1 and L = x21 + y21 + z 21 . (a) Show that the element stiffness matrix in global coordinates can be compactly written10 Ke = (b) EA T B B, L3 in which B = [ −x21 −y21 −z 21 x21 y21 z 21 ] . (E5.4)

Compute Ke if the nodes are at {1, 2, 3} and {3, 8, 6}, with elastic modulus E = 343 and cross section area A = 1. Note: the computation can be either done by hand or with the help of a program such as the following Mathematica module, which is used in Part III:

Stiffness3DBar[ncoor_,mprop_,fprop_,opt_]:= Module[ {x1,x2,y1,y2,z1,z2,x21,y21,z21,Em,Gm,rho,alpha,A, num,L,LL,LLL,B,Ke}, {{x1,y1,z1},{x2,y2,z2}}=ncoor; {x21,y21,z21}={x2-x1,y2-y1,z2-z1}; {Em,Gm,rho,alpha}=mprop; {A}=fprop; {num}=opt; If [num,{x21,y21,z21,Em,A}=N[{x21,y21,z21,Em,A}]]; LL=x21^2+y21^2+z21^2; L=PowerExpand[Sqrt[LL]]; LLL=Simplify[LL*L]; B={{-x21,-y21,-z21,x21,y21,z21}}; Ke=(Em*A/LLL)*Transpose[B].B; Return[Ke]]; ClearAll[Em,A]; Em=343; A=1;
9 10

End nodes are labeled 1 and 2 instead of i and j to agree with the code listed below. There are several ways of arriving at this result. Some are faster and more elegant than others. Here is a sketch of one of the ways. Denote by L 0 and L the lengths of the bar in the undeformed and deformed configurations, respectively. Then
2 1 2 (L

− L 2 ) = x21 (u x2 − u x1 ) + y21 (u y2 − u y1 ) + z 21 (u z2 − u z1 ) + Q ≈ Bu, 0

in which Q is a quadratic function of node displacements which is therefore dropped in the small-displacement linear theory. Also on account of small displacements
2 1 2 (L

− L 2 ) = 1 (L + L 0 )(L − L 0 ) ≈ L 0 2

L.

Hence the small axial strain is e = L/L = (1/L 2 )Bue , which begins the Tonti diagram. Next is F = E A e. Finally you must show that force equilibrium at nodes requires fe = (1/L)BT F. Multiplying through gives (E5.4). A plodding way is to start from the local stiffness (5.8) and transform to global using (E5.1).

5–15

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–16

ncoor={{0,0,0},{2,6,3}}; mprop={Em,0,0,0}; fprop={A}; opt={False}; Ke=Stiffness3DBar[ncoor,mprop,fprop,opt]; Print["Stiffness of 3D Bar Element:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm]; Print["eigs of Ke: ",Eigenvalues[Ke]]; As a check, the six eigenvalues of this particular Ke should be 98 and five zeros.
EXERCISE 5.12 [A/C:25] Complete Example 5.2.

5–16

Introduction to FEM

Constructing MoM Members

5

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

What Are MoM Members?

Skeletal structural members whose stiffness equations can be constructed by Mechanics of Materials (MoM) methods

Can be locally modeled as 1D elements

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

MoM Members Tend to Look Alike ...
cross section
z y ¯ x ¯

x

y

z ¯

nal dir longitudi

ection

One dimension (longitudinal) much larger than the other two (transverse)

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

But Receive Different Names According to Structural Function
Bars: Beams: Shafts: transmit axial forces transmit bending transmit torque

Spars (aka Webs): transmit shear Beam-columns: transmit bending + axial force

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Common Features of MoM Finite Element Models
End quantities are defined at the joints z ¯ y e i x y z ¯ Internal quantities are defined in the member j x ¯

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Governing Matrix Equations for Simplex MoM Element
From node displacements to internal deformations (strains) _ v=Bu From deformations to internal forces p=Sv From internal forces to node forces _ f=A p

Kinematic

Constitutive

Equilibrium

If ¯ and u are PVW (Virtual Work) conjugate, B = A f ¯

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Tonti Diagram of Governing Matrix Equations for Simplex MoM Element
Stiffness ¯ ¯ ¯ f = AT S B u = K u

¯ u

¯ f

¯ Kinematic v = B u p=Sv

¯ f = AT p Equilibrium

v

Constitutive

p

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Elimination of the Internal Quantities v and p gives the Element Stiffness Equations through Simple Matrix Multiplications
¯ = AT S B u = Ku ¯¯ ¯ f ¯ K = AT S B
If B = A

¯ K = BT S B

symmetric if S is

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

The Bar Element Revisited
(a) z −F z ¯ x y y ¯ Axial rigidity EA, length L

F

x ¯

(b)

y ¯ f¯ , uxi i xi ¯

EA

j f¯ , uxj xj ¯

x ¯

L

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

The Bar Element Revisited (cont'd)
d = [ −1 u xi ¯ 1] ux j ¯ ¯ = Bu

EA F= d = S d, L f¯xi −1 ¯= F = AT F f = 1 f¯x j ¯ = AT S B = S BT B = E A K L 1 −1 −1 1

Can be expanded to the 4 x 4 of Chapter 2 by adding two _ _ zero rows and columns to accomodate uyi and uy j

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Discrete Tonti Diagram for Bar Element

_

Stiffness
EA L
_ 1 −1 u −1 1 _ f

Kinematic
d= −1 1 u xi ¯ ux j ¯ ¯ = Bu

u

_

f=

Equilibrium
¯= f f¯xi f¯x j = −1 F = AT F 1

F=

d

EA d = Sd L

Constitutive

F

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

The Spar (a.k.a. Shear-Web) Element
(a) z z ¯ x (b) y y ¯ f¯yi , uyi GA ¯ s (e) i L f¯yj , u yj ¯ j x ¯ −V Shear rigidity GA s , length L V y ¯ x ¯

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Spars used in Wing Structure
(Piper Cherokee)

COVER PLATES SPAR RIB

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

The Spar Element (cont'd)
1 u yi ¯ ¯ = Bu γ = [ −1 1 ] uyj ¯ L V = G As γ = S γ ¯ ¯ = f yi = −1 V = AT V f 1 f¯y j ¯= f f¯yi f¯y j ¯ = AT S Bu = G As ¯ K= L G As L 1 −1 −1 1 u yi ¯ uyj ¯ ¯¯ = Ku

1 −1

−1 1

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

The Shaft Element
(a) y ¯ z _ _ m xi , θxi x (b) y mxi, θxi ¯ ¯ y ¯ i (e) L z ¯ GJ ¯ j mxj, θxj T T Torsional rigidity GJ, length L x ¯ _ _ m xj , θxj

x ¯

For stiffness derivation details see Notes

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Matrix Equations for Non-Simplex MoM Element
From node displacements to internal deformations at each section

¯ v=Bu

Kinematic

From deformations to internal forces at each section

p = Rv
From internal forces to node forces

Constitutive

¯ d f = AT dp

Equilibrium

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Tonti Diagram of Matrix Equations for Non-Simplex MoM Element (with A=B)
¯ f=
0 L

Stiffness

¯ u
Kinematic (at each section)

¯ ¯ BT R B dx u

¯ f

¯ v=Bu

¯ d f = BT dp p=Rv

Equilibrium

v

Constitutive (at each section)

p

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

High-Aspect Wing, Constellation (1952)

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Low-Aspect Delta Wing, F-117 (1975)

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Low-Aspect Delta Wing, Blackhawk (1972)

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 20

Introduction to FEM

Delta Wing Aircraft

IFEM Ch 5 – Slide 21

5–17
Homework Exercises for Chapter 5 Constructing MoM Members – Solutions

Solutions to Exercises

See Figure E5.3(a). The constitutive equation is V = (G As /L) d y . It is easily checked that B = [ −1 1 ] = A. Thus d y and V are conjugate. The Tonti diagram is shown in Figure E5.3(b).
(a) (b)
− u

EXERCISE 5.1 Take d y = γ L = u y j − u yi as deformation variable v paired to the transverse shear force V . ¯ ¯

K = AT S B =

_

G As 1 −1 −1 1 L

f
− dy = [ −1 1 ] −yi = B u u
yj

y

V
− u

dy

f = −yi =

f f yj

−1 V = AT V 1

x
−V dy

V=

G As dy = S d y L

Note: A = B

V

Figure E5.3. Solutions to Exercise 5.1: (a): conjugate variable d y (displacements grossly exaggerated for visibility); (b) Tonti diagram.

EXERCISE 5.2 The displacement transformation matrix Te is obtained by extracting rows 2 and 4 from that

of (2.17). With s and c defined as there, u yi ¯ uyj ¯ −s 0 c 0 0 −s u xi 0  u yi  = Te ue , c  ux j  uyj

=

(E5.5)

¯e Carrying out the multiplication (Te )T K Te gives the closed form of the spar element stiffness in global coordinates  2  s −sc −s 2 sc G As  −sc c2 sc −c2  ¯e . (E5.6) Ke = (Te )T K Te =  −s 2 sc s 2 −sc  L sc −c2 −sc c2
EXERCISE 5.3 The displacement transformation matrix Te is the same as that in (2.13) with the u x and u y

replaced by θx and θ y , respectively, because infinitesimal rotations transform exactly as vectors. As usual, the ¯e force transformation matrix is (Te )T . The result for the globalized element stiffness matrix Ke = (Te )T K Te is the same as (2.18), with factor E A/L replaced by G J/L.
EXERCISE 5.4

(a)

By elementary kinematics: u x = u x cx ji + u y c y ji + u z cz ji ¯ (E5.7) where {cx ji , c y ji , cz ji } are the 3 direction cosines of longitudinal x, defined by end nodes i and j (i → j) ¯ with respect to {x, y, z}, respectively. These 3 numbers are easily computed as {x ji /L , y ji /L , z ji /L}, respectively, in which x ji = x j − xi , y ji = y j − yi , z ji = z j − z i are the node coordinate differences and

5–17

Chapter 5: CONSTRUCTING MOM MEMBERS

5–18

L= (b)

x 2 + y 2 + z 2 is the element length. Evaluating this formula at end nodes i and j and puting in ji ji ji

matrix form gives the stated form. T=
EXERCISE 5.5
1 7

2 0

6 0

3 0

0 2

0 6

0 3

(E5.8)

(a)

From kinematics, at any point on the line i- j (the longitudinal axis of the spar) we can write the displacement in the y direction ¯ as the linear combination of global displacements: u y = c x y u x + c y y u y + cz y u z ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ (E5.9)
b − y i

k a h α m c β L−c j − x

¯ where cx y , c y y and cz y are the direction cosines formed by y ¯ ¯ ¯ with the x, y and z global axes, respectively. But the direction y can be defined by that of the vector joining m to k, where m is ¯ the projection of the orientation node on i- j; see Figure E5.4. Consequently cx y = cxkm , c y y = c ykm , and cz y = czkm and ¯ ¯ ¯ u y = cxkm u x + c ykm u y + czkm u z ¯ (E5.10)

Figure E5.4. Reproduction of Figure E5.2(b) for the reader’s convenience.

Evaluate this relation at node i: u yi = cxkm u xi + c ykm u yi + czkm u zi and at node j: u y j = cxkm u x j + ¯ ¯ c ykm u y j + czkm u z j . Collecting and passing to matrix form gives


¯ ue = u yi ¯ uyj ¯ = cxmk c ymk czmk 0 0 0 0 0 0 cxmk c ymk czmk

u xi  u yi   .  = T ue .  .  . uzj

(E5.11)

The global components of vector m→k are xkm = xk − xm , ykm = yk − ym and z km = z k − z m and its 2 2 2 length is h = xkm + ykm + z km . Consequently cxkm = xkm / h, c ykm = x ym / h and czkm = z km / h. This proves the form of T given in (E5.2). This assumes that the location of m is known, which is the topic of the next item. (b) Before proceeding to locate m the lengths a, b and L are computed from the coordinate data for {i, j, k}. These are the triangle side lengths pictured in Figure E5.4, are always positive. Then compute 2A from Heron’s area formula given in the Exercise assignment, taking the + sign of the square root so A ≥ 0. If A = 0 orientation node k is colinear with {i, j} and the computation aborts. Since 2A = Lh, obviously h = 2A/L, which must be positive. The location of point m is determined if the signed distance c from node i is computed. This can be done in several ways. Two methods are described below. Method I. The method outlined in the Exercise proceeds as follows. Compute cos α from the cosine law at vertex i: cos α = (L 2 + b2 − a 2 )/(2bL), Then c = b cos α = b(L 2 + b2 − a 2 )/(2bL) = (L 2 + b2 − a 2 )/(2L). The global coordinates of m are obtained by linear interpolation of those of i and j: xm = xi (L − c)/L + x j c/L, ym = xi (L − c)/L + y j c/L and z m = z i (L − c)/L + z j c/L. Then form xkm , ykm , z km , divide by h to get the direction cosines and store in T as per (E5.11). Method II. (Suggested in footnote to Exercise assignment). Apply Pithagoras’ theorem twice: h 2 = (b2 − c2 ) and h 2 = a 2 − (L − c)2 . On subtracting, h 2 and c2 cancel out giving b2 − a 2 + L 2 − 2Lc = 0, whence c = (L 2 + b2 − a 2 )/(2L), which is the same result as above. The coordinates of m are defined by interpolation, and T constructed as described for Method I.

5–18

.

FEM Modeling: Introduction

6

6–1

Chapter 6: FEM MODELING: INTRODUCTION

6–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§6.1. §6.2.

FEM Terminology Idealization §6.2.1. Models . . . . . . . . . . . . §6.2.2. Mathematical Models . . . . . . . §6.2.3. Implicit vs. Explicit Modeling . . . . . §6.3. Discretization §6.3.1. Analytical or Numerical? . . . . . . §6.3.2. Error Sources and Approximation . . . §6.3.3. Other Discretization Methods . . . . §6.4. The Finite Element Method §6.5. Element Attributes §6.5.1. Dimensionality . . . . . . . . . . §6.5.2. Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . §6.5.3. Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . §6.5.4. Degrees of Freedom . . . . . . . . §6.5.5. Nodal Forces . . . . . . . . . . §6.5.6. Constitutive Properties . . . . . . . §6.5.7. Fabrication Properties . . . . . . . §6.6. Classification of Mechanical Elements §6.6.1. Primitive Structural Elements . . . . §6.6.2. Continuum Elements . . . . . . . . §6.6.3. Special Elements . . . . . . . . . §6.6.4. Macroelements . . . . . . . . . . §6.6.5. Substructures . . . . . . . . . . §6.7. Assembly §6.8. Boundary Conditions §6.8.1. Essential and Natural B.C. . . . . . . §6.8.2. Boundary Conditions in Structural Problems §6. Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §6. References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . .

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6–3 6–4 6–5 6–5 6–6 6–6 6–6 6–7 6–8 6–8 6–8 6–9 6–9 6–10 6–10 6–10 6–10 6–10 6–10 6–11 6–11 6–11 6–12 6–12 6–12 6–13 6–13 6–13 6–14 6–14

6–2

6–3

§6.1

FEM TERMINOLOGY

Chapters 2 through 5 cover material technically known as Matrix Structural Analysis or MSA. This is a subject that historically preceded the Finite Element Method (FEM), as chronicled in Appendix H. This Chapter begins covering the FEM proper. This is distinguished from MSA by two traits: • • The ability to go beyond structures. The prominent role of continuum models and variational mathematics.

This Chapter introduces terminology used in FEM modeling, and surveys attributes and types of finite elements used in structural mechanics. The next Chapter gives more specific rules for defining meshes and boundary conditions. §6.1. FEM Terminology The ubiquitous term “degrees of freedom,” often abbreviated to either freedom or DOF, has figured prominently in the preceding Chapters. This term, as well as “stiffness matrix” and “force vector,” originated in structural mechanics, the application for which FEM was invented. These names have carried over to non-structural applications. This “terminology overspill” is discussed next. Classical analytical mechanics is that invented by Euler and Lagrange in the XVIII century and further developed by Hamilton and Jacobi as a systematic formulation of Newtonian mechanics. Its objects of attention are models of mechanical systems ranging from material particles composed of sufficiently large number of molecules, through airplanes, to the Solar System.1 The spatial configuration of any such system is described by its degrees of freedom or DOF. These are also called generalized coordinates. The terms state variables and primary variables are also used, particularly in mathematically oriented treatments. If the number of degrees of freedom is finite, the model is called discrete, and continuous otherwise. Because FEM is a discretization method, the number of DOF of a FEM model is necessarily finite. They are collected in a column vector called u. This vector is called the DOF vector or state vector. The term nodal displacement vector for u is reserved to mechanical applications. In analytical mechanics, each degree of freedom has a corresponding “conjugate” or “dual” term, which represents a generalized force.2 In non-mechanical applications, there is a similar set of conjugate quantities, which for want of a better term are also called forces or forcing terms. They are the agents of change. These forces are collected in a column vector called f. The inner product fT u has the meaning of external energy or work. Just as in the truss problem, the relation between u and f is assumed to be of linear and homogeneous. The last assumption means that if u vanishes so does f. The relation is then expressed by the master stiffness equations: Ku = f. (6.1) K is universally called the stiffness matrix even in non-structural applications because no consensus has emerged on different names. The physical significance of the vectors u and f varies according to the application being modeled, as illustrated in Table 6.1.
1

For cosmological scales, such as galaxy clusters or black holes, the general theory of relativity is necessary. For the atomic and sub-particle world, quantum mechanics is appropriate. In variational mathematics this is called a duality pairing.

2

6–3

Chapter 6: FEM MODELING: INTRODUCTION

6–4

Table 6.1. Significance of u and f in Miscellaneous FEM Applications Application Problem Structures and solid mechanics Heat conduction Acoustic fluid Potential flows General flows Electrostatics Magnetostatics State (DOF) vector u represents Displacement Temperature Displacement potential Pressure Velocity Electric potential Magnetic potential Conjugate vector f represents Mechanical force Heat flux Particle velocity Particle velocity Fluxes Charge density Magnetic intensity

If the relation between forces and displacements is linear but not homogeneous, equation (6.1) generalizes to Ku = f M + f I . (6.2)

Here f I is the initial node force vector introduced in Chapter 29 for effects such as temperature changes, and f M is the vector of mechanical forces. The basic steps of FEM are discussed below in more generality. Although attention is focused on structural problems, most of the steps translate to other applications problems as noted above. The role of FEM in numerical simulation is schematized in Figure 6.1, which is a merged simplification of Figures 1.2 and 1.3. Although this diagram oversimplifies the way FEM is actually used, it serves to illustrate terminology. The three key simulation steps shown are: idealization, discretization and solution. Each step is a source of errors. For example, the discretization error is the discrepancy that appears when the discrete solution is substituted in the mathematical model. The reverse steps: continuification and realization, are far more difficult and (generally) ill-posed problems. The idealization and discretization steps, briefly mentioned in Chapter 1, deserve further discussion. The solution step is dealt with in more detail in Part III of this book.
IDEALIZATION Physical system DISCRETIZATION SOLUTION Discrete solution Solution error

FEM
Mathematical model Discrete model

REALIZATION & IDENTIFICATION

CONTINUIFICATION

Discretization + solution error

Modeling + discretization + solution error
Figure 6.1. A simplified view of the physical simulation process, reproduced to illustrate modeling terminology.

6–4

6–5 §6.2. Idealization

§6.2

IDEALIZATION

Idealization passes from the physical system to a mathematical model. This is the most important step in engineering practice, because it cannot be “canned.” It must be done by a human. §6.2.1. Models The word “model” has the traditional meaning of a scaled copy or representation of an object. And that is precisely how most dictionaries define it. We use here the term in a more modern sense, which has become increasingly common since the advent of computers: A model is a symbolic device built to simulate and predict aspects of behavior of a system. (6.3) Note the distinction made between behavior and aspects of behavior. To predict everything, in all physical scales, you must deal with the actual system. A model abstracts aspects of interest to the modeler.3 The qualifier symbolic means that a model represents a system in terms of the symbols and language of another discipline. For example, engineering systems may be (and are) modeled with the symbols of mathematics and/or computer sciences.4 §6.2.2. Mathematical Models Mathematical modeling, or idealization, is a process by which an engineer or scientist passes from the actual physical system under study, to a mathematical model of the system, where the term model is understood in the sense of (6.3). The process is called idealization because the mathematical model is necessarily an abstraction of the physical reality — note the phrase aspects of behavior in (6.3). The analytical or numerical results produced by the mathematical model are physically re-interpreted only for those aspects.5 To give an example of the choices that an engineer may face, suppose that the structure is a flat plate structure subjected to transverse loading. Here is a non-exhaustive list of four possible mathematical models: 1. 2. 3. 4. A very thin plate model based on Von Karman’s coupled membrane-bending theory. A thin plate model, such as the classical Kirchhoff’s plate theory. A moderately thick plate model, for example Mindlin-Reissner plate theory. A very thick plate model based on three-dimensional elasticity.

The person responsible for this kind of decision is supposed to be familiar with the advantages, disadvantages, and range of applicability of each model. Furthermore the decision may be different in static analysis than in dynamics.
3 4 5

“All models are wrong, some are useful.” (George Box) A problem-definition input file, a digitized earthquake record, or a stress plot are examples of the latter. Whereas idealization can be reasonably taught in advanced design courses, the converse process of “realization” or “identification” — see Figure 6.1 — generally requires considerable physical understanding and maturity that can only be gained through professional experience.

6–5

Chapter 6: FEM MODELING: INTRODUCTION

6–6

Why is the mathematical model an abstraction of reality? Engineering systems, particularly in Aerospace and Mechanical, tend to be highly complex. For simulation it is necessary to reduce that complexity to manageable proportions. Mathematical modeling is an abstraction tool by which complexity can be controlled. This is achieved by “filtering out” physical details that are not relevant to the analysis process. For example, a continuum material model filters out the aggregate, crystal, molecular and atomic levels of matter. Engineers are typically interested in a few integrated quantities, such as the maximum deflection of a bridge or the fundamental periods of an airplane. Although to a physicist this is the result of the interaction of billions and billions of molecules, such details are weeded out by the modeling process. Consequently, picking a mathematical model is equivalent to choosing an information filter. §6.2.3. Implicit vs. Explicit Modeling
NT ONE MP EL CO EV L
ent pon Comations equ

al atic hem Matmodel

ary Libr t onen FEM omp e
C iscret d del mo

TEM SYS EL V LE e
plet Com tion solu em Syst ete r disc del mo

l sica Phy tem sys

Figure 6.2. A reproduction of Figure 1.5 with some relabeling. Illustrates implicit modeling: picking elements from an existing FEM code consents to an idealization. This has legal and professional implications.

As noted the diagram of Figure 6.1 is an oversimplification of engineering practice. The more common scenario is that pictured in Figures 1.2, 1.4 and 1.5. The latter is reproduced in Figure 6.2 for convenience. A common scenario in industry is: you have to analyze a structure or a substructure, and at your disposal is a “black box” general-purpose finite element program. Those programs offer a catalog of element types; for example, bars, beams, plates, shells, axisymmetric solids, general 3D solids, and so on. The moment you choose specific elements from the catalog you automatically accept the mathematical models on which the elements are based. This is implicit modeling. Ideally you should be fully aware of the implications of your choice. Providing such “finite element literacy” is one of the objective of this book. Unfortunately many users of commercial programs are unaware of the implied-consent aspect of implicit modeling and their legal implications. The other extreme happens when you select a mathematical model of the physical problem with your eyes wide open and then either shop around for a finite element program that implements that model, or write the program yourself. This is explicit modeling. It requires far more technical expertise, resources, experience and maturity than implicit modeling. But for problems that fall out of the ordinary it could be the right thing to do. In practice a combination of implicit and explicit modeling is common. The physical problem to be simulated is broken down into subproblems. Those subproblems that are conventional and fit available programs may be treated with implicit modeling, whereas those that require special handling may only submit to explicit modeling. 6–6

6–7 §6.3. Discretization

§6.3

DISCRETIZATION

Mathematical modeling is a simplifying step. But models of physical systems are not necessarily simple to solve. They often involve coupled partial differential equations in space and time subject to boundary and/or interface conditions. Such models have an infinite number of degrees of freedom. §6.3.1. Analytical or Numerical? At this point one faces the choice of going for analytical or numerical solutions. Analytical solutions, also called “closed form solutions,” are more intellectually satisfying, particularly if they apply to a wide class of problems, so that particular instances may be obtained by substituting the values of free parameters. Unfortunately they tend to be restricted to regular geometries and simple boundary conditions. Moreover some closed-form solutions, expressed for example as inverses of integral transforms, may have to be anyway numerically evaluated to be useful. Most problems faced by the engineer either do not yield to analytical treatment or doing so would require a disproportionate amount of effort.6 The practical way out is numerical simulation. Here is where finite element methods enter the scene. To make numerical simulations practical it is necessary to reduce the number of degrees of freedom to a finite number. The reduction is called discretization. The product of the discretization process is the discrete model. As discussed in Chapter 1, for complex engineering systems this model is the product of a multilevel decomposition. Discretization can proceed in space dimensions as well as in the time dimension. Because the present book deals primarily (except in Part IV) with static problems, we need not consider the time dimension and are free to concentrate on spatial discretization. §6.3.2. Error Sources and Approximation Figure 6.1 tries to convey graphically that each simulation step introduces a source of error. In engineering practice modeling errors are by far the most important. But they are difficult and expensive to evaluate, because model validation requires access to and comparison with experimental results. These may be either scarce, or unavailable in the case of a new product in the design stage. Next in order of importance is the discretization error. Even if solution errors are ignored — and usually they can — the computed solution of the discrete model is in general only an approximation in some sense to the exact solution of the mathematical model. A quantitative measurement of this discrepancy is called the discretization error. The characterization and study of this error is addressed by a branch of numerical mathematics called approximation theory. Intuitively one might suspect that the accuracy of the discrete model solution would improve as the number of degrees of freedom is increased, and that the discretization error goes to zero as that number goes to infinity. This loosely worded statement describes the convergence requirement of
6

This statement has to be tempered in two respects. First, the wider availability and growing power of computer algebra systems, outlined in Chapter 4, has widened the realm of analytical solutions than can be obtained within a practical time frame. Second, a combination of analytical and numerical techniques is often effective to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to facilitate parameter studies. Important examples are provided by Fourier analysis, perturbation and boundary-element methods.

6–7

Chapter 6: FEM MODELING: INTRODUCTION

6–8

discrete approximations. One of the key goals of approximation theory is to make the statement as precise as it can be expected from a branch of mathematics.7 §6.3.3. Other Discretization Methods It was stated in Chapter 1 that the most popular discretization techniques in structural mechanics are finite element methods and boundary element methods. The finite element method (FEM) is by far the most widely used. The boundary element method (BEM) has gained in popularity for special types of problems, particularly those involving infinite domains, but remains a distant second, and seems to have reached its natural limits. In non-structural application areas such as fluid mechanics and electromagnetics, the finite element method is gradually making up ground but faces stiff competition from both the classical and energybased finite difference methods. Finite difference and finite volume methods are particularly well entrenched in computational fluid dynamics spanning moderate to high Reynolds numbers. §6.4. The Finite Element Method The finite element method (FEM) is the dominant discretization technique in structural mechanics. As discussed in Chapter 1, the FEM can be interpreted from either a physical or mathematical standpoint. The treatment in Chapters 1–10 emphasizes the former. The basic concept in the physical FEM is the subdivision of the mathematical model into disjoint (non-overlapping) components of simple geometry called finite elements or elements for short. The response of each element is expressed in terms of a finite number of degrees of freedom characterized as the value of an unknown function, or functions, at a set of nodal points. The response of the mathematical model is then considered to be approximated by that of the discrete model obtained by connecting or assembling the collection of all elements. The disconnection-assembly concept occurs naturally when examining many artificial and natural systems. For example, it is easy to visualize an engine, bridge, building, airplane, or skeleton as fabricated from simpler components. Unlike finite difference models, finite elements do not overlap in space. In the mathematical interpretation of the FEM, this property goes by the name disjoint support or local support. §6.5. Element Attributes Just like members in the truss example, one can take finite elements of any kind one at a time. Their local properties can be developed by considering them in isolation, as individual entities. This is the key to the modular programming of element libraries. In the Direct Stiffness Method, elements are isolated by the disconnection and localization steps, which were described for the truss example in Chapter 2. The procedure involves the separation of elements from their neighbors by disconnecting the nodes, followed by referral of the element to a
7

The discretization error is often overhyped in the FEM literature, since it provides an inexhaustible source of publishable poppycock. If the mathematical model is way off, reducing the discretization error buys nothing; just a more accurate answer to the wrong problem.

6–8

6–9

§6.5 ELEMENT ATTRIBUTES

1D

2D

2D

3D

Figure 6.3. Typical finite element geometries in one through three dimensions.

convenient local coordinate system.8 After that we can consider generic elements: a bar element, a beam element, and so on. From the standpoint of the computer implementation, it means that you can write one subroutine or module that constructs, by suitable parametrization, all elements of one type, instead of writing a new one for each element instance. Following is a summary of the data associated with an individual finite element. This data is used in finite element programs to carry out element level calculations. §6.5.1. Dimensionality Elements can have intrinsic dimensionality of one, two or three space dimensions.9 There are also special elements with zero dimensionality, such as lumped springs or point masses. The intrinsic dimensionality can be expanded as necessary by use of kinematic transformations. For example a 1D element such as a bar, spar or beam may be used to build a model in 2D or 3D space. §6.5.2. Nodes Each element possesses a set of distinguishing points called nodal points or nodes for short. Nodes serve a dual purpose: definition of element geometry, and home for degrees of freedom. When a distinction is necessary we call the former geometric nodes and the latter connection nodes. For most elements studied here, geometric and connector nodes coalesce. Nodes are usually located at the corners or end points of elements, as illustrated in Figure 6.3. In the so-called refined or higher-order elements nodes are also placed on sides or faces, as well as possibly the interior of the element.
8

Both steps are only carried out in the modeler’s mind. They are placed as part of the DSM for instructional convenience. In practice, processing begins directly at the element level. In dynamic analysis, time may appear as an additional dimension.

9

6–9

Chapter 6: FEM MODELING: INTRODUCTION

6–10

Remark 6.1. In some elements geometric and connection nodes may be at different locations. This is illustrated

by the Veubeke equilibrium triangle described in Chapter 15. Some elements have purely geometric nodes, also called orientation nodes to complete the definition of certain geometric attributes. An example is the spar element in 3D shown in Figure E5.2, in which a third geometric node is used to define a local plane.

§6.5.3. Geometry The geometry of the element is defined by the placement of the geometric nodal points. Most elements used in practice have fairly simple geometries. In one-dimension, elements are usually straight lines or curved segments. In two dimensions they are of triangular or quadrilateral shape. In three dimensions the most common shapes are tetrahedra, pentahedra (also called wedges or prisms), and hexahedra (also called cuboids or “bricks”). See Figure 6.3. §6.5.4. Degrees of Freedom The element degrees of freedom (DOF) specify the state of the element. They also function as “handles” through which adjacent elements are connected. DOFs are defined as the values (and possibly derivatives) of a primary field variable at connector node points. The actual selection depends on criteria studied at length in Part II. Here we simply note that the key factor is the way in which the primary variable appears in the mathematical model. For mechanical elements, the primary variable is the displacement field and the DOF for many (but not all) elements are the displacement components at the nodes. §6.5.5. Nodal Forces There is always a set of nodal forces in a one-to-one correspondence with degrees of freedom. In mechanical elements the correspondence is established through energy arguments. §6.5.6. Constitutive Properties For a mechanical element these are relations that specify the material behavior. For example, in a linear elastic bar element it is sufficient to specify the elastic modulus E and the thermal coefficient of expansion α. §6.5.7. Fabrication Properties For mechanical elements these are fabrication properties which have been integrated out from the element dimensionality. Examples are cross sectional properties of MoM elements such as bars, beams and shafts, as well as the thickness of a plate or shell element. For computer implementation the foregoing data sets are organized into appropriate data structures. These are used by element generation modules to compute element stiffness relations in the local system. 6–10
Physical Structural Component Mathematical Model Name bar Finite Element Idealization

beam

tube, pipe

spar (web)

shear panel (2D version of above)
Figure 6.4. Examples of primitive structural elements.

6–11
Physical

§6.6
Finite element idealization

CLASSIFICATION OF MECHANICAL ELEMENTS

Physical

Finite element idealization

plates

3D solids

Figure 6.5. Continuum element examples.

§6.6. Classification of Mechanical Elements The following classification of finite elements in structural mechanics is loosely based on the “closeness” of the element with respect to the original physical structure. It is given here because it clarifies points that recur in subsequent sections, as well as providing insight into advanced modeling techniques such as hierarchical breakdown and global-local analysis. §6.6.1. Primitive Structural Elements These resemble fabricated structural components. They are often drawn as such; see Figure 6.4. The qualifier primitive distinguishes them from macroelements, which is another element class described below. Primitive means that they are not decomposable into simpler elements. These elements are usually derived from Mechanics-of-Materials simplified theories and are better understood from a physical, rather than mathematical, standpoint. Examples are the elements discussed in Chapter 5: bars, cables, beams, shafts, spars. §6.6.2. Continuum Elements These do not resemble fabricated structural components at all. They result from the subdivision of “blobs” of continua, or of structural components viewed as continua. Unlike structural elements, continuum elements are better understood in terms of their mathematical interpretation. Examples: plates, slices, shells, axisymmetric solids, general solids. See Figure 6.5. §6.6.3. Special Elements Special elements partake of the characteristics of structural and continuum elements. They are derived from a continuum mechanics standpoint but include features closely related to the physics of the problem. Examples: crack elements for fracture mechanics applications, shear panels, infinite and semi-infinite elements, contact and penalty elements, rigid-body elements. See Figure 6.6. 6–11

Chapter 6: FEM MODELING: INTRODUCTION

6–12

Infinity double node

Crack element

Infinite element
Figure 6.6. Special element examples.

Honeycomb panel

§6.6.4. Macroelements Macroelements are also called mesh units and superelements, although the latter term overlaps with substructures (defined below). These often resemble structural components, but are fabricated with simpler elements. See Figure 6.7. The main reason for introducing macroelements is to simplify preprocessing tasks. For example, it may be simpler to define a regular 2D mesh using quadrilaterals rather than triangles. The fact that, behind the scene, the quadrilateral is actually a macroelement may not be important to most users. Similarly a box macroelement can save modeling times for structures that are built by such components; for example box-girder bridges §6.6.5. Substructures Also called structural modules and superelements. These are sets of elements with a well defined structural function, typically obtained by cutting the complete structure into functional components. Examples: the wings and fuselage of an airplane; the towers, deck and cables of a suspension bridge. The distinction between substructures and macroelements is not clear-cut. The main conceptual distinction is that substructures are defined “top down” as parts of a complete structure, whereas macroelements are built “bottom up” from primitive elements. The term superelement is often used in a collective sense to embrace element groupings. This topic is further covered in Chapter 10. §6.7. Assembly The assembly procedure of the Direct Stiffness Method for a general finite element model follows rules identical in principle to those discussed for the truss example. As in that case the processs involves two basic steps: Globalization. The element equations are transformed to a common global coordinate system, if necessary. Merge. The element stiffness equations are merged into the master stiffness equations by appropriate indexing and matrix-entry addition. 6–12
Figure 6.7. Macroelement examples.

6–13

§6.8

BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

The hand calculations for the example truss conceal, however, the implementation complexity. The master stiffness equations in practical applications may involve thousands or even millions of freedoms, and programming can become involved. The topic is elaborated upon in Chapter 25. §6.8. Boundary Conditions A key strength of the FEM is the ease and elegance with which it handles arbitrary boundary and interface conditions. This power, however, has a down side. A big hurdle faced by FEM newcomers is the understanding and proper handling of boundary conditions. Below is a simple recipe for treating boundary conditions. The following Chapter provides more specific rules and examples. §6.8.1. Essential and Natural B.C. The key thing to remember is that boundary conditions (BCs) come in two basic flavors: essential and natural. Essential BCs directly affect DOFs, and are imposed on the left-hand side vector u. Natural BCs do not directly affect DOFs and are imposed on the right-hand side vector f. The mathematical justification for this distinction requires use of concepts from variational calculus, and is consequently relegated to Part II. For the moment, the basic recipe is: 1. 2. If a boundary condition involves one or more degrees of freedom in a direct way, it is essential. An example is a prescribed node displacement. Otherwise it is natural.

The term “direct” is meant to exclude derivatives of the primary function, unless those derivatives also appear as degrees of freedom, such as rotations in beams and plates. §6.8.2. Boundary Conditions in Structural Problems Essential boundary conditions in mechanical problems involve displacements (but not strain-type displacement derivatives). Support conditions for a building or bridge problem furnish a particularly simple example. But there are more general boundary conditions that occur in practice. A structural engineer must be familiar with displacement B.C. of the following types. Ground or support constraints. Directly restraint the structure against rigid body motions. Symmetry conditions. To impose symmetry or antisymmetry restraints at certain points, lines or planes of structural symmetry. This allows the discretization to proceed only over part of the structure with a consequent savings in modeling effort and number of equations to be solved. Ignorable freedoms. To suppress displacements that are irrelevant to the problem.10 Even experienced users of finite element programs are sometimes baffled by this kind. An example are rotational degrees of freedom normal to smooth shell surfaces.
10

In classical dynamics these are called ignorable coordinates.

6–13

Chapter 6: FEM MODELING: INTRODUCTION

6–14

Connection constraints. To provide connectivity to adjoining structures or substructures, or to specify relations between degrees of freedom. Many conditions of this type can be subsumed under the label multipoint constraints or multifreedom constraints. These can be notoriously difficult to handle from a numerical standpoint, and are covered in Chapters 8–9.
Notes and Bibliography Most FEM textbooks do not provide a systematic treatment of modeling. This is no accident: few academic authors have experience with complex engineering systems. Good engineers are too busy (and in demand) to have time for writing books. This gap has been particularly acute since FEM came on the scene because of generational gaps: “real engineers” tend to mistrust the computer, and often for good reason. The notion of explicit versus implicit modeling, which has legal and professional implications, is rarely mentioned. FEM terminology is by now standard, and so is a majority of the notation. But that is not so in early publications. E.g. K is universally used11 for stiffness matrix in virtually all post-1960 books. There are a few exceptions: the often cited Przemieniecki [204] uses S. There is less unanimity on u and f for node displacement and force vectors, respectively; some books such as Zienkiewicz and Taylor [279] still use different symbols. The element classification given here attempts to systematize dispersed references. In particular, the distinction between macroelements, substructures and superelements is an ongoing source of confusion, particularly since massively parallel computation popularized the notion of “domain decomposition” in the computer science community. The all-encompassing term “superelement” emerged in Norway by 1968 as part of the implementation of the computer program SESAM. Additional historical details are provided in Chapter 10. The topic of BC classification and handling is a crucial one in practice. More modeling mistakes are done in this aspect of FEM application than anywhere else. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

11

A symbol derived from the “spring constant” k that measures the stiffness of a mechanical spring.

6–14

Introduction to FEM

FEM Modeling: Introduction

6

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

FEM Terminology
degrees of freedom (abbrv: DOF) state (primary) variables: displacements in mechanics conjugate variables: forces in mechanics stiffness matrix master stiffness equations

Ku =f K u = f + fI M

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Physical Significance of Vectors u and f in Miscellaneous FEM Applications
Application Problem Structures and solid mechanics Heat conduction Acoustic fluid Potential flows General flows Electrostatics Magnetostatics State (DOF) vector u represents Displacement Temperature Displacement potential Pressure Velocity Electric potential Magnetic potential Forcing vector f represents Mechanical force Heat flux Particle velocity Particle velocity Fluxes Charge density Magnetic intensity

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Where FEM Fits (from Chapter 1)
IDEALIZATION Physical system DISCRETIZATION SOLUTION Discrete solution Solution error

Mathematical model

FEM

Discrete model

REALIZATION & IDENTIFICATION

CONTINUIFICATION

Discretization + solution error

Modeling + discretization + solution error

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Idealization Process (from Chapter 2)
member support joint

Physical System
IDEALIZATION

;; ;; ;;

Mathematical Model

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 5

;; ;; ;;

Introduction to FEM

Mathematical Model Definition
Traditional definition
Scaled fabricated version of a physical system (think of a car or train model)

Simulation oriented definition
A model is a symbolic device built to simulate and predict aspects of behavior of a system

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Implicit Modeling
ONE MP EL CO EV L
en pon Comations equ t

NT

a atic hem Matmodel

l

ry ibra M Lk-Box mponent FEBlac de Co rete of M Co disc del mo FE

TEM SYS EL LEV e
plet Com tion solu em Syst ete scr el di d mo

l sica Phy tem ys s

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Recall the "Breakdown" DSM Steps

  Disconnection
Breakdown Localization  Member (Element) Formation -> generic elements

Let Stop Here and Study Generic Elements next

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

... Because Most of the Remaining DSM Steps

Globalization Merge Application of BCs Solution Recovery of Node Forces

are Element Independent

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Attributes of Mechanical Finite Elements
Dimensionality Nodes serve two purposes: geometric definition home for DOFs (connectors) Degrees of freedom (DOFs) or "freedoms" Conjugate node forces Material properties Fabrication properties

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Element Geometry Is Defined by Node Locations
1D

2D

2D

3D

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Classification of Mechanical Finite Elements
Primitive Structural Continuum Special Macroelements Substructures

  
Superelements

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 12

Primitive Structural Elements
(often built from MoM models)
Physical Structural Component Mathematical Model Name bar

Introduction to FEM

Finite Element Discretization

beam

tube, pipe

spar (web)

shear panel (2D version of above)

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Continuum Elements
Physical Finite element idealization Physical Finite element idealization

plates

3D solids

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Special Elements

double node

Infinity

Crack element

Infinite element

Honeycomb panel

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

MacroElements

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Substructures

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Substructures (cont'd)
S4 S6

S2

S5

S1 S3

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 18

An Early Use of FEM Substructuring Boeing 747
Global Analysis: 1966 Local Analysis (shaded regions): 1967-68 First flight: 1970

Introduction to FEM

WING BODY INTERSECTION ANALYSIS 4 substructures,12549 elements 4266 nodes, 25596 freedoms

CARGO DOOR CABIN ANALYSIS 747 Regions Analyzed with FEM-DSM at Boeing

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Boundary Conditions (BCs)
The most difficult topic for FEM program users ("the devil hides in the boundary")

  Essential
Two types

 Natural

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 20

Introduction to FEM

Boundary Conditions Essential vs. Natural
Recipe: 1. If a BC involves one or more DOF in a direct way, it is essential and goes to the Left Hand Side (LHS) of Ku = f 2. Otherwise it is natural and goes to the Right Hand Side (RHS) of Ku = f

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 21

Examples of Structural Models: Machine Component (Mech. Engrg)

Introduction to FEM

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 22

;;; ;;; ;;; ;;;;; ;;; ;;;;;;;;; ;;;;; ;;;
Examples of Structural Models: Dam under Ground Motion (Civil Engrg)
Cavitating volume Water Concrete

Introduction to FEM

;;;;;;;;; ;;;;;;;;;
Unsaturated fill Sandstone Base rock Base ground motion
IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 23

Saturated soil

Introduction to FEM

Examples of Structural Models: Rocket Nozzle (Aerospace Engrg)
Rotational axis

;; ;; ;;
21.37"

GRAPHITE

INSULATOR

GLASS FILAMENT GLASS FABRIC STEEL SHELL ASBESTOS

(a) Typical solid rocket nozzle (Aerojet Corp., 1963)

(b) Finite element idealization

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 24

Examples of Structural Models: SuperTanker (Marine Engrg)
A

Introduction to FEM

B

Neutral Axis Stringer Web Frame Cross section of tanker Centerline Girder Longitudinal

Typical internal structure of tanker

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 25

Examples of Structural Models: F16 External View (Aero)

Introduction to FEM

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 26

Examples of Structural Models: F16 Internal Structure (Aero)

Introduction to FEM

IFEM Ch 6 – Slide 27

.

FEM Modeling: Mesh, Loads and BCs

7

7–1

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§7.1. §7.2.

§7.3.

§7.4. §7.5.

§7.6.

§7. §7. §7.

General Recommendations Guidelines on Element Layout §7.2.1. Mesh Refinement . . . . . . . §7.2.2. Element Aspect Ratios . . . . . §7.2.3. Physical Interfaces . . . . . . §7.2.4. Preferred Shapes . . . . . . . Direct Lumping of Distributed Loads §7.3.1. Node by Node (NbN) Lumping . . §7.3.2. Element by Element (EbE) Lumping §7.3.3. *Weighted Lumping . . . . . . §7.3.4. *Energy Consistent Lumping . . Boundary Conditions Support Conditions §7.5.1. Supporting Two Dimensional Bodies §7.5.2. Supporting Three Dimensional Bodies Symmetry and Antisymmetry Conditions §7.6.1. Visualization . . . . . . . . §7.6.2. Effect of Loading Patterns . . . . Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7–3 7–3 7–3 7–4 7–5 7–5 7–5 7–6 7–6 7–9 7–9 7–10 7–11 7–11 7–12 7–12 7–12 7–13 7–14 7–15 7–16

7–2

7–3

§7.2 GUIDELINES ON ELEMENT LAYOUT

This Chapter continues the exposition of finite element modeling principles. After some general recommendations, it gives guidelines on layout of finite element meshes, conversion of distributed loads to node forces, and handling the simplest forms of support boundary conditions. The next two Chapters deal with more complicated forms of boundary conditions called multifreedom constraints. The presentation is “recipe oriented” and illustrated by specific examples from structural mechanics. Most examples are two-dimensional. No attempt is made at rigorous justification of rules and recommendations, because that would require mathematical tools beyond the scope of this course. §7.1. General Recommendations The general rules that should guide you in the use of commercial or public FEM packages, are1 • • •

Use the simplest type of finite element that will do the job. Never, never, never mess around with complicated or special elements, unless you are absolutely sure of what you are doing. Use the coarsest mesh you think will capture the dominant physical behavior of the physical system, particularly in design applications.

Three word summary: keep it simple. Initial FE models may have to be substantially revised to accommodate design changes. There is little point in using complicated models that will not survive design iterations. The time for refinement is when the design has stabilized and you have a better picture of the underlying physics, possibly reinforced by experiments or observation. §7.2. Guidelines on Element Layout The following guidelines are stated for structural applications. As noted above, they will be often illustrated for two-dimensional meshes of continuum elements for ease of visualization. §7.2.1. Mesh Refinement Use a relatively fine (coarse) discretization in regions where you expect a high (low) gradient of strains and/or stresses.2 Regions to watch out for high gradients are: • • • Near entrant corners (see Remark below) or sharply curved edges. In the vicinity of concentrated (point) loads, concentrated reactions, cracks and cutouts. In the interior of structures with abrupt changes in thickness, material properties or cross sectional areas.

The examples in Figure 7.1 illustrate some of these “danger regions.” Away from such regions one can use a fairly coarse discretization within constraints imposed by the need of representing the structural geometry, loading and support conditions reasonably well.
1 2

Paraphrasing the Bellman in The Hunting of the Snark: “what I say three times is true.” Gradient is the key word. High gradient means rapid variation. A high value by itself means nothing in this context.

7–3

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–4

entrant corners (cf. Remark 7.1) Cutouts Cracks weld Vicinity of concentrated (point) loads, and sharp contact areas

Load transfer (bonded joints, welds, anchors, reinforcing bars, etc.)

Abrupt thickness changes

Material interfaces

Figure 7.1. Some situations where a locally refined finite element discretization (in the red-shaded areas) is recommended.

Remark 7.1. The first bullet above mentions “entrant corner.” That is a region where isostatics (principal stress trajectories) “bunch up.” For a two-dimensional problem mathematically posed on a singly-connected interior domain, they can be recognized as follows. Traverse the boundary CCW so the body or structure is on your left. When hitting a sharp or rounded corner, look at the angle (positive CCW) formed by the exterior normals (the normal going toward your right) before and after, measured from before to after, and always taking the positive value. If the angle exceeds 180◦ , it is an entrant corner. [If it is close to 360◦ , it is a crack tip.] For exterior problems or multiple-connected domains, the definition must be appropriately adjusted.

§7.2.2. Element Aspect Ratios
Good Bad

When discretizing two and three dimensional problems, try to avoid finite elements of high aspect ratios: elongated or “skinny” elements, such as the ones illustrated on the right of Figure 7.2. (The aspect ratio of a two- or three-dimensional element is the ratio between its largest and smallest dimension.) As a rough guideline, elements with aspect ratios exceeding 3 should be viewed with caution and those exceeding 10 with alarm. Such elements will not necessarily produce bad results — that depends on the loading and boundary conditions of the problem — but do introduce the potential for trouble.

Figure 7.2. Elements with good and bad aspect ratios.

Remark 7.2. In many “thin” structures modeled as continuous bodies the appearance of “skinny” elements is inevitable on account of computational economy reasons. An example is provided by the three-dimensional modeling of layered composites in aerospace and mechanical engineering problems.

7–4

7–5
No

§7.3

DIRECT LUMPING OF DISTRIBUTED LOADS

OK

Physical interface

Figure 7.3. llustration of the rule that elements should not cross material interfaces.

§7.2.3. Physical Interfaces A physical interface, resulting from example from a change in material, should also be an interelement boundary. That is, elements must not cross interfaces. See Figure 7.3. §7.2.4. Preferred Shapes In 2D FE modeling, if you have a choice between triangles and quadrilaterals with similar nodal arrangement, prefer quadrilaterals. Triangles are quite convenient for mesh generation, mesh transitions, rounding up corners, and the like. But sometimes triangles can be avoided altogether with some thought. One of the homework exercises is oriented along these lines. In 3D FE modeling, prefer strongly bricks over wedges, and wedges over tetrahedra. The latter should be used only if there is no viable alternative.3 The main problem with tetrahedra and wedges is that they can produce wrong stress results even if the displacement solution looks reasonable. §7.3. Direct Lumping of Distributed Loads In practical structural problems, distributed loads are more common than concentrated (point) loads.4 Distributed loads may be of surface or volume type. Distributed surface loads (called surface tractions in continuum mechanics) are associated with actions such as wind or water pressure, snow weight on roofs, lift in airplanes, live loads on bridges, and the like. They are measured in force per unit area. Volume loads (called body forces in continuum mechanics) are associated with own weight (gravity), inertial, centrifugal, thermal, prestress or electromagnetic effects. They are measured in force per unit volume. A derived type: line loads, result from the integration of surface loads along one transverse direction, such as a beam or plate thickness, or of volume loads along two transverse directions, such as a bar or beam area. Line loads are measured in force per unit length. Whatever their nature or source, distributed loads must be converted to consistent nodal forces for FEM analysis. These forces end up in the right-hand side of the master stiffness equations.
3

Unfortunately, many existing space-filling automatic mesh generators in three dimensions produce tetrahedral meshes. There are generators that try to produce bricks, but these often fail in geometrically complicated regions. In fact, one of the objectives of a good structural design is to avoid or alleviate stress concentrations produced by concentrated forces.

4

7–5

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS
Nodal force f3 at 3 is set to P, the magnitude of the crosshatched area under the load curve. This area extends halfway over adjacent element sides

7–6
Distributed load intensity (load acts downward on boundary)

1

2

;; ;; ;; ;;
3

f3 = P 4 5 6

Boundary

Finite element mesh

Figure 7.4. NbN direct lumping of distributed line load, illustrated for a 2D problem.

The meaning of “consistent” can be made precise through variational arguments, by requiring that the distributed loads and the nodal forces produce the same external work. Since this requires the introduction of external work functionals, the topic is deferred to Part II. However, a simpler approach called direct load lumping, or simply load lumping, is often used by structural engineers in lieu of the mathematically impeccable but complicated variational approach. Two variants of this technique are described below for distributed surface loads. §7.3.1. Node by Node (NbN) Lumping The node by node (NbN) lumping method is graphically explained in Figure 7.4. This example shows a distributed surface loading acting normal to the straight boundary of a two-dimensional FE mesh. (The load is assumed to have been integrated through the thickness normal to the figure, so it is actually a line load measured as force per unit length.) The procedure is also called tributary region or contributing region method. For the example of Figure 7.4, each boundary node is assigned a tributary region around it that extends halfway to adjacent nodes. The force contribution P of the cross-hatched area is directly assigned to node 3. This method has the advantage of not requiring the error-prone computation of centroids, as needed in the EbE technique discussed below. For this reason it is often preferred in hand computations.5 It can be extended to three-dimensional meshes as well as volume loads.6 It should be avoided, however, when the applied forces vary rapidly (within element length scales) or act only over portions of the tributary regions. §7.3.2. Element by Element (EbE) Lumping In this variant the distributed loads are divided over element domains. The resultant load is assigned to the centroid of the load diagram, and apportioned to the element nodes by statics. A node force is obtained by adding the contributions from all elements meeting at that node. The procedure is illustrated in Figure 7.5, which shows details of the computation over 2–3. The total force at node
5 6

It has been extensively used in the aircraft industry for smooth-varying pressure loads computations. The computation of tributary areas and volumes for general 2D and 3D regions can be done through the so-called Voronoi diagrams. This is an advanced topic in computational geometry (see, e.g., [84]) and thus not treated here.

7–6

7–7

§7.3 DIRECT LUMPING OF DISTRIBUTED LOADS

Force P has magnitude of crosshatched area under load curve and acts at its centroid

1

;;; ;;; ;;; ;;;
e

Distributed load intensity (load acts downward on boundary)

e f 2 = (b/Le )P

C

f3e = (a/Le)P

centroid C of crosshatched area
Boundary

2
6

P
a b

3

f2e

P

f3e

2

3

4

5

Le=a+b Details of element-level force computations

Finite element mesh

Figure 7.5. EbE direct lumping of distributed line load, illustrated for a 2D problem.

3, for instance, would be that contributed by segments 2–3 and 3–4. For the frequent case in which the variation of the load over the element is linear (so the area under the load is a trapezoid) the node forces can be computed directly by the formulas given in Figure 7.6. If applicable, EbE is more accurate than NbN lumping. In fact it agrees with consistent node lumping for simple elements that possess only corner nodes. In those cases it is not affected by sharpness of the load variation and can be even used for point loads that are not applied at the nodes.

e f ie = L (2qi +qj ) 6

;;;; ;;;; ;;;; ;;;;
qi
e

qj f je = L (qi +2qj )
6
e

i

Le

j

Figure 7.6. EbE lumping of linearly varying line load over element.

The EbE procedure is not applicable if the centroidal resultant load cannot be apportioned by statics. This happens if the element has midside faces or internal nodes in addition to corner nodes, or if it has rotational degrees of freedom. For those elements the variational-based consistent approach covered in Part II and briefly outlined in §7.3.3, is preferable.
Example 7.1. Figures 7.7(a,b) show web-downloaded pictures of the Norfork Dam, a 220-ft high, concretebuilt gravity dam. Its typical cross section is shown in 7.7(c). The section is discretized by triangular elements as illustrated in Figure 7.7(d). The dam has a length of 2624 ft and was constructed over the White River in Arkansas over 1941–44.7 The structure is assumed to be in plane strain. Accordingly the FEM model shown in 7.7(d) is a typical 1-ft slice of the dam and near-field soil.

In the analysis of dam and marine structures, a “wet node” of a FEM discretization is one in contact with the water. The effect of hydrostatic pressure is applied to the structure through nodal forces on wet nodes. The wet nodes for a water head of 180 ft over the riverbed are shown in Figure 7.8(b). Nodes are numbered 1 through 9 for convenience. The pressure in psf (lbs per sq-ft) is p = 62.4 d where d is the depth in ft. Compute the horizontal hydrostatic nodal forces f x1 and f x2 using NbN and EbE, assuming that the wet face AB is vertical for simplicity.
7

As discussed in Notes and Bibliography, this example has historical significance, as the first realistic Civil Engineering structure modeled ca. 1960 by the Finite Element Method, which until then had been largely confined to aerospace.

7–7

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

(a)

(b)

;;;; ;;;; ;;;; ;;;; ;; ;; ;;
MAX WATER EL. 584'

7–8

SPILLWAY CREST EL. 552'

(c) y

Concrete dam

EL. 364'

x
spillway crest 188' over riverbed

200'

A

Water

C

B

D

(d)

Soil

Figure 7.7. Norfork Dam: (a,b) pictures; (c) cross section of dam above foundation (line inside dam is a thermally induced crack considered in the 1960 study); (d) coarse mesh including foundation and soil but not crack [56,64]

(a)
180 ft Water
d

A 1 y =180 1
2 y =136 2 3 y = 84
3

(b)

22 1 2 3 4 5

70 120 162

(c)

C
9 8

p=62.4 d (lbs/sq-ft)
7 6

4

5 x5 =0 x =−70 All dimensions in ft. x =−210 6 Plane strain model, slice x8 =−350 7 x 9=−490 1 ft thick normal to section

B

y4 = 36 y5 = 0

1 44 2 96 144 3 180 4 5

Figure 7.8. Norfork Dam example: (a) computation of wet node forces due to hydrostatic pressure; (b) NbN tributary regions; (c) EbE regions.

Node by Node. For node 1 go halfway to 2, a distance of (180 − 136)/2 = 22 ft. The tributary load area is a triangle extending 22 ft along y with bottom pressure 62.4 × 22 = 1372.8 psf and unit width normal to paper, giving f x1 = 1 22 × 1372.8 = 15101 lbs. For node 2 go up 22 ft and down (136 − 84)/2 = 26 ft. The 2 tributary load area is a trapezoid extending 22 + 26 = 48 ft vertically, with pressures 1372.8 psf at the top and 62.4 × 70 = 4368.0 psf at the bottom. This gives f x2 = 48 × (1372.8 + 4368.0)/2 = 137779 lbs. Element by Element. It is convenient to pre-compute hydro pressures at wet node levels: p1 = 0, p2 = 62.4 × 44 = 2745.6 psf, p3 = 62.4 × 96 = 5990.4. Because the variation of p is linear, the formulas of Figure (1) (1) 7.6 can be applied directly: f x1 = (44/6)(2 × 0 + 2745.6) = 20134 lbs, f x2 = (44/6)(0 + 2 × 2745.6) = (2) 40269 lbs and f x2 = (52/6)(2 × 2745.6 + 5990.4) = 99507 lbs. Adding contributions to nodes 1 and 2: (1) (1) (2) f x1 = f x1 = 20134 lbs and f x2 = f x2 + f x2 = 40269 + 99507 = 139776 lbs. The computations for wet nodes 3 through 9 are left as an exercise.

7–8

7–9

§7.3 DIRECT LUMPING OF DISTRIBUTED LOADS

(The node numbering is different). The specific weight for concrete of γ = 200 pcf (pounds per cubic foot). Compute the node force f y11 due to own weight. For this calculation NbN is unwieldy because computation of the nodal tributary region requires construction of a Voronoi diagram. (Furthermore for constant specific weight it gives the same answer as EbE.) To apply EbE, select the elements that contribute to 11: the six triangles (9), (10), (11), (15), (16) and (17).
2 4 7
(10)

Example 7.2. Figure 7.9 shows the mesh for the y > 0 portion of the gravity dam of the previous example.

1
(5)

(1)

3 6
(8) (12)

(2) (3) (4)

5
(6)

(7)

8

9

The area of a triangle with corners at {x1 , y1 }, {x2 , y2 } 10 (9) 11 (11) 12 (13) 13 (15) and {x3 , y3 }} is given by A = (x2 y3 − x3 y2 ) + (x3 y1 − (19) (17) x1 y3 )+(x1 y2 − x2 y1 ). Applying this to the geometry of 14 (14) 15 (16) 16 (18) 17 (20) 18 (29) (21) (27) the figure one finds that the areas are A(9) =, A(10) =, (23) (25) 19 (22) (28) (26) (24) A(11) =, A(15) =, A(16) =, and A(17) =. The weight 24 20 22 21 23 forces on each element are W (9) = γ h, W (10) = γ h, Figure 7.9. Computation of weight force at node W (11) = γ h, A(15) = γ h, A(16) = γ h, and A(17) = γ h, 11 of gravity dam example of Figure 7.7(d). where h is the thickness normal to the figure (1 ft here).

Node 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

x *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00 *.00

y 152.00 152.00 152.00 94.00 94.00 94.00 94.00 40.00 40.00 40.00 40.00 40.00

For uniform element thickness and specific weight, one third of each force goes to each element corner. Thus node 11 receives (7.1) f y11 = 1 (W (9) + W (10) + W (11) + W (17) + W (18) ) = 3 (example incomplete, TBF) §7.3.3. *Weighted Lumping The NbN and EbE methods are restricted to simple elements, specifically those with corner nodes only. We outline here a general method that works for more complicated models. The mathematical justification requires energy theorems covered in Part II. Thus at this stage the technique is merely presented as a recipe. To fix the ideas consider again the 2D situation depicted in Figures 7.4 and 7.5. Denote the distributed load by q(x). We want to find the lumped force f n at an interior node n of coordinate xn . Let the adjacent nodes be n − 1 and n + 1, with coordinates xn−1 and xn+1 , respectively. Introduce a weight function Wn (x) with properties to be specified below. The lumped force is given by
xn+1

fn =
xn−1

Wn (x) q(x) d x

(7.2)

For this formula to make sense, the weight function must satisfy several properties: 1. 2. 3. Unit value at node n: Wn (xn ) = 1. Vanishes over any element not pertaining to n: Wn = 0 if x ≤ xn−1 or x ≥ xn+1 Gives the same results as NbN or EbE for constant q over elements with corner nodes only. Wn (x) = 1 For EbE pick if
1 (xn−1 2

Both NbN and EbE are special cases of 7.2. For NbN pick + xn ) ≤ x ≤ 1 (xn + xn+1 ), 2 wn (x) = 0 otherwise. (7.3)

if xn ≤ x ≤ xn+1 , 0 otherwise. These particular weight functions are depicted in Figure 7.10.

 x−x  1 − xn − xn−1 n−1 Wn (x) = x 1 − x x −− n  xn n+1

if xn−1 ≤ x ≤ xn ,

(7.4)

7–9

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–10

(a)

halfway between n−1 and n

Wn = 1 1

halfway between n and n+1

(b)

Wn 1

n−1
xn

n

n+1

n−1

xn

n

n+1

Figure 7.10. Weight functions corresponding to: (a) NbN lumping, and (b) EbE lumping.

§7.3.4. *Energy Consistent Lumping The rule 7.2 can be justified from the standpoint of the Principle of Virtual Work. Let δu n be a virtual node displacement paired to f n . Take δu n Wn (x) to be the associated displacement variation. The external virtual work of q(x) is q(x)Wn (x) δu n d x extended over the portion where Wn = 0. Equating this to f n δu n and cancelling δu n from both sides yields 7.2. If Wn is the trial displacement function actually used for the development of element equations the lumping is called energy consistent, or consistent for short.

q h (per unit of x length)
f1 =? f2 =?

W1 = − ξ(1−ξ)/2 = N1
3 f 3 =? 1

1

2

1

2
2

3

W2 = 1−ξ = N2
1

1

2

3
1

W3= ξ(1+ξ)/2 = N3 2 1 a

3

ξ = 1 − 2x/a x

Figure 7.11. Example of consistent load lumping.

(As will be seen later, trial functions are the union of shape functions over the patch of all elements connected to node n.) This important technique is studied in Part II of the course after energy methods are introduced.
Example 7.3. Conside the mesh of 9-node quadrilaterals shown in Figure 7.11. (This is later used as a benchmark problem in Chapter 27.) The upper plate edge 1–3 is subject to a uniform normal load qh per unit length, where h is the plate thickness. The problem is to compute the node forces f 1 , f 2 and f 3 . If 1–2 and 2–3 were on two different elements, both NbN and EbE would give f 1 = f 3 = 1 qha and f 2 = 1 qha. But 4 2 this lumping is wrong for an element with midside nodes. Instead, pick the weight functions Wi (i = 1, 2, 3) shown on the right of Figure 7.11.

Since there is only one element on the loaded edge, the Wi are actually the quadratic shape functions Ni for a 3-node line element, developed in later Chapters. The dimensionless variable ξ is called an isoparametric natural coordinate. Applying the rule 7.2 we get
a

f1 =
0

dx dξ = W1 (x) q h d x = W1 (ξ ) q h dξ −1

1

1 −1

− 1 ξ(1 − ξ )q h ( 1 a) dξ = 1 qha. 2 2 6

(7.5)

Similarly f 2 = 2 qha and f 3 = f 1 . As a check, f 1 + f 2 + f 3 = qha, which is the total load acting on the 3 plate edge.

7–10

7–11

§7.5

SUPPORT CONDITIONS

;; ;; ; ;

;;; ; ; ;; ; ; ; ; ;;
B B A A

;;;

;; ;;
x

(a)

(b)

y

(c)

y

Figure 7.12. Suppressing two-dimensional rigid body motions.

;; ;;
B A

x

§7.4. Boundary Conditions The key distinction between essential and natural boundary conditions (BC) was introduced in the previous Chapter. The distinction is explained in Part II from a variational standpoint. In this section we discuss the simplest essential boundary conditions in structural mechanics from a physical standpoint. This makes them relevant to problems with which a structural engineer is familiar. Because of the informal setting, the ensuing discussion relies heavily on examples. In structural problems formulated by the DSM, the recipe of §6.7.1 that distinguishes between essential and natural BC is: if it directly involves the nodal freedoms, such as displacements or rotations, it is essential. Otherwise it is natural. Conditions involving applied loads are natural. Essential BCs take precedence over natural BCs. The simplest essential boundary conditions are support and symmetry conditions. These appear in many practical problems. More exotic types, such as multifreedom constraints, require more advanced mathematical tools and are covered in the next two Chapters. §7.5. Support Conditions Supports are used to restrain structures against relative rigid body motions. This is done by attaching them to Earth ground (through foundations, anchors or similar devices), or to a “ground structure” which is viewed as the external environment.8 The resulting boundary conditions are often called motion constraints. In what follows we analyze two- and three-dimensional motions separately. §7.5.1. Supporting Two Dimensional Bodies Figure 7.12 shows two-dimensional bodies that move in the plane of the paper. If a body is not restrained, an applied load will cause infinite displacements. Regardless of loading conditions, the body must be restrained against two translations along x and y, and one rotation about z. Thus the minimum number of constraints that has to be imposed in two dimensions is three. In Figure 7.12, support A provides translational restraint, whereas support B, together with A, provides rotational restraint. In finite element terminology, we say that we delete (fix, remove, preclude) all translational displacements at point A, and that we delete the translational degree of
8

For example, the engine of a car is attached to the vehicle frame through mounts. The car frame becomes the “ground structure,” which moves with respect to Earth ground, as Earth rotates and moves through space, etc.

7–11

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–12

freedom directed along the normal to the AB direction at point B. This body is free to distort in any manner without the supports imposing any deformation constraints. Engineers call A and B reaction-to-ground points. This means that if the supports are conceptually removed, applied loads are automatically balanced by reactive forces at A and B, in accordance with Newton’s third law. Additional freedoms may be precluded to model greater restraint by the environment. However, Figure 7.12(a) does illustrate the minimal number of constraints. Figure 7.12(b) is a simplification of Figure 7.12(a). Here the line AB is parallel to the global y axis. We simply delete the x and y translations at point A, and the x translation at point B. If the roller support at B is modified as in 7.12(c), however, it becomes ineffective in constraining the infinitesimal rotational motion about point A because the rolling direction is normal to AB. The configuration of 7.12(c) is called a kinematic mechanism, and will result in a singular modified stiffness matrix. §7.5.2. Supporting Three Dimensional Bodies Figure 7.13 illustrates the extension of the freedomrestraining concept to three dimensions. The minimal number of freedoms that have to be constrained is now six and many combinations are possible. In the example of Figure 7.13, all three degrees of freedom at point A have been fixed. This prevents all rigid body translations, and leaves three rotations to be taken care of. The x displacement component at point B is deleted to prevent rotation about z, the z component is deleted at point C to prevent rotation about y, and the y component is deleted at point D to prevent rotation about x. §7.6. Symmetry and Antisymmetry Conditions Engineers doing finite element analysis should be on the lookout for conditions of symmetry or antisymmetry. Judicious use of these conditions allows only a portion of the structure to be analyzed, with a consequent saving in data preparation and computer processing time.9 §7.6.1. Visualization Recognition of symmetry and antisymmetry conditions can be done by either visualization of the displacement field, or by imagining certain rotational ot reflection motions. Both techniques are illustrated for the two-dimensional case. A symmetry line in two-dimensional motion can be recognized by remembering the “mirror” displacement pattern shown in Figure 7.14(a). Alternatively, a 180◦ rotation of the body about the symmetry line reproduces exactly the original problem. An antisymmetry line can be recognized by the displacement pattern illustrated in Figure 7.14(b).
9

; ; ; ;;;; ;; ;; ; ;;;
y B A C z

Figure 7.13. Suppressing rigid body motions in a three-dimensional body.

Even if symmetry or antisymmetry are not explicitly applied through boundary conditions, they provide valuable checks on the computed solution.

7–12

; ;
D

x

7–13

§7.6 SYMMETRY AND ANTISYMMETRY CONDITIONS

Alternatively, a 180◦ rotation of the body about the antisymmetry line reproduces exactly the original problem except that all applied loads are reversed. Similar recognition patterns can be drawn in three dimensions to help visualization of planes of symmetry or antisymmetry. More complex regular patterns associated with sectorial symmetry (also called harmonic symmetry) as well as rotational symmetry can be treated in a similar manner, but will not be discussed here. §7.6.2. Effect of Loading Patterns

Symmetry line (a)

(b)

Antisymmetry line

A'
loads

A

A"
displacement vectors

A' A

A"

Figure 7.14. Visualizing symmetry and antisymmetry lines.

Although the structure may look symmetric in shape, it must be kept in mind that model reduction can be used only if the loading conditions are also symmetric or antisymmetric.
y (a) A C B D x (b)

Figure 7.15. A doubly symmetric structure under symmetric loading.

Consider the plate structure shown in Figure 7.15(a). This structure is symmetrically loaded on the x-y plane. Applying the recognition patterns stated above one concludes that the structure is doubly symmetric in both geometry and loading. It is evident that no displacements in the x-direction are possible for any point on the y-axis, and that no y displacements are possible for points on the x axis. A finite element model of this structure may look like that shown in Figure 7.15(b). On the other hand if the loading is antisymmetric, as illustrated in Figure 7.16(a), the x axis becomes an antisymmetry line as none of the y = 0 points can move along the x direction. The boundary conditions to be imposed on the FE model are also different, as shown in Figure 7.16(b).
Remark 7.3. For the case shown in Figure 7.16(b) note that all rollers slide in the same direction. Thus the vertical rigid body motion along y is not precluded. To do that, one node has to be constrained in the y direction. If there are no actual physical supports, the choice is arbitrary and amounts only to an adjustment on the overall (rigid-body) vertical motion. In Figure 7.16(b) the center point C has been so chosen. But any other node could be selected as well; for example A or D. The important thing is not to overconstrain the structure by applying more than one y constraint.

7–13

;; ;; ; ;

; ; ;

A C

B D

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–14

y (a) A B x (b)

C

D

; ; ; ;;;
A B C

D

Vertical (y) motion of C (or another node) should be constrained to eliminate the y rigid motion

Figure 7.16. A doubly symmetric structure under antisymmetric loading.

Remark 7.4. Point loads acting at nodes located on symmetry or antisymmetry lines require special care. For example, consider the doubly symmetric plate structure of Figure 7.15 under the two point loads of magnitude P, as pictured in Figure 7.17(a). If the structure is broken down into 4 quadrants as in Figure 7.17(b), P must be halved as indicated in Figure 7.17(c). The same idea applies to point loads on antisymmetry lines, but there the process is trickier, as illustrated in Figure 7.18. The load must not be applied if the node is fixed against motion, since then the node force will appear as a reaction.

(a)
A B D

(b)
C

P

P

P/2 P/2

P/2 P/2

Figure 7.17. Breaking up a point load acting on a symmetry line node.

P

A C

B D

P

;;; ;; ;; ;;

P/2

2P

Figure 7.18. Breaking up a point load acting on a antisymmetry line node.

Distributed loads should not be divided when the structure is broken down into pieces, since the lumping process will take care of the necessary apportionment to nodes. Notes and Bibliography FEM modeling rules in most textbooks are often diffuse, if given at all. In those that focus on the mathematical interpretation of FEM they are altogether lacking; the emphasis being on academic boundary value problems.

7–14

;; ;; ;;; ;;;
P/2

; ; ;

;; ;; ;;

;; ; ; ; ; ;

;; ;; ;;

(c)

P/2

7–15

§7.

References

The rule collection at the start of this Chapter attempts to place important recommendations in one place. The treatment of boundary conditions, particularly symmetry and antisymmetry, tends to be also flaky. A notable exception is [190], which is understandable since Irons worked in industry (at Rolls-Royce Aerospace Division) before moving to academia. The Norfork Dam used in Examples 7.1 and 7.2 (and two Exercises) for hydrostatic load-lumping calculations was the first realistic Civil Engineering structure analyzed by FEM. It greatly contributed to the acceptance of the method beyond the aerospace industry where it had originated. How this seminal event came to pass is narrated by Wilson in [64], from which the following fragment is taken. Annotations are inserted in squared brackets. “On the recommendation from Dr. Roy Carlson, a consultant to the Little Rock District of the Corps of Engineers, Clough [then a Professor at UC Berkeley] submitted [in 1960] a proposal to perform a finite element analysis of Norfork Dam, a gravity dam that had a temperature induced vertical crack near the center of the section. The proposal contained a coarse mesh solution that was produced by the new program [a matrix code developed by E. L. Wilson, then a doctoral student under Clough’s supervision; the mesh is that shown in Figure 7.7(d)] and clearly indicated the ability of the new method to model structures of arbitrary geometry with different orthotropic properties within the dam and foundation. The finite element proposal was accepted by the Corps over an analog computer proposal submitted by Professor Richard MacNeal of CalTech [who later directed the development of NASTRAN under a NASA contract in the late 1960s], which at that time was considered as the state-of-the-art method for solving such problems. The Norfork Dam project provided an opportunity to improve the numerical methods used within the program and to extend the finite element method to the nonlinear solution of the crack closing due to hydrostatic loading. Wilson and a new graduate student, Ian King, conducted the detailed analyses that were required by the study. The significant engineering results of the project indicated that the cracked dam was safe [since the crack would be closed as the reservoir was filled].” References Referenced items moved to Appendix R.

7–15

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–16

Homework Exercises for Chapters 6 and 7 FEM Modeling: Mesh, Loads and BCs

P C A E D F M L J I B G

O

;;
N

K

Figure E7.1. Inplane bent plate for Exercise 7.1.

;;
H

EXERCISE 7.1 [D:10] The plate structure shown in Figure E7.1 is loaded and deforms in the plane of the paper. The applied load at D and the supports at I and N extend over a fairly narrow area. List what you think are the likely “trouble spots” that would require a locally finer finite element mesh to capture high stress gradients. Identify those spots by its letter and a reason. For example, D: vicinity of point load.

A

B

D

C

Figure E7.2. Transition meshing for Exercise 7.2.

EXERCISE 7.2 [D:15] Part of a two-dimensional FE mesh has been set up as indicated in Figure E7.2.

Region ABC D is still unmeshed. Draw a transition mesh within that region that correctly merges with the regular grids shown, uses 4-node quadrilateral elements (quadrilaterals with corner nodes only), and avoids triangles. Note: There are several (equally acceptable) solutions.
EXERCISE 7.3 [A:15] A rectangular plate of constant thickness h and inplane dimensions 8a and 6a is meshed with 8 rectangular elements as shown in Figure E7.3(a). The plate specific weight is γ and acts along the −y axis direction.

(a)

Compute the node forces due to plate weight at nodes 1 through 15, using the NbN method. Obtain the node-tributary regions as sketched in Figure E7.3(b), which shows each element divided by the medians drawn as dashed lines (the tributary region of node 7 is shown in yellow). Partial answer: f y1 = −2a 2 γ h. Check that adding up all y forces at the 15 nodes one gets W = −48a 2 γ h. Repeat the computations using the EbE method. For this, take the total weight force on each element, and assign one quarter to each corner node. (This agrees with consistent energy lumping for 4-node rectangular elements.) Do the results agree with NbN lumping?

(b)

7–16

7–17

Exercises

(a)
1

Plate thickness h, specific weight γ
2 3 4 5

(b)
1 2 3 4 5

y x
6

(1)
7

(2)
8

(3)
9

(4)

6a
10 6 7 8 9 10

2a
11

(5)
12

(6)
13

(7)
14

(8)
15 11 12 13 14 15

8a
Figure E7.3. (a) Mesh layout for Exercise 7.3. (b) shows tributary area for node 7.

EXERCISE 7.4 [N/C:20] Complete the computation of hydrostatic node forces on the Norfork Dam under a

water head of 180 ft, initiated in Example 7.1, using the data of Figure 7.8, and either the NbN or EbE method (pick one). Assume face AB is vertical. Do two checks: sum of horizontal (x) forces on nodes 1 through 5 is 1 1802 × 62.4 lbs, and sum of vertical (y) forces on nodes 5 through 9 is −180 × 62.4 × 490 lbs. 2
EXERCISE 7.5 [N/C:25] Complete the computation of own weight nodal forces of the coarse mesh of the Norfork dam proper, initiated in Example 7.2, reusing the data of Figure 7.9. Use the EbE method. Recover coordinates, and write a computer program to compute node forces. Compute the total weight of the dam slice in lbs. EXERCISE 7.6 [A:10] Figure E7.4 depicts two

instances of a pull test. In (a) a stiffer material (steel rod) is pulled out of a softer one (concrete block); in this case the load transfer diagram shows a rapid variation near the inner end of the rod. In (b) a softer material (plastic rod) is pulled out of a stiffer one (concrete rod), and the load transfer diagram is reversed. If the test is to be simulated by a finite element model, indicate for (a) and (b) where a finer mesh would be desirable. Explain.

(a)

(b)

EXERCISE 7.7 [D:20] Identify the symmetry and antisymmetry lines in the two-dimensional problems illustrated in Figure E7.5. They are: (a) a circular disk under two diametrically opposite point forces (the famous “Brazilian test” for concrete); (b) the same disk under two diametrically opposite force pairs; (c) a clamped semiannulus under a force pair oriented as shown; (d) a stretched rectangular plate with a central circular hole. Finally (e) and (f) are half-planes under concentrated loads.10

;;;; ;;;; ;;;; ;;;; ;;;;
Load transfer A B Concrete Load transfer A Concrete

Steel

P

Plastic

B

P

Figure E7.4. Pull tests for Exercise 7.6.

Having identified those symmetry/antisymmetry lines, state whether it is possible to cut the complete structure to one half or one quarter before laying out a finite element mesh. Then draw a coarse FE mesh indicating, with rollers or fixed supports, which kind of displacement BCs you would specify on the symmetry or antisymmetry lines. Note: Do all sketches on your paper, not on the printed figures.
10

Note that (e) is the famous Flamant’s problem, which is important in the 2D design of foundations of civil structures. The analytical solution of (e) and (f) may be found, for instance, in Timoshenko-Goodier’s Theory of Elasticity, 2nd Edition, page 85ff.

7–17

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–18

(a)

P (b) P

P P

P

P

;; ;;
P P

(d)
45
o

(c)

(uniform)
center hole

fixed

q
45o

q

P
(f)

(e)

P

P

infinite half plane
Figure E7.5. Problems for Exercise 7.7.

EXERCISE 7.8 [D:20] You (a finite element guru) pass away and come back to the next life as an intelligent

but hungry bird. Looking around, you notice a succulent big worm taking a peek at the weather. You grab one end and pull for dinner; see Figure E7.6. After a long struggle, however, the worm wins. While hungrily looking for a smaller one your thoughts wonder to FEM and how the worm extraction process might be modeled so you can pull it out more efficiently. Then you wake up to face this homework question. Try your hand at the following “worm modeling” points. (a) The worm is simply modeled as a string of one-dimensional (bar) elements. The “worm axial force” is of course constant from the beak B to ground level G, then decreases rapidly because of soil friction (which varies roughly as plotted in the figure above) and drops to nearly zero over D E. Sketch how a good “worm-element mesh” should look like to capture the axial force well. On the above model, how would you represent boundary conditions, applied forces and friction forces? Next you want a more refined anaysis of the worm that distinguishes skin and insides. What type of finite element model would be appropriate? (Advanced) Finally, point out what need to be added to the model of (c) to include the soil as an elastic medium.

(b) (c) (d)

Briefly explain your decisions. Dont write equations.

7–18

7–19
B

Exercises

;;;;;;;; ;;;;;;;;
G D
friction force on worm surface

E

Figure E7.6. The hungry bird.

EXERCISE 7.9 [D:15, 5 each] Prove from kinematics:

(a) (b) (c)

Two symmetry lines in 2D cannot cross at a finite point, unless that point is fixed. Two antisymmetry lines in 2D cannot cross at a finite point, unless that point is fixed. A symmetry line and an antisymmetry line must cross at right angles, unless the cross point is fixed.

Note: proofs of (a,b,c) are very similar; just draw vectors at alleged intersections. angle π/n from each other. This is called sectorial symmetry if n ≥ 3. Draw a picture for n = 5, say for a car wheel. Explain why point C is fixed.
EXERCISE 7.11 [A/D:25, 5 each] A body is in 3D space. The analogs of symmetry and antisymmetry lines EXERCISE 7.10 [A/D:15] A 2D body has n > 1 symmetry lines passing through a point C and spanning an

are symmetry and antisymmetry planes, respectively. The former are also called mirror planes. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) State the kinematic properties of symmetry and antisymmetric planes, and how they can be identified. Two symmetry planes intersect. State the kinematic properties of the intersection line. A symmetry plane and an antisymmetry plane planes intersect. State the kinematic properties of the intersection line. Can the angle between the planes be arbitrary? Can two antisymmetry planes intersect? Three symmetry planes intersect. State the kinematic properties of the intersection point.

EXERCISE 7.12 [A:25] A 2D problem is called periodic in the x direction if all fields, in particular displace-

ments, repeat upon moving over a distance a > 0: u x (x + a, y) = u x (x, y) and u y (x + a, y) = u y (x, y). Can this situation be treated by symmetry and/or antisymmetry lines?
EXERCISE 7.13 [A:25] Extend the previous exercise to antiperiodicity, in which u x (x + a, y) = u x (x, y) and u y (x + a, y) = −u y (x, y). EXERCISE 7.14 [A:20] Prove that EbE and energy consistent lumping agree if the element shape functions are piecewise linear. EXERCISE 7.15 [A:40] If the world were spatially n-dimensional (meaning it has elliptic metric), how many

independent rigid body modes would a body have? (Prove by induction)

7–19

Introduction to FEM

FEM Modeling: Mesh, Loads and BCs

7

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Topics in Chapter 7
General Modeling Rules Finite Element Mesh Layouts Distributed Loads NbN Lumping EbE Lumping Displacement BCs suppressing rigid body motions taking advantage of symmetry and antisymmetry

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

General FEM Modeling Rules
Use the simplest elements that will do the job Never, never, never use complicated or special elements unless you are absolutely sure of what you are doing Use the coarsest mesh that will capture the dominant behavior of the physical model, particularly in design situations

3 word summary: Keep It Simple

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Another Justification for Simplicity

In product design situations several FEM models of increasing refinement will be set up as design evolves Ergo, do not overkill at the beginning

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Where Finer Meshes Should be Used

entrant corners Cutouts Cracks weld Vicinity of concentrated (point) loads, and sharp contact areas

Load transfer (bonded joints, welds, anchors, reinforcing bars, etc.)

Abrupt thickness changes

Material interfaces

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Avoid 2D/3D Elements of Bad Aspect Ratio
Good Bad

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Elements Must Not Cross Interfaces

No

OK

Physical interface

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Element Geometry Preferences

Other things being equal, prefer in 2D: Quadrilaterals over Triangles in 3D: Bricks over Wedges Wedges over Tetrahedra

(Elements do not file discrimination suits)

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Node by Node (NbN) Distributed Load Lumping
Nodal force f3 at 3 is set to P, the magnitude of the crosshatched area under the load curve. This area extends halfway over adjacent element sides

1

2

;; ;; ;; ;;
3

Distributed load intensity (load acts downward on boundary)

f3 = P 4 5 6

Boundary

Finite element mesh

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Element by Element (EbE) Distributed Load Lumping
Force P has magnitude of crosshatched area under load curve and acts at its centroid

f2e 1

;;; ;;; ;;; ;;;
e

Distributed load intensity (load acts downward on boundary)

centroid C of crosshatched area

f 2 = (b/L )P

e

C
e

f3e = (a/Le)P

P

f3e

2
4 5 6 Boundary

P
a b

3

2

3

Le=a+b Details of element-level force computations

Finite element mesh

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

EbE Shortcut for Linearly Varying Line Load (Bypasses Centroid Calculation)

Le (2q +q ) fi = 6 j i
e

qi

;;;;; ;;;;; ;;;;; ;;;;; ;;;;;
e

qj Le (q +2q ) fj = i j
e 6

i

L

e

j

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Boundary Conditions (BCs)

The most difficult topic for FEM program users

Essential Two types Natural

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Boundary Conditions Essential vs. Natural
Recipe: 1. If a BC involves one or more DOF in a direct way, it is essential and goes to the Left Hand Side (LHS) of Ku = f 2. Otherwise it is natural and goes to the Right Hand Side (RHS) of Ku = f

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Minimum Support Conditions to Suppress Rigid Body Motions in 2D

;;; ;; ;

(a)

(b)

y B

(c)
B

y

;; ;;
A

B

;; ;;

;; ;; ;
A

x

;;; ;;
A

; ;
x

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Minimum Support Conditions to Supress Rigid Body Motions in 3D

;; ;; ;; ;;; ;; ; ;;; ;;; ; ;;; ;;; ;; ;;;;;
y B A C z

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 15

;; ;; ;;
x

D

Introduction to FEM

Visualizing Symmetry and Antisymmetry Conditions in 2D

(a)

Symmetry line

(b)

Antisymmetry line

A' loads

A

A" displacement vectors

A' A

A"

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Example of Application of Symmetry BCs
y
(a) A C B D

x

(b)

; ;; ; ; ;
IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 17

; ;

A C

B D

Introduction to FEM

Example of Application of Antisymmetry BCs
y
(a) A B

C

D

x

(b)

;; ;;;; ;; ;; ;; ;;;; ;;;;
A B C

D

Vertical (y) motion of one node such as C or D may be constrained to suppress y-RBM

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

"Breaking Up" Point Loads at Symmetry BCs
y

(a)
A B D

P

C

P

x

(b)

P/2 P/2

P/2 P/2

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 19

;; ;; ; ; ; ;

; ; ;

(c)

P/2

Introduction to FEM

"Breaking Up" Point Loads at Antisymmetry BCs
(A trickier problem)
y

P

A C

B D

P

x

;; ;; ;; ;; ;; ;;

P/2

IFEM Ch 7 – Slide 20

;; ;; ;; ;; ;; ;;
P/2

; ; ;

2P

; ; ;

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–20

Homework Exercises for Chapter 7. - Solutions FEM Modeling: Mesh, Loads and BCs
EXERCISE 7.1 Trouble spots from recipe are: B, F, J, M (entrant corners), N, D, I (concentrated forces).

See Figure E7.7 for a physical justification.

Figure E7.7. Figure shows principal stress trajectories or “isostatics.” They are drawn in red for tension and blue for compression. (Determined from experimental data gathered in 1964 photoelasticity project at UC Berkeley.) Trajectories “bunch up” in regions of high stress gradients near loads and entrant corners.

EXERCISE 7.2 What perhaps are the two simplest solutions for the transition zone are pictured in Figure

E7.8.

A

B

A

B

D

C

D

C

Figure E7.8. Two simple transition-mesh solutions for Exercise 7.2.

Several quadrilateral-based “transition meshes” are illustrated in Figure E7.9 for completeness; redrawn from Irons and Ahmad [148]. The solutions of Figure E7.8 are essentially variations of (e) and (f). Solution (d) is interesting in that it produces somewhat better looking element shapes.
EXERCISE 7.3

(a)

Counting “tributary squares” of size a × a rapidly gives the answer: f y1 = f y5 = −2a 2 γ h, f y2 = f y3 = f y4 = −4a 2 γ h, f y6 = f y10 = −3a 2 γ h, f y7 = f y8 = f y9 = −6a 2 γ h, f y11 = f y15 = −a 2 γ h, n=15 f y12 = f y13 = f y14 = −2a 2 γ h. Check: W = n=1 f yn = −(2 × 2 + 3 × 4 + 2 × 3 + 3 × 6 + 2 × 1 + 3 × 2) a 2 γ h = −48 a 2 γ h. The results are identical to NbN. When doing it by hand, EbE is slower because NbN can be done by “grid eyeballing.”

(b)

7–20

7–21

Solutions to Exercises

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

(h)

(i)

Figure E7.9. Quad-only transition meshes for various situations.

EXERCISE 7.4

This Exercise was solved with the Mathematica scripts listed in Figure E7.10. Note that the logic of the EbE script is simpler, with less “ifs and buts” than NbN. This is generally true of their computer implementations. Results of running these scripts are collected in the Table 7.1. Table 7.1. Results for Exercise 7.4 (forces in lbs) Node Node by Node (NbN) x-force y-force 15100.8 0 137779.2 0 296400.0 0 369532.8 0 192067.2 −393120.0 0 −1179360.0 0 −1572480.0 0 −1572480.0 0 −786240.0 1010880.0 −5503680.0 Element by Element (EbE) x-force y-force 20134.4 139776.0 295360.0 366912.0 188697.6 0 0 0 0 1010880.0 0 0 0 0 −393120.0 −1179360.0 −1572480.0 −1572480.0 −786240.0 −5503680.0

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Sum

The sum of x-forces and y-forces checks out with the total hydrostatic forces 1 1802 × 62.4 = 1010880.0 lbs 2 and −490 × 180 × 62.4 = −5503680.0 lbs, respectively.

7–21

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS
Exercise 7.4 - Hydrostatic load lumping by NbN method (* Assume face AB is vertical to simplify formulas *) ClearAll[Γ,whead]; Γ=62.4; whead=180; xn={ 0, 0, 0, 0,0,-70,-210,-350,-490}; yn={180,136,84,36,0, 0, 0, 0, 0}; fxn=fyn=Table[0,{9}]; For [j=1,j<=9,j++, {xi,yi}={xj,yj}={xk,yk}={xn[[j]],yn[[j]]}; If [j>1, {xi,yi}={xn[[j-1]],yn[[j-1]]} ]; If [j<9, {xk,yk}={xn[[j+1]],yn[[j+1]]} ]; {xd1,yd1,xd2,yd2}={xj-xi,yi-yj,xk-xj,yj-yk}/2; {di,dj,dk}=whead-{yi,yj,yk}; If [j<=5, dm=(di+2*dj+dk)/4, dm=dj]; dmx=dmy=dm; If [j==5, dmx=(di+3*dj)/4; dmy=dj]; fxn[[j]]=(yd1+yd2)*dmx*Γ; fyn[[j]]=(xd1+xd2)*dmy*Γ; ]; Print["NbN hydro force lumping results:"]; Print[Table[{i,fxn[[i]],fyn[[i]]},{i,1,9}]//InputForm]; sx=Sum[fxn[[i]],{i,1,9}]; sy=Sum[fyn[[i]],{i,1,9}]; Print["x equil check: ", sx," vs ",whead^2*Γ/2]; Print["y equil check: ", sy," vs ",whead*(xn[[9]]-xn[[5]])*Γ]; Exercise 7.4 - Hydrostatic load lumping by EbE method (* Assume face AB is vertical to simplify hand computations *) ClearAll[Γ,whead]; Γ=62.4; whead=180; xn={ 0, 0, 0, 0,0,-70,-210,-350,-490}; yn={180,136,84,36,0, 0, 0, 0, 0}; dn=(whead-yn)*Γ; fxn=fyn=Table[0,{9}]; For [e=1,e<=8,e++, i=e; j=e+1; {xi,xj}={xn[[i]],xn[[j]]}; {yi,yj}={yn[[i]],yn[[j]]}; {di,dj}={dn[[i]],dn[[j]]}; xe=xi-xj; ye=yi-yj; fexi= (2*di+dj)*ye/6; fexj= (di+2*dj)*ye/6; feyi=-(2*di+dj)*xe/6; feyj=-(di+2*dj)*xe/6; fxn[[i]]+=fexi; fxn[[j]]+=fexj; fyn[[i]]+=feyi; fyn[[j]]+=feyj; ]; Print["EbE hydro force lumping results:"]; Print[Table[{i,fxn[[i]],fyn[[i]]},{i,1,9}]//TableForm]; sx=Sum[fxn[[i]],{i,1,9}]; sy=Sum[fyn[[i]],{i,1,9}]; Print["x equil check: ", sx," vs ",whead^2*Γ/2]; Print["y equil check: ", sy," vs ",whead*(xn[[9]]-xn[[5]])*Γ];

7–22

Figure E7.10. Solution of Exercise 7.4 with Mathematica.

EXERCISE 7.5 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.6 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.7 Symmetry and antisymmetry lines are identified on Figure E7.11. Problem domains may be

reduced to the darker regions. Appropriate supports to realize these symmetry and antisymmetry conditions as well as actual supports (if given) are depicted in Figure E7.11.
EXERCISE 7.8 (a) From the beak to ground one “worm-bar” element is enough. Smaller elements inside

the ground, specially near G, to capture high force gradient. May increase in size as end E is approached. (b) Pull force as axial load at B. Friction forces, assumed known may be represented by tangentially lumping on worm nodes. Lateral worm displacement precluded by rollers over G E. (c) A 2D or 3D continuum-element solid model representing skin and insides.

7–22

7–23

Solutions to Exercises

P
(a) (b)

Partial credit for finding only the two symmetry lines if BCs & loads are correctly treated (see next figure)

P P

(c)

(e)

(d) A 2D or 3D continuum-element model for soil. No infinite elements are needed because the problem is highly localized (a worm is not a dam). Friction may be represented by special nonlinear elements on the worm surface, but that is an advanced topic.
EXERCISE 7.9 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.10 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.11 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.12 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.13 Exercise never assigned.

;;; ;;; ;;; ;;;
P P

P

(d)

(f)

P

P

Figure E7.11. Symmetry and antisymmetry lines in problems of Exercise 7.4.

7–23

Chapter 7: FEM MODELING: MESH, LOADS AND BCS

7–24

(a)

;; ;; ; ;

; ; ;

P/2

(c)

all nodes fixed on clamped edge

(e)

Important BCs

; ; ; ;; ;; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
P/2

P

;;; ; ; ;
(d)
no supports on hole edge nodes!

;; ;; ; ; ; ;; ;; ;;
(b)

P/2

Full credit for this solution

(f)

Important BCs

BCs on truncated mesh edges can be fairly arbitrary if sufficiently away from load. Recommend placing rollers as shown but full fixity would not be a serious mistake

Figure E7.12. Representation of the kinematic boundary conditions on the reduced regions (darker areas) of the previous figure. Only extremely coarse FEM meshes sketched since the only important answers are the treatment of boundary conditions and loads.

EXERCISE 7.14 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.15 Exercise never assigned. EXERCISE 7.16 n(n + 1)/2.

7–24

; ; ;;; ;; ; ;; ; ;;;; ;; ;; ;
P

; ; ; ; ; ; ;

P/2

P/2

Partial credit for this solution

q

; ; ; ;;;; ;; ;

BCs on truncated mesh edges can be fairly arbitrary if sufficiently away from load. Recommend placing rollers as shown but full fixity would not be a serious mistake

.

MultiFreedom Constraints I

8

8–1

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§8.1.

§8.2. §8.3.

§8. §8. §8.

Classification of Constraint Conditions §8.1.1. MultiFreedom Constraints . . . . . . . §8.1.2. Methods for Imposing Multifreedom Constraints §8.1.3. *MFC Matrix Forms . . . . . . . . . The Example Structure The Master-Slave Method §8.3.1. A One-Constraint Example . . . . . . . §8.3.2. Several Homogeneous MFCs . . . . . . §8.3.3. Nonhomogeneous MFCs . . . . . . . . §8.3.4. *The General Case . . . . . . . . . §8.3.5. *Retaining the Original Freedoms . . . . . §8.3.6. Model Reduction by Kinematic Constraints . §8.3.7. Assessment of the Master-Slave Method . . . Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .

8–3 8–3 8–4 8–5 8–5 8–6 8–7 8–8 8–9 8–9 8–10 8–10 8–13 8–14 8–14 8–15

8–2

8–3

§8.1

CLASSIFICATION OF CONSTRAINT CONDITIONS

§8.1. Classification of Constraint Conditions In previous Chapters we have considered structural support conditions that are mathematically expressable as constraints on individual degrees of freedom: nodal displacement component = prescribed value. (8.1)

These are called single-freedom constraints. Chapter 3 explains how to incorporate constraints of this form into the master stiffness equations, using hand- or computer-oriented techniques. The displacement boundary conditions studied in Chapter 7, which include modeling of symmetry and antisymmetry, lead to constraints of this form. For example: u x4 = 0, u y9 = 0.6. (8.2)

These are two single-freedom constraints. The first one is homogeneous while the second one is non-homogeneous. These attributes are defined below. §8.1.1. MultiFreedom Constraints The next step up in complexity involves multifreedom equality constraints, or multifreedom constraints for short, the last name being acronymed to MFC. These are functional equations that connect two or more displacement components: F(nodal displacement components) = prescribed value, (8.3)

where function F vanishes if all its nodal displacement arguments do. Equation (8.3), in which all displacement components are in the left-hand side, is called the canonical form of the constraint. An MFC of this form is called multipoint or multinode if it involves displacement components at different nodes. The constraint is called linear if all displacement components appear linearly on the left-hand-side, and nonlinear otherwise. The constraint is called homogeneous if, upon transfering all terms that depend on displacement components to the left-hand side, the right-hand side — the “prescribed value” in (8.3) —is zero. It is called non-homogeneous otherwise. In this and next Chapter only linear constraints will be studied. Furthermore more attention is devoted to the homogeneous case, because it arises more frequently in practice.
Remark 8.1. The most general constraint class is that of inequality constraints, such as u y5 − 2u x2 ≥ 0.5.

These constraints are relatively infrequent in linear structural analysis, except in problems that involve contact conditions. They are of paramount importance, however, in other fields such as optimization and control.

8–3

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–4

Example 8.1. Here are three instances of MFCs:

u x2 = 1 u y2 , 2

u x2 − 2u x4 + u x6 = 1 , 4

(x5 + u x5 − x3 − u x3 )2 + (y5 + u y5 − y3 − u y3 )2 = 0.

(8.4)

The first one is linear and homogeneous. It is not a multipoint constraint because it involves the displacement components of one node: 2. The second one is multipoint because it involves three nodes: 2, 4 and 6. It is linear and non-homogeneous. The last one is multipoint, nonlinear and homogeneous. Geometrically it expresses that the distance between nodes 3 and 5 in two-dimensional motions on the {x, y} plane remains constant. This kind of constraint appears in geometrically nonlinear analysis of structures, which is a topic beyond the scope of this book.

§8.1.2. Methods for Imposing Multifreedom Constraints Accounting for multifreedom constraints is done — at least conceptually — by changing the assembled master stiffness equations to produce a modified system of equations: Ku = f
MFC

Unmodified master stiffness equations K u = f before applying MFCs Apply MFCs
by

ˆ ˆ f. Ku = ˆ

(8.5)

master-slave penalty functions Lagrange multipliers

The modification process (8.5) is also called constraint application or constraint imposition. The modified system is that submitted ˆ to the equation solver, which returns u. The procedure is flowcharted in Figure 8.1. The sequence of operations sketched therein applies to all methods outlined below. 1.

^ Modified stiffness equations K ^ = ^ u f Equation solver returns ^ u Recover u if necessary
Figure 8.1. Schematics of MFC application.

Three methods for treating MFCs are discussed in this and the next Chapter: Master-Slave Elimination. The degrees of freedom involved in each MFC are separated into master and slave freedoms. The slave freedoms are then explicitly eliminated. The modified equations do not contain the slave freedoms. Penalty Augmentation. Also called the penalty function method. Each MFC is viewed as the presence of a fictitious elastic structural element called penalty element that enforces it approximately. This element is parametrized by a numerical weight. The exact constraint is recovered if the weight goes to infinity. The MFCs are imposed by augmenting the finite element model with the penalty elements. Lagrange Multiplier Adjunction. For each MFC an additional unknown is adjoined to the master stiffness equations. Physically this set of unknowns represent constraint forces that would enforce the constraints exactly should they be applied to the unconstrained system.

2.

3.

For each method the exposition tries to give first the basic flavor by working out the same example for each method. The general technique is subsequently presented in matrix form for completeness but is considered an advanced topic. Conceptually, imposing MFCs is not different from the procedure discussed in Chapter 3 for singlefreedom constraints. The master stiffness equations are assembled ignoring all constraints. Then 8–4

8–5

§8.2

THE EXAMPLE STRUCTURE

the MFCs are imposed by appropriate modification of those equations. There are, however, two important practical differences: 1. The modification process is not unique because there are alternative constraint imposition methods, namely those listed above. These methods offer tradeoffs in generality, programming implementation complexity, computational effort, numerical accuracy and stability. In the implementation of some of these methods — notably penalty augmentation — constraint imposition and assembly are carried out simultaneously. In that case the framework “first assemble, then modify,” is not strictly respected in the actual implementation.

2.

Remark 8.2. The three methods are also applicable, as can be expected, to the simpler case of a single-freedom constraint such as (8.2). For most situations, however, the generality afforded by the penalty function and Lagrange multiplier methods are not warranted. The hand-oriented reduction process discussed in Chapters 3 and 4 is in fact a special case of the master-slave elimination method in which “there is no master.” Remark 8.3. Often both multifreedom and single-freedom constraints are prescribed. The modification

process then involves two stages: apply multifreedom constraints and apply single freedom constraints. The order in which these are carried out is implementation dependent. Most implementations do the MFCs first, either after the assembly is completed or during the assembly process. The reason is practical: single-freedom constraints are often automatically taken care of by the equation solver itself. §8.1.3. *MFC Matrix Forms Matrix forms of linear MFCs are often convenient for compact notation. An individual constraint such as the second one in (8.4) may be written [1 In direct matrix notation: ¯ ¯ ai ui = gi , (no sum on i) (8.7) ¯ ¯ in which index i (i = 1, 2, . . .) identifies the constraint, ai is a row vector, ui collects the set of degrees of freedom that participate in the constraint, and gi is the right hand side scalar (0.25 in the foregoinf example). The bars over a and u distinguishes (8.7) from the expanded form (8.9) discussed below. For method description and general proofs it is often convenient to expand matrix forms so that they embody all degrees of freedom. For example, if (8.6) is part of a two-dimensional finite element model with 12 freedoms: u x1 , u y1 , . . . u y6 , the left-hand side row vector may be expanded with nine zeros as follows −2 1] u x2 u x4 u x6 = 0.25. (8.6)

u 
x1

[0 0 1 0 0

0 −2

0

0

0

1

 u y1    0 ]  u x2  = 0.25,  .  . .
u y6

(8.8)

in which case the matrix notation ai u = gi A u = g, (8.9) (8.10) is used. Finally, all multifreedom constraints expressed as (8.9) may be collected into a single matrix relation:

in which rectangular matrix A is formed by stacking the ai ’s as rows and column vector g is formed by stacking the gi s as entries. If there are 12 degrees of freedom in u and 5 multifreedom constraints then A will be 5 × 12.

8–5

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–6
u5 , f5
(5)

u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3

4

5

6

Figure 8.2. A one-dimensional problem discretized with six bar finite elements. The seven nodes may move only along the x direction. Subscript x is omitted from the u’s and f ’s to reduce clutter.

§8.2. The Example Structure The one-dimensional finite element discretization shown in Figure 8.2 will be used throughout Chapters 8 and 9 to illustrate the three MFC application methods. This structure consists of six bar elements connected by seven nodes that can only displace in the x direction. Before imposing various multifreedom constraints discussed below, the master stiffness equations for this problem are assumed to be  K 11  K 12   0   0   0  0 0 or Ku = f. (8.12) The nonzero stiffness coefficients K i j in (8.11) depend on the bar rigidity properties. For example, if E e Ae /L e = 100 for each element e = 1, . . . , 6, then K 11 = K 77 = 100, K 22 = . . . = K 66 = 200, K 12 = K 23 = . . . = K 67 = −100. However, for the purposes of the following treatment the coefficients may be kept arbitrary. The component index x in the nodal displacements u and nodal forces f has been omitted for brevity. Now let us specify a multifreedom constraint that states that nodes 2 and 6 must move by the same amount: u2 = u6. (8.13) Passing all node displacements to the right hand side gives the canonical form: u 2 − u 6 = 0. (8.14) K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67    0 u1 0   u2      0   u3      0   u4  =     0   u5      K 67 u6 K 77 u7  f1 f2   f3   f4  ,  f5   f6 f7

(8.11)

Constraint conditions of this type are sometimes called rigid links because they can be mechanically interpreted as forcing node points 2 and 6 to move together as if they were tied by a rigid member.1 We now study the imposition of constraint (8.14) on the master equations (8.11) by the methods mentioned above. In this Chapter the master-slave method is treated. The other two methods: penalty augmentation and Lagrange multiplier adjunction, are discussed in the following Chapter.
1

This physical interpretation is exploited in the penalty method described in the next Chapter. In two and three dimensions rigid link constraints are more complicated.

8–6

8–7 §8.3. The Master-Slave Method

§8.3 THE MASTER-SLAVE METHOD

To apply this method by hand, the MFCs are taken one at a time. For each constraint a slave degree of freedom is chosen. The freedoms remaining in that constraint are labeled master. A new set ˆ of degrees of freedom u is established by removing all slave freedoms from u. This new vector contains master freedoms as well as those that do not appear in the MFCs. A matrix transformation ˆ equation that relates u to u is generated. This equation is used to apply a congruent transformation to the master stiffness equations. This procedure yields a set of modified stiffness equations that ˆ are expressed in terms of the new freedom set u. Because the modified system does not contain the slave freedoms, these have been effectively eliminated. §8.3.1. A One-Constraint Example The mechanics of the process is best seen by going through an example. To impose (8.14) pick u 6 as slave and u 2 as master. Relate the original unknowns u 1 , . . . u 7 to the new set in which u 6 is missing:     u1 1 0 0 0 0 0   u1  u2   0 1 0 0 0 0     u   u3   0 0 1 0 0 0   2     u  (8.15)  u4  =  0 0 0 1 0 0   3  ,      u4   u5   0 0 0 0 1 0        u5 u6 0 1 0 0 0 0 u7 u7 0 0 0 0 0 1 This is the required transformation relation. In compact form: ˆ u = Tu . (8.16)

Replacing (8.15) into (8.12) and premultiplying by TT yields the modified system ˆ ˆ f, Ku = ˆ in which ˆ K = TT K T, ˆ = TT f. f (8.17)

Carrying out the indicated matrix multiplications yields  K 11  K 12   0   0  0 0 K 12 K 22 + K 66 K 23 0 K 56 K 67 0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 K 56 0 K 45 K 55 0     0 u1 f1 K 67   u 2   f 2 + f 6      0   u 3   f3  =   , 0   u 4   f4      0 u5 f5 K 77 u7 f7

(8.18)

Equation (8.18) is a new linear system containing 6 equations in the remaining 6 unknowns: u 1 , u 2 , u 3 , u 4 , u 5 and u 7 . Upon solving it, u 6 is recovered from the constraint (8.13).
Remark 8.4. The form of modified system (8.17) can be remembered by a simple mnemonic rule: premultiply

ˆ both sides of T u = u by TT K, and replace K u by f on the right hand side.

8–7

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–8

Remark 8.5. For a simple freedom constraint such as u 4 = 0 the only possible choice of slave is of course

u 4 and there is no master. The congruent transformation is then nothing more than the elimination of u 4 by striking out rows and columns from the master stiffness equations.
Remark 8.6. For a simple MFC such as u 2 = u 6 , it does not matter which degree of freedom is chosen as master or unknown. Choosing u 2 as slave produces a system of equations in which now u 2 is missing:

K

11

 0  0   0 

K 12 0

0 K 33 K 34 0 K 23 0

0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0

0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0

K 12 K 23 0 K 56 K 22 + K 66 K 67

0 u1 f1 0   u 3   f3  0   u 4   f4    =  . 0   u 5   f5      K 67 u6 f2 + f6 K 77 u7 f7



(8.19)

Although (8.18) and (8.19) are algebraically equivalent, the latter would be processed faster if a skyline solver (Part III of course) is used for the modified equations.

§8.3.2. Several Homogeneous MFCs The matrix equation (8.17) in fact holds for the general case of multiple homogeneous linear constraints. Direct establishment of the transformation equation, however, is more complicated if slave freedoms in one constraint appear as masters in another. To illustrate this point, suppose that for the example system we have three homogeneous multifreedom constraints: u 2 − u 6 = 0, u 1 + 4u 4 = 0, 2u 3 + u 4 + u 5 = 0, (8.20)

Picking as slave freedoms u 6 , u 4 and u 3 from the first, second and third constraint, respectively, we can solve for them as u6 = u2, u4 = − 1 u1, 4 u 3 = − 1 (u 4 + u 5 ) = 1 u 1 − 1 u 5 . 2 8 2 (8.21)

Observe that solving for u 3 from the third constraint brings u 4 to the right-hand side. But because u 4 is also a slave freedom (it was chosen as such for the second constraint) it is replaced in favor of u 1 using u 4 = − 1 u 1 . The matrix form of the transformation (8.21) is 4   1 u1  u2   0    1  u3   8    1  u4  =  − 4     u5   0     u6 0 u7 0  0 0 1 0 0 −1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0   0  u1   u2  0u ,  5  0  u7  0 1

(8.22)

The modified system is now formed through the congruent transformation (8.17). Note that the slave freedoms selected from each constraint must be distinct; for example the choice u 6 , u 4 , u 4 would be inadmissible as long as the constraints are independent. This rule is easy to enforce when slave freedoms are chosen by hand, but can lead to implementation and numerical difficulties when it is programmed as an automated procedure, as further discussed later. 8–8

8–9

§8.3 THE MASTER-SLAVE METHOD

Remark 8.7. The three MFCs (8.20) with u 6 , u 4 and u 2 chosen as slaves and u 1 , u 2 and u 5 chosen as masters,

may be presented in the partitioned matrix form: 0 0 2 0 1 4 0 1 0 u3 u4 u6 = 0 −1 0 1 0 0 0 0 −1 u1 u2 u5 (8.23)

This may be compactly written As us + Am um = 0. Solving for the slave freedoms gives us = −A−1 Am um . s ˆ Expanding with zeros to fill out u and u produces (8.22). This general matrix form is considered in §8.4.4. Note that non-singularity of As is essential for this method to work.

§8.3.3. Nonhomogeneous MFCs Extension to non-homogeneous constraints is immediate. In this case he transformation equation becomes non-homogeneous. For example suppose that (8.14) has a nonzero prescribed value: u 2 − u 6 = 0.2 (8.24)

Nonzero RHS values such as 0.2 in (8.24) may be often interpreted physically as “gaps” (thus the use of the symbol g in the matrix form). Chose u 6 again as slave: u 6 = u 2 − 0.2, and build the transformation       0 1 0 0 0 0 0   u1 u1  0   u2   0 1 0 0 0 0     u2       u3   0 0 1 0 0 0     0   u      (8.25)  u4  =  0 0 0 1 0 0   3  +  0  .    u4       u5   0 0 0 0 1 0     0     u5    u6 −0.2 0 1 0 0 0 0 u7 u7 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 In compact matrix notation, ˆ u = T u + g. (8.26) Here the constraint gap vector g is nonzero and T is the same as before. To get the modified system applying the shortcut rule of Remark 8.4, premultiply both sides of (8.26) by TT K, replace Ku by f, and pass the data to the RHS: ˆ ˆ f, Ku = ˆ in which ˆ K = TT K T, ˆ = TT (f − K g). f (8.27)

ˆ Upon solving (8.27) for u, the complete displacement vector is recovered from (8.26). For the MFC (8.24) this technique gives the system      u1 f1 K 12 0 0 0 0 K 11 0 K 56 K 67   u 2   f 2 + f 6 − 0.2K 66   K 12 K 22 + K 66 K 23      K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0   u3   f3   0 (8.28)   =  .  0   u4   f4 0 K 34 K 44 K 45   0      0 K 56 0 K 45 K 55 0 u5 f 5 − 0.2K 56 0 0 0 K 77 u7 f 7 − 0.2K 67 0 K 67 See Exercise 8.2 for multiple non-homogeneous MFCs. 8–9

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–10

§8.3.4. *The General Case For implementation in general-purpose programs the master-slave method can be described as follows. The degrees of freedoms in u are classified into three types: independent or unconstrained, masters and slaves. (The unconstrained freedoms are those that do not appear in any MFC.) Label these sets as uu , um and us , respectively, and partition the stiffness equations accordingly: Kuu T Kum T Kus Kum Kmm T Kms Kus Kms Kss uu um us = fu fm fs (8.29)

The MFCs may be written in matrix form as A m u m + A s us = g A , where As is assumed square and nonsingular. If so we can solve for the slave freedoms: us = −A−1 Am um + A−1 g A = T um + g, s s
def

(8.30)

(8.31) fu − Kus g fm − Kms g

Inserting into the partitioned stiffness equations (8.30) and symmetrizing yields Kuu symm Kmm Kum + Kus T T + T Kms + Kms T + TT Kss T
T

uu um

=

(8.32)

It is seen that the misleading simplicity of the handworked examples is gone. §8.3.5. *Retaining the Original Freedoms A potential disadvantage of the master-slave method in computer work is that it requires a rearrangement of ˆ the original stiffness equations because u is a subset of u. The disadvantage can be annoying when sparse matrix storage schemes are used for the stiffness matrix, and becomes intolerable if secondary storage is used for that purpose. With a bit of trickery it is possible to maintain the original freedom ordering. Let us display it for the example problem under (8.14). Instead of (8.15), use the square transformation

u1 1 u2   0   u3   0     u4  =  0     u5   0    u6 0 u7 0

0 1 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 K 56 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 u1 0   u2  0   u3    0   u4  ,   0   u5    u6 ˜ 0 u7 1 0 u1 f1 K 67   u 2   f 2 + f 6  0   u 3   f3      0   u 4  =  f4  ,     0   u 5   f5      u6 ˜ 0 0 K 77 u7 f7



(8.33)

in which u 6 is a placeholder for the slave freedom u 6 . The modified equations are ˜

K 11  K 12  0   0   0  0 0

K 12 K 22 + K 66 K 23 0 K 56 0 K 67

0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0

0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0

0 0 0 K 45 K 55 0 0



(8.34)

which are submitted to the equation solver. If the solver is not trained to skip zero rows and columns, a one ˜ should be placed in the diagonal entry for the u 6 (sixth) equation. The solver will return u 6 = 0, and this ˜ placeholder value is replaced by u 2 . Note several points in common with the computer-oriented placeholder technique described in §3.4 to handle single-freedom constraints.

8–10

8–11
u 1 , f1
(1)

§8.3
u 2 , f2
(2)

THE MASTER-SLAVE METHOD

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7
u 7, f7

1
u 1, f1

2

3

4

5

6

2 master DOFs to be retained

x
1 7
5 slave DOFs to be eliminated Reduced model

Master
u 1, f1

Master
u 7, f7

x
7

1

Figure 8.3. Model reduction of the example structure of Figure 8.2 to the end freedoms.

§8.3.6. Model Reduction by Kinematic Constraints The congruent transformation equations (8.17) and (8.27) have additional applications beyond the master-slave method. An important one is model reduction by kinematic constraints. Through this procedure the number of DOF of a static or dynamic FEM model is reduced by a significant number, typically to 1% – 10% of the original number. This is done by taking a lot of slaves and a few masters. Only the masters are left after the transformation. The reduced model is commonly used in subsequent calculations as component of a larger system, particularly during design or in parameter identification.
Example 8.2. Consider the bar assembly of Figure 8.2. Assume that the only masters are the end motions u 1

and u 7 , as illustrated in Figure 8.2, and interpolate all freedoms linearly:

u1 1  u 2   5/6  u 3   4/6     u 4  =  3/6     u 5   2/6    u6 1/6 u7 0

0 1/6  2/6   u 3/6  1 ,  u 4/6  7  5/6 1

or

ˆ u = T u.

(8.35)

ˆˆ ˆ The reduced-order-model (ROM) equations are Ku = TT KTu = TT f = ˆ or in detail f, ˆ K 11 ˆ K 17 in which ˆ K 11 = ˆ K 17 = ˆ K 77 = fˆ1 =
1 (36K 11 +60K 12 +25K 22 +40K 23 +16K 33 +24K 34 +9K 44 +12K 45 +4K 55 +4K 56 +K 66 ), 36 1 (6K 12 +5K 22 +14K 23 +8K 33 +18K 34 +9K 44 +18K 45 +8K 55 +14K 56 +5K 66 +6K 67 ), 36 1 (K 22 +4K 23 +4K 33 +12K 34 +9K 44 +24K 45 +16K 55 +40K 56 +25K 66 +60K 67 +36K 77 ), 36 1 (6 f 1 +5 f 2 +4 f 3 +3 f 4 +2 f 5 + f 6 ), fˆ7 = 1 ( f 2 +2 f 3 +3 f 4 +4 f 5 +5 f 6 +6 f 7 ). 6 6

ˆ K 17 ˆ K 77

u1 u7

=

fˆ1 , fˆ7

(8.36)

(8.37)

8–11

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–12

(* Model Reduction Example *) ClearAll[K11,K12,K22,K23,K33,K34,K44,K45,K55,K56,K66, f1,f2,f3,f4,f5,f6]; K={{K11,K12,0,0,0,0,0},{K12,K22,K23,0,0,0,0}, {0,K23,K33,K34,0,0,0},{0,0,K34,K44,K45,0,0}, {0,0,0,K45,K55,K56,0},{0,0,0,0,K56,K66,K67}, {0,0,0,0,0,K67,K77}}; Print["K=",K//MatrixForm]; f={f1,f2,f3,f4,f5,f6,f7}; Print["f=",f]; T={{6,0},{5,1},{4,2},{3,3},{2,4},{1,5},{0,6}}/6; Print["T (transposed to save space)=",Transpose[T]//MatrixForm]; Khat=Simplify[Transpose[T].K.T]; fhat=Simplify[Transpose[T].f]; Print["Modified Stiffness:"]; Print["Khat(1,1)=",Khat[[1,1]],"\nKhat(1,2)=",Khat[[1,2]], "\nKhat(2,2)=",Khat[[2,2]] ]; Print["Modified Force:"]; Print["fhat(1)=",fhat[[1]]," fhat(2)=",fhat[[2]] ];
K11 K12 0 0 0 0 0 K12 K22 K23 0 0 0 0 0 K23 K33 K34 0 0 0 0 0 K34 K44 K45 0 0 0 0 0 K45 K55 K56 0 0 0 0 0 K56 K66 K67 0 0 0 0 0 K67 K77 f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6, f7 1 T transposed to save space 0
5 6 1 6 2 3 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 3 1 6 5 6

K

f

0 1

Modified Stiffness: 1 Khat 1,1 36 K11 60 K12 25 K22 40 K23 16 K33 24 K34 9 K44 12 K45 4 K55 4 K56 K66 36 1 Khat 1,2 6 K12 5 K22 14 K23 8 K33 18 K34 9 K44 18 K45 8 K55 14 K56 5 K66 6 K67 36 1 Khat 2,2 K22 4 K23 4 K33 12 K34 9 K44 24 K45 16 K55 40 K56 25 K66 60 K67 36 K77 36 Modified Force: 1 fhat 1 6 f1 6 1 6

5 f2

4 f3

3 f4

2 f5

f6

fhat 2

f2

2 f3

3 f4

4 f5

5 f6

6 f7

Figure 8.4. Mathematica script for the model reduction example of Figure 8.3.

This reduces the order of the FEM model from 7 to 2. A Mathematica script to do the reduction is shown in Figure 8.4. The key feature is that the masters are picked a priori, as the freedoms to be retained in the model for further use.
Remark 8.8. Model reduction can also be done by the static condensation method explained in Chapter 10. As its name indicates, condensation is restricted to static analysis. On the other hand, for such problems it is exact whereas model reduction by kinematic constraints generally introduces approximations.

8–12

8–13 §8.3.7. Assessment of the Master-Slave Method

§8.3

THE MASTER-SLAVE METHOD

What are the good and bad points of this constraint application method? It enjoys the advantage of being exact (except for inevitable solution errors) and of reducing the number of unknowns. The concept is also easy to explain and learn. The main implementation drawback is the complexity of the general case as can be seen by studying (8.29) through (8.32). The complexity is due to three factors: 1. 2. 3. The equations may have to be rearranged because of the disappearance of the slave freedoms. This drawback can be alleviated, however, through the placeholder trick outlined in §8.3.5. An auxiliary linear system, namely (8.31), has to be assembled and solved to produce the transformation matrix T and vector g. The transformation process may generate many additional matrix terms. If a sparse matrix storage scheme is used for K, the logic for allocating memory and storing these entries can be difficult and expensive.

The level of complexity depends on the generality allowed as well as on programming decisions. At one extreme, if K is stored as full matrix and slave freedom coupling in the MFCs is disallowed the logic is simple.2 At the other extreme, if arbitrary couplings are permitted and K is placed in secondary (disk) storage according to some sparse scheme, the complexity can become overwhelming. Another, more subtle, drawback of this method is that it requires decisions as to which degrees of freedom are to be treated as slaves. This can lead to implementation and numerical stability problems. Although for disjointed constraints the process can be programmmed in reliable form, in more general cases of coupled constraint equations it can lead to incorrect decisions. For example, suppose that in the example problem you have the following two MFCs:
1 u 6 2

+ 1 u4 = u6, 2

u 3 + 6u 6 = u 7 .

(8.38)

For numerical stability reasons it is usually better to pick as slaves the freedoms with larger coefficients. If this is done, the program would select u 6 as slave freedoms from both constraints. This leads to a contradiction because having two constraints we must eliminate two slave degrees of freedom, not just one. The resulting modified system would in fact be inconsistent. Although this defect can be easily fixed by the program logic in this case, one can imagine the complexity burden if faced with hundreds or thousands of MFCs. Serious numerical problems can arise if the MFCs are not independent. For example:
1 u 6 2

= u6,

1 u 5 3

+ 6u 6 = u 7 ,

u 2 + u 3 − u 7 = 0.

(8.39)

The last constraint is an exact linear combination of the first two. If the program blindly choses u 2 , u 3 and u 7 as slaves, the modified system is incorrect because we eliminate three equations when in fact there are only two independent constraints.
2

This is the case in model reduction, since each slave freedom appears in one and only one MFC.

8–13

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–14

Exact linear dependence, as in (8.39), can be recognized by a rank analysis of the As matrix defined in (8.30). In floating-point arithmetic, however, such detection may fail because that kind of computation is inexact by nature.3 The complexity of slave selection is in fact equivalent to that of automatically selecting kinematic redundancies in the Force Method of structural analysis. It has led implementors of programs that use this method to require masters and slaves be prescribed in the input data, thus transfering the burden to users. The method is not generally extendible to nonlinear constraints without case by case programming. In conclusion, the master-slave method is useful when a few simple linear constraints are imposed by hand. As a general purpose technique for finite element analysis it suffers from complexity and lack of robustness. It is worth learning, however, because of the great importance of congruent transformations in model reduction for static and dynamic problems.
Notes and Bibliography Multifreedom constraints are treated in several of the FEM books recommended in §1.7.5, notably Zienkiewicz and Taylor [304]. The master-slave method was incorporated to treat MFCs as part of the DSM developed at Boeing during the 1950s. It is first summarily described in the DSM-overview by Turner, Martin and Weikel [279, p. 212]. The implementation differs, however, from the one described here because the relation of FEM to energy methods was not clear at the time. The master-slave method became popular through its adoption by the general-purpose NASTRAN code developed in the late 1960s [8] and early assessments of its potential [271]. The implementation unfortunately relied on user inputs to identify slave DOFs. Through this serious blunder the method gained a reputation for unreliability that persists to the present day. The important application of master-slave to model reduction, which by itself justifies teaching the method, is rarely mentioned in FEM textbooks. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

3

The safest technique to identify dependencies is to do a singular-value decomposition (SVD) of As . This can be, however, prohibitively expensive if one is dealing with hundreds or thousands of constraints.

8–14

8–15
Homework Exercises for Chapter 8 MultiFreedom Constraints I

Exercises

e = 1, . . . , 6. Consequently K 11 = K 77 = 100, K 22 = . . . = K 66 = 200, K 12 = K 23 = . . . = K 67 = −100. The applied node forces are taken to be f 1 = 1, f 2 = 2, f 3 = 3, f 4 = 4, f 5 = 5, f 6 = 6 and f 7 = 7, which are easy to remember. The structure is subjected to one support condition: u 1 = 0 (a fixed left end), and to one MFC: u 2 − u 6 = 1/5. Solve this problem using the master-slave method to process the MFC, taking u 6 as slave. Upon forming the modified system (8.27) apply the left-end support u 1 = 0 using the placeholder method of §3.4. Solve the equations and verify that the displacement solution and the recovered node forces including reactions are u = [ 0 0.270 Ku = [ −27 26.5 0.275 3 4 0.250 5 0.185 0.070 7 ]T 0.140 ]T (E8.1)

EXERCISE 8.1 [C+N:20] The example structure of Figure 8.1 has E e Ae /L e = 100 for each element

−18.5

Use Mathematica or Matlab to do the algebra is recommended. For example, the Mathematica script of Figure E8.1 solves this Exercise.

(* Exercise 8.1 - Master-Slave Method *) (* MFC: u2-u6 = 1/5 - slave: u6 *) MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar[kbar_]:=Module[ {K=Table[0,{7},{7}]}, K[[1,1]]=K[[7,7]]=kbar; For [i=2,i<=6,i++,K[[i,i]]=2*kbar]; For [i=1,i<=6,i++,K[[i,i+1]]=K[[i+1,i]]=-kbar]; Return[K]]; FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar[Khat_,fhat_]:=Module[ {Kmod=Khat,fmod=fhat}, fmod[[1]]=0; Kmod[[1,1]]=1; Kmod[[1,2]]=Kmod[[2,1]]=0; Return[{Kmod,fmod}]]; K=MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar[100]; Print["Stiffness K=",K//MatrixForm]; f={1,2,3,4,5,6,7}; Print["Applied forces=",f]; T={{1,0,0,0,0,0},{0,1,0,0,0,0},{0,0,1,0,0,0}, {0,0,0,1,0,0},{0,0,0,0,1,0},{0,1,0,0,0,0}, {0,0,0,0,0,1}}; Print["Transformation matrix T=",T//MatrixForm]; g={0,0,0,0,0,-1/5,0}; Print["Constraint gap vector g=",g]; Khat=Simplify[Transpose[T].K.T]; fhat=Simplify[Transpose[T].(f-K.g)]; {Kmod,fmod}=FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar[Khat,fhat]; (* fix left end *) Print["Modified Stiffness upon fixing node 1:",Kmod//MatrixForm]; Print["Modified RHS upon fixing node 1:",fmod]; umod=LinearSolve[Kmod,fmod]; Print["Computed umod (lacks slave u6)=",umod]; u=T.umod+g; Print["Complete solution u=",u]; Print["Numerical u=",N[u]]; fu=K.u; Print["Recovered forces K.u with reactions=",fu]; Print["Numerical K.u=",N[fu]];

Figure E8.1. Script for solving Exercise 8.1.

8–15

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–16

EXERCISE 8.2 [C+N:25] As in the previous Exercise but applying the following three MFCs, two of which

are non-homogeneous: u 2 − u 6 = 1/5, u 3 + 2u 4 = −2/3, 2u 3 − u 4 + u 5 = 0. (E8.2)

Hint. Chose u 4 , u 5 and u 6 as slaves. Much of the script shown for Exercise 8.1 can be reused. The main changes are in the formation of T and g. If you are a Mathematica wizard (or willing to be one) those can be automatically formed by the statements listed in Figure E8.2.

sol=Simplify[Solve[{u2-u6==1/5, u3+2*u4==-2/3,2*u3-u4+u5==0},{u4,u5,u6}]]; ums={u1,u2,u3,u4,u5,u6,u7}/.sol[[1]]; um={u1,u2,u3,u7}; T=Table[Coefficient[ums[[i]],um[[j]]],{i,1,7},{j,1,4}]; g=ums/.{u1->0,u2->0,u3->0,u4->0,u5->0,u6->0,u7->0}; Print["Transformation matrix T=",T//MatrixForm]; Print["Gap vector g=",g];

Figure E8.2. Script for partially solving Exercise 8.2.

If you do this, explain what it does and why it works. Otherwise form and enter T and g by hand. The numerical results (shown to 5 places) should be u = [ 0. 0.043072 −0.075033 Ku = [ −4.3072 16.118 10.268 −0.29582 −37.085 −0.14575 16.124 −0.15693 7. ]T . −0.086928 ]T , (E8.3)

−8.1176

EXERCISE 8.3 [A:25] Can the MFCs be pre-processed to make sure that no slave freedom in a MFC appears

as master in another?
EXERCISE 8.4 [A:25] In the general case discussed in §8.4.4, under which condition is the matrix As of (8.30) diagonal and thus trivially invertible? EXERCISE 8.5 [A:25] Work out the general technique by which the unknowns need not be rearranged, that

ˆ is, u and u are the same. Use “placeholders” for the slave freedoms. (Hint: use ideas of §3.4).
EXERCISE 8.6 [A/C:35] Is it possible to establish a slave selection strategy that makes As diagonal or triangular? (This requires knowledge of matrix techniques such as pivoting.) EXERCISE 8.7 [A/C:40] Work out a strategy that produces a well conditioned As by selecting new slaves as linear combinations of finite element freedoms if necessary. (Requires background in numerical analysis and advanced programming experience in matrix algebra).

8–16

Introduction to FEM

MultiFreedom Constraints I

8

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Multifreedom Constraints
Single freedom constraint examples

u x4 = 0 u y9 = 0.6 u x2 = 1 u y2 2

linear, homogeneous linear, non-homogeneous

Multifreedom constraint examples linear, homogeneous linear, non-homogeneous

u x2 −2u x4 +u x6 = 0.25

(x5 +u x5 −x3 −u x3 ) 2 +( y5 +u y5 −y3 −u y3 )2 = 0
nonlinear, homogeneous

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Sources of Multifreedom Constraints
"Skew" displacement BCs Coupling nonmatched FEM meshes Global-local and multiscale analysis Incompressibility Model reduction

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

MFC Application Methods

Master-Slave Elimination Penalty Function Augmentation Lagrange Multiplier Adjunction

Chapter 8

  
Chapter 9

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Procedure Summary in Static Analysis Valid for the Three Methods
Unmodified master stiffness equations K u = f before applying MFCs Apply MFCs
  master slave  Lagrange multiplier

penalty function

^ u f Modified stiffness equations K ^ = ^ Equation solver gives ^ u Recover u if necessary

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Example 1D Structure to Illustrate MFCs
u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3

4

5

6

Multifreedom constraint:
u 2 − u6 = 0

u2 = u6

or

Linear homogeneous MFC

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Example 1D Structure (Cont'd)
u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3

4

5

6

Unconstrained master stiffness equations    u1 K 11 K 12 0 0 0 0 0  K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0   u2      0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0   u3      0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0   u4  =     0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0   u5      0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67   u 6  0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 u7
or

         

 f1 f2   f3   f4   f5   f6  f7

Ku = f

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Master-Slave Method for Example Structure
Recall:

u2 = u6

or

u 2 − u6 = 0
 0   u 0 1  u2 0    u3  0  u  0 4   u5  0 u7 1

Taking u2 as master and u6 as slave    u1 1 0 0 0 0  u2   0 1 0 0 0     u3   0 0 1 0 0     u4  =  0 0 0 1 0     u5   0 0 0 0 1     u6   0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 u7
or

^ u=Tu

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Forming the Modified Stiffness Equations
Unconstrained master stiffness equations: Master-slave transformation:

Ku = f
^ u = Tu ^ KTu = f ^ TT K T u = TT f ^ ^ ^

Replace u & premultiply both sides by TT :

^ On renaming K = TT K T and ^ = TT f f we get the modified stiffness equations:

Ku = f

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Modified Stiffness Equations for Example Structure

In full  K 11 K 12  K 12 K 22 + K 66   0 K 23   0 0   0 K 56 0 K 67

ˆ ˆ f K u = ˆ
0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 K 56 0 K 45 K 55 0 0 u1 K 67   u 2    0   u3    = 0   u4    0   u5  K 77 u7
          f1 f2 + f6   f3   f4   f5  f7 

Solve for

u, then recover u = T u ˆ ˆ

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 10

Multiple MFCs
Suppose
u 2 − u 6 = 0, u6 = u2 u 1 + 4 u4 = 0,

Introduction to FEM

2u 3 + u 4 + u 5 = 0

Pick 3, 4 and 6 as slaves while 1, 2, 5 and 7 are masters
u4 = − 1 u1 4 u 3 = − 1 (u 4 + u 5 ) = 1 u 1 − 1 u 5 2 8 2

Put in matrix form:    1 u1  u2   0    1  u3   8     u4  =  − 1    4  u5      0  u6    0 u7 0

0 1 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 1 0 0

0 −1 2

 0 0 u  1 0    u2  0u   5  0  u7 0 1

This is u = T u - then proceed as before ˆ

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Non-homogeneous MFCs
u 2 − u 6 = 0.2   u1 1  u2   0     u3   0     u4  =  0     u5   0     u6   0 u7 0 
Pick again u 6 as slave, put into matrix form:

0 1 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0

 0   u 0 1   u2 0    u3  0  +   u4  0    u5  0 u7 1

0  0   0   0   0  −0.2 0

         

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Nonhomogeneous MFCs (cont'd)
ˆ u= Tu+g
g: "gap" vector

Premultiply both sides by TT K, replace K u = f and pass data to RHS. This gives

ˆ ˆ ˆ Ku = f
with

ˆ ˆ K = TT K T and f = TT (f − K g)
a modified force vector

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 13

Nonhomogeneous MFCs (cont'd)

Introduction to FEM

For the example structure

K 11  K 12   0   0   0 0

K 12 K 22 + K 66 K 23 0 K 56 K 67

0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0

0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0

0 K 56 0 K 45 K 55 0

    0 u1 f1 K 67   u 2   f 2 + f 6 − 0.2K 66       0   u3   f3   =     u4    0    f4    u 5   f 5 − 0.2K 56  0 K 77 u7 f 7 − 0.2K 67

ˆ Solve for u, then recover u = T u + g ˆ

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Model Reduction Example
u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7
u 7, f7

1
u 1, f1

2

3

4

5

6

2 master DOFs to be retained

x
1
5 slave DOFs to be eliminated

7

Master
u 1, f1
Reduced model

Master
u 7, f7

x
7

1

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Model Reduction Example (cont'd)
Lots of slaves, few masters. Only masters are left. Example of previous slide:
  1 u1  u 2   5/6     u 3   4/6     u 4  =  3/6     u 5   2/6     u 6   1/6  u7 0  0 1/6   2/6   u 3/6  1  u 4/6  7  5/6  1

5 slaves

2 masters

Applying the congruential transformation we get the reduced stiffness equations
ˆ K 11 ˆ K 17 ˆ K 17 ˆ K 77 u1 u7 = fˆ1 fˆ7

where
ˆ K 11 = ˆ K 17 = ˆ K 77 = fˆ1 =
1 (36K 11 +60K 12 +25K 22 +40K 23 +16K 33 +24K 34 +9K 44 +12K 45 +4K 55 +4K 56 +K 66 ) 36 1 (6K 12 +5K 22 +14K 23 +8K 33 +18K 34 +9K 44 +18K 45 +8K 55 +14K 56 +5K 66 +6K 67 ) 36 1 (K 22 +4K 23 +4K 33 +12K 34 +9K 44 +24K 45 +16K 55 +40K 56 +25K 66 +60K 67 +36K 77 ) 36 1 (6 f 1 +5 f 2 +4 f 3 +3 f 4 +2 f 5 + f 6 ), fˆ7 = 1 ( f 2 +2 f 3 +3 f 4 +4 f 5 +5 f 6 +6 f 7 ). 6 6

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Model Reduction Example: Mathematica Script
(* Model Reduction Example *) ClearAll[K11,K12,K22,K23,K33,K34,K44,K45,K55,K56,K66, f1,f2,f3,f4,f5,f6]; K={{K11,K12,0,0,0,0,0},{K12,K22,K23,0,0,0,0}, {0,K23,K33,K34,0,0,0},{0,0,K34,K44,K45,0,0}, {0,0,0,K45,K55,K56,0},{0,0,0,0,K56,K66,K67}, {0,0,0,0,0,K67,K77}}; Print["K=",K//MatrixForm]; f={f1,f2,f3,f4,f5,f6,f7}; Print["f=",f]; T={{6,0},{5,1},{4,2},{3,3},{2,4},{1,5},{0,6}}/6; Print["Transformation matrix T=",T//MatrixForm]; Khat=Simplify[Transpose[T].K.T]; fhat=Simplify[Transpose[T].f]; Print["Modified Stiffness:"]; Print["Khat(1,1)=",Khat[[1,1]],"\nKhat(1,2)=",Khat[[1,2]], "\nKhat(2,2)=",Khat[[2,2]] ]; Print["Modified Force:"]; Print["fhat(1)=",fhat[[1]]," fhat(2)=",fhat[[2]] ];
Modified Stiffness: Khat 1,1 Khat 1,2 Khat 2,2 1 36 1 36 1 36 36 K11 6 K12 K22 60 K12 5 K22 4 K23 25 K22

(Some print output removed so slide fits)
40 K23 16 K33 24 K34 9 K44 12 K45 4 K55 4 K56 K66 14 K23 4 K33 8 K33 18 K34 9 K44 9 K44 18 K45 16 K55 8 K55 40 K56 14 K56 25 K66 5 K66 60 K67 6 K67 36 K77

12 K34

24 K45

Modified Force: 1 fhat 1 6 f1 6

5 f2

4 f3

3 f4

2 f5

f6

fhat 2

1 6

f2

2 f3

3 f4

4 f5

5 f6

6 f7

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Assessment of Master-Slave Method
ADVANTAGES exact if precautions taken easy to understand retains positive definiteness important applications to model reduction DISADVANTAGES requires user decisions messy implementation for general MFCs hinders sparsity of master stiffness equations sensitive to constraint dependence restricted to linear constraints

IFEM Ch 8 – Slide 18

8–17
Homework Exercises for Chapter 8. - Solutions MultiFreedom Constraints I

Solutions to Exercises

EXERCISE 8.1 Here are the results of running the Mathematica program under version 4.2:

Stiffness K

100 100 0 0 0 0 0

100 200 100 0 0 0 0

0 100 200 100 0 0 0

0 0 100 200 100 0 0

0 0 0 100 200 100 0

0 0 0 0 100 200 100

0 0 0 0 0 100 100

Applied forces

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 400 100 0 100 100 0 100 200 100 0 0 0 0 100 200 100 0 0 100 0 100 200 0 0 100 0 0 0 100

Transformation matrix T

Constraint gap vector g

1 , 5 1 0 0 Modified Stiffness upon fixing node 1: 0 0 0 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,

Modified RHS upon fixing node 1: 0, 48, 3, 4, 15, 13 27 11 1 37 7 , , , , 100 40 4 200 50

Computed umod

lacks slave u6 0,

0,

Complete solution u Numerical u

27 11 1 37 7 7 , , , , , 100 40 4 200 100 50

0., 0.27, 0.275, 0.25, 0.185, 0.07, 0.14 27, 53 , 3, 4, 5, 2 37 ,7 2

Recovered forces K.u with reactions Numerical K.u

27., 26.5, 3., 4., 5., 18.5, 7.

EXERCISE 8.2

The following Mathematica script solves this Exercise:

8–17

Chapter 8: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS I

8–18

(* Exercise 8.2 - Master-Slave Method *) (* MFCs: u2-u6=1/5, u3+2u4=-2/3, 2u3-u4+u5=0 - slaves: u4,u5,u6 *) K=MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar[100]; Print["Stiffness K=",K//MatrixForm]; f={1,2,3,4,5,6,7}; Print["Applied forces=",f]; T={{1, 0, 0, 0}, {0, 1, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 1, 0}, {0, 0, -1/2, 0}, {0, 0, -5/2, 0}, {0, 1, 0, 0}, {0, 0, 0, 1}}; Print["Transf matrix T (transposed)=",Transpose[T]//MatrixForm]; g={0, 0, 0, -1/3, -1/3, -1/5, 0}; Print["Constraint gap vector g=",g]; Khat=Simplify[Transpose[T].K.T]; fhat=Simplify[Transpose[T].(f-K.g)]; {Kmod,fmod}=FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar[Khat,fhat]; (* fix left end *) Print["Modified Stiffness upon fixing node 1:",Kmod//MatrixForm]; Print["Modified RHS upon fixing node 1:",fmod]; umod=LinearSolve[Kmod,fmod]; Print["Computed umod (lacks slaves)=",umod]; u=T.umod+g; Print["Complete solution u=",u]; Print["Numerical u=",SetPrecision[N[u],5]]; fu=K.u; Print["Recovered forces K.u with reactions=",fu]; Print["Numerical K.u=",SetPrecision[N[fu],5]];

Modules MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar and FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar are listed in the statement of Exercise 8.1. T and g were actually computed by the commands shown in the statement of the Exercise, printed in InputForm and fed into the script. But they could have also been computed by hand. Running this code gives

Stiffness K

100 100 0 0 0 0 0

100 200 100 0 0 0 0

0 100 200 100 0 0 0

0 0 100 200 100 0 0

0 0 0 100 200 100 0

0 0 0 0 100 200 100

0 0 0 0 0 100 100

Applied forces

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
1 2

0 0
5 2

0 0 1 0 0 0

Transf matrix T

transposed

0 0 1

0 1 Constraint gap vector g , 3 1 0 Modified Stiffness upon fixing node 1: 0 0 Modified RHS upon fixing node 1: 0, Computed umod lacks slaves 0, 0, 44 , 3

0 0 0 1 0, 0, 0, , 3

0 0 1 1 ,0 5 0 0 400 150 150 1350 100 0 569 , 6 287 , 3825 13

0 100 0 100

659 , 15300 287 , 3825

133 1530 223 , 1530 2401 , 15300 0.15693, 133 1530 0.086928 138 ,7 17

Complete solution u Numerical u

659 , 15300

2263 , 7650

0, 0.043072,

0.075033,

0.29582,

0.14575,

Recovered forces K.u with reactions Numerical K.u 4.3072, 16.118, 10.268,

659 274 1571 , , , 153 17 153 37.085, 16.124,

5674 2467 , , 153 153 8.1176, 7.0000

8–18

8–19
EXERCISE 8.3 Never assigned. EXERCISE 8.4 Never assigned. EXERCISE 8.5 Never assigned. EXERCISE 8.6 Never assigned.

Solutions to Exercises

EXERCISE 8.7 If you can solve this one as a hobby, apply for a job with MSC Software.

8–19

.

MultiFreedom Constraints II

9

9–1

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§9.1.

§9.2.

§9.3. §9.4. §9. §9. §9.

The Penalty Method §9.1.1. Physical Interpretation . . . . . . . . §9.1.2. Choosing the Penalty Weight . . . . . . §9.1.3. The Square Root Rule . . . . . . . . §9.1.4. Penalty Elements for General MFCs . . . §9.1.5. *The Theory Behind the Recipe . . . . . §9.1.6. Assessment of the Penalty Method . . . . Lagrange Multiplier Adjunction §9.2.1. Physical Interpretation . . . . . . . . §9.2.2. Lagrange Multipliers for General MFCs . . §9.2.3. *The Theory Behind the Recipe . . . . . §9.2.4. Assessment of the Lagrange Multiplier Method *The Augmented Lagrangian Method Summary Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9–3 9–3 9–3 9–4 9–5 9–6 9–7 9–8 9–8 9–9 9–10 9–10 9–10 9–11 9–12 9–12 9–13

9–2

9–3

§9.1

THE PENALTY METHOD

In this Chapter we continue the discussion of methods to treat multifreedom constraints (MFCs). The master-slave method described previously was found to exhibit serious shortcomings for treating arbitrary constraints, although the method has important applications to model reduction. We now pass to the study of two other methods: penalty augmentation and Lagrange multiplier adjunction. Both techniques are better suited to general implementations of the Finite Element Method, whether linear or nonlinear. §9.1. The Penalty Method

u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3

4

5

6

Figure 9.1. The example structure of Chapter 8, repeated for convenience.

§9.1.1. Physical Interpretation The penalty method will be first presented using a physical argument, leaving the mathematical formulation to a subsequent section. Consider again the example structure of Chapter 8, which is reproduced in Figure 9.1 for convenience. To impose u 2 = u 6 imagine that nodes 2 and 6 are connected with a “fat” bar of axial stiffness w, labeled with element number 7, as shown in Figure 9.2. This bar is called a penalty element and w is its penalty weight. Such an element, albeit fictitious, can be treated exactly like another bar element insofar as continuing the assembly of the master stiffness equations. The penalty element stiffness equations, K(7) u(7) = f(7) , are1 1 −1 u2 0 w = (9.1) u6 −1 1 0 Because there is one freedom per node, the two local element freedoms map into global freedoms 2 and 6, respectively. Using the assembly rules of Chapter 3 we obtain the following modified master ˆ f, stiffness equations: Ku = ˆ which shown in detail are  K 11 K 12    0   0   0  0 0 K 12 K 22 + w K 23 0 0 −w 0 0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0 −w 0 0 K 56 K 66 + w K 67    0 u1 0   u2      0   u3      0   u4  =     0   u5      K 67 u6 K 77 u7  f1 f2   f3   f4  .  f5   f6 f7

(9.2)

ˆ This system can now be submitted to the equation solver. Note that u ≡ u, and only K has changed.
1

The general method to construct these equations is described in §9.1.4.

9–3

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–4
u5 , f5
(5)

u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3

4
(7)

5

6

penalty element of axial rigidity w
Figure 9.2. Adjunction of a fictitious penalty bar of axial stiffness w, identified as element 7,to enforce the MFC u 2 = u 6 .

§9.1.2. Choosing the Penalty Weight What happens when (9.2) is solved numerically? If a finite weight w is chosen the constraint u 2 = u 6 is approximately satisfied in the sense that one gets u 2 − u 6 = eg , where eg = 0. The “gap error” eg is called the constraint violation. The magnitude |eg | of this violation depends on the weight: the larger w, the smaller the violation. More precisely, it can be shown that |eg | becomes proportional to 1/w as w gets to be sufficiently large (see Exercises). For example, raising w from, say, 106 to 107 can be expected to cut the constraint violation by roughly 10 if the physical stiffnesses are small compared to w. Therefore it seems as if the proper strategy should be: try to make w as large as possible while respecting computer overflow limits. However, this is misleading. As the penalty weight w tends to ∞ the modified stiffness matrix in (9.2) becomes more and more ill-conditioned with respect to inversion. To make this point clear, suppose for definiteness that the rigidities E e Ae /L e of the actual bars e = 1, . . . 6 are unity, that w >> 1, and that the computer solving the stiffness equations has a floating-point precision of 16 decimal places. Numerical analysts characterize such precision by saying that f = O(10−16 ), where | f | is the smallest power of 10 that perceptibly adds to 1 in floating-point arithmetic.2 The modified stiffness matrix of (9.2) becomes   1 −1 0 0 0 0 0 0 −w 0   −1 2 + w −1 0   −1 2 −1 0 0 0   0   K= 0 (9.3) 0 −1 2 −1 0 0    0 0 −1 2 −1 0   0   0 −w 0 0 −1 2 + w −1 0 0 0 0 0 −1 1 Clearly as w → ∞ rows 2 and 6, as well as columns 2 and 6, tend to become linearly dependent; in fact the negative of each other. But linear dependency means singularity. Thus K approaches singularity as w → ∞. In fact, if w exceeds 1/ f = 1016 the computer will not be able to distinguish K from an exactly singular matrix. If w << 1016 but w >> 1, the effect will be seen in ˆ increasing solution errors affecting the computed displacements u returned by the equation solver. These errors, however, tend to be more of a random nature than the constraint violation error.
2

Such definitions are more rigurously done by working with binary numbers and base-2 arithmetic but for the present discussion the use of decimal powers is sufficient.

9–4

9–5 §9.1.3. The Square Root Rule

§9.1

THE PENALTY METHOD

Obviously we have two effects at odds with each other. Making w larger reduces the constraint violation error but increases the solution error. The best w is that which makes both errors roughly equal in absolute value. This tradeoff value is difficult to find aside of systematically running numerical experiments. In practice the heuristic square root rule is often followed. This rule can be stated as follows. Suppose that the largest stiffness coefficient, before adding penalty elements, is of the order of 10k and that the working machine precision is p digits.3 Then choose penalty weights to be of order 10k+ p/2 with the proviso that such a choice would not cause arithmetic overflow.4 For the above example in which k ≈ 0 and p ≈ 16, the optimal w given by this rule would be w ≈ 108 . This w would yield a constraint violation and a solution error of order 10−8 . Note that there is no simple way to do better than this accuracy aside from using extended (e.g., quad) floatingpoint precision. This is not easy to do when using standard low-level programming languages. √ The name “square root” arises because the recommended w is in fact 10k 10 p . It is seen that picking the weight by this rule requires knowledge of both stiffness magnitudes and floating-point hardware properties of the computer used, as well as the precision selected by the program. §9.1.4. Penalty Elements for General MFCs For the constraint u 2 = u 6 the physical interpretation of the penalty element is clear. Nodal points 2 and 6 must move in lockstep long x, which can be approximately enforced by the heavy bar device shown in Figure 9.2. But how about 3u 3 + u 5 − 4u 6 = 1? Or just u 2 = −u 6 ? The treatment of more general constraints is linked to the theory of Courant penalty functions, which in turn is a topic in variational calculus. Because the necessary theory given in §9.1.5 is viewed as an advanced topic, the procedure used for constructing a penalty element is stated here as a recipe. Consider the homogeneous constraint 3u 3 + u 5 − 4u 6 = 0. Rewrite this equation in matrix form [3 1 u3 −4 ] u 5 u6 = 0, (9.5) (9.4)

and premultiply both sides by the transpose of the coefficient matrix: 3 1 [3 −4
3

1

u3 −4 ] u 5 u6

=

9 3 −12

3 1 −4

−12 −4 16

u3 u5 u6

¯e = K ue =

0 0 . 0

(9.6)

Such order-of-magnitude estimates can be readily found by scanning the diagonal of K because the largest stiffness coefficient of the actual structure is usually a diagonal entry. If overflows occurs, the master stiffness should be scaled throughout or a better choice of physical units made.

4

9–5

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II
e

9–6

¯ Here K is the unscaled stiffness matrix of the penalty element. This is now multiplied by the penalty weight w and assembled into the master stiffness matrix following the usual rules. For the example problem, augmenting (9.2) with the w-scaled penalty element (9.6) yields  K 11  K 12   0   0   0  0 0 K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 0 K 23 K 33 + 9w K 34 3w −12w 0 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 3w K 45 K 55 + w K 56 − 4w 0 0 0 −12w 0 K 56 − 4w K 66 + 16w K 67    0 u1 0   u2      0   u3      0   u4  =     0   u5      K 67 u6 K 77 u7  f1 f2   f3   f4  .  f5   f6 f7

(9.7)

If the constraint is nonhomogeneous the force vector is also modified. To illustrate this effect, consider the MFC: 3u 3 + u 5 − 4u 6 = 1. Rewrite in matrix form as [3 1 u3 −4 ] u 5 u6 = 1. (9.8)

Premultiply both sides by the transpose of the coefficient matrix: 9 3 −12 Scaling by w and assembling yields  K 11  K 12   0   0   0  0 0 K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 0 K 23 K 33 + 9w K 34 3w −12w 0 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 3w K 45 K 55 + w K 56 − 4w 0 0 0 −12w 0 K 56 − 4w K 66 + 16w K 67     u1 f1 0 0   u2   f2      0   u 3   f 3 + 3w      0   u4  =  f4  .     0   u 5   f5 + w      K 67 u6 f 6 − 4w K 77 u7 f7 (9.10) 3 1 −4 −12 −4 16 u3 u5 u6 = 3 1 . −4 (9.9)

§9.1.5. *The Theory Behind the Recipe The rule comes from the following mathematical theory. Suppose we have a set of m linear MFCs. Using the matrix notation introduced in §8.1.3, these will be stated as apu = bp, p = 1, . . . m (9.11)

where u contains all degrees of freedom and each a p is a row vector with same length as u. To incorporate the MFCs into the FEM model one selects a weight w p > 0 for each constraints and constructs the so-called Courant quadratic penalty function or “penalty energy”
m

P=
p=1

Pp ,

with

Pp = u T

1 T a a u 2 p p

− w p aT b p = 1 uT K( p) u − uT f( p) , p 2

(9.12)

9–6

9–7

§9.1

THE PENALTY METHOD

where we have called K( p) = w p aT a p and f( p) = w p aT bi . P is added to the potential energy function p = 1 uT Ku − uT f to form the augmented potential energy a = + P. Minimization of a with respect 2 to u yields
m m

Ku +
p=1

K

( p)

u=f+
p=1

f( p) .

(9.13)

Each term of the sum on p, which derives from term Pp in (9.12), may be viewed as contributed by a penalty element with globalized stiffness matrix K( p) = w p aT a p and globalized added force term f( p) = w p aT b p . p p To use a even more compact form we may write the set of multifreedom constraints as Au = b. Then the penalty augmented system can be written compactly as (K + AT WA) u = f + WAT b, (9.14)

where W is a diagonal matrix of penalty weights. This compact form, however, conceals the configuration of the penalty elements.

§9.1.6. Assessment of the Penalty Method The main advantage of the penalty function method is its straightforward computer implementation. Looking at modified systems such as (9.2), (9.7) or (9.10) it is obvious that the master equations ˆ need not be rearranged. That is, u and u are the same. Constraints may be programmed as “penalty elements,” and stiffness and force contributions of these elements merged through the standard assembler. In fact using this method there is no need to distinguish between unconstrained and constrained equations! Once all elements — regular and penalty — are assembled, the system can be passed to the equation solver.5 An important advantage with respect to the master-slave (elimination) method is its lack of sensitivity with respect to whether constraints are linearly dependent. To give a simplistic example, suppose that the constraint u 2 = u 6 appears twice. Then two penalty elements connecting 2 and 6 will be inserted, doubling the intended weight but not otherwise causing undue harm. An advantage with respect to the Lagrange multiplier method described in §9.2 is that positive definiteness is not lost. Such loss can affect the performance of certain numerical processes.6 Finally, it is worth noting that the penalty method is easily extendible to nonlinear constraints although such extension falls outside the scope of this book. The main disadvantage, however, is a serious one: the choice of weight values that balance solution accuracy with the violation of constraint conditions. For simple cases the square root rule previously described often works, although its effective use calls for knowledge of the magnitude of stiffness coefficients. Such knowledge may be difficult to extract from a general purpose “black box” program. For difficult cases selection of appropriate weights may require extensive numerical experimentation, wasting the user time with numerical games that have no bearing on the actual objective, which is getting a solution. The deterioration of the condition number of the penalty-augmented stiffness matrix can have serious side effects in some solution procedures such as eigenvalue extraction or iterative solvers.
5 6

Single freedom constraints, such as those encountered in Chapter 3, are usually processed separately for efficiency. For example, solving the master stiffness equations by Cholesky factorization or conjugate-gradients.

9–7

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–8
u5 , f5
(5)

u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3 −λ

4

5
λ

6

Figure 9.3. Physical interpretation of Lagrange multiplier adjunction to enforce the MFC u 2 = u 6 .

Finally, even if optimal weights are selected, the combined solution error cannot be lowered beyond a threshold value. From this assessment it is evident that penalty augmentation, although superior to the master-slave method from the standpoint of generality and ease of implementation, is no panacea. §9.2. Lagrange Multiplier Adjunction §9.2.1. Physical Interpretation As in the case of the penalty function method, the method of Lagrange multipliers can be given a rigorous justification within the framework of variational calculus. But in the same spirit it will be introduced for the example structure from a physical standpoint that is particularly illuminating. Consider again the constraint u 2 = u 6 . Borrowing some ideas from the penalty method, imagine that nodes 2 and 6 are connected now by a rigid link rather than a flexible one. Thus the constraint is imposed exactly. But of course the penalty method with an infinite weight would “blow up.” We may remove the link if it is replaced by an appropriate reaction force pair (−λ, +λ), as illustrated in Figure 9.3. These are called the constraint forces. Incorporating these forces into the original stiffness equations (8.10) we get      u1 f1 0 0 0 0 0 K 11 K 12 0 0 0 0   u 2   f2 − λ   K 12 K 22 K 23      K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0   u 3   f3   0      (9.15) 0 0   u 4  =  f4  . 0 K 34 K 44 K 45  0      0   u 5   f5  0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56  0      u6 f6 + λ 0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 u7 f7 This λ is called a Lagrange multiplier. Because λ is an unknown, let us transfer it to the left hand side by appending it to the vector of unknowns:      u1  f1 0 0 0 0 0 0 K 11 K 12  u2  0 0 0 0 1     f2   K 12 K 22 K 23 u     0 0 0 0   3   f3  K 23 K 33 K 34  0 u     (9.16) 0 0 0   4  =  f4  . 0 K 34 K 44 K 45  0 u     0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0   5   f5   u     f6 0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 −1  6  u7 f7 0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 0 λ 9–8

9–9

§9.2

LAGRANGE MULTIPLIER ADJUNCTION

But now we have 7 equations in 8 unknowns. To render the system determinate, the constraint condition u 2 − u 6 = 0 is appended as eighth equation:  K 11  K 12   0   0   0   0  0 0 K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 1 0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0 0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 −1 0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 0    u1 0 1   u2      0   u3      0   u4     =  0   u5      −1   u 6      0 u7 λ 0  f1 f2   f3   f4  , f5   f6   f7 0

(9.17)

This is called the multiplier-augmented system. Its coefficient matrix, which is symmetric, is called the bordered stiffness matrix. The process by which λ is appended to the vector of original unknowns is called adjunction. Solving this system provides the desired solution for the degrees of freedom while also characterizing the constraint forces through λ. §9.2.2. Lagrange Multipliers for General MFCs The general procedure will be stated first as a recipe. Suppose that we want to solve the example structure subjected to three MFCs u 2 − u 6 = 0, 5u 2 − 8u 7 = 3, 3u 3 + u 5 − 4u 6 = 1, (9.18)

Adjoin these MFCs as the eighth, nineth and tenth equations:  K 11  K 12   0   0   0   0   0   0  0 0 K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 −1 0 −4   0 0     u1  0     u2   0    u   0  3  u  =  K 67   4   u   K 77   5    u6  0    u7  −8 0  f1 f2   f3   f4   f5  , f6   f7   0  3 1

(9.19)

Three Lagrange multipliers: λ1 , λ2 and λ3 , are required to take care of three MFCs. Adjoin those unknowns to the nodal displacement vector. Symmetrize the coefficient matrix by appending 3 columns that are the transpose of the 3 last rows in (9.19), and filling the bottom right-hand corner 9–9

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–10

with a 3 × 3 zero matrix:  K 11 K 12 0  K 12 K 22 K 23  K 23 K 33  0  0 K 34  0  0 0  0  0 0  0  0 0  0  1 0  0  0 5 0 0 0 3

0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 −1 0 −4

0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 0 −8 0

0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 −1 0 0 −8 0 0 0 0 0 0

   u1 0 0   u2      3   u3      0   u4      1   u5     =  −4   u 6      0   u7      0   λ1      λ2 0 λ3 0

 f1 f2   f3   f4   f5  . f6   f7   0  3 1

(9.20)

§9.2.3. *The Theory Behind the Recipe The recipe illustrated by (9.20) comes from a well known technique of variational calculus. Using the matrix notation introduced in §8.1.3, compactly denote the set of m MFCs by Au = b, where A is m × n. The potential energy of the unconstrained finite element model is = 1 uT Ku − uT f. To impose the constraint, 2 adjoin m Lagrange multipliers collected in vector λ and form the Lagrangian L(u, λ) = + λT (Au − b) = 1 uT Ku − uT f + λT (Au − b). 2 AT 0 (9.21)

Extremizing L with respect to u and λ yields the multiplier-augmented form K A u f = . λ b (9.22)

The master stiffness matrix K in (9.22) is said to be bordered with A and AT . Solving this system provides u and λ. The latter can be interpreted as forces of constraint in the following sense: a removed constraint can be replaced by a system of forces characterized by λ multiplied by the constraint coefficients. More precisely, the constraint forces are −AT λ.

§9.2.4. Assessment of the Lagrange Multiplier Method In contrast to the penalty method, the method of Lagrange multipliers has the advantage of being exact (aside from computational errors due to finite precision arithmetic). It provides directly the constraint forces, which are of interest in many applications. It does not require guesses as regards weights. As the penalty method, it can be extended without difficulty to nonlinear constraints. It is not free of disadvantages. It introduces additional unknowns, requiring expansion of the original stiffness method, and more complicated storage allocation procedures. It renders the augmented stiffness matrix indefinite, an effect that may cause grief with some linear equation solving methods that rely on positive definiteness. Finally, as the master-slave method, it is sensitive to the degree of linear independence of the constraints: if the constraint u 2 = u 6 is specified twice, the bordered stiffness is obviously singular. On the whole this method appears to be the most elegant one for a general-purpose finite element program that is supposed to work as a “black box” by minimizing guesses and choices from its users. Its implementation, however, is not simple. Special care must be exercised to detect singularities due to constraint dependency and to account for the effect of loss of positive definiteness of the bordered stiffness on equation solvers. 9–10

9–11
§9.3.

§9.4

SUMMARY

*The Augmented Lagrangian Method

The general matrix forms of the penalty function and Lagrangian multiplier methods are given by expressions (9.13) and (9.22), respectively. A useful connection between these methods can be established as follows. Because the lower diagonal block of the bordered stiffness matrix in (9.22) is null, it is not possible to directly eliminate λ. To make this possible, replace this block by S−1 , where S is a constraint-scaling diagonal matrix of appropriate order and is a small number. The reciprocal of is a large number called w = 1/ . To maintain exactness of the second equation, S−1 λ is added to the right-hand side: K A AT S−1 u = λ S λP
−1

f

(9.23)

Here superscript P (for “predicted value”) is attached to the λ on the right-hand side as a “tracer.” We can now formally solve for λ and subsequently for u. The results may be presented as (K + wAT SA) u = f + wAT Sb − AT λ P , λ = λ P + wS(b − Au), Setting λ P = 0 in the first matrix equation yields (K + wAT SA) u = f + wAT Sb. On taking W = wS, the general matrix equation (9.13) of the penalty method is recovered. This relation suggests the construction of iterative procedures in which one tries to improve the accuracy of the penalty function method while w is kept constant [70]. This strategy circumvents the aforementioned ill-conditioning problems when the weight w is gradually increased. One such method is easily constructed by inspecting (9.24). Using superscript k as an iteration index and keeping w fixed, solve equations (9.24) in tandem as follows: (K + AT WA) uk = f + AT Wb − AT λk , (9.26) λk+1 = λk + W(b − Auk ), for k = 0, 1, . . . , beginning with λ0 = 0. Then u0 is the penalty solution. If the process converges one recovers the exact Lagrangian solution without having to solve the Lagrangian system (9.23) directly. The family of iterative procedures that may be precipitated from (9.24) collectively pertains to the class of augmented Lagrangian methods. (9.25) (9.24)

§9.4. Summary The treatment of linear MFCs in finite element systems can be carried out by several methods. Three of these: master-slave elimination, penalty augmentation and Lagrange multiplier adjunction, have been discussed. It is emphasized that no method is uniformly satisfactory in terms of generality, robustness, numerical behavior and simplicity of implementation. Figure 9.4 gives an assessment of the three techniques in terms of seven attributes. 9–11
Generality Ease of implementation Sensitivity to user decisions Accuracy Sensitivity as regards constraint dependence Retains positive definiteness Modifies unknown vector

Master-Slave Elimination fair poor to fair high variable high yes yes

Penalty Function excellent good high mediocre none yes no

Lagrange Multipliers excellent fair small to none excellent high no yes

Figure 9.4. Assessment summary of three MFC application methods.

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–12

For a general purpose program that tries to attain “black box” behavior (that is, minimal decisions on the part of users) the method of Lagrange multipliers has the edge. This edge is unfortunately blunted by a fairly complex computer implementation and by the loss of positive definiteness in the bordered stiffness matrix.
Notes and Bibliography A form of the penalty function method, quite close to that described in §9.1.5, was first proposed by Courant in the early 1940s [54]. It entered the FEM through the work of numerous people in the 1960s. There is a good description in the book by Zienkiewicz and Taylor [279]. The Lagrange Multiplier method is much older. Multipliers (called initially “coefficients”) were described by Lagrange in his famous M´ canique Analytique monograph [153], as part of the procedure for forming the e function now called the Lagrangian. Its use in FEM is more recent than penalty methods. Augmented Lagrangian methods have received much attention since the late 1960s, when they originated in the field of constrained optimization [131,201]. The use of the Augmented Lagrangian Multiplier method for FEM kinematic constraints is first discussed in [70], wherein the iterative algorithm (9.26) for the master stiffness equations is derived. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

9–12

9–13
Homework Exercises for Chapter 9 MultiFreedom Constraints II

Exercises

EXERCISE 9.1 [C+N:20] This is identical to Exercise 8.1, except that the MFC u 2 − u 6 = 1/5 is to be treated by the penalty function method. Take the weight w to be 10k , in which k varies as k = 3, 4, 5, . . . 16. For each sample w compute the Euclidean-norm solution error e(w) = ||u p (w) − uex ||2 , where u p is the computed solution and uex is the exact solution listed in (E8.1). Plot k = log10 w versus log10 e and report for which weight e attains a minimum. (See Slide #5 for a check). Does it roughly agree with the square root rule (§9.1.3) if the computations carry 16 digits of precision?

As in Exercise 8.1, use Mathematica, Matlab (or similar) to do the algebra. For example, the following Mathematica script solves this Exercise: (* Exercise 9.1 - Penalty Method *) (* MFC: u2-u6=1/5 variable w *) K=MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar[100]; Print["Stiffness K=",K//MatrixForm]; f={1,2,3,4,5,6,7}; Print["Applied forces=",f]; uexact= {0,0.27,0.275,0.25,0.185,0.07,0.14}; ew={}; For [w=100, w<=10^16, w=10*w; (* increase w by 10 every pass *) Khat=K; fhat=f; Khat[[2,2]]+=w; Khat[[6,6]]+=w; Khat[[6,2]]=Khat[[2,6]]-=w; fhat[[2]]+=(1/5)*w; fhat[[6]]-=(1/5)*w; (*insert penalty *) {Kmod,fmod}=FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar[Khat,fhat]; u=LinearSolve[N[Kmod],N[fmod]]; Print["Weight w=",N[w]//ScientificForm," u=",u//InputForm]; e=Sqrt[(u-uexact).(u-uexact)]; (*Print["L2 solution error=",e//ScientificForm]; *) AppendTo[ew,{Log[10,w],Log[10,e]}]; ]; ListPlot[ew,AxesOrigin->{5,-8},Frame->True, PlotStyle-> {AbsolutePointSize[4],AbsoluteThickness[2],RGBColor[1,0,0]}, PlotJoined->True,AxesLabel->{"Log10(w)","Log10(u error)"}]; Here MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar and FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar are the same modules listed in Exercise 8.1. Note: If you run the above program, you may get several beeps from Mathematica as it is processing some of the systems with very large weights. Don’t be alarmed: those are only warnings. The LinearSolve function ˆ is alerting you that the coefficient matrices K for weights of order 1012 or bigger are ill-conditioned.
EXERCISE 9.2 [C+N:15] Again identical to Exercise 8.1, except that the MFC u 2 − u 6 = 1/5 is to be treated by the Lagrange multiplier method. The results for the computed u and the recovered force vector Ku should agree with (E8.1). Use Mathematica, Matlab (or similar) to do the algebra. For example, the following Mathematica script solves this Exercise:

(* Exercise 9.2 - Lagrange Multiplier Method *) (* MFC: u2-u6=1/5 *) K=MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar[100]; Khat=Table[0,{8},{8}]; f={1,2,3,4,5,6,7}; fhat=AppendTo[f,0]; For [i=1,i<=7,i++, For[j=1,j<=7,j++, Khat[[i,j]]=K[[i,j]] ]]; {Kmod,fmod}=FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar[Khat,fhat];

9–13

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–14

Kmod[[2,8]]=Kmod[[8,2]]= 1; Kmod[[6,8]]=Kmod[[8,6]]=-1; fmod[[8]]=1/5; Print["Kmod=",Kmod//MatrixForm]; Print["fmod=",fmod]; umod=LinearSolve[N[Kmod],N[fmod]]; u=Take[umod,7]; Print["Solution u=",u ,", lambda=",umod[[8]]]; Print["Recovered node forces=",K.u]; Here MasterStiffnessOfSixElementBar and FixLeftEndOfSixElementBar are the same modules listed in Exercise 8.1. Does the computed solution agree with (E8.1)?
EXERCISE 9.3 [A:10] For the example structure, show which penalty elements would implement the fol-

lowing MFCs: (a) (b) u 2 + u 6 = 0, u 2 − 3u 6 = 1/3. (E9.1)

As answer, show the stiffness equations of those two elements in a manner similar to (9.1).
EXERCISE 9.4 [A/C+N:15+15+10] Suppose that the assembled stiffness equations for a one-dimensional finite element model before imposing constraints are

2 −1 0

−1 2 −1

0 −1 2

u1 u2 u3

=

1 0 2

.

(E9.2)

This system is to be solved subject to the multipoint constraint u1 = u3. (a) (b) (E9.3)

Impose the constraint (E9.3) by the master-slave method taking u 1 as master, and solve the resulting 2 × 2 system of equations by hand. Impose the constraint (E9.3) by the penalty function method, leaving the weight w as a free parameter. Solve the equations by hand or CAS (Cramer’s rule is recommended) and verify analytically that as w → ∞ the solution approaches that found in (a). Tabulate the values of u 1 , u 2 , u 3 for w = 0, 1, 10, 100. Hint 1: the value of u 2 should not change. Hint 2: the solution for u 1 should be (6w + 5)/(4w + 4). Impose the constraint (E9.3) by the Lagrange multiplier method. Show the 4 × 4 multiplier-augmented system of equations analogous to (9.13) and solve it by computer or calculator.

(c)

ure E9.1 rests on a skew-roller that forms a 45◦ angle with the horizontal axis x. The member is loaded axially by a force P as shown. The finite element equations upon removing the fixed right end freedoms {u x2 , u x2 , θ2 }, but before imposing the skew-roller MFC, are E A/L 0 0 0 12E I /L 3 6E I /L 2 0 6E I /L 2 4E I /L u x1 u y1 θ1 = P 0 0 , (E9.4)

EXERCISE 9.5 [A/C:10+15+10] The left end of the cantilevered beam-column member illustrated in Fig-

where E, A, and I = Izz are given member properties, θ1 is the left end rotation, and L is the member length.7
7

The stiffness equations for a beam column are derived in Part III of this book. For now consider (E9.4) as a recipe.

9–14

9–15

Exercises

To simplify the calculations set P = α E A, and I = β AL 2 , in which α and β are dimensionless parameters, and express the following solutions in terms of α and β. (a) Apply the skew-roller constraint by the master-slave method (make u y1 slave) and solve for u x1 and θ1 in terms of L, α and β. This may be done by hand or a CAS. Partial solution: u x1 = αL/(1 + 3β). Apply the skew-roller constraint with the penalty method by inserting a penalty element at node 1. Follow the rule of §9.1.4 to construct the 2 × 2 penalty stiffness. Compute u x1 from the modified equations (Cramer’s rule is recommended if solved by hand). Verify that as w → ∞ the answer obtained in (a) is recovered. Partial solution: u x1 = αL(3E Aβ +wL)/(3E Aβ +wL(1+3β)). Can the penalty stiffness be physically interpreted in some way?

(b)

θ z

;; ;;
1

y

beam-column member x P

E, A, I

L

45

o

Figure E9.1. Cantilevered beam-column on skew-roller for Exercise 9.5.

; ; ;
2

(c)

Apply the skew roller constraint by Lagrangian multiplier adjunction, and solve the resulting 4×4 system of equations using a CAS (by hand it will take long). Verify that you get the same solution as in (a).

EXERCISE 9.6 [A:5+5+10+10+5] A cantiveler beam-column is to be joined to a plane stress plate mesh as

depicted in Figure E9.2.8 Both pieces move in the plane {x, y}. Plane stress elements have two degrees of freedom per node: two translations u x and u y along x and y, respectively, whereas a beam-column element has three: two translations u x and u y along x and y, and one rotation (positive CCW) θz about z. To connect the cantilever beam to the mesh, the following “gluing” conditions are applied: (1) The horizontal (u x ) and vertical (u y ) displacements of the beam at their common node (2 of beam, 4 of plate) are the same. The beam end rotation θ2 and the mean rotation of the plate edge 3–5 are the same. For infinitesimal displacements and rotaavg tions the latter is θ35 = (u x5 − u x3 )/H . Write down the three MFC conditions: two from (1) and one from (2), and state whether they are linear and homogeneous.
avg

3

6

9

plane beam 1 2 nodes 2 and 4 occupy same position

H/2
4 7 10

H H/2

(2)

θ z

y x

5

8 11 plane stress mesh

Questions: (a)

Figure E9.2. Beam linked to plate in plane stress for Exercise 9.6. Beam shown slightly separate from plate for visualization convenience: nodes 2 and 4 actually are at the same location.

(b) (c)

Where does the above expression of θ35 come from? (Geometric interpretation is OK.) Can it be made more accurate9 by including u x4 ? Write down the master-slave transformation matrix if {u x2 , u y2 , θ2 } are picked as slaves. It is sufficient to write down the transformation for the DOFs of nodes 2, 3, 4, and 5, which gives a T of order 9 × 6, since the transformations for the other freedoms are trivial. If the penalty method is used, write down the stiffness equations of the three penalty elements assuming the same weight w is used. Their stiffness matrices are of order 2 × 2, 2 × 2 and 3 × 3, respectively. (Do not proceed further)

(d)

8

This is extracted from a question previously given in the Aerospace Ph. D. Preliminary Exam. Technically it is not difficult once the student understand what is being asked. This can take some time, but a HW is more relaxed. To answer the second question, observe that the displacements along 3–4 and 4–5 vary linearly. Thus the angle of rotation about z is constant for each of them, and (for infinitesimal displacements) may be set equal to the tangent.

9

9–15

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–16

(e)

If Lagrange multiplier adjunction is used, how many Lagrange multipliers will you need to append? (Do not proceed further).

ˆ EXERCISE 9.7 [A:30] Show that the master-slave transformation method u = Tu can be written down as a special form of the method of Lagrange multipliers. Start from the augmented functional
MS

ˆ = 1 uT Ku − uT f + λT (u − Tu) 2
MS

(E9.5)

and write down the stationarity conditions of

ˆ with respect to u, λ and u in matrix form.

EXERCISE 9.8 [A:35] Check the matrix equations (9.23) through (9.26) quoted for the Augmented Lagrangian method. EXERCISE 9.9 [A:40] (Advanced, close to a research paper). Show that the master-slave transformation

ˆ method u = Tu can be expressed as a limit of the penalty function method as the weights go to infinity. Start from the augmented functional
P

ˆ ˆ = 1 uT Ku − uT f + 1 w(u − Tu)T (u − Tu) 2 2

(E9.6)

ˆ Write down the matrix stationarity conditions with respect to to u and u and take the limit w → ∞. Hint: using Woodbury’s formula (Appendix C, §C.5.2) (K + wTT ST)−1 = K−1 − K−1 TT (K + w−1 S−1 )−1 T K−1 . show that K
−1

(E9.7) (E9.8)

= TK−1 TT .

9–16

Introduction to FEM

MultiFreedom Constraints II

9

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Penalty Function Method Physical Interpretation
Recall the example structure
u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3

4

5

6

under the homogeneous MFC

u2 = u6

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Penalty Function Method (cont'd)
u 1 , f1
(1)

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x
7

1

2

3

4
(7)

5

6

"penalty element" of axial rigidity w

w

1 −1 −1 1

u2 u6

=

0 0

w = the "penalty weight" assigned to the constraint

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Penalty Function Method (cont'd)
Upon merging the penalty element the modified stiffness equations are     K 12 0 0 0 0 0 K 11 u1  K 12 K 22 + w K 23 0 0 −w 0   u2        0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0   u3        0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0   u4  =       0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0   u5        0 −w 0 0 K 56 K 66 + w K 67   u 6   0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 u7 This modified system is submitted to the equation solver. Note that u retains the same arrangement of DOFs.

 f1 f2   f3   f4   f5   f6  f7

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

But which penalty weight to use?
Log10(of solution error norm)
0 -2 -4 -6

From IFEM Exercise 9.1 (Mathematica 4.2 on Mac G4)

constraint gap error dominates
4

best w
6 8 10 12 14

solution error dominates
Log10(w)

Rough guideline: "square root rule"; see Notes.

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Penalty Function Method - General MFCs
3u 3 + u 5 − 4u 6 = 1 u3 [ 3 1 −4 ] u 5 u6 Premultiply both sides by [ 3 1 −4 ] T

Rewrite as matrix product

=1

9 3 −12 3 1 −4 −12 −4 16

u3 u5 u6

=

3 1 −4

"Penalty element" stiffness equations

Scale by w and merge: K u   f  K 12 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 1 K 23 0 0 0 0   u2   f2   K 12 K 22  0 K 23 K 33 + 9w K 34   u 3   f3 + 3w  3w −12w 0       0 K 44 K 45 0 0   u4  =  0 K 34 f4        0 K 56 − 4w 0   u5   f5 + w  0 3w K 45 K 55 + w      u6 0 0 −12w 0 K 56 − 4w K 66 + 16w K 67 f6 − 4w 0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 u7 f7

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Assessment of Penalty Function Method
ADVANTAGES general application (inc' nonlinear MFCs) easy to implement using FE library and standard assembler no change in vector of unknowns retains positive definiteness insensitive to constraint dependence DISADVANTAGES selection of weights left to user - big burden accuracy limited by ill-conditioning

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 7

Lagrange Multiplier Method Physical Interpretation
u 1 , f1
(1)

Introduction to FEM

u 2 , f2
(2)

u 3 , f3
(3)

u4 , f4
(4)

u5 , f5
(5)

u6 , f 6
(6)

u7 , f7

x

1

2

K 11  K 12   0   0   0   0 0

K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0

3 4 5 6 7 −λ λ force-pair that enforces MFC     0 0 0 0 0 u1 f1 K 23 0 0 0 0   u 2   f2 − λ        u 3   f3  K 33 K 34 0 0 0       u 4  =  f4  K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0     0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0   u 5   f5        u 6   f6 + λ  0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 f7 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 u7

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Lagrange Multiplier Method (cont'd)
Because λ is unknown, it is passed to the LHS and appended to the node-displacement vector:

K 11  K 12   0   0   0   0 0

K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0

0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0

0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0

0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0

0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67

0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77

  u1 0   u 1  2    u3   0      u4   0   =    u5   0      u6   −1      u7  0 λ  

 f1 f2   f3   f4   f5   f6  f7

This is now a system of 7 equations and 8 unknowns. Need an extra equation: the MFC.

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Lagrange Multiplier Method (cont'd)
Append MFC as additional equation:
    0 u1 1   u2      0   u3      0   u4     = 0   u5      −1   u 6      0   u7   0 λ            

K 11  K 12   0   0   0   0   0 0

K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 1

0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0

0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0

0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0

0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 −1

0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 0

f1 f2 f3 f4 f5 f6 f7 0

This is the multiplier-augmented system. The new coefficient matrix is called the bordered stiffness.

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Lagrange Multiplier Method - Multiple MFCs
Three MFCs:
u 2 − u 6 = 0, 5u 2 − 8u 7 = 3, 3u 3 + u 5 − 4u 6 = 1

Recipe step #1: append the 3 constraints
K
11

 K 12  0   0   0  0   0   0 
0 0

K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 1 5 0

0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 −1 0 −4

 0  0    u1  0    u2   0     u  0  3    u4  =   K 67     u  K 77   5    u6   0   u7  −8 0

f1  f2  f3   f4   f5   f6  f7   0  3 1

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Lagrange Multiplier Method - Multiple MFCs (cont'd)
Recipe step #2: append multipliers, symmetrize & fill
 K 11  K 12  0   0   0  0   0   0 
0 0 K 12 K 22 K 23 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 K 23 K 33 K 34 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 K 34 K 44 K 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 K 45 K 55 K 56 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 K 56 K 66 K 67 −1 0 −4 0 0 0 0 0 K 67 K 77 0 −8 0 0 1 0 0 0 −1 0 0 0 0 0 0   u1   5 0   u2   0 3   u3      0 0   u4      0 1   u5     =  0 −4   u 6   −8 0   u 7      0 0   λ1      0 0 λ2 0 0 λ3 f1  f2  f3   f4   f5   f6  f7   0  3 1

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Assessment of Lagrange Multiplier Method
ADVANTAGES general application exact no user decisions ("black box")

DISADVANTAGES difficult implementation additional unknowns loses positive definiteness sensitive to constraint dependence

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 13

MFC Application Methods: Assessment Summary
Master-Slave Elimination Generality Ease of implementation Sensitivity to user decisions Accuracy Sensitivity as regards constraint dependence Retains positive definiteness Modifies unknown vector fair poor to fair high variable high yes yes Penalty Function excellent good high mediocre none yes no

Introduction to FEM

Lagrange Multiplier excellent fair small to none excellent high no yes

IFEM Ch 9 – Slide 14

9–17

Solutions to Exercises

Homework Exercises for Chapter 9. MultiFreedom Constraints II Solutions

EXERCISE 9.1 The result of running the Mathematica script on version 4.2 on a Mac G4 are shown in Figure

E9.3. Some intermediate printout produced in the weight loop has been deleted to save space. The log-log plot has been massaged through Adobe Illustrator to boost line widths.

Weight w = 1. x 10 3 L2 solution error = 4.05286 x 10 −2 Weight w = 1. x 10 4 −3 L2 solution error = 4.14382 x 10 5 Weight w = 1. x 10 L2 solution error = 4.15314 x 10 −4 Weight w = 1. x 106 L2 solution error = 4.15407 x 10 −5

0

Log10 (||u-u ex||)
-2

-4

[Intermediate output deleted to save space]
Weight w = 1. x 10 15 L2 solution error = 3.23124 x 10 −4 Weight w = 1. x 1016 −3 L2 solution error = 1.05892 x 10 17 Weight w = 1. x 10 −1 L2 solution error = 1.09243 x 10 -6

-8 4 6 8 10 12

Log 10 (w)
14 16

Figure E9.3. Results from Exercise 9.1.

The minimum solution error is obtained for w ≈ 1010 , which gives roughly 8 digits of accuracy. The square root rule suggests taking w ≈ 102 × 1016/2 = 1010 so for this simple problem it works well. Note: The plot minimum and ascending branch shape may depend on the floating-point hardware used. On PCs in which Mathematica takes advantage of the 80-bit floating-point registers of the Pentium, the maximum accuracy is significantly better (about 14 places) and the optimal weight moves up to w ≈ 1016 .
EXERCISE 9.2 The results of running the given Mathematica script for the Lagrangian Multiplier method are shown in Figure E9.4.
1 0 0 200 0 − 100 0 0 Kmod = 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 − 100 200 − 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 − 100 200 − 100 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 − 100 200 − 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 − 100 200 − 100 −1 0 0 0 0 0 − 100 100 0 0 1 0 0 0 −1 0 0

fmod = { 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, } 5 Solution u = { 0., 0.27, 0.275, 0.25, 0.185, 0.07, 0.14 }, lambda = −24.5 Recovered node forces = { −27., 26.5, 3., 4., 5., −18.5, 7.}
Figure E9.4. Results from Exercise 10.2.

9–17

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–18

EXERCISE 9.3 The penalty elements for the stated MFCs are obtained with the rules explained in §9.1.4:

w w
EXERCISE 9.4

1 1

1 1 −3 9

u2 u6 u2 u6

= =
1 3

0 0 1 −3

(E9.9) (E9.10)

1 −3

(a)

Master-slave transformation: u1 u2 u3 Transformed system: 4 −2 which yields u 1 = u 2 = u 3 = 1.5. = −2 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 u1 u2 = u1 . u2 3 0 (E9.11)

(E9.12)

(b)

The penalty augmented system is 2+w −1 −w 6w + 5 , 4w + 4 −1 2 −1 −w −1 2+w u1 u2 u3 = 1 0 2 . (E9.13)

Solving this system by Cramer’s rule yields u1 = u 2 = 1.5 for any w, u3 = 6w + 7 . 4w + 4 (E9.14)

As w → ∞ the solution tends to u 1 = u 2 = u 3 = 1.5, which is the same found in (a). For sample finite values of w we get w=0 u 1 = 1.250, u 2 = 1.500, u 3 = 1.750 w=1 u 1 = 1.375, u 2 = 1.500, u 3 = 1.625 w = 10 u 1 = 1.477, u 2 = 1.500, u 3 = 1.523 (E9.15) w = 100 u 1 = 1.498, u 2 = 1.500, u 3 = 1.502 (c) Lagrange-multiplier augmented system:

2 −1 2  −1  0 −1 1 0

0 −1 2 −1

1 u1 1 0   u2   0  = . −1   u 3   2  λ 0 0



 

(E9.16)

EXERCISE 9.5 The finite element equations are

E A/L 0 0

0 12E I /L 3 6E I /L 2

0 6E I /L 2 4E I /L

u x1 u y1 θ1

=

P 0 0

,

(E9.17)

Introducing P = α E A and I = β AL 2 converts this to the scaled form EA L 1 0 0 0 12β 6β L 0 6β L 4β L 2 u x1 u y1 θ1 = αE A 0 0 . (E9.18)

9–18

9–19
(a)

Solutions to Exercises

Master-slave method. The MFC is u x1 = u y1 . Transformation equation with u x1 as master: u x1 u y1 θ1 = 1 1 0 0 0 1 u x1 , θ1 ˆ u = Tu. (E9.19)

or

Applying the congruent transformation to (E9.18) yields EA L Solving: u x1 = αL , 1 + 3β θ1 = − 3α , 2(1 + 3β) (E9.21) 1 + 12β 6β L 6β L 4β L 2 u x1 θ1 = αE A . 0 (E9.20)

from which the physical solution in terms of P, E, A, I, L is easily recovered. (b) Penalty function method. The penalty element stiffness equation is wE A 1 −1 −1 1 u x1 u y1 = 0 . 0 (E9.22)

where w is dimensionless. Augmenting (E9.18) with this yields EA L 1 + wL −wL 0 −wL 12β + wL 6β L 0 6β L 4β L 2 u x1 u y1 θ1 = αE A 0 0 , (E9.23)

Solving for u x1 by Cramer’s rule we obtain u x1 = αL(3β + wL) . 3β + wL(1 + 3β) (E9.24)

As w → ∞ the displacement u x1 approaches that in (E9.21). Likewise for u y1 (which approaches u x1 in the limit) and θ1 . Physical interpretation: the penalty element may be viewed as a fictious truss element of rigidity wE A attached to node 1 and oriented 135◦ with restect to x. In fact this is a way to implement skew rollers in FEM programs that lack other means of implementing MFC, as long as a truss element is available in the element library. Note: if the penalty weight w is not divided by E A as in (E9.22), E A appears in the solution as reported in an email last week. That solution is also considered correct. (c) The Lagrange Multiplier method gives

 EA
L  0   0 1

0 12β E A L 6β E A −1

0 6β E A 4β E AL 0

u x1   α E A   −1   u y1  =  0  ,   θ1   0  0 0 λ 0 1



(E9.25)

9–19

Chapter 9: MULTIFREEDOM CONSTRAINTS II

9–20

(a)
3

θ avg 35
plate edge

(b)
3

θ 34 ux3 ux4 ux5
5

ux3
H
4

+θ z

y x ux5
5

H/2 H/2

θ 45
Figure E9.5. Geometric interpretation of plate edge rotations for Exercise 10.6.

EXERCISE 9.6

(a)

The three multifreedom constraints (MFCs) are u x2 = u x4 , u y2 = u y4 , θ2 = θ35 = (u x5 − u x3 )/2.
avg

(E9.26)

These three MFCs are linear and homogeneous. (b) The rotation θ35 of the plate edge 3–5 about z is defined in terms of the displacements of the nodes 3–5. From geometry, see Figure E9.5(a): θ35 ≈ tan θ35 ≈
avg avg avg

u x5 − u x3 H

(E9.27)

where the replacements are justified by the small-displacements and small-angles assumptions of this course. Trying to refine this estimate by accounting for the displacement of node 4, we have two angles identified in Figure E9.5(b): θ34 ≈ tan θ34 ≈ (u x4 − u x3 )/(H/2) = 2(u x4 − u x3 )/H and θ45 ≈ tan θ45 ≈ (u x5 − u x4 )/(H/2) = 2(u x5 − u x4 )/H . Assuming that the rotation at node 4 is the average of these (which is reasonable since the lengths 34 and 45 are the same) we get θ4
avg

= 1 (θ34 + θ45 ) = 2

1 2

2(u x4 − u x3 ) 2(u x5 − u x4 ) + H H

=

u x5 − u x3 . H

(E9.28)

It is seen that u x4 cancels out and we get back (E9.27). Conclusion: the inclusion of node 4 makes no difference in this particular configuration. Note. Another way to refine the rotation estimate would be to try a least-square linear fit through u x3 , u x4 and u x5 . If correctly explained and worked out, this alternative method is also acceptable as answer for the second part of the question. (c) With u x2 , u y2 and θ2 as slave freedoms the master-slave transformation is

 u x2 

0 u y2   0   θ2   −1/H     u x3   1     u y3  =  0 u   0  x4    u y4   0    u x5 0 u y5 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

0 0 1/H 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 0  u x3 0  u 0   y3  u  0   x4  . u  0   y4   u x5 0  u y5 0 1

(E9.29)

9–20

9–21
(d) The penalty elements for the MFCs (E9.26) are 1 −1 u x2 0 = , u x4 −1 1 0 1 −1 u y2 0 = , For u y2 = u y4 : w u y4 −1 1 0 1 1/H −1/H 2 For θ2 = (u x5 − u x3 )/H : w 1/H −1/H 2 1/H 2 −1/H −1/H 1/H 2 For u x2 = u x4 : w

Solutions to Exercises

(E9.30) θ2 u x3 u x5 = 0 0 0

Scaled versions of the latter (for example, using H θ2 + u x3 − u x5 = 0 as MFC) are also OK as answers. (e) Three multipliers, one for each MFC.
MS

EXERCISE 9.7 The stationarity conditions for functional

are f 0 0 (E9.31)

K I −TT

I 0 0

−T 0 0

u λ ˆ u

=

ˆ Eliminating u and λ, in that order, yields TT KTu = Tu, which is the equation of the master-slave method.
EXERCISE 9.8 Never assigned. EXERCISE 9.9 Solution given in paper [71].

9–21

.

Superelements and Global-Local Analysis

10

10–1

Chapter 10: SUPERELEMENTS AND GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

10–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§10.1. Superelement Concept §10.1.1. Where Does the Idea Come From? . . . . §10.1.2. Subdomains . . . . . . . . . . . §10.1.3. *Mathematical Requirements . . . . . . §10.2. Static Condensation §10.2.1. Condensation by Explicit Matrix Operations §10.2.2. Condensation by Symmetric Gauss Elimination §10.2.3. Recovery of Internal Freedoms . . . . . §10.3. Global-Local Analysis §10. Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §10. References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §10. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10–3 10–3 10–5 10–5 10–5 10–5 10–6 10–8 10–8 10–10 10–10 10–11

10–2

10–3 §10.1. Superelement Concept

§10.1

SUPERELEMENT CONCEPT

A superelement is a grouping of finite elements that, upon assembly, may be regarded as an individual element for computational purposes. These purposes may be driven by modeling or processing needs. A random assortment of elements does not necessarily make up a superelement. To be considered as such, a grouping must meet certain conditions. Informally we can say that it must form a structural component on its own. This imposes certain conditions stated mathematically in §10.1.3. Inasmuch as these conditions involve advanced concepts such as rank sufficiency, which are introduced in later Chapters, the restrictions are not dwelled upon here. As noted in Chapter 6, superelements may originate from two overlapping contexts: “bottom up” or “top down.” In a bottom up context one thinks of superelements as built from simpler elements. In a top-down context, superelements may be thought as being large pieces of a complete structure. This dual viewpoint motivates the following classification: Macroelements. These are superelements assembled with a few primitive elements. Also called mesh units when they are presented to program users as individual elements. Substructures. Complex assemblies of elements that result on breaking up a structure into distinguishable portions. When does a substructure becomes a macroelement or vice-versa? There are no precise rules. In fact the generic term superelement was coined to cover the entire spectrum, ranging from individual elements to complete structures. This universality is helped by common processing features. Both macroelements and substructures are treated exactly the same way as regards matrix processing. The basic rule is that associated with condensation of internal degrees of freedom. The technique is illustrated in the following section with a simple example. The reader should note, however, that condensation applies to any superelement, whether composed of two or a million elements.1 §10.1.1. Where Does the Idea Come From? Substructuring was invented by aerospace engineers in the early 1960s2 to carry out a first-level breakdown of complex systems such as a complete airplane, as depicted in Figure 10.1. The decomposition may continue hierarchically through additional levels as illustrated in Figure 10.2. The concept is also natural for space vehicles operating in stages, such as the Apollo short stack depicted in Figure 10.3. Three original motivating factors for substructuring can be cited. 1. Facilitate division of labor. Substructures with different functions are done by separate design groups with specialized knowledge and experience. For instance an aircraft company may set up a fuselage group, a wing group, a landing-gear group, etc. These groups are thus protected from “hurry up and wait” constraints. More specifically: a wing design group can keep on working on refinements, improvements and experimental model verification as long as the interface information (the wing-fuselage intersection) stays sensibly unchanged.

1

Of course the computer implementation becomes totally different as one goes from macroelements to substructures, because efficient processing for large matrix systems requires exploitation of sparsity. See Notes and Bibliography at the end of this Chapter.

2

10–3

Chapter 10: SUPERELEMENTS AND GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

10–4
S4 S6

S2

S5

S1 S3

Figure 10.1. Complete airplane broken down into six level one substructures identified as S1 through S6 .
level two substructure

level one substructure individual element

Figure 10.2. Further breakdown of wing structure. The decomposition process may continue down to the individual element level.

2.

Take advantage of repetition. Often structures are built of several identical or nearly identical units. For instance, the wing substructures S2 and S3 of Figure 10.1 are mirror images on reflection about the fuselage midplane, and so are the stabilizers S4 and S5 . Even if the loading is not symmetric about that midplane, recognizing repetitions saves model preparation time. Overcome computer limitations. The computers of the 1960s operated under serious memory limitations. (For example, the first supercomputer: the Control Data 6600, had a total high-speed memory of 131072 60-bit words or 1.31 MB; that machine cost $10M in 1966 dollars.) It was difficult to fit a complex structure such as an airplane as one entity. Substructuring permitted the complete analysis to be carried out in stages through use of auxiliary storage devices such as tapes or disks.

COMMAND MODULE

SERVICE MODULE

ADAPTER LUNAR MODULE

3.

INSTRUMENT UNIT

THIRD STAGE SIV-B

Figure 10.3. The Apollo short stack.

Of the three motivations, the first two still hold today. The third one has moved to a different plane: parallel processing, as noted in §10.1.2 below. In the late 1960s the idea was picked up and developed extensively by the offshore and shipbuilding 10–4

10–5

§10.2

STATIC CONDENSATION

industries, the products of which tend to be modular and repetitive to reduce fabrication costs. As noted above, repetition favors the use of substructuring techniques. At the other end of the superelement spectrum, the mesh units herein called macroelements appeared in the mid 1960s. They were motivated by user convenience. For example, in hand preparation of models, quadrilateral and bricks involve less human labor than triangles and tetrahedra, respectively. It was therefore natural to combine the latter to assemble the former. Going a step further one can assemble components such as “box elements” for applications such as box-girder bridges. §10.1.2. Subdomains Applied mathematicians working on solution procedures for parallel computation have developed the concept of subdomains. These are groupings of finite elements that are entirely motivated by computational considerations. They are subdivisions of the finite element model done more or less automatically by a program called domain decomposer. Although the concepts of substructures and subdomains overlap in many respects, it is better to keep the two separate. The common underlying theme is divide and conquer but the motivation is different.
§10.1.3. *Mathematical Requirements A superelement is said to be rank-sufficient if its only zero-energy modes are rigid-body modes. Equivalently, the superelement does not possess spurious kinematic mechanisms. Verification of the rank-sufficient condition guarantees that the static condensation procedure described below will work properly.

§10.2. Static Condensation Degrees of freedom of a superelement are classified into two groups: Internal Freedoms. Those that are not connected to the freedoms of another superelement. Nodes whose freedoms are internal are called internal nodes. Boundary Freedoms. These are connected to at least another superelement. They usually reside at boundary nodes placed on the periphery of the superelement. See Figure 10.4. The objective is to get rid of all displacement degrees of freedom associated with internal freedoms. This elimination process is called static condensation, or simply condensation. Condensation may be presented in terms of explicit matrix operations, as shown in the next subsection. A more practical technique based on symmetric Gauss elimination is discussed later. §10.2.1. Condensation by Explicit Matrix Operations To carry out the condensation process, the assembled stiffness equations of the superelement are partitioned as follows: ub f Kbb Kbi = b . (10.1) Kib Kii ui fi where subvectors ub and ui collect boundary and interior degrees of freedom, respectively. Take the second matrix equation: (10.2) Kib ub + Kii ui = fi , 10–5

Chapter 10: SUPERELEMENTS AND GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

10–6

(a)
i b b b

b

b

(b)
i b b

b

b

b

Figure 10.4. Classification of superelement freedoms into boundary and internal. (a) shows the vertical stabilizer substructure S6 of Figure 10.2. (The FE mesh is pictured as two-dimensional for illustrative purposes; for an actual aircraft it will be three dimensional.) Boundary freedoms are those associated to the boundary nodes labeled b (shown in red), which are connected to the fuselage substructure. (b) shows a quadrilateral macroelement mesh-unit fabricated with 4 triangles: it has one interior and four boundary nodes.

If Kii is nonsingular we can solve for the interior freedoms:
−1 ui = Kii (fi − Kib ub ),

(10.3)

Replacing into the first matrix equation of (10.1) yields the condensed stiffness equations ˜ f Kbb ub = ˜b . In this equation,
−1 ˜ Kbb = Kbb − Kbi Kii Kib ,

(10.4)

˜b = fb − Kbi K−1 fi , f ii

(10.5)

are called the condensed stiffness matrix and force vector, respectively, of the substructure. From this point onward, the condensed superelement may be viewed, from the standpoint of further operations, as an individual element whose element stiffness matrix and nodal force vector are Kbb and ˜b , respectively. f Often each superelement has its own “local” coordinate system. A transformation of (10.5) to an overall global coordinate system is necessary upon condensation. In the case of multiple levels, the transformation is done with respect to the next-level superelement coordinate system. This coordinate transformation procedure automates the processing of repeated portions.
Remark 10.1. The feasibility of the condensation process (10.3)–(10.5) rests on the non-singularity of Kii . This matrix is nonsingular if the superelement is rank-sufficient in the sense stated in §10.1.3, and if fixing the boundary freedoms precludes all rigid body motions. If the former condition is verified but not the latter, the superelement is called floating. Processing floating superelements demands more advanced computational techniques, among which one may cite the use of projectors and generalized inverses [90].

10–6

10–7

§10.2

STATIC CONDENSATION

CondenseLastFreedom[K_,f_]:=Module[{pivot,c,Kc,fc, n=Length[K]}, If [n<=1,Return[{K,f}]]; Kc=Table[0,{n-1},{n-1}]; fc=Table[0,{n-1}]; pivot=K[[n,n]]; If [pivot==0, Print["CondenseLastFreedom:", " Singular Matrix"]; Return[{K,f}]]; For [i=1,i<=n-1,i++, c=K[[i,n]]/pivot; fc[[i]]=f[[i]]-c*f[[n]]; For [j=1,j<=i,j++, Kc[[j,i]]=Kc[[i,j]]=K[[i,j]]-c*K[[n,j]] ]; ]; Return[Simplify[{Kc,fc}]] ]; K={{6,-2,-1,-3},{ -2,5,-2,-1},{ -1,-2,7,-4},{-3,-1,-4,8}}; f={3,6,4,0}; Print["Before condensation:"," K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm]; {K,f}=CondenseLastFreedom[K,f];Print["Upon condensing DOF 4:", " K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm]; {K,f}=CondenseLastFreedom[K,f];Print["Upon condensing DOF 3:", " K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm];

Figure 10.5. Mathematica module to condense the last degree of freedom from a stiffness matrix and force vector. The test statements carry out the example (10.6)–(10.10).

§10.2.2. Condensation by Symmetric Gauss Elimination In the computer implementation of the the static condensation process, calculations are not carried out as outlined above. There are two major differences. The equations of the substructure are not actually rearranged, and the explicit calculation of the inverse of Kii is avoided. The procedure may be in fact coded as a variant of symmetric Gauss elimination. To convey the flavor of this technique, consider the following stiffness equations of a superelement:     3 6 −2 −1 −3 u1 5 −2 −1   u 2   6   −2 (10.6)    =  . 4 u3 −1 −2 7 −4 0 u4 −3 −1 −4 8 Suppose that the last two displacement freedoms: u 3 and u 4 , are classified as interior and are to be statically condensed out. To eliminate u 4 , perform symmetric Gauss elimination of the fourth row and column:     3 − 0×(−3) 6 − (−3)×(−3) −2 − (−1)×(−3) −1 − (−4)×(−3)  u 1  8 8 8 8     (−3)×(−1) (10.7) 5 − (−1)×(−1) −2 − (−4)×(−1)   u 2  =  6 − 0×(−1)  ,  −2 − 8 8 8 8 (−3)×(−4) (−1)×(−4) (−4)×(−4) 0×(−4) u3 −1 − −2 − 7− 4− 
8 8 8 8

or

4 u3 5 Repeat the process for the third row and column to eliminate u 3 :
39 8 − 19 8

39 8  − 19 8 −5 2

− 19 8
39 8 −5 2

− 5   u1   3  2 − 5   u2  =  6  .
2

(10.8)

− −

(−5/2)×(−5/2) 5 (−5/2)×(−5/2) 5

− 19 − 8
39 8

(−5/2)×(−5/2) 5 (−5/2)×(−5/2) 5

u1 u2

=

3− 6−

4×(−5/2) 5 4×(−5/2) 5

,

(10.9)

10–7

Chapter 10: SUPERELEMENTS AND GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

10–8

or

29 8 − 29 8

− 29 8
29 8

u1 u2

=

5 . 8

(10.10)

These are the condensed stiffness equations. Figure 10.5 shows a Mathematica program that carries out the foregoing steps. Module CondenseLastFreedom condenses the last freedom of a stiffness matrix K and a force vector f. It is invoked as { Kc,fc }=CondenseLastFreedom[K,f]. It returns the condensed stiffness Kc and force vector fc as new arrays. To do the example (10.6)–(10.10), the module is called twice, as illustrated in the test statements of Figure 10.5. Obviously this procedure is much simpler than going through the explicit matrix inverse. Another important advantage of Gauss elimination is that equation rearrangement is not required even if the condensed degrees of freedom do not appear sequentially. For example, suppose that the assembled superelement contains originally eight degrees of freedom and that the freedoms to be condensed out are numbered 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8. Then Gauss elimination is carried out over those equations only, and the condensed (3 × 3) stiffness and (3 × 1) force vector extracted from rows and columns 2, 3 and 7. An implementation of this process is considered in Exercise 10.2.
Remark 10.2. The symmetric Gauss elimination procedure, as illustrated in steps (10.6)–(10.10), is primarily

useful for macroelements and mesh units, since the number of stiffness equations for those typically does not exceed a few hundreds. This permits the use of full matrix storage. For substructures containing thousands or millions of degrees of freedom — such as in the airplane example — the elimination is carried out using more sophisticated sparse matrix algorithms; for example that described in [70].
Remark 10.3. The static condensation process is a matrix operation called “partial inversion” or “partial elimi-

nation” that appears in many disciplines. Here is the general form. Suppose the linear system Ax = y, where A is n × n square and x and y are n-vectors, is partitioned as A11 A21 A12 A22 x1 x2 = y1 . y2 (10.11)

Assuming the appropriate inverses to exist, then the following are easily verified matrix identities: A−1 −A−1 A12 11 11 A21 A−1 A22 − A21 A−1 A12 11 11 y1 x2 = x1 , y2 A11 − A12 A−1 A21 A12 A−1 22 22 −A−1 A21 A−1 22 22 x1 y2 = y1 . x2 (10.12)

We say that x1 has been eliminated or “condensed out” in the left identity and x2 in the right one. In FEM applications, it is conventional to condense out the bottom vector x2 , so the right identity is relevant. If A is symmetric, to retain symmetry in (10.12) it is necessary to change the sign of one of the subvectors.

§10.2.3. Recovery of Internal Freedoms (to be added) §10.3. Global-Local Analysis As discussed in the first Chapter, complex engineering systems are often modeled in a multilevel fashion following the divide and conquer approach. The superelement technique is a practical realization of that approach. A related, but not identical, technique is multiscale analysis. The whole system is first analyzed as a global entity, discarding or passing over details deemed not to affect its overall behavior. Local details 10–8

10–9

§10.3

GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

coarse mesh
Figure 10.6. Left: example panel structure for global-local analysis. Right: a FEM mesh for a one-shot analysis.

finer meshes

are then analyzed using the results of the global analysis as boundary conditions. The process can be continued into the analysis of further details of local models. And so on. When this procedure is restricted to two stages and applied in the context of finite element analysis, it is called global-local analysis in the FEM literature. In the global stage the behavior of the entire structure is simulated with a finite element model that necessarily ignores details such as cutouts or joints. These details do not affect the overall behavior of the structure, but may have a bearing on safety. Such details are a posteriori incorporated in a series of local analyses. The gist of the global-local approach is explained in the example illustrated in Figures 10.6 and 10.7. Although the structure is admittedly too simple to merit the application of global-local analysis, it serves to illustrate the basic ideas. Suppose one is faced with the analysis of the rectangular panel shown on the top of Figure 10.6, which contains three small holes. The bottom of that figure shows a standard (one-stage) FEM treatment using a largely regular mesh that is refined near the holes. Connecting the coarse and fine meshes usually involves using multifreedom constraints because the nodes at mesh boundaries do not match, as depicted in that figure. Figure 10.7 illustrates the global-local analysis procedure. The global analysis is done with a coarse but regular FEM mesh which ignores the effect of the holes. This is followed by local analysis of the region near the holes using refined finite element meshes. The key ingredient for the local analyses is the application of boundary conditions (BCs) on the finer mesh boundaries. These BCs may be of displacement (essential) or of force (natural) type. If the former, the applied boundary displacements are interpolated from the global mesh solution. If the latter, the internal forces or stresses obtained from the global calculation are converted to nodal forces on the fine meshes through a lumping process. The BC choice noted above gives rise to two basic variations of the global-local approach. Experience accumulated over several decades3 has shown that the stress-BC approach generally gives more reliable answers. The global-local technique can be extended to more than two levels, in which case it receives the more encompassing name multiscale analysis. Although this generalization is still largely in the realm of
3

Particularly in the aerospace industry, in which the global-local technique has been used since the early 1960s.

10–9

Chapter 10: SUPERELEMENTS AND GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

10–10

Global analysis with a coarse mesh, ignoring holes, followed bylocal analysis of the vicinity of the holes with finer meshes:

Figure 10.7. Global-local analysis of problem of Figure 10.6.

research, it is receiving increasing attention from various science and engineering communities for complex products such as the thermomechanical analysis of microelectronic components.
Notes and Bibliography Substructuring was invented by aerospace engineers in the early 1960s. Przemieniecki’s book [205] contains a fairly complete bibliography of early work. Most of this was in the form of largely inaccessible internal company or lab reports and so the actual history is difficult to trace. Macroelements appeared simultaneously in many of the early FEM codes. Quadrilateral macroelements fabricated with triangles are described in [68]. For a survey of uses of the static condensation algorithm in FEM, see [270]. The generic term superelement was coined in the late 1960s by the SESAM group at DNV Veritas [65]. The matrix form of static condensation for a complete structure is presented in [8, p. 46], as a scheme to eliminate unloaded DOF in the displacement method. It is unclear when this idea was first applied to substructures or macroelements. The first application for reduced dynamical models is by Guyan [121]. The application of domain decomposition to parallel FEM solvers has produced an enormous and highly specialized literature. Procedures for handling floating superelements using generalized inverse methods are discussed in [90]. The global-local analysis procedure described here is also primarily used in industry and as such it is rarely mentioned in academic textbooks. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

10–10

10–11
Homework Exercises for Chapter 10 Superelements and Global-Local Analysis
EXERCISE 10.1 [N:15] The free-free stiffness equations of a superelement are

Exercises

88 −44 −44 0 u1 5  −44 132 −44 −44   u 2   10   −44 −44 176 −44   u  =  15  . 3 u4 0 −44 −44 220 20



(E10.1)

Eliminate u 2 and u 3 from (E10.1) by static condensation, and show (but do not solve) the condensed equation system. Use either the explicit matrix inverse formulas (10.5) or the symmetric Gauss elimination process explained in §10.2.2. Hint: regardless of method the result should be 52 −36 −36 184 u1 u4 = 15 . 30 (E10.2)

EXERCISE 10.2 [C+N:20] Generalize the program of Figure 10.5 to a module CondenseFreedom[K,f,k] that is able to condense the kth degree of freedom from K and f, which is not necessarily the last one. That is, k may range from 1 to n, where n is the number of freedoms in Ku = f. Apply that program to solve the previous Exercise.

Hint: here is a possible way of organizing the inner loop: ii=0; For [i=1,i<=n,i++, If [i==k, Continue[]]; ii++; c=K[[i,k]]/pivot; fc[[ii]]=f[[i]]-c*f[[k]]; jj=0; For [j=1,j<=n,j++, If [j==k,Continue[]]; jj++; Kc[[ii,jj]]=K[[i,j]]-c*K[[k,j]] ]; ]; Return[{Kc,fc}]
EXERCISE 10.3 [D:15] Explain the similarities and differences between superelement analysis and global-local

FEM analysis.
EXERCISE 10.4 [A:20] If the superelement stiffness K is symmetric, the static condensation process can be viewed as a special case of the master-slave transformation method discussed in Chapter 8. To prove this, take exterior freedoms ub as masters and interior freedoms ui as slaves. Assume the master-slave transformation relation def ub I 0 u= = = Tub − g. (E10.3) [ ub ] − −1 −1 ui −Kii Kib −Kii fi ˆˆ ˆ f f Work out K = TT KT and ˆ = TT (f − Kg), and show that Ku = ˆ coalesces with the condensed stiffness T −1 −1 ˆ equations (10.4)–(10.5) if ub ≡ u. (Take advantage of the symmetry properties Kbi = Kib , (Kii )T = Kii .) EXERCISE 10.5 [D:30] (Requires thinking) Explain the conceptual and operational differences between onestage FEM analysis and global-local analysis of a problem such as that illustrated in Figures 10.6 and 10.7. Are the answers the same? What is gained, if any, by the global-local approach over the one-stage FEM analysis? EXERCISE 10.6 [N:20] The widely used Guyan’s scheme [121] for dynamic model reduction applies the staticcondensation relation (E10.3) as master-slave transformation to both the stiffness and the mass matrix of the superelement. Use this procedure to eliminate the second and third DOF of the mass-stiffness system:

2 1 M= 0 0

1 4 1 0

0 1 4 1

0 0 , 1 2

1 −1 0 0 2 −1 0  −1 K= . 0 −1 2 −1  0 0 −1 1

(E10.4)

10–11

Chapter 10: SUPERELEMENTS AND GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

10–12

ˆ ˆ ˆ v Compute and compare the vibration frequencies of the eigensystems (M + ωi2 K)vi = 0 and (M + ωi2 K)ˆ i = 0 before and after reduction. Hints. The four original squared frequencies are the eigenvalues of M−1 K, which may be obtained, for example, with the Matlab eig function. The largest is 2, lowest 0. To perform the Guyan reduction is is convenient to reorder M and K so that rows and columns 2 and 3 become 3 and 4, respectively: 2 2 0 ω  1 0

0 2 0 1

1 0 4 1

0 v1 1 1   v4   0 = 1   v2   −1 v3 4 0



0 −1 0 v1 1 0 −1   v4  , 0 2 −1   v2  v3 −1 −1 2



(E10.5)

which in partitioned matrix form is ω2 Mbb Mib Mbi Mii vb vi = Kbb Kib Kbi Kii vb . vi (E10.6)

Next show that static condensation of K is equivalent to a master-slave transformation I −1 −Kii Kib 1  0 = 2/3 1/3

T=

0 1  1/3  2/3


relating

v1 1  v4   0  v  =  2/3 2 v3 1/3

0 1  v1 . 1/3  v4 2/3

(E10.7)

ˆ ˆ The rest is easy. Form M = TT MT and K = TT KT, find the two squared frequencies of the condensed eigensystem and verify that they approximate the two lowest original squared frequencies.
EXERCISE 10.7 [A:20] Two beam elements: 1–2 and 2–3, each of length L and rigidity E I are connected at node 2. The macroelement has 6 degrees of freedom: {v1 , θ1 , v2 , θ2 , v3 , θ3 }. Eliminate the two DOF of node 2 by condensation. Is the condensed stiffness the same as that of a beam element of length 2L and rigidity E I ?

(For expressions of the beam stiffness matrices, see Chapter 12.)

10–12

Introduction to FEM

Superelements and Global-Local Analysis

10

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Superelements

Two extremes

Macroelements Substructures

"bottom up" "top down"

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Substructuring was Invented in the Aerospace Industry (early 1960s)

S2

S4

S6

S5

S1 S3

First level substructuring

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Substructures (cont'd)
level two substructure (wing section)

level one substructure (wing) individual element

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

An Early Use of Global-Local Analysis and Substructuring: Boeing 747
Global Analysis: 1966 Local Analysis (shaded regions): 1967-68 First flight: 1970

WING BODY INTERSECTION ANALYSIS 4 substructures,12549 elements 4266 nodes, 25596 freedoms

CARGO DOOR CABIN ANALYSIS 747 Regions Analyzed with FEM-DSM at Boeing

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Another Example (McDonnell-Douglas DC-10, ca 1968)

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Multilevel FEM Substructuring was Invented in the Norwegian Offshore Industry in the mid/late 60s

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 7

Among Other Things, to Take Advantage of Repetition

Introduction to FEM

From DNV (Det Norske Veritas) web-posted brochure. Permission requested for inclusion in book proper.

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Multistage Rockets Naturally Decompose into Substructures
Short stack Apollo/Saturn lunar rocket
COMMAND MODULE

SERVICE MODULE

ADAPTER LUNAR MODULE

INSTRUMENT UNIT

THIRD STAGE SIV-B

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Static Condensation
A universal way to eliminate internal DOFs

b

b

i i b b b b b

b

b

b

Substructure

Macroelement

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Static Condensation by Matrix Algebra
Partition

Kbb Kib

Kbi Kii

ub ui

=

fb fi

Solve for interior displacements from 2nd matrix equation

−1 ui = Kii (fi − Kib ub )
replace into first matrix equation

Kbb ub = fb
where

~

~

Condensed stiffness equations

−1 Kbb = Kbb − Kbi Kii Kib −1 fb = fb − Kbi Kii fi

~

~

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 11

Static Condensation by Symmetric Gauss Elimination
 6 − 2 − 1 − 3u  3 1 5 − 2 − 1   u2   6  − 2    =   −1 −2 7 −4 4 u3 −3 −1 −4 8 0 u4 Task: eliminate u4
6−
(− 3)×(− 3) 8 (− 3)×(− 1) 8 (− 3)×(− 4) 8

Introduction to FEM

8 is called the pivot

 − 2 −
−1−

−2− 5− −2−

(− 1)×(− 3) 8 (− 1)×(− 1) 8 (− 1)×(− 4) 8

−1− −2− 7−

(− 4)×(− 3) 8 (− 4)×(− 1) 8 (− 4)×(− 4) 8



 3− u1      u2 =  6 − u3 4−

0×(− 3) 8 0×(− 1) 8 0×(− 4) 8

  

39 8 19 − 8 −5 2

19 8 39 8 −5 2

− 5   u1   3  2 − 5   u2  =  6  2 5 u3 4

Condensed equations

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Static Condensation by Symmetric Gauss Elimination (cont'd)

39 8 19 − 8 −5 2

19 8 39 8 −5 2

− 5   u1   3  2 − 5   u2  =  6  2 5 u3 4

Now eliminate u3
39 8 19 8

− −

(− 5/2 ) ×(− 5/2 ) 5 (− 5/2 ) × (− 5/2 ) 5

19 8 39 8

− − −

(− 5/2 )× (− 5/2 ) 5 (− 5/2 )×(− 5/2 ) 5

u1 u2

3− 6−

4×(− 5/2 ) 5 4×(− 5/2 ) 5

29 8 29 8

29 8 29 8

u1 u2

=

5 8

Condensed equations

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Static Condensation Module
(posted on web site)
CondenseLastFreedom[K_,f_]:=Module[{pivot,c,Kc,fc, n=Length[K]}, If [n<=1,Return[{K,f}]]; Kc=Table[0,{n-1},{n-1}]; fc=Table[0,{n-1}]; pivot=K[[n,n]]; If [pivot==0, Print["CondenseLastFreedom:", " Singular Matrix"]; Return[{K,f}]]; For [i=1,i<=n-1,i++, c=K[[i,n]]/pivot; fc[[i]]=f[[i]]-c*f[[n]]; For [j=1,j<=i,j++, Kc[[j,i]]=Kc[[i,j]]=K[[i,j]]-c*K[[n,j]] ]; ]; Return[Simplify[{Kc,fc}]] ]; ClearAll[K,f]; K={{6,-2,-1,-3},{ -2,5,-2,-1},{ -1,-2,7,-4},{-3,-1,-4,8}}; f={3,6,4,0}; Print["Before condensation:"," K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm]; {K,f}=CondenseLastFreedom[K,f];Print["Upon condensing DOF 4:", " K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm]; {K,f}=CondenseLastFreedom[K,f];Print["Upon condensing DOF 3:", " K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm];

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Static Condensation Module Results on Notes Example
6 2 1 3 2 5 2 1
39 8 19 8 5 2 29 8 29 8

Before condensation: K

1 2 7 4
19 8 39 8 5 2 29 8 29 8

3 1 4 8
5 2 5 2

f

3 6 4 0 3 6 4

Upon condensing DOF 4: K

f

5 5 8

Upon condensing DOF 3: K

f

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Global-Local Analysis (an instance of Multiscale Analysis)

Example structure: panel with small holes

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Standard (one-stage) FEM Analysis

coarse mesh

finer meshes

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Global-Local (two-stage) FEM Analysis

Global analysis with a coarse mesh, ignoring holes, followed by local analysis of the vicinity of the holes with finer meshes (next slide)

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Local Analysis
BCs of displacement or (better) of force type using results extracted from the global analysis

IFEM Ch 10 – Slide 19

10–13

Solutions to Exercises

Homework Exercises for Chapter 10 – Superelements and Global-Local Analysis Solutions

EXERCISE 10.1 To apply the matrix form of static condensation, prepare the partitions

Kii = Then

132 −44 −44 −44 88 0 10 5 , Kbi = , Kbb = , fi = , fb = . −44 176 −44 −44 0 220 15 20
−1 ˜ Kbb = Kbb − Kbi Kii Kib =

(E10.8)

52 −36 , −36 184

˜b = fb − Kbi K−1 fi = 15 . f ii 30

(E10.9)

Performing symmetric Gauss elimination on u 2 and u 3 gives the same answer. This was actually done with Mathematica by testing the module of the next Exercise.
EXERCISE 10.2

Module CondenseFreedom listed in Figure E10.1 statically condenses an arbitrary DOF. The test statements given in Figure E10.2 process the system of Exercise 10.1. The results reproduce (E10.9).
CondenseFreedom[K_,f_,k_]:=Module[{c,pivot,Kc,fc, ii,jj,n=Length[K]}, If [n<=0,Return[{K,f}]]; If [k<=0 || k>n, Return[{K,f}]]; Kc=Table[0,{n-1},{n-1}]; fc=Table[0,{n-1}]; pivot=K[[k,k]]; If [pivot==0,Print["CondenseFreedom:", "Singular Matrix"]; Return[{K,f}]]; ii=0; For [i=1,i<=n,i++, If [i==k, Continue[]]; ii++; c=K[[i,k]]/pivot; fc[[ii]]=f[[i]]-c*f[[k]]; jj=0; For [j=1,j<=n,j++, If [j==k,Continue[]]; jj++; Kc[[ii,jj]]=K[[i,j]]-c*K[[k,j]] ]; ]; Return[{Kc,fc}] ];

Figure E10.1. Mathematica module for Exercise 10.2.
K=44*{{2,-1,-1,0},{-1,3,-1,-1},{-1,-1,4,-1},{0,-1,-1,5}}; f={1,2,3,4}*5; Print["K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm]; {K,f}=CondenseFreedom[K,f,3]; Print["Upon condensing DOF 3:", " K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm]; {K,f}=CondenseFreedom[K,f,2]; Print["Upon condensing DOF 2:", " K=",K//MatrixForm," f=",f//MatrixForm];
K 88 44 44 0 44 132 44 44 44 44 176 44 0 44 44 220 f 5 10 15 20 77 55 11 55 121 55 11 55 209 52 36 36 184 f f 15 30
35 4 55 4 95 4

Upon condensing DOF 3:

K

Upon condensing DOF 2:

K

Figure E10.2. Test of Mathematica module CondenseFreedom on system (E10.1).

10–13

Chapter 10: SUPERELEMENTS AND GLOBAL-LOCAL ANALYSIS

10–14

EXERCISE 10.3 Similarity: both are staged processes. Difference: in superelements staging is controlled by

the way a single model is decomposed, whereas in global-local analysis staging is dictated by the use of two models.
EXERCISE 10.4 Here are the necessary matrix manipulations:

Kbb Kbi I −1 ˆ K = TT KT = [ I −Kbi Kii ] −1 Kib Kii −Kii Kib −1 Kbb − Kbi Kii Kib −1 −1 ˜ = [ I −Kbi Kii ] = Kbb − Kbi Kii Kib = Kbb . 0 ˆ = TT (f − Kg) = [ I f = [I
−1 −Kbi Kii ] −1 −Kbi Kii ] −1 fb − Kbi Kii fi 0

(E10.10)

fb Kbb − fi Kib

Kbi Kii

0 −1 −Kii fi

−1 = fb − Kbi Kii fi = ˜b . f

(E10.11)

EXERCISE 10.5 The answers are not the same unless the process is iterated.

(To be expanded).

EXERCISE 10.6 For the original full-model vibration eigenproblem

2 1 ω2  0 0 the 4 squared frequencies are:

1 4 1 0

0 1 4 1

0 v1 1 −1 0 0 v1 0   v2   −1 2 −1 0   v2  = , 1   v3   0 −1 2 −1   v3  v4 v4 2 0 0 −1 1





(E10.12)

2 ω1 = 0,

2 ω2 = 1/5 = 0.2,

2 ω3 = 1,

2 ω4 = 2.

(E10.13)

To perform the Guyan reduction with matrix operations it is convenient to rearrange the system so that the DOF to be eliminated: v2 and v3 , appear at the bottom of the eigenvector: 2 0 ω2  1 0

0 2 0 0

1 0 4 1

0 v1 1 1   v4   0 = 1   v2   −1 v3 4 0



0 −1 0 v1 1 0 −1   v4  , 0 2 −1   v2  v3 −1 −1 2



(E10.14)

which in partitioned matrix form is ω2 Mbb Mib Mbi Mii vb vi = Kbb Kib Kbi Kii vb . vi (E10.15)

The transformation matrix given in the Exercise statement is I −1 −Kii Kib 1  0 = 2/3 1/3

T=

0 1  1/3  2/3


relating

v1 1  v4   0  v  =  2/3 2 v3 1/3

0 1  v1 . 1/3  v4 2/3

(E10.16)

10–14

10–15

Solutions to Exercises

To show that this transformation, applied as a master-slave congruential transformation, is equivalent to stiffness matrix condensation, observe that
−1 ˆ K = Kbb − Kbi Kii Kib =

−1 3

1 3

−1 3
1 3

,

while

TT KT =

−1 3

1 3

−1 3
1 3

ˆ = K.

(E10.17)

(The general proof is given as the solution of Exercise 10.4, but the numerical verification of (E10.17) is sufficient ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ for this Exercise.) The reduced vibration eigenproblem is ω2 M v = K v in which K = TT K T, M = TT M T ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ and v = [ v1 v4 ]T . Carrying out the congruential transformations we obtain the reduced eigensystem ω2 ˆ 6 3 3 6 v1 v4 = −1 3
1 3

−1 3
1 3

v1 . v4

(E10.18)

The 2 squared frequencies given by this reduced model are
2 ω1 = 0, 2 ω2 = 2/9 = 0.222222.

(E10.19)

The zero frequency (which is associated to a rigid body mode) is reproduced exactly. The first nonzero frequency ω2 is found within an error of about 5%. The third and fourth frequencies are lost in the reduction process.
EXERCISE 10.7 Not assigned.

10–15

.

Variational Formulation of Bar Element

11

11–1

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§11.1. A New Beginning §11.2. Definition of Bar Member §11.3. Variational Formulation §11.3.1. The Total Potential Energy Functional . §11.3.2. Variation of an Admissible Function . §11.3.3. The Minimum Potential Energy Principle §11.3.4. TPE Discretization . . . . . . . §11.3.5. Bar Element Discretization . . . . . §11.3.6. Shape Functions . . . . . . . . §11.3.7. The Strain-Displacement Equation . . §11.3.8. *Trial Basis Functions . . . . . . §11.4. The Finite Element Equations §11.4.1. The Stiffness Matrix . . . . . . . §11.4.2. The Consistent Node Force Vector . . §11.5. *Accuracy Analysis §11.5.1. *Nodal Exactness and Superconvergence §11.5.2. *Fourier Patch Analysis . . . . . §11.5.3. *Robin BCs . . . . . . . . . . §11. Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §11. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §11. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11–3 11–3 11–3 11–3 11–6 11–6 11–7 11–7 11–8 11–8 11–9 11–9 11–9 11–10 11–10 11–10 11–11 11–12 11–13 11–14 11–15

11–2

11–3 §11.1. A New Beginning

§11.3

VARIATIONAL FORMULATION

This Chapter begins Part II of the course. This Part focuses on the construction of structural and continuum finite elements using a variational formulation based on the Total Potential Energy. Why only elements? Because the other synthesis steps of the DSM: globalization, merge, BC application and solution, remain the same as in Part I. Those operations are not element dependent. Individual elements are constructed in this Part beginning with the simplest ones and progressing to more complicated ones. The formulation of 2D finite elements from a variational standpoint is discussed in Chapters 14 and following. Although the scope of that formulation is broad, exceeding structural mechanics, it is better understood by going through specific elements first. From a geometrical standpoint the simplest finite elements are one-dimensional or line elements. This means that the intrinsic dimensionality is one, although these elements may be used in one, two or three space dimensions upon transformation to global coordinates as appropriate. The simplest one-dimensional structural element is the two-node bar element, which we have already encountered in Chapters 2, 3 and 5 as the truss member. In this Chapter the bar stiffness equations are rederived using the variational formulation. For uniform properties the resulting equations are the same as those found previously using the physical or Mechanics of Materials approach. The variational method has the advantage of being readily extendible to more complicated situations, such as variable cross section or more than two nodes. §11.2. Definition of Bar Member In structural mechanics a bar is a structural component characterized by two properties: (1) One preferred dimension: the longitudinal dimension or axial dimension is much larger that the other two dimensions, which are collectively known as transverse dimensions. The intersection of a plane normal to the longitudinal dimension and the bar defines the cross sections. The longitudinal dimension defines the longitudinal axis. See Figure 11.1. (2) The bar resists an internal axial force along its longitudinal dimension. In addition to trusses, bar elements are used to model cables, chains and ropes. They are also used as fictitious elements in penalty function methods, as discussed in Chapter 9. We will consider here only straight bars, although their cross section may vary. The one-dimensional mathematical model assumes that the bar material is linearly elastic, obeying Hooke’s law, and that displacements and strains are infinitesimal. Figure 11.2 pictures the relevant quantities for a fixedfree bar. Table 11.1 collects the necessary terminology for the governing equations. Figure 11.3 displays the governing equations of the bar in a graphic format called a Tonti diagram. The formal similarity with the diagrams used in Chapter 5 to explain MoM elements should be noted, although the diagram of Figure 11.3 pertains to the continuum model rather than to the discrete one. 11–3

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–4

Table 11.1

Nomenclature for Mathematical Model of Axially Loaded Bar

Quantity x (.) u(x) q(x) L E A EA e = du/d x = u σ = Ee = Eu F = Aσ = E A e = E Au P

Meaning Longitudinal bar axis∗ d(.)/d x Axial displacement Distributed axial force, given per unit of bar length Total bar length Elastic modulus Cross section area; may vary with x Axial rigidity Infinitesimal axial strain Axial stress Internal axial force Prescribed end load

x is used in this Chapter instead of x (as in Chapters 2–3) to simplify the notation. ¯

y

cross section

z

;; ;;

x

axial rigidity EA u(x) P

;;;
x

Cross section

q(x)

P
Longitudinal axis

L

Figure 11.1. A fixed-free bar member.

Figure 11.2. Quantities that appear in analysis of bar.

§11.3. Variational Formulation To illustrate the variational formulation, the finite element equations of the bar will be derived from the Minimum Potential Energy principle. §11.3.1. The Total Potential Energy Functional In Mechanics of Materials it is shown that the internal energy density at a point of a linear-elastic material subjected to a one-dimensional state of stress σ and strain e is U = 1 σ (x)e(x), where 2 σ is to be regarded as linked to the displacement u through Hooke’s law σ = Ee and the straindisplacement relation e = u = du/d x. This U is also called the strain energy density. Integration 11–4

11–5
Displacement Axial BCs displacement u(x)

§11.3

VARIATIONAL FORMULATION

Prescribed end displacement

Distributed axial load q(x)

Kinematic

e=u'

F'+q=0 Equilibrium

Axial strain e(x)

F = EA e Constitutive

Axial force F(x)

Force BCs

Prescribed end load

Figure 11.3. Tonti diagram for the continuum model of a bar member. Field equations and BCs are represented as lines connecting the boxes. Yellow (brown) boxes contain unknown (given) quantities.

over the volume of the bar gives the total internal energy U=
1 2

σ e dV =
V

L 1 2 0

Fe d x =

L 1 2 0

(E Au )u d x =

L 1 2

u E A u d x,
0

(11.1)

in which all integrand quantities may depend on x. The external energy due to applied mechanical loads pools contributions from two sources: 1. 2. The distributed load q(x). This contributes a cross-section density of q(x)u(x) because q is assumed to be already integrated over the section. Any applied end load(s). For the fixed-free example of Figure 11.2 the end load P would contribute P u(L).

The second source may be folded into the first by conventionally writing any point load P acting at a cross section x = a as a contribution P δ(a) to q(x), where δ(a) denotes the one-dimensional Dirac delta function at x = a. If this is done the external energy can be concisely expressed as W =
0 L

q u d x.

(11.2)

The total potential energy of the bar is given by =U −W (11.3)

Mathematically this is a functional, called the Total Potential Energy functional or TPE. It depends only on the axial displacement u(x). In variational calculus this is called the primary variable of the functional. When the dependence of on u needs to be emphasized we shall write [u] = U [u]−W [u], with brackets enclosing the primary variable. To display both primary and independent variables we write, for example, [u(x)] = U [u(x)] − W [u(x)]. 11–5

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–6 is

Remark 11.1. According to the rules of Variational Calculus, the Euler-Lagrange equation for

∂ d ∂ − = −q − (E A u ) = 0 (11.4) ∂u d x ∂u This is the equation of equilibrium in terms of the axial displacement, usually written (E A u ) + q = 0, or E A u + q = 0 if E A is constant. This equation is not explicitly used in the FEM development. It is instead replaced by δ = 0, with the variation restricted over the finite element interpolation functions.

§11.3.2. Variation of an Admissible Function The concept of admissible variation is fundamental in both variational calculus and the variationally formulated FEM. Only the primary variable(s) of a functional may be varied. For the TPE functional (11.4) this is the axial displacement u(x). Suppose that u(x) is changed to u(x) + δ u(x).1 This is illustrated in Figure 11.4, where for convenience u(x) is plotted normal to x. The functional changes from to + δ . The function δ u(x) and the scalar δ are called the variations of u(x) and , respectively. The variation δ u(x) should not be confused with the ordinary differential du(x) = u (x) d x since on taking the variation the independent variable x is frozen; that is, δx = 0.
δu(x)
u(L)

u

u(x)+δu(x)

u(x)
u(0) = 0

x

A displacement variation δu(x) is said to be admissible when both u(x) and u(x) + δ u(x) are kinematically admissible in the sense of the Principle of Virtual Work (PVW). This agrees with the conditions stated in the classic variational calculus. A kinematically admissible axial displacement u(x) obeys two conditions: (i) It is continuous over the bar length, that is, u(x) ∈ C0 in x ∈ [0, L].

Figure 11.4. Concept of admissible variation of the axial displacement function u(x). For convenience u(x) is plotted normal to the longitudinal axis. Both depicted u(x) and u(x) + δu(x) are kinematically admissible, and so is the variation δu(x).

(ii) It satisfies exactly any displacement boundary condition, such as the fixed-end specification u(0) = 0 of Figure 11.2. The variation δ u(x) depicted in Figure 11.4 is kinematically admissible because both u(x) and u(x) + δ u(x) satisfy the foregoing conditions. The physical meaning of (i)–(ii) is the subject of Exercise 11.1. §11.3.3. The Minimum Potential Energy Principle The Minimum Potential Energy (MPE) principle states that the actual displacement solution u ∗ (x) that satisfies the governing equations is that which renders stationary:2 δ = δU − δW = 0 iff u = u∗ (11.5)

with respect to admissible variations u = u ∗ + δu of the exact displacement field u ∗ (x).
1

The symbol δ not immediately followed by a parenthesis is not a delta function but instead denotes variation with respect to the variable that follows. The symbol “iff” in (11.5) is an abbreviation for “if and only if”.

2

11–6

11–7

§11.3

VARIATIONAL FORMULATION

u ∗ (x) of (11.5) exists, is unique, and renders [u] a minimum over the class of kinematically admissible displacements. The last attribute explains the “mininum” in the name of the principle.

Remark 11.2. Using standard techniques of variational calculus3 it can be shown that if E A > 0 the solution

§11.3.4. TPE Discretization To apply the TPE functional (11.2) to the derivation of finite element equations we replace the continuum mathematical model by a discrete one consisting of a union of bar elements. For example, Figure 11.5 illustrates the subdivision of a bar member into four two-node elements. Functionals are scalars. Therefore, corresponding to a discretization such as that shown in Figure 11.5, the TPE functional (11.4) may be decomposed into a sum of contributions of individual elements:
u 1, f1
(1)

u 2, f2
(2)

u 3, f3
(3)

u 4, f4
(4)

u 5, f5

1 u

2

3

4

5
u5

u2 u1 = 0

u3

u4

u(x)

x

Figure 11.5. FEM discretization of bar member. A piecewise- linear admissible displacement trial function u(x) is drawn underneath the mesh. It is assumed that the left end is fixed; thus u 1 = 0.

=

(1)

+

(2)

+ ... +

(Ne )

(11.6)

where Ne is the number of elements. The same decomposition applies to the internal and external energies, as well as to the stationarity condition (11.5): δ =δ
(1)

(2)

+ ... + δ

(Ne )

= 0.

(11.7)

Using the fundamental lemma of variational calculus,4 it can be shown that (11.7) implies that for a generic element e we may write δ
e

= δU e − δW e = 0.

(11.8)

This variational equation is the basis for the derivation of element stiffness equations once the displacement field has been discretized over the element, as described next.
Remark 11.3. In mathematics (11.8) is called a weak form. In mechanics it also states the Principle of Virtual

Work for each element: δU e = δW e , which says that the virtual work of internal and external forces on admissible displacement variations is equal if the element is in equilibrium [200].

3 4

See references in Notes and Bibliography at the end of Chapter. See, e.g., Chapter II of Gelfand and Fomin [110].

11–7

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–8

§11.3.5. Bar Element Discretization Figure 11.6 depicts a generic bar element e. It has two nodes, which are labeled 1 and 2. These are ¯ called the local node numbers.5 The element is referred to its local axis x = x − x1 , which measures e the distance from its left end. The two degrees of freedom are u 1 and u e . (Bars are not necessary 2 on these values since the directions of x and x are the same.) The element length is = L e . ¯ The mathematical concept of bar finite elements is based on approximation of the axial displacement u(x) over the element. The exact displacement u ∗ is replaced by an approximate displacement u ∗ (x) ≈ u e (x) (11.9)

over the finite element mesh. This approximate displacement, u e (x), taken over all elements e = 1, 2, . . . N e , is called the finite element trial expansion or simply trial expansion. See Figure 11.5. This FE trial expansion must belong to the class of kinematically admissible displacements defined in §11.3.2. Consequently, it must be C0 continuous over and between elements. §11.3.6. Shape Functions In a two-node bar element the only possible variation of the displacement u e that satisfies the interelement continuity requirement stated above is linear. It can be expressed by the interpolation formula ue e e e e u e (x) = N1 u e + N2 u e = [ N1 N2 ] 1 = Nue . (11.10) 1 2 ue 2
e e The functions N1 and N2 that multiply the node displacements u 1 and u 2 are called shape functions. These functions interpolate the internal displacement u e directly from the node values.

See Figure 11.6. For the bar element, with x = x − x1 mea¯ suring the distance from the left node i, the shape functions are
e N1 = 1 −

1

(e)
e = L x = x γ x1 -

2

x ¯

= 1 − ζ,

e N2 =

x ¯

= ζ.

(11.11)

¯ Here ζ = (x − x1 )/ = x/ is a dimensionless coordinate, also known as a natural coordinate. Note that d x = dζ and e dζ = d x/ . The shape function N1 has the value 1 at node 1 e and 0 at node 2. Conversely, shape function N2 has the value 0 at node 1 and 1 at node 2. This is a general property of shape functions. It follows from the fact that element displacement interpolations such as (11.10) are based on physical node values.

1 Ne i

1− x/
0 Nje 1

x/
0

Figure 11.6. The shape functions of the generic bar element.

5

Note the notational change from the labels i and j of Part I. This will facilitate transition to multidimensional elements.

11–8

11–9

§11.4

THE FINITE ELEMENT EQUATIONS

Remark 11.4. In addition to continuity, shape functions must satisfy a completeness requirement with respect

to the governing variational principle. This condition is stated and discussed in later Chapters. Suffices for now to say that the shape functions (11.11) do satisfy this requirement.

§11.3.7. The Strain-Displacement Equation The axial strain over the element is e du e d N1 e= = (u e ) = dx dx where B= is called the strain-displacement matrix.
§11.3.8. *Trial Basis Functions
(1) (2) (3) (4)
e d N2 dx

ue 1 ue 2 1 [ −1

=

1

[ −1

1]

ue 1 ue 2

= Bue ,

(11.12)

1]

(11.13)

Shape functions are associated with elements. A trial basis function, or simply basis function, is associated with a node. Suppose node i of a bar discretization connects elements (e1) and (e2). The trial basis function Ni is defined as Ni(e1) Ni(e2)

1 u

2

3

4

5

x if x ∈ element (e1) Ni (x) = (11.14) if x ∈ element (e2) Figure 11.7. Trial basis function for node 3. 0 otherwise For a piecewise linear discretizations such as the two-node bar this function has the shape of a hat. Thus it is sometimes called a hat function or chapeau function. See Figure 11.7, in which i = 3, e1 = 2, e2 = 3. The concept is important in the variational interpretation of FEM as a Rayleigh-Ritz method.

N3(2)

(3) N3

(thick line)

N3

§11.4. The Finite Element Equations In linear FEM the discretization process for the TPE functional leads to the following algebraic form e = U e − W e , U e = 1 (ue )T Ke ue , W e = (ue )T fe , (11.15) 2 where Ke and fe are called the element stiffness matrix and the element consistent nodal force vector, respectively. Note that in (11.15) the three energies are only function of the node displacements ue . U e and W e depend quadratically and linearly, respectively, on those displacements. Taking the variation of the discretized TPE of (11.15) with respect to the node displacements gives6 ∂ e T = δue Ke ue − fe = 0. (11.16) e ∂u Because the variations δue can be arbitrary, the bracketed quantity must vanish, which yields δ
e

= δue

T

Ke ue = fe

(11.17)

These are the element stiffness equations. Hence the foregoing names given to Ke and fe are justified a posteriori.
6

The 1 factor disappears on taking the variation because U e is quadratic in the node displacements. For a review on the 2 calculus of discrete quadratic forms, see Appendix D.

11–9

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–10

§11.4.1. The Stiffness Matrix For the two-node bar element, the internal energy U e is Ue =
1 2 x2 x1

e E A e dx =

1 1 2

e E A e dζ,
0

(11.18)

where the strain e is related to the nodal displacements through (11.12). This form is symmetrically expanded by inserting e = Bue into the second e and e = e T = (ue )T BT into the first e: Ue =
1 1 2 0

[ ue 1

ue ] 2

1 1 −1 E A [ −1 1

1]

ue 1 ue 2

dζ.

(11.19)

The nodal displacements can be moved out of the integral, giving Ue = in which Ke =
0 1 1 1 2

[ ue 1

ue ] 2

EA
2

0

1 −1

−1 1

ue 1 ue 2

=

1 2

ue

T

Ke ue .

(11.20)

E A BT B dζ =
0

1

EA
2

1 −1

−1 1

dζ.

(11.21)

is the element stiffness matrix. If the rigidity E A is constant over the element, Ke = E A B T B
0 1

dζ =

EA
2

1 −1

−1 1

=

EA

1 −1

−1 . 1

(11.22)

This is the same element stiffness matrix of the prismatic truss member derived in Chapters 2 and 5 by a Mechanics of Materials approach, but now obtained through a variational argument. §11.4.2. The Consistent Node Force Vector The consistent node force vector fe introduced in (11.15) comes from the element contribution to the external work potential W : We =
x2 x1

q u dx =
0

1

q NT ue dζ = ue

T 0

1

q

1−ζ ζ

dζ = ue

T e

f,

(11.23)

in which ζ = (x − x1 )/ . Consequently fe =
x2

q
x1

1−ζ ζ

dx =
0

1

q

1−ζ ζ

dζ.

(11.24)

If the force q is constant over the element, one obtains the same results as with the EbE load-lumping method of Chapter 7. See Exercise 11.3. 11–10

11–11
§11.5.

§11.5 *ACCURACY ANALYSIS

*Accuracy Analysis

Low order 1D elements may give surprisingly high accuracy. In particular the lowly two-node bar element can display infinite accuracy under some conditions. This phenomenon is studied in this advanced section as it provides an introduction to modified equation methods and Fourier analysis along the way. §11.5.1. *Nodal Exactness and Superconvergence Suppose that the following two conditions are satisfied: 1. 2. The bar properties are constant along the length (prismatic member). The distributed load q(x) is zero between nodes. The only applied loads are point forces at the nodes.

If so, a linear axial displacement u(x) as defined by (11.10) and (11.11) is the exact solution over each element since constant strain and stress satisfy, element by element, all of the governing equations listed in Figure 11.3.7 It follows that if the foregoing conditions are verified the FEM solution is exact; that is, it agrees with the analytical solution of the mathematical model.8 Adding extra elements and nodes would not change the solution. That is the reason behind the truss discretizations used in Chapters 2–3: one element per member is enough if they are prismatic and loads are applied to joints. Such models are called nodally exact. What happens if the foregoing assumptions are not met? Exactness is then generally lost, and several elements per member may be beneficial if spurious mechanisms are avoided.9 For a 1D lattice of equal-length, prismatic two-node bar elements, an interesting and more difficult result is: the solution is nodally exact for any loading if consistent node forces are used. This is proven in the subsection below. This result underlies the importance of computing node forces correctly. If conditions such as equal-length are relaxed, the solution is no longer nodally exact but convergence at the nodes is extremely rapid (faster than could be expected by standard error analysis) as long as consistent node forces are used. This phenomenon is called superconvergence in the FEM literature. §11.5.2. *Fourier Patch Analysis The following analysis is based on the modified differential equation (MoDE) method of Warming and Hyett [261] combined with the Fourier patch analysis approach of Park and Flaggs [188,189]. Consider a lattice of two-node prismatic bar elements of constant rigidity E A and equal length , as illustrated in Figure 11.8. The total length of the lattice is L. The system is subject to an arbitrary axial load q(x). The only requirement on q(x) is that it has a convergent Fourier series in the space direction.
q(x)

xi = xj −

i

j

k EA = const

xj xk = xj +
L

1 − (xj −x)/ = 1−ψ
Two-element patch ijk i

Trial basis function Nj for node j

1
j

1 + (x j−x)/ = 1+ψ
k

Figure 11.8. Superconvergence patch analysis.

From the lattice extract a patch10 of two elements connecting nodes xi , x j and xk as shown in Figure 11.8. The
7

The internal equilibrium equation p + q = E A u + q = 0 is trivially verified because q = 0 from the second assumption, and u = 0 because of shape function linearity. In variational language: the Green function of the u = 0 problem is included in the FEM trial space. These can happen when transforming such elements for 2D and 3D trusses. See Exercise E11.7. A patch is the set of all elements connected to a node; in this case j.

8 9 10

11–11

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–12

FEM patch equations at node j are EA [ −1 2 −1 ] ui uj uk = fj, (11.25)

in which the node force f j is obtained by consistent lumping:
xk 0 1

fj =
xi

q(x)N j (x) d x =
−1

q(x j + ψ )(1 + ψ) dψ +
0

q(x j + ψ )(1 − ψ) dψ.

(11.26)

Here N j (x) is the “hat” trial basis function for node j, depicted in Figure 11.8, and ψ = (x − x j )/ is a dimensionless coordinate that takes the values −1, 0 and 1 at nodes i, j and k, respectively. If q(x) is expanded in Fourier series
M

q(x) =
m=1

qm eiβm x ,

βm = mπ/L ,

(11.27)

(the term m = 0 requires special handling) the exact solution of the continuum equation E A u + q = 0 is
M

u ∗ (x) =
m=1

u ∗ eiβm x , m

u∗ = m

qm eiβm x . 2 E Aβm

(11.28)

Evaluation of the consistent force using (11.26) gives
M

fj =
m=1

f jm ,

f jm = qm

sin2 ( 1 βm ) 2
1 2 2 β 4 m

eiβm x2 .

(11.29)

To construct a modified differential equation (MoDE), expand the displacement by Taylor series centered at node j. Evaluate at i and k: u i = u j − u j + 2 u j /2! − 3 u j /3! + 4 u iv /4! + . . . and u k = u j + u j + j 2 u j /2 + 3 u j /3! + 4 u iv /4! + . . .. Replace these series into (11.25) to get j −2E A
2 4 1 u j + u iv + u vi + . . . 2! 4! j 6! j

= fj.

(11.30)

This is an ODE of infinite order. It can be reduced to an algebraic equation by assuming that the response of 2 4 (11.30) to qm eiβm x is harmonic: u jm eiβm x . If so u jm = −βm u jm , u iv = βm u jm , etc, and the MoDE becomes jm sin2 ( 1 βm ) iβm x j β2 2 β4 4 1 2 e . − m + m − . . . u jm = 4E A sin2 ( 1 βm ) u jm = f jm = qm 2 1 2 2 2! 4! 6! βm 4 (11.31) 2 Solving gives u jm = qm eiβm x j /(E Aβm ), which compared with (11.28) shows that u jm = u ∗ for any m > 0. m Consequently u j = u ∗ . In other words, the MoDE (11.30) and the original ODE: E Au + q = 0 have the j same value at x = x j for any load q(x) developable as (11.27). This proves nodal exactness. In between nodes the two solutions will not agree.11
2 2E A βm

The case m = 0 has to be treated separately since the foregoing expressions become 0/0. The response to a uniform q = q0 is a quadratic in x, and it is not difficult to prove nodal exactness.
11

The FEM solution varies linearly between nodes whereas the exact one is generally trigonometric.

11–12

11–13
§11.5.3. *Robin BCs

§11. Notes and Bibliography

Suppose that for a bar of length L one has the following end conditions: u (0) = au(0) + b at x = 0 and u (L) = au(L) + b at x = L, in which a and b are given coefficients. Those are called Robin BCs in the literature. Adjoining them as Courant penalty terms gives the functional
L

F(u) =
0

[ 1 (u )2 − f u] d x + 1 [u (0) − au(0) − b]2 + 1 [u (L) + au(L) + b]2 . 2 2 2

(11.32)

Divide [0,L] into Ne elements and N = Ne + 1 nodes. Do C 0 linear interpolation over each element, insert into F(u) to get Fd (u) = 1 uT Ku − fT v, in which u is the vector of node values, K the master stiffness matrix 2 and f the master force vector. Coefficients a and b will affect both K and f. Vanishing of the first variation: δ Fd = 0 yields the FEM equations Ku = f to be solved for u. The Robin BCs at x = 0 and x = L will affect the stiffness and force contributions of the first and last elements, but not those of interior elements. This kind of boundary value problem (i.e., with Robin BCs) is common in heat conduction and heat transfer with convection given over cooling surfaces. In that case the heat flux is proportional to the difference of the (unknown) surface temperature and that of the cooling fluid. Elements that ”touch” the convention boundary are affected. Notes and Bibliography The foregoing development pertains to the simplest structural finite element: the two-node bar element. For bars this may be generalized in various directions. Refined bar elements. Adding internal nodes we can pass from linear to quadratic and cubic shape functions. These elements are rarely useful on their own right, but as accessories to 2D and 3D high order continuum elements (for example, to model edge reinforcements.) For that reason they are not considered here. The 3-node bar element is developed in exercises assigned in Chapter 16. Two- and three-dimensional truss structures. The only additional ingredients are the transformation matrices discussed in Chapters 3 and 6. Curved bar elements. These can be derived using isoparametric mapping, a device introduced later. Matrices for straight bar elements are available in any finite element book; for example Przemieniecki [204]. Tonti diagrams were introduced in the 1970s in papers now difficult to access, for example [251]. Scanned images are available, howewer, at http://www.dic.units.it/perspage/discretephysics The fundamentals of Variational Calculus may be studied in the excellent textbook [110], which is now available in an inexpensive Dover edition. The proof of the MPE principle can be found in texts on variational methods in mechanics. For example: Langhaar [155], which is the most readable “old fashioned” treatment of the energy principles of structural mechanics, with a beautiful treatment of virtual work. (Out of print but used copies may be found via the web engines cited in §1.5.2.) The elegant treatment by Lanczos [154] is recommended as reading material although it is more oriented to physics than structural mechanics. The first accuracy study of FEM discretizations using modified equation methods is by Waltz et. al. [259]; however their procedures were faulty, which led to incorrect conclusions. The first correct derivation of modified equations appeared in [261]. The topic has recently attracted interest from applied mathematicians because modified equations provide a systematic tool for backward error analysis of differential equations: the discrete solution is the exact solution of the modified problem. This is particularly important for the study of long term behavior of discrete dynamical systems, whether deterministic or chaotic. Recommended references along these lines are [117,121,232]. Nodal exactness of bar models for point node loads is a particular case of a theorem by Tong [250]. For arbitrary loads it was proven by Park and Flaggs [188,189], who followed a variant of the scheme of §11.5.2.

11–13

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–14

A different technique is used in Exercise 11.8. The budding concept of superconvergence, which emerged in the late 1960s, is outlined in the book of Strang and Fix [227]. There is a monograph [260] devoted to the subject; it covers only Poisson problems but provides a comprehensive reference list until 1995. References Referenced items moved to Appendix R.

11–14

11–15
Homework Exercises for Chapter 11 Variational Formulation of Bar Element

Exercises

EXERCISE 11.1 [D:10] Explain the kinematic admissibility requirements stated in §11.3.2 in terms of physics, namely ruling out the possibility of gaps or interpenetration as the bar material deforms. EXERCISE 11.2 [A/C:15] Using (11.21), derive the stiffness matrix for a tapered bar element in which the cross section area varies linearly along the element length:

A = Ai (1 − ζ ) + A j ζ,

(E11.1)

where Ai and A j are the areas at the end nodes, and ζ = x e / is the dimensionless coordinate defined in §11.3.6. Show that this yields the same answer as that of a stiffness of a constant-area bar with cross section 1 (Ai + A j ). Note: the following Mathematica script may be used to solve this exercise:12 2
ClearAll[Le,x,Em,A,Ai,Aj]; Be={{-1,1}}/Le; ζ =x/Le; A=Ai*(1-ζ )+Aj*ζ ; Ke=Integrate[Em*A*Transpose[Be].Be,{x,0,Le}]; Ke=Simplify[Ke]; Print["Ke for varying cross section bar: ",Ke//MatrixForm];

In this and following scripts Le stands for .
EXERCISE 11.3 [A:10] Using the area variation law (E11.1), find the consistent load vector fe for a bar

of constant area A subject to a uniform axial force q = ρg A per unit length along the element. Show that this vector is the same as that obtained with the element-by-element (EbE) “lumping” method of §8.4, which simply assigns half of the total load: 1 ρg A , to each node. 2
EXERCISE 11.4 [A/C:15] Repeat the previous calculation for the tapered bar element subject to a force q = ρg A per unit length, in which A varies according to (E11.1) whereas ρ and g are constant. Check that if Ai = A j one recovers f i = f j = 1 ρg A . Note: the following Mathematica script may be used to solve this 2 exercise:13

ClearAll[q,A,Ai,Aj,ρ,g,Le,x]; ζ =x/Le; Ne={{1-ζ ,ζ }}; A=Ai*(1-ζ )+Aj*ζ ; q=ρ*g*A; fe=Integrate[q*Ne,{x,0,Le}]; fe=Simplify[fe]; Print["fe for uniform load q: ",fe//MatrixForm]; ClearAll[A]; Print["fe check: ",Simplify[fe/.{Ai->A,Aj->A}]//MatrixForm];
EXERCISE 11.5 [A/C:20] A tapered bar element of length , end areas Ai and A j with A interpolated as

per (E11.1), and constant density ρ, rotates on a plane at uniform angular velocity ω (rad/sec) about node i. Taking axis x along the rotating bar with origin at node i, the centrifugal axial force is q(x) = ρ Aω2 x along the length, in which x ≡ x e . Find the consistent node forces as functions of ρ, Ai , A j , ω and , and specialize the result to the prismatic bar A = Ai = A j . Partial result check: f j = 1 ρω2 A 2 for A = Ai = A j . 3
12

The ClearAll[...] at the start of the script is recommended programming practice to initialize variables and avoid “cell crosstalk.” In a Module this is done by listing the local variables after the Module keyword. The ClearAll[A] before the last statement is essential; else A would retain the previous assignation.

13

11–15

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–16

EXERCISE 11.6 [A:15] (Requires knowledge of Dirac’s delta function properties.) Find the consistent load

vector fe if the bar is subjected to a concentrated axial force Q at a distance x = a from its left end. Use Equation (11.32), with q(x) = Q δ(a), in which δ(a) is the one-dimensional Dirac’s delta function at x = a. Note: the following script does it by Mathematica, but it is overkill:
ClearAll[Le,q,Q,a,x]; ζ =x/Le; Ne={{1-ζ ,ζ }}; q=Q*DiracDelta[x-a]; fe=Simplify[ Integrate[q*Ne,{x,-Infinity,Infinity}] ]; Print["fe for point load Q at x=a: ",fe//MatrixForm];

EXERCISE 11.7 [C+D:20] In a learned paper, Dr. I. M. Clueless proposes “improving” the result for the example truss by putting three extra nodes, 4, 5 and 6, at the midpoint of members 1–2, 2–3 and 1–3, respectively. His “reasoning” is that more is better. Try Dr. C.’s suggestion using the Mathematica implementation of Chapter 4 and verify that the solution “blows up” because the modified master stiffness is singular. Explain physically what happens. EXERCISE 11.8 [A:35, close to research paper level]. Prove nodal exactness of the two-node bar element for arbitrary but Taylor expandable loading without using the Fourier series approach. Hints: expand q(x) = q(x j ) + ( ψ)q (x j ) + ( ψ)2 q (x j )/2! + . . ., where ψ = x − x j is the distance to node j, compute the consistent force f j (x) from (11.26), and differentiate the MoDE (11.30) repeatedly in x while truncating all derivatives to a maximum order n ≥ 2. Show that the original ODE: E Au + q = 0, emerges as an identity regardless of how many derivatives are kept.

11–16

Introduction to FEM

Variational Formulation of Bar Element

11

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Bar Member - Variational Derivation
y

z

;; ;; ;;

Cross section

P
Longitudinal axis x

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Bar Member (cont'd)
cross section x axial rigidity EA u(x) P

;;;

q(x)

L

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

The Bar Revisited - Notation
Quantity x (.)' u(x) q(x) L E A EA e = du/dx = u' σ = E e = E u' F = A σ = EA e = EA u' P Meaning Longitudinal bar axis * d(.)/dx Axial displacement Distributed axial force, given per unit of bar length Total length of bar member Elastic modulus Cross section area, may vary with x Axial rigidity Infinitesimal axial strain Axial stress Internal axial force Prescribed end load

_ * x is used in this Chapter instead of x (as in Chapters 2-3) to simplify the notation

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Tonti Diagram of Governing Equations
Displacement BCs

Prescribed end displacements

Axial displacements u(x)

Distributed axial load q(x)

Kinematic

e=u'

F'+q=0 Equilibrium

Axial strains e(x)

F = EA e

Constitutive

Axial force F(x)

Force BCs

Prescribed end loads

unknown

given (problem data)

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Potential Energy of the Bar Member
(before discretization)

Internal energy (= strain energy)

U=

L 1 2 0

Fe d x =

L 1 2 0

( E Au')u' d x =

L 1 2

u' E Au' d x
0

External work

W =
0

L

qu d x

Total potential energy

Π= U− W

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Concept of Kinematically Admissible Variation
u
u(x)+δu(x) δu(x)
u(L)

u(x)
u(0) = 0
L

x

δu(x) is kinematically admissible if u(x) and u(x) + δu(x) (i) are continuous over bar length, i.e. u(x) ∈ C 0 in x ∈ [0, L]. (ii) satisfy exactly displacement BC; in the figure, u(0) = 0

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

The Minimum Potential Energy (MPE) Principle
The MPE principle states that the actual displacement solution u* (x) that satisfies the governing equations is that which renders the TPE functional Π[u] stationary:

δΠ = δU − δW = 0

iff

u = u*

with respect to admissible variations u = u* + δu of the exact displacement solution u* (x)

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

FEM Discretization of Bar Member

u 1, f1
(1)

u 2, f2
(2)

u 3, f3
(3)

u 4, f4
(4)

u 5, f5

1

2

3

4

5

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

FEM Displacement Trial Function
u 1, f1
(1)

u 2, f2
(2)

u 3, f3
(3)

u 4, f4
(4)

u 5, f5

1

2

3

4

5

End node 1 assumed fixed

u
u2 u1 = 0
Axial displacement plotted normal to x for visualization convenience

u3

u4

u(x)

u5

x

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Total Potential Energy Principle and Decomposition over Elements

δΠ = δU − δW = 0
But and

iff
(2) (2)

u = u* + ... + Π

(exact solution)
(N e) (N e)

Π= Π

(1)

+ Π

δΠ = δΠ

(1)

+ δΠ

+ ... + δΠ

= 0

From fundamental lemma of variational calculus, each element variation must vanish, giving

δΠe = δU e − δW e = 0

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Element Shape Functions

1

(e)
e = L x = x γ x1 -

2

1 Ne i

1− x/
0 Nje 1

x/
0

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Element Shape Functions (cont'd)
Linear displacement interpolation:
e u1 e e e e ue (x) = N1e u1 + N2e u2 = [ N1 N2 ] e = N ue u2

in which

N1e = 1 − ζ= x−x1

x−x1

= 1 − ζ,

N2 =

e

x−x1

dimensionless (natural) coordinate

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Displacement Variation Process Yields the Element Stiffness Equations
Π = Ue − W e δΠ e = 0
since e

{
δu e

Ue =

1 (u e ) T 2

Ke ue

W e = (u e ) T f e
T

Ke ue − f e = 0
(Appendix D)

δu e

is arbitrary [...] = 0

Ke u e = f e
the element stiffness equations

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

The Bar Element Stiffness
Ue = U =
e
1 2 1 2

e E A e dx
0

e = u'
1] = −1 1 ue 1 e u2
1 2

0

[ u1

1 −1 u2 ] 1 EA 1 −1 −1 1

1

[ −1
e u1 ue 2

dx
T

U =
e

1 2

e [ u1

ue 2

]
0

2

dx

ue

Ke u e

Ke =
0

E A BT B d x =
0

EA
2

1 −1

dx

If EA is constant over element
Ke = EA 1 −1 −1 1

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

The Consistent Nodal Force Vector
W =
0

e

q u dx =

(u e )T NTq d x = u e
0

T 0

q

1−ζ ζ

d x = ue

T

fe

Since

ue

is arbitrary

fe =
0

q

1−ζ ζ

dx

in which

ζ=

x−x1

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Bar Consistent Force Vector (cont'd)
If q is constant along element
1/2 1/2

f

e

= q
0

1− ζ ζ

dx = q

the same result as with EbE load lumping (i.e., assigning one half of the total load to each node)

IFEM Ch 11 – Slide 17

Chapter 11: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF BAR ELEMENT

11–16

Homework Exercises for Chapter 11. Variational Formulation of Bar Element Solutions
EXERCISE 11.1 If the function u(x) is discontinuous at x = a, material gap or interpenetration at that cross section occurs. The first requirement rules that out at an arbitrary cross section. The second requirement does the same for supports. EXERCISE 11.2 Only A in (11.28) is a function of x. Consequently

Ke =
0

EA
2

1 −1

−1 1

dx =

E
2

1 −1

−1 1

A(x) d x.
0

(E11.2)

But
1 1

A(x) d x =
0 0

A(ζ ) dζ =
0

Ai (1 − ζ ) + A j ζ dζ =

1 (Ai 2

¯ + A j ) = A,

(E11.3)

¯ where A = 1 (Ai + A j ) is the average area. Therefore 2 Ke =
EXERCISE 11.3

¯ EA

1 −1

−1 . 1

(E11.4)

f =
e 0

1−ζ ρg A ζ

1

d x = ρg A
0

1−ζ ζ

dζ = ρg A

1 2 1 2

= 1 ρg A 2

1 . 1

(E11.5)

This is the same answer of element-by-element load lumping.
EXERCISE 11.4

fe =
0

ρg A

1−ζ ζ

1

d x = ρg
0

Ai (1 − ζ ) + A j ζ (1 − ζ ) Ai (1 − ζ ) + A j ζ ζ

dζ = ρg

1 3 1 6

Ai + 1 A j 6 Ai + 1 A j 3

. (E11.6)

Obviously if Ai = A j we recover (E11.5).
EXERCISE 11.5 Here is a Mathematica solution:
ClearAll[Le,q,A,Ai,Aj,ρ,g]; ζ =x/Le; Ne={1-ζ ,ζ }; A=Ai*(1-ζ )+Aj*ζ ; q=ρ*A*ω^2*x; fe=Integrate[q*Ne,{x,0,Le}]; fe=Simplify[fe]; Print["fe for centrifugal load q: ",fe]; ClearAll[A]; Print["fe check:",Simplify[fe/.{Ai->A,Aj->A}]];
2 1 2 2 (Ai + Aj) Le ρ ω , 1 (Ai + 3Aj) Le ρ ω 2 } 12 12 fe check: { 1 A Le 2 ρ ω 2, 1 A Le 2 ρ ω 2 } 3 6

fe for centrifugal load q: {

e So the answer is f xi =

1 (Ai 12

+ A j ) 2 ρω2 , f xej =

1 (Ai 12

+ 3A j ) 2 ρω2 .

11–16

11–17
EXERCISE 11.6

Solutions to Exercises

fe =
0

1 − x/ x/

Q δ(a) d x = Q

1−a . a

(E11.7)

in which the δ-function property used.

∞ −∞

g(x) δ(a) d x = g(a), g(x) being any continuous function, has been

EXERCISE 11.7 Three zero energy mechanisms occur because the bars can hinge without restraints about the midpoint nodes 4, 5 and 6. Removal would require messy MFC constraints. But the addition of these nodes is unnecessary since one element per member gives the exact answer if the loads are applied at the nodes, as discussed in §11.5.

q /4! + 4 q /6! + 6 q /8! + . . .), where q and its derivatives are evaluated at x = x2 . Insert this into the RHS of (11.30). Differentiate both sides repeatedly with respect to x keeping only even derivatives up to a certain order. The configuration is illustrated here when keeping up to the eighth derivative of u(x) and sixth of q(x):
2

EXERCISE 11.8 The consistent node force computed from (11.26) is f j = 2 (q/2! +


−2E A 

1 2! 

2

4

 0    0
0

4! 1 2! 0 0

6!
2

4! 1 2! 0

8!   u   f j  j 4  u 6!   j  =  f j  = 2     2  uj fj  12 1 2! uj fj

6

1 2!   0 

2

4

   0
0

4! 1 2! 0 0

6!
2

4! 1 2! 0

8!   q j  4  6!   q j    2  qj  12 qj 1 2!

6

(E11.8)

Cancelling the common Toeplitz coefficient matrix, which is possible since it is obviously nonsingular,14 and the factor, one gets (from the first row) E Au j +q j = 0 identically for any differentiation order. Consequently the FEM solution is nodally exact for any load, as load as the consistent force computation is used. As usual the fastest route, if and when applicable, is to use the Laplace transform L. Let s be the transform ˜ variable, with L(d k F(x)/d x k ) ⇒ s k F(s). Transforming (11.30) with the nodal force f j found above yields ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ −(2E A/ ) cosh( s) − 1 u(s) = (2/ ) cosh( s) − 1 s −2 q(s), or E A s 2 u(s) + q(s) = 0, with subscript j suppressed for brevity. Backtransforming gives E Au j + q j = 0.

14

The determinant of a triangular matrix is the product of the diagonal entries, all of which are nonzero.

11–17

.

Variational Formulation of Plane Beam Element

12

12–1

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§12.1. Introduction §12.2. What is a Beam? §12.2.1. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . §12.2.2. Mathematical Models . . . . . . . . . §12.2.3. Assumptions of Classical Beam Theory . . . §12.3. The Bernoulli-Euler Beam Theory §12.3.1. Element Coordinate Systems . . . . . . . §12.3.2. Kinematics . . . . . . . . . . . . §12.3.3. Loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §12.3.4. Support Conditions . . . . . . . . . §12.3.5. Strains, Stresses and Bending Moments . . . §12.4. Total Potential Energy Functional §12.5. Beam Finite Elements §12.5.1. Finite Element Trial Functions . . . . . . §12.5.2. Shape Functions . . . . . . . . . . . §12.6. The Finite Element Equations §12.6.1. The Stiffness Matrix of a Prismatic Beam . . §12.6.2. Consistent Nodal Force Vector for Uniform Load §12. Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §12. References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §12. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12–3 12–3 12–3 12–3 12–4 12–4 12–4 12–5 12–5 12–5 12–5 12–6 12–8 12–8 12–8 12–9 12–10 12–10 12–15 12–15 12–16

12–2

12–3 §12.1. Introduction

§12.2

WHAT IS A BEAM?

The previous Chapter introduced the TPE-based variational formulation of finite elements, which was illustrated for the bar element. This Chapter applies that technique to a more complicated one-dimensional element: the plane beam described by engineering beam theory. Mathematically, the main difference of beams with respect to bars is the increased order of continuity required for the assumed transverse-displacement functions to be admissible. Not only must these functions be continuous but they must possess continuous x first derivatives. To meet this requirement both deflections and slopes are matched at nodal points. Slopes may be viewed as rotational degrees of freedom in the small-displacement assumptions used here. §12.2. What is a Beam? Beams are the most common type of structural component, particularly in Civil and Mechanical Engineering. A beam is a bar-like structural member whose primary function is to support transverse loading and carry it to the supports. See Figure 12.1. By “bar-like” it is meant that one of the dimensions is considerably larger than the other two. This dimension is called the longitudinal dimension or beam axis. The intersection of planes normal to the longitudinal dimension with the beam member are called cross sections. A longitudinal plane is one that passes through the beam axis.

Figure 12.1. A beam is a structural member designed to resist transverse loads.

A beam resists transverse loads mainly through bending action, Bending produces compressive longitudinal stresses in one side of the beam and tensile stresses in the other. The two regions are separated by a neutral surface of zero stress. The combination of tensile and compressive stresses produces an internal bending moment. This moment is the primary mechanism that transports loads to the supports. The mechanism is illustrated in Figure 12.2. §12.2.1. Terminology
Neutral surface Compressive stress

Tensile stress
Figure 12.2. Beam transverse loads are primarily resisted by bending action.

A general beam is a bar-like member designed to resist a combination of loading actions such as biaxial bending, transverse shears, axial stretching or compression, and possibly torsion. If the internal axial force is compressive, the beam has also to be designed to resist buckling. If the beam is subject primarily to bending and axial forces, it is called a beam-column. If it is subjected primarily to bending forces, it is called simply a beam. A beam is straight if its longitudinal axis is straight. It is prismatic if its cross section is constant. A spatial beam supports transverse loads that can act on arbitrary directions along the cross section. A plane beam resists primarily transverse loading on a preferred longitudinal plane. This Chapter considers only plane beams. 12–3

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–4

§12.2.2. Mathematical Models One-dimensional mathematical models of structural beams are constructed on the basis of beam theories. Because beams are actually three-dimensional bodies, all models necessarily involve some form of approximation to the underlying physics. The simplest and best known models for straight, prismatic beams are based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory (also called classical beam theory and engineering beam theory), and the Timoshenko beam theory. The Bernoulli-Euler theory is that taught in introductory Mechanics of Materials courses, and is the one emphasized in this Chapter. The Timoshenko beam model is presented in Chapter 13, which collects advanced material. Both models can be used to formulate beam finite elements. The Bernoulli-Euler beam theory leads to the so-called Hermitian beam elements.1 These are also known as C 1 elements for the reason explained in §12.5.1. This model neglects the effect of transverse shear deformations on the internal energy. Elements based on Timoshenko beam theory, also known as C 0 elements, incorporate a first order correction for transverse shear effects. This model assumes additional importance in dynamics and vibration. §12.2.3. Assumptions of Classical Beam Theory The Bernoulli-Euler or classical beam theory for plane beams rests on the following assumptions: 1. Planar symmetry. The longitudinal axis is straight and the cross section of the beam has a longitudinal plane of symmetry. The resultant of the transverse loads acting on each section lies on that plane. The support conditions are also symmetric about this plane. Cross section variation. The cross section is either constant or varies smoothly. Normality. Plane sections originally normal to the longitudinal axis of the beam remain plane and normal to the deformed longitudinal axis upon bending. Strain energy. The internal strain energy of the member accounts only for bending moment deformations. All other contributions, notably transverse shear and axial force, are ignored. Linearization. Transverse deflections, rotations and deformations are considered so small that the assumptions of infinitesimal deformations apply. Material model. The material is assumed to be elastic and isotropic. Heterogeneous beams fabricated with several isotropic materials, such as reinforced concrete, are not excluded.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

§12.3. The Bernoulli-Euler Beam Theory §12.3.1. Element Coordinate Systems Under transverse loading one of the top surfaces shortens while the other elongates; see Figure 12.2. Therefore a neutral surface that undergoes no axial strain exists between the top and the bottom. The intersection of this surface with each cross section defines the neutral axis of that cross section.2
1

The qualifier “Hermitian” relates to the use of a transverse-displacement interpolation formula studied by the French mathematician Hermite. The term has nothing to do with the mathematical model used. If the beam is homogenous, the neutral axis passes through the centroid of the cross section. If the beam is fabricated of different materials — for example, a reinforced concrete beam — the neutral axes passes through the centroid of an “equivalent” cross section. This topic is covered in Mechanics of Materials textbooks; for example Popov [201].

2

12–4

12–5

§12.3

THE BERNOULLI-EULER BEAM THEORY

y, v

q(x) y,v
m

zc
Neutral surface

_

x, u

z
Beam cross section

Neutral axis Centroid Symmetry plane

L

Figure 12.3. Terminology and choice of axes for Bernoulli-Euler model of plane beam.

The Cartesian axes for plane beam analysis are chosen as shown in Figure 12.3. Axis x lies along the longitudinal beam axis, at neutral axis height. Axis y lies in the symmetry plane and points upwards. Axis z is directed along the neutral axis, forming a RHS system with x and y. The origin is placed at the leftmost section. The total length (or span) of the beam member is called L. §12.3.2. Kinematics The motion under loading of a plane beam member in the x, y plane is described by the two dimensional displacement field u(x, y) , (12.1) v(x, y) where u and v are the axial and transverse displacement components, respectively, of an arbitrary beam material point. The motion in the z direction, which is primarity due to Poisson’s ratio effects, is of no interest. The normality assumption of the Bernoulli-Euler model can be represented mathematically as u(x, y) = −y ∂v(x) = −yv = −yθ, ∂x v(x, y) = v(x). (12.2)

Note that the slope v = ∂v/∂ x = dv/d x of the deflection curve has been identified with the rotation symbol θ . This is permissible because θ represents to first order, according to the kinematic assumptions of this model, the rotation of a cross section about z positive CCW. §12.3.3. Loading The transverse force per unit length that acts on the beam in the +y direction is denoted by q(x), as illustrated in Figure 12.3. Concentrated loads and moments acting on isolated beam sections can be represented by the delta function and its derivative. For example, if a transverse point load F acts at x = a, it contributes Fδ(a) to q(x). If the concentrated moment C acts at x = b, positive CCW, it contributes Cδ (b) to q(x), where δ denotes a doublet acting at x = b. §12.3.4. Support Conditions Support conditions for beams exhibit far more variety than for bar members. Two canonical cases are often encountered in engineering practice: simple support and cantilever support. These are illustrated in Figures 12.4 and 12.5, respectively. Beams often appear as components of skeletal structures called frameworks, in which case the support conditions are of more complex type. 12–5

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–6

;;;;;;; ;;;;;;; ;;;;;;; ;;;;;;;
Figure 12.4. A simply supported beam has end supports that preclude transverse displacements but permit end rotations.

Figure 12.5. A cantilever beam is clamped at one end and free at the other. Airplane wings and stabilizers are examples of this configuration.

§12.3.5. Strains, Stresses and Bending Moments The Bernoulli-Euler or classical model assumes that the internal energy of beam member is entirely due to bending strains and stresses. Bending produces axial stresses σx x , which will be abbreviated to σ , and axial strains ex x , which will be abbreviated to e. The strains can be linked to the displacements by differentiating the axial displacement u(x) of (12.2): e= d 2v ∂ 2v ∂u = −y 2 = −y 2 = −yv = −yκ. ∂x ∂x dx (12.3)

Here κ denotes the deformed beam axis curvature, which to first order is κ ≈ d 2 v/d x 2 = v . The bending stress σ = σx x is linked to e through the one-dimensional Hooke’s law σ = Ee = −E y d 2v = −E yκ, dx2 (12.4)

where E is the longitudinal elastic modulus. The most important stress resultant in classical beam theory is the bending moment M, which is defined as the cross section integral M=
A

−yσ d x = E

d 2v dx2

y 2 d A = E I κ.
A
y

(12.5)

Here I ≡ Izz denotes the moment of inertia A y 2 d A of the cross section with respect to the z (neutral) axis. The bending moment M is considered positive if it compresses the upper portion: y > 0, of the beam cross section, as illustrated in Figure 12.6. This convention explains the negative sign of y in the integral (12.5). The product E I is called the bending rigidity of the beam with respect to flexure about the z axis.

M
z x

V
Figure 12.6. Positive sign convention for M and V .

The governing equations of the Bernoulli-Euler beam model are summarized in the Tonti diagram of Figure 12.7. 12–6

12–7

§12.4

TOTAL POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONAL

Prescribed end displacements

Displacement BCs

Transverse displacements

Distributed transverse load

v(x) κ = v'' M = EI κ
Constitutive

q(x)

Kinematic

M''=q Equilibrium

Curvature

κ(x)

Bending moment

Force BCs

M(x)

Prescribed end loads

Figure 12.7. The Tonti diagram for the governing equations of the Bernoulli-Euler beam model.

§12.4. Total Potential Energy Functional The total potential energy of the beam is =U −W (12.6)

where as usual U and W denote the internal and external energies, respectively. As previously explained, in the Bernoulli-Euler model U includes only the bending energy: U=
1 2

σe dV =
V

L 1 2 0

Mκ d x =

L 1 2 0

E I κ2 dx =

L 1 2 0

EI v

2

dx =

L 1 2 0

v E I v d x. (12.7)

The external work W accounts for the applied transverse force: W =
0 L

qv d x.

(12.8)

The three functionals , U and W must be regarded as depending on the transverse displacement v(x). When this dependence needs to be emphasized we write [v], U [v] and W [v]. Note that [v] includes up to second derivatives in v, because v = κ appears in U . This number is called the variational index. Variational calculus tells us that since the index is 2, admissible displacements v(x) must be continuous, have continuous first derivatives (slopes or rotations), and satisfy the displacement BCs exactly. This continuity requirement can be succintly stated by saying that admissible displacements must be C 1 continuous. This condition guides the construction of beam finite elements described below.
Remark 12.1. If there is an applied distributed moment m(x) per unit of beam length, the external energy L (12.8) must be augmented with a 0 m(x)θ(x) d x term. This is further elaborated in Exercises 12.4 and 12.5. Such kind of distributed loading is uncommon in practice although in framework analysis occasionally the need arises for treating a concentrated moment between nodes.

12–7

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–8

§12.5. Beam Finite Elements
P'(x+u,y+v)

Beam finite elements are obtained by subdividing beam members longitudinally. The simplest Bernoulli-Euler plane beam element has two end nodes: 1 and 2, and four degrees of freedom (DOF). These are collected in the node displacement vector ue = [ v1 θ1 v2 θ2 ]T . (12.9)

θ2 v2

y, v

θ1

v1 1

E, I

2
x

x, u

P(x,y)
Figure 12.8. The two-node Bernoulli-Euler plane beam element with four DOFs.

The element is shown in Figure 12.8, which pictures the undeformed and deformed configurations. §12.5.1. Finite Element Trial Functions

The freedoms (12.9) are used to define uniquely the variation of the transverse displacement v e (x) over the element. The C 1 continuity requirement says that both v(x) and the slope θ = v (x) = dv(x)/d x must be continuous over the entire member, and in particular between beam elements. C 1 continuity can be trivially met within each element by choosing polynomial interpolation shape functions as shown below, because polynomials are C ∞ continuous. Matching nodal displacements and rotations with adjacent elements enforces the necessary interelement continuity.
interpenetration gap

(a)

(b)

v(x)

v(x)

Figure 12.9. Deflection of a clamped-SS beam discretized with four elements, grossly exaggerated for visibility. (a) Cubic deflection elements; (b) linear deflection elements. The latter maintains only C 0 continuity, leading to unacceptable material gap and interpenetration at nodes.

Remark 12.2. The physical reason for C 1 continuity is illustrated in Figure 12.9, in which the lateral deflection

curve v(x) is grossly exaggerated for visibility. The left figure shows the approximation of v(x) by four cubic functions, which maintain the required continuity. The right figure shows an attempt to approximate v(x) by four piecewise linear functions that maintain only C 0 continuity. In this case material gap and interpenetration occur at the nodes, as well as at the clamped left end, because section rotations jump between elements.

§12.5.2. Shape Functions The simplest shape functions that meet the C 1 continuity requirement for the nodal DOF configuration (12.9) are called the Hermitian cubic shape functions. The interpolation formula based on these functions is   v1  θ1  e e e e (12.10) v e = [ Nv1 Nθ 1 Nv2 Nθ 2 ]   = Ne ue . v2 θ2 12–8

12–9

§12.6

THE FINITE ELEMENT EQUATIONS

These shape functions are conveniently expressed in terms of the dimensionless “natural” coordinate ξ= 2x − 1, (12.11)

where is the element length. Coordinate ξ varies from ξ = −1 at node 1 (x = 0) to ξ = +1 at node 2 (x = ). Note that d x/dξ = 1 and 2 dξ/d x = 2/ . The shape functions in terms of ξ are
e Nv1 = 1 (1 − ξ )2 (2 + ξ ), 4 e Nθ 1 = e Nv2 = e Nθ 2 = 1 (1 − ξ )2 (1 + ξ ), 8 1 (1 + ξ )2 (2 − ξ ), 4 − 1 (1 + ξ )2 (1 − ξ ). 8

v1 = 1

e Nv1(ξ)

θ1 = 1
e Nθ1(ξ)

e Nv2(ξ)

v2 = 1 θ2 = 1

(12.12)

ξ = −1

e Nθ2(ξ)

ξ=1

These four functions are depicted in Figure 12.10.

Figure 12.10. Cubic shape functions of plane beam element.

The curvature κ that appears in U can be expressed in terms of the nodal displacements by differentiating twice with respect to x: 4 d 2 v e (ξ ) 4 dNe e d 2 v e (x) = 2 = 2 2 u = B ue = N ue . κ= 2 2 dx dξ dξ Here B = N is the 1 × 4 curvature-displacement matrix B=
Remark 12.3. The 4/
2

(12.13)

1

6

ξ

3ξ − 1

−6

ξ

3ξ + 1 .

(12.14)

factor in (12.13) comes from the differentiation chain rule. If f (x) is a function of x, and ξ = 2x/ − 1, noting that d(2/ )/d x = 0 one gets d f (x) d f (ξ ) dξ 2 d f (ξ ) = = , dx dξ d x dξ 0 d 2 f (x) d(2/ ) d f (ξ ) 2 d + = dx2 dx dξ dx d f (ξ ) dξ = 4 d 2 f (ξ ) . (12.15) 2 dξ 2

§12.6. The Finite Element Equations Insertion of (12.12) and (12.14) into the TPE functional specialized to this element, yields the quadratic form in the nodal displacements
e

= 1 (ue )T Ke ue − (ue )T fe , 2
1

(12.16)

where Ke =
0

E I BT B d x = 12–9

E I BT B
−1

1 2

dξ,

(12.17)

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–10

ClearAll[EI,l,ξ]; B={{6*ξ,(3*ξ-1)*l,-6*ξ,(3*ξ+1)*l}}/l^2; Ke=(EI*l/2)*Integrate[Ne,{ξ,-1,1}]; Ke=Simplify[Ke]; Print["Ke for prismatic beam:\n",Ke//MatrixForm]; Ke for prismatic beam: 12 EI 6 EI _ 12 EI l3 l l3 6 EI 4 EI _ 6 EI l2 l l2 _ 12 EI _ 6 EI 12 EI l3 l2 l3 6 EI 2 EI _ 6 EI l2 l l2 6 EI l2 2 EI l 6 EI l2 4 EI l ClearAll[q,l,ξ]; Ne={{2*(1-ξ)^2*(2+ξ), (1-ξ)^2*(1+ξ)*l, 2*(1+ξ)^2*(2-ξ),−(1+ξ)^2*(1-ξ)*l}}/8; fe=(q*l/2)*Integrate[Ne,{ξ,-1,1}]; fe=Simplify[fe]; Print["fe^T for uniform load q:\n",fe//MatrixForm]; fe^T for uniform load q: lq l 2q l q _ l 2q 2 12 2 12

_

Figure 12.11. Using Mathematica to form Ke for a prismatic beam element.

Figure 12.12. Using Mathematica to form fe for uniform transverse load q.

is the element stiffness matrix and fe =
0

NT q d x =

1

NT q
−1

1 2

dξ,

(12.18)

is the consistent element node force vector. The calculation of the entries of Ke and fe for prismatic beams and uniform load q is studied next. More complex cases are treated in the Exercises. §12.6.1. The Stiffness Matrix of a Prismatic Beam If the bending rigidity E I is constant over the element it can be moved out of the ξ -integral in (12.17):  K =
e 1 EI 2

 3ξ − 1 −6ξ 3ξ + 1 dξ. (12.19)

EI B B dξ = 2 −1
T

1

 3ξ − 1     −6ξ  6ξ  −1 
1

3ξ + 1 Expanding and integrating over the element yields    −36ξ 2 6ξ(3ξ +1) 36ξ 2 6ξ(3ξ −1) 12 6 −12 6 2 2 EI 1  (3ξ −1)2 2 −6ξ(3ξ −1) (9ξ 2 −1) 2    dξ = E I  4 −6 2  Ke = 3    3 12 −6 36ξ 2 −6ξ(3ξ +1)  2 −1 symm 4 2 symm (3ξ +1)2 2 (12.20) Although the foregoing integrals can be easily carried out by hand, it is equally expedient to use a CAS such as Mathematica or Maple. For example the Mathematica script listed in the top box of Figure 12.11 processes (12.20) using the Integrate function. The output, shown in the bottom box, corroborates the hand integration result. 

12–10

12–11

§12.6 THE FINITE ELEMENT EQUATIONS

§12.6.2. Consistent Nodal Force Vector for Uniform Load If q does not depend on x it can be moved out of (12.18), giving   1 (1 − ξ )2 (2 + ξ ) 4 1 1  1 (1 − ξ )2 (1 + ξ )    8 e T 1 1 N dξ = 2 q f = 2q  dξ =  1 2 −1 −1  4 (1 + ξ ) (2 − ξ )  − 1 (1 + ξ )2 (1 − ξ ) 8 
1 2

1

 (12.21)

 1  q  6 .  1  −1 6

This shows that a uniform load q over the beam element maps to two transverse node loads q /2, as may be expected, plus two nodal moments ±q 2 /12. The latter are called the fixed-end moments in the structural mechanics literature.3 The hand result (12.21) can be verified with the Mathematica script of Figure 12.12, in which fe is printed as a row vector to save space.

;;;;;; ;;;;;;
1

(b) Load case I

M
2

(a)
y,v
EI constant

x

1

Example 12.1. To see the beam element in action consider the cantilever illustrated in Figure 12.13(a). The

beam is prismatic with constant rigidity E I and span L. It is discretized with a single element as shown in Figure 12.13(b,c,d), and subjected to the three load cases pictured there. Case I involves an applied end moment M, case II a transverse end force P, and case III a uniformly distributed load q over the entire beam. The FEM equations are constructed using the stiffness matrix (12.20) with = L. For the first two load cases, forces at end node 2 are directly set up from the given loads since no lumping is needed. Applying the support conditions v1 = θ1 = 0 gives the reduced stiffness equations EI L3 12 −6L −6L 4L 2
I v2 θ2I

I I for load cases I and II, respectively. Solving gives the tip deflections v2 = M L 2 /(2E I ) and v2 I = P L 3 /(3E I ), and the tip rotations θ2I = M L/E I and θ2I I = P L 2 /(2E I ). These agree with the analytical values provided by Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. Thus a one-element idealization is sufficient for exactness. The reason is that the analytical deflection profiles v(x) are quadratic and cubic polynomials in x for cases I and II, respectively. Both are included in the span of the element shape functions. Displacements v(x), rotations θ (x) and moments M(x) expressed as functions of x also agree with the analytical solution, as may be expected.

;;
A
3

(c) Load case II

P
2 q uniform 2

x L

B

1

x

1

(d) Load case III

1

x

1

Figure 12.13. Cantilever beam problem for Example 12.1: (a) structure, (b-c): one-element FEM idealizations for three load cases.

=

0 , M

EI L3

12 −6L

−6L 4L 2

I v2 I θ2I I

=

P , 0

(12.22)

Introduced by Hardy Cross in 1930 (long before FEM) as a key ingredient for his moment distribution method. Indeed the title of his famous paper [59] is “Analysis of continuous frames by distributing fixed-end moments.”

12–11

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–12

EI v(x)/(qL4 )
0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8

EI θ(x)/(qL 3 )
0.3 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8

M(x)/(qL2 )
0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

Lateral deflection Analytical FEM, β = 0 FEM, β = 1

Section rotation Analytical FEM, β = 0 FEM, β = 1

Bending moment Analytical FEM, β = 0 FEM, β = 1

x/L

1

x/L

x/L
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

1

Figure 12.14. FEM versus analytical solutions for load case III of Example 12.1.

The results for load case III are more interesting since now the exact deflection is a quartic polynomial, which lies beyond the span of the FEM shape functions. A dimensionless parameter 0 ≤ β ≤ 1 is introduced in the reduced stiffness equations to study the effect of load lumping method on the solution: EI L3 12 −6L −6L 4L 2
I v2 I I θ2I I I

=

1 2

qL

1 −1β 6 L

.

(12.23)

Setting β = 1 gives the energy consistent load lumping (12.21) whereas β = 0 gives the EbE (here same I as NbN) load lumping f 2I I I = 1 q L with zero fixed-end moments. The solution of (12.23) is v2 I I = 2 III 4 3 q L (4 − β)/(24 E I ) and θ2 = q L (3 − β)/(12 E I ). From this one recovers the displacement, rotation and bending moment over the beam as v I I I (x) = q L 2 x 2 L(6−β) − 2x , 24 E I θ I I I (x) = q L x L(6−β) − 3x , 12 E I M I I I (x) = qL L(6−β) − 6x . 12 (12.24)

The analytical (exact) solution is
I vexI I (x) =

q x 2 (3L 2 −3L x+x 2 ) , 24 E I

I θexI I (x) =

q x (6L 2 −4L x+x 2 ) , 6 EI

I MexI I (x) =

1 2

q(L − x)2 .

(12.25)

The FEM and analytical solutions (12.24)-(12.25) are graphically compared in Figure 12.14. Deflections and rotations obtained with the consistent load lumping β = 1 agree better with the analytical solution. In addition the nodal values are exact (a superconvergence result further commented upon in the next Example). For the bending moment the values provided by the EbE lumping β = 0 are nodally exact but over the entire beam I the β = 1 solution gives a better linear fit to the parabolic function MexI I (x).
Example 12.2. The second example involves a simply supported beam under uniform line load q, depicted in Figure 12.15(a). It is prismatic with constant rigidity E I , span L, and discretized with two elements of length L 1 = L(/ + α) and L 2 = L − L 1 = L(/ − α), respectively. (Ordinarily two elements of the same length / L would be used; the scalar α ∈ (−/, /) is introduced to study the effect of unequal element sizes.)

y,v A

(a)
q (uniform) x L

EI constant B 1

y,v

(b)
x 1 2
2

3

;

; ; ;
12–12

L1=L(1 +α) 2

L2=L(1 −α) 2

Figure 12.15. SS beam problem for Example 12.2: (a) structure, (b) two-element FEM idealization.

; ;

12–13

§12.6 THE FINITE ELEMENT EQUATIONS

Using (12.20) and (12.21) to form the stiffness and consistent forces for both elements, assembling and applying the support conditions v1 = v3 = 0, provides the reduced stiffness equations 8L 2 1+2α   −24L E I  (1+2α)2  L 3  4L 2  1+2α  0

−24L (1+2α)2 192(1+12α 2 ) (1−4α 2 )3 192Lα (1−4α 2 )2 24L (1−2α)2

4L 2 1+2α 192Lα (1−4α 2 )2 16L 2 1−4α 2 4L 2 1−2α

 L(1+2α)2  θ  24 1   24L    1 2 v  qL  2 (1−2α)  . θ  = 2 Lα   2 4L 2    − 3  1−2α  θ3 2
0 8L 2 1−2α − L(1−2α) 24

(12.26)

Solving for the lateral displacement of node 2 gives v2 = q L 4 (5 − 24α 2 + 16α 4 )/(384E I ). The exact deflection is v(x) = q L 4 (ζ − 2ζ 3 + ζ 4 )/(24E I ) with ζ = x/L. Replacing x = L 1 = L(/ + α) yields exact = q L 4 (5 − 24α 2 + 16α 4 )/(384E I ), which is the same as the FEM result. Likewise θ2 is exact. v2 The result seems prima facie surprising. First, since the analytical solution is a quartic polynomial in x we have no reason to think that a cubic element will be exact. Second, one would expect accuracy deterioration as the element sizes differ more and more with increasing α. The fact that the solution at nodes is exact for any combination of element lengths is an illustration of superconvergence, a phenomenon already discussed in §11.5. A general proof of nodal exactness is given in §13.7, but it does require advanced mathematical tools. Note that displacements and rotations inside elements will not agree with the exact one; this can be observed in Figure 12.14(a,b) for load case III of the previous example.
y,v (a) A x B

EI constant

q(x)=−w constant

; ;

;

L1= 1 Lα 2

L2= 1 L(1−α) 2 L/2

L3= 1 L(1−α) 2 L/2 _ W

L y,v (b) 1 x 1 2 w
2

L1= 1 Lα 2

;; ;;

3

L2= 1 L(1−α) 2 L/2

1.5 1.25 1 0.75 0.5 0.25

; ;
(c)
0.1 0.2 0.3

C

D

E

L4= 1 Lα 2

Figure 12.16. Continuum beam problem for Example 12.3, (a): structure, (b) two-element FEM model of half beam, (c) scaled external energy of FEM model as function of α.

Example 12.3. (Adapted from a driven-tank experiment by Patrick Weidman). This example displays the

advantages of symbolic computation for solving a problem in geometric design: optimal location of supports. The prismatic continuous beam shown in Figure 12.16(a) is free at ends A and E, and simply supported at B, C and D. The beam has total span L and constant bending rigidity E I . It is loaded by a uniform distributed load q(x) = −w. Support C is at midspan whereas B and D are at distances L 1 = L 4 = 1 Lα from the left 2 and right free ends, respectively. Here 0 ≤ α < 1 is a design parameter to be determined as discussed later. Since the problem is symmetric about midspan C only one half of the structure, say AC, need to be discretized. The finite element model of this portion is shown in Figure 12.16(b). It has two beam elements and three nodes

;; ;;
12–13

0.4

α

0.5

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–14

placed at A, B and C, respectively. Element lengths depend on the design parameter α, which is carried along as a variable. The six degrees of freedom are collected in u = [ v1 θ1 v2 θ2 v3 θ3 ]T . The master stiffness equations are 6L − 24 0 0 α3 α2  L2  − 6L 0 0 2 α  α   ˆ  24 6L 24 1−3α α − 6L(1−2α) − 24 6L 4E I  − α 3 − α 2 3 3 α α ˆ α2 α2 ˆ α3 α2 ˆ ˆ  2 2 L 3  6L 6L(1−2α) L 2L 6L L 2 − 2  2 α − α2 α2 αα ˆ α ˆ ˆ α ˆ  α  24 6L 24 − 6L  0 0 − 3 − 2  α ˆ α ˆ α3 ˆ α2 ˆ 6L L2 6L 2L 2 0 0 − 2 α ˆ α ˆ α2 ˆ α ˆ α3 6L α2 6L α2 2L 2 α

 24

       −α  v1 0   −Lα 2   0  θ     1  12   v  wL  −1   f r       2   L(2α−1)  +  2    = 4    0    θ2  12        v3  −α   f 3r  ˆ   θ3 mr L α2 ˆ 3  12

(12.27) in which α = 1 − α. Note that reaction forces are carefully segregated in (12.27) to simplify application of ˆ the general recovery technique discussed in §3.4.3. The support BCs are v2 = v3 = θ3 = 0, where the latter comes from the symmetry condition at C. Removing those freedoms provides the reduced stiffness equations

 24 6L 6L      −α α3 α2 α2 v1   4E I  6L 2L 2 L 2  wL  −Lα 2   α2 α  . α   θ1  = 12 4 L3   2 2 L(2α−1) θ2 6L L 2L
α2 α αα ˆ 12 Solving yields v1 = − wL 4 α (1 + α)3 − 2 , 768 E I θ1 = wL 3 (1 + α)3 − 2 , 384 E I θ2 =

(12.28)

wL 3 α (1 − 2α − 5α 2 ). (12.29) ˆ 384 E I

The complete solution is u = [ v1 θ1 0 θ2 0 0 ]T . Inserting into (12.27) and solving for reactions gives fr 2 = wL 3 + 2α + α 2 , 16 α ˆ fr 3 = wL 5 − 10α − α 2 , 16 α ˆ mr 3 = − wL 2 (1 − 2α − α 2 ). 32 (12.30)

whence the support reactions follow as R B = fr 2 and RC = 2 fr 3 . It remains to find the best α. Of course “best” depends on the optimality criterion. Four choices are examined below. ¯ Minimum External Energy. The external energy at equilibrium is W (α) = fT u = w 2 L 5 W (α)/(18432 E I ), ¯ (α) = 1 − 5α − 2α 2 + 26α 3 + 5α 4 + 3α 5 . Minimizing W with respect to α may be interpreted in which W ¯ as finding the stiffest structure (in the energy sense) under the given load vector f. A plot of W (α) over 1 0 ≤ α ≤ 2 clearly displays a minimum at α ≈ 0.27 as shown in Figure 12.16(c). Solving the quartic equation ¯ d W /dα = 0 gives one positive real root in the range α ∈ [0, 1), which to 5 places is αbest = 0.26817. Equal Reactions. A second choice is to require that supports at B and C take the same load: R B = RC (note that, because of symmetry, R D = R B ). Setting fr 2 = 2 fr 3 with their expressions taken from (12.30), yields √ 3 + 2α + α 2 = 10 − 20α − 2α 2 , or 7 − 22α − 3α 2 = 0. This quadratic has the roots α = 1 (−11 ± 142). 3 The positive real root αbest = 0.30546 makes R B = RC = R D = wL/3, as may be expected. Minimum Relative Deflection. Consider two sections located at xi and x j , in which {xi , x j } ∈ [0, 1 L], with 2 lateral displacements vi = v(xi ) and v j = v(x j ), respectively. The maximum relative deflection is defined as v max (α) = max |v j − vi | for a fixed α. We seek the α ∈ [0, 1) that minimizes v max (α). The computations are ji ji far more complex than for the previous two criteria and are the subject of Exercise 12.11. Result: the best α

12–14

12–15

§12.

References

is the positive real root of 4 + 11α − 81α 2 − 49α 3 − 47α 4 = 0, which to 5 places is αbest = 0.26681. If this value is adopted, the relative deflection does not exceed vimax < wL 4 /(67674E I ). j Minimum Absolute Moment. Let M(x, α) denote the bending moment function recovered from the FEM solution for a fixed α. The maximum absolute moment is M max (α) = max |M(x, α)| for x ∈ [0, 1 L]. We 2 seek an α ∈ [0, 1) that minimizes it. This is the topic of Exercise 12.12. This problem is less well posed than the previous one because M(x, α) varies linearly over each element, is nonzero at node 1 and discontinous at node 2. On the other hand, the exact bending moment varies parabolically, is zero at node 1 and continuous at node 2. Result: using the FEM-recovered M(x, α) and taking the average M at node 2, one finds that the best α is the positive root of 2 − 4α − 15α 2 = 0, or αbest = 0.25540, for which M max < wL 2 /589. The optimal solution using the exact moment distribution, however, is quite different. This is an intrinsic weakness of displacement-based FEM since internal forces are obtained by differentiation, which boosts errors. To get a better result a finer mesh would be needed. In summary, the optimal α from the foregoing criteria varies between 0.255 to 0.306. As a reasonable compromise an engineer could pick αbest ≈ 0.28. Notes and Bibliography The Bernoulli-Euler (BE) beam model synthesizes pioneer work by Jacob and Daniel Bernoulli as well as that of Leonhard Euler in the XVIII Century. Although the model was first enunciated by 1750, it was not applied in structural design and analysis until the second half of the XIX Century. While Galileo Galilei is credited with first attempts at a theory, recent studies [14] argue that Leonardo da Vinci made crucial observations a century before Galileo. However, da Vinci lacked Hooke’s law and calculus to complete the theory. A comprehensive source of stiffness and mass matrices of plane and spatial beams is the book by Przemieniecki [205]. The derivation of stiffness matrices is carried out there using differential equilibrium equations rather than energy methods. This was in fact the common practice before 1962, as influenced by the use of transfer matrix methods [194] on the limited memory computers of the time. Results for prismatic elements, however, are identical. Energy derivations were popularized by Archer [11,12], Martin [170] and Melosh [178,179]. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

12–15

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–16

Homework Exercises for Chapter 12 Variational Formulation of Plane Beam Element
EXERCISE 12.1 [A/C:20] Use (12.17) to derive the element stiffness matrix Ke of a Hermitian beam element

of variable bending rigidity given by the inertia law I (x) = I1 (1 − x ) + I2 x = I1 1 (1 − ξ ) + I2 1 (1 + ξ ). 2 2 (E12.1)

Use of Mathematica or similar CAS tool is recommended since the integrals are time consuming and error prone. Mathematica hint: write EI = EI1*(1-ξ )/2 + EI2*(1+ξ )/2; (E12.2)

and keep EI inside the argument of Integrate. Check whether you get back (12.20) if EI=EI1=EI2. If you use Mathematica, this check can be simply done after you got and printed the tapered beam Ke, by writing ClearAll[EI]; Ke=Simplify[ Ke/.{EI1->EI,EI2->EI}]; and printing this matrix.4
EXERCISE 12.2 [A/C:20] Use (12.18) to derive the consistent node force vector fe for a Hermitian beam

element under linearly varying transverse load q defined by q(x) = q1 (1 − x ) + q2 x = q1 1 (1 − ξ ) + q2 1 (1 + ξ ). 2 2 (E12.3)

Again use of a CAS is recommended, particularly since the polynomials to be integrated are quartic in ξ , and hand computations are error prone. Mathematica hint: write q = q1*(1-ξ )/2 + q2*(1+ξ )/2; (E12.4)

and keep q inside the argument of Integrate. Check whether you get back (12.21) if q1 = q2 = q (See previous Exercise for Mathematica procedural hints).
EXERCISE 12.3 [A:20] Obtain the consistent node force vector fe of a Hermitian beam element subject to

a transverse point load P at abscissa x = a where 0 ≤ a ≤ . Use the Dirac’s delta function expression q(x) = P δ(a) and the fact that for any continuous function f (x), 0 f (x) δ(a) d x = f (a) if 0 ≤ a ≤ . Check the special cases a = 0 and a = .
EXERCISE 12.4 [A:25] Derive the consistent node force vector fe of a Hermitian beam element subject to a

linearly varying z-moment m per unit length, positive CCW, defined by the law m(x) = m 1 (1 − ξ )/2 + m 2 (1 + ξ )/2. Use the fact that the external work per unit length is m(x)θ(x) = m(x) v (x) = (ue )T (dN/d x)T m(x). For arbitrary m(x) show that this gives f =
e 0

∂NT m dx = ∂x

1 −1

∂NT 2 m ∂ξ

1 1 2

dξ =
−1

T Nξ m dξ,

(E12.5)

T where Nξ denote the column vectors of beam shape function derivatives with respect to ξ . Can you see a shortcut that avoids the integral altogether if m is constant?

EXERCISE 12.5 [A:20] Obtain the consistent node force vector fe of a Hermitian beam element subject to

a concentrated moment (“point moment”, positive CCW) C applied at x = a. Use the expression (E12.5) in which m(x) = C δ(a), where δ(a) denotes the Dirac’s delta function at x = a. Check the special cases a = 0, a = and a = /2.
4

ClearAll[EI] discards the previous definition (E12.2) of EI; the same effect can be achieved by writing EI=. (dot).

12–16

12–17
EXERCISE 12.6 [A/C:25] Consider the one-dimensional Gauss integration rules.5
1

Exercises

One point :
−1 1

. f (ξ ) dξ = 2 f (0).

(E12.6)

Two points:
−1 1

√ √ . f (ξ ) dξ = f (−1/ 3) + f (1/ 3).

(E12.7) (E12.8)

Three points:
−1

5 8 . 5 f (ξ ) dξ = f (− 3/5) + f (0) + f ( 3/5). 9 9 9

Try each rule on the monomial integrals
1 1 1

dξ,
−1 −1

ξ dξ,
−1

ξ 2 dξ, . . .

(E12.9)

until the rule fails. In this way verify that rules (E12.6), (E12.7) and (E12.8) are exact for polynomials of degree up to 1, 3 and 5, respectively. (Labor-saving hint: for odd monomial degree no computations need to be done; why?).
EXERCISE 12.7 [A/C:25] Repeat the derivation of Exercise 12.1 using the two-point Gauss rule (E12.7) to

evaluate integrals in ξ . A CAS is recommended. If using Mathematica you may use a function definition to 1 save typing. For example to evaluate −1 f (ξ ) dξ in which f (ξ ) = 6ξ 4 − 3ξ 2 + 7, by the 3-point Gauss rule (E12.8), say f[ξ ]:=6ξ ^4-3ξ ^2+7; int=Simplify[(5/9)*(f[-Sqrt[3/5]]+f[Sqrt[3/5]])+(8/9)*f[0]]; and print int. To form an element by Gauss integration define matrix functions in terms of ξ , for example Be[ξ ], or use the substitution operator /., whatever you prefer. Check whether one obtains the same answers as with analytical integration, and explain why there is agreement or disagreement. Hint for the explanation: consider the order of the ξ polynomials you are integrating over the element.
EXERCISE 12.8 [A/C:25] As above but for Exercise 12.2. EXERCISE 12.9 [A/C:30] Derive the Bernoulli-Euler beam stiffness matrix (12.20) using the method of

differential equations. To do this integrate the homogeneous differential equation E I v = 0 four times over a cantilever beam clamped at node 1 over x ∈ [0, ] to get v(x). The process yields four constants of integration C1 through C4 , which are determined by matching the two zero-displacement BCs at node 1 and the two force BCs at node 2. This provides a 2 × 2 flexibility matrix relating forces and displacements at node j. Invert to get a deformational stiffness, and expand to 4 × 4 by letting node 1 translate and rotate.
EXERCISE 12.10 [C:20] Using Mathematica, repeat Example 12.2 but using EbE lumping of the distributed force q. (It is sufficient to set the nodal moments on the RHS of (12.26) to zero.) Is v2 the same as the exact exact as function of α, and draw conclusions. analytical solution? If not, study the ratio v2 /v2 EXERCISE 12.11 [C:25] For the continuous beam of Example 12.3, verify the results given there for the optimal α that minimizes the maximum relative deflection. Plot the deflection profile when α = αbest . EXERCISE 12.12 [C:25] For the continuous beam of Example 12.3, verify the results given there for the optimal α that minimizes the absolute bending moment. Plot the moment diagram when α = αbest .
5

Gauss integration is studied further in Chapter 17.

12–17

Introduction to FEM

Variational Formulation of Plane Beam Element

12

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

A Beam is a Structural Member Designed to Resist Primarily Transverse Loads

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Transverse Loads are Transported to Supports by Flexural Action

Neutral surface

Compressive stress

Tensile stress

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Beam Configuration
Spatial (General Beams) Plane (This Chapter)

Beam Models
Bernoulli-Euler Timoshenko (more advanced topic: described in Chapter 13 but not covered in course)

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Plane Beam Terminology

y, v q(x) x, u Neutral surface y, v Beam cross section Neutral axis Symmetry plane

z

L

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Common Support Conditions

;;;;;; ;;;;;; ;;;;;;

Simply Supported

Cantilever

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Basic Relations for Bernoulli-Euler Model of Plane Beam
u(x, y ) v(x, y ) −y ∂v(x) ∂x = v(x) = −y v v(x) = −y θ v(x)

∂ 2v ∂u d 2v = −y 2 = −y 2 = −y κ e= ∂x ∂x dx d 2v σ = Ee = −E y 2 = −Ey κ dx

M=EIκ
Plus equilibrium equation M'' = q (replaced by MPE principle in FEM)

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Kinematics of Bernoulli-Euler Beam
Cross section

P'(x+u,y+v) y, v

θ=dv/dx = v' v(x,y)=v(x,0)
y x P(x,y)

x, u

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Tonti Diagram for Bernoulli-Euler Model of Plane Beam (Strong Form)

Prescribed end displacements

Displacement BCs

Transverse displacements

Distributed transverse load

v(x) κ = v'' M = EI κ
Constitutive

q(x)

Kinematic

M''=q Equilibrium

Curvature

κ(x)

Bending moment

Force BCs

M(x)

Prescribed end loads

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Total Potential Energy of Beam Member
=U−W
Internal External

U=
=

1 2

σx x ex x d V =
V L

L 1 2 0

Mκ d x =

L 1 2

EI
0

∂ 2v ∂x2

2

dx

1 2

E I κ2 dx

Internal energy due to bending

0

W=
0

L

qv d x

External energy due to transverse load q

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Degrees of Freedom of Plane Beam Element

θ2 v2 v1 1
v  θ ue =  1    v2 θ2
1

θ1

2

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Physical Interpretation of C1 Continuity
(deflections grossly exaggerated for visibility) interpenetration (a) (b) gap

v(x)

v(x)

Piecewise cubic interpolation provides required C1 continuity

Piecewise linear interpolation gives unacceptable C 0 continuity

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Bernoulli-Euler Kinematics of Plane Beam Element
P'(x+u,y+v) y, v

θ2 v2

θ1

v1 1

E, I

2
x

x, u

P(x,y)

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Shape Functions in Terms of Natural Coordinate ξ
e e e v e = [ Nv1 Nθ1 Nv2

 v1 e θ  Nθ2 ]  1  = N ue v2 θ2 ξ=
e Nv2(ξ) = 1 4

Introduce the natural (isoparametric) coordinate
e Nv1(ξ) = 1 (1 − ξ) (2 + ξ) 4 2 e Nθ1(ξ) = 1 8

2x

−1
2

(1 + ξ) (2 − ξ)
2

(1 − ξ)2 (1 + ξ)

e Nθ2(ξ) = − 1 (1 + ξ) (1 − ξ) 8

Plots on next slide

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Beam Element Shape Function Plots
v1 = 1
e Nv1(ξ)

e Nv1(ξ) =

1 4

(1 − ξ) (2 + ξ)
2

θ1 = 1
e Nθ1(ξ)

e Nθ1(ξ) =
e Nv2(ξ)

1 8

(1 − ξ)2 (1 + ξ) (1 + ξ) (2 − ξ)
2 2

v2 = 1 θ2 = 1

e Nv2(ξ) =

1 4

ξ = −1

e Nθ2(ξ)

e Nθ2(ξ) = − 1 (1 + ξ) (1 − ξ) 8

ξ=1

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Getting Curvatures from the Displacement Interpolation
0

d 2 v(x) d 2 N e d 2 ue κ= = u +N 2 2 2 dx dx dx e e e e d 2 Nv1 d 2 Nθ1 d 2 Nv2 d 2 Nθ2 = dx2 dx2 dx2 dx2

v1 θ1 v2 θ2

d 2 N ue = dx2
def

= B ue

B is the 1 x 4 curvature-displacement matrix constructed in next slide

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Curvatures from Displacements (Cont'd)
To construct B, apply the chain rule
d f (x) d f (ξ) dξ 2 d f(ξ) = = dx dξ dx dξ 0 d 2f (x) d (2/ ) d f (ξ) 2 d = + dx 2 dx dξ dx

d f (ξ) 4 d 2 f(ξ) = 2 dξ dξ

to differentiate the shape functions. Result is

B=

1

6

ξ

3ξ − 1 −6 ξ

3ξ + 1

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Element Stiffness and Consistent Node Forces
Varying the element TPE
e

=

1 2

ue

T

K ue − ue

e

T

fe

we get
1

K

e

=
0

E I BT B d x =

E I BT B
−1

1 2

fe =
0

NT q d x =

1

NT q
−1

1 2

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Analytical Computation of Prismatic Beam Element Stiffness
("prismatic" means constant EI)

 K
e

36ξ 2

EI = 3 2

   −1 
1

6ξ(3ξ − 1)` (3ξ − 1) 2
2

−36ξ 2 −6ξ(3ξ − 1) 36ξ 2

   dξ −6ξ(3ξ + 1)  (9ξ 2 − 1) (3ξ + 1) 2
2 2

6ξ(3ξ + 1)

symm  12 EI  = 3  symm 6 4 2 −12 −6 12

6  2 2   −6 4 2

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Mathematica Script for Symbolic Computation of Prismatic Plane Beam Element Stiffness
ClearAll[EI,l,Ξ]; B={{6*Ξ,(3*Ξ-1)*l,-6*Ξ,(3*Ξ+1)*l}}/l^2; Ke=(EI*l/2)*Integrate[Transpose[B].B,{Ξ,-1,1}]; Ke=Simplify[Ke]; Print["Ke for prismatic beam:"]; Print[Ke//MatrixForm];
Ke for prismatic beam:
 EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l  EI l

Corroborates the result from hand integration.

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 20

Introduction to FEM

Analytical Computation of Consistent Node Force Vector for Uniform Load q
 1 ( 1 − ξ) 2 (2 + ξ ) 4 1  1 ( − ξ) 2 ( 1 + ξ )   dξ  8 1   1  4 ( 1 + ξ) 2( 2 − ξ )  −1 − 1 ( 1 + ξ) 2 ( 1 − ξ ) 8      

f =
e

1 1 q 2 −1

N dξ = 1 q 2  =q

1 2  1  12  1  2 1 − 12

"fixed end moments"

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 21

Introduction to FEM

Mathematica Script for Computation of Consistent Node Force Vector for Uniform q
ClearAll[q,l,Ξ] Ne={{2*(1-Ξ)^2*(2+Ξ), (1-Ξ)^2*(1+Ξ)*l, 2*(1+Ξ)^2*(2-Ξ),-(1+Ξ)^2*(1-Ξ)*l}}/8; fe=(q*l/2)*Integrate[Ne,{Ξ,-1,1}]; fe=Simplify[fe]; Print["fe^T for uniform load q:"]; Print[fe//MatrixForm];
fe^T for uniform load q:
lq  l q  lq  l q 

Force vector printed as row vector to save space.

IFEM Ch 12 – Slide 22

12–15

Solutions to Exercises

Homework Exercises for Chapter 12 - Variational Formulation of Plane Beam Element Solutions
EXERCISE 12.1 A Mathematica script for fe by analytical integration is shown in Figure E12.1.

ClearAll[EI,EIi,EIj,Le,ξ , ]; Le= ; Be={{6*ξ ,(3*ξ -1)*Le,-6*ξ ,(3*ξ +1)*Le}}; EI=EI1*(1-ξ )/2+EI2*(1+ξ )/2; Ke=1/(2*Le^3)*Integrate[EI*Transpose[Be].Be,{ξ ,-1,1}]; Ke=Simplify[Ke]; Print["Ke for variable xsec beam:\n", Ke//MatrixForm]; ClearAll[EI]; Ke=Simplify[Ke/.{EI2->EI,EI2->EI}]; Print["Ke for EI1=EI2=EI is ", Ke//MatrixForm];
Ke for variable xsec beam: 6 EI1 EI2 2 2 EI1 EI2
3 2

6 EI1 EI2
3

2 EI1 2 EI2
2

2 2 EI1 EI2
2

3 EI1 EI2 2 2 EI1 EI2
2

2 2 EI1 EI2
2

EI1 EI2 2 EI1 2 EI2
2

6 EI1 EI2
3

6 EI1 EI2
3

2 EI1 2 EI2
2

EI1 EI2

2 EI1 2 EI2
2

EI1 3 EI2

Figure E12.1. Script to solve Exercise 12.1

Transcribing the result:


Ke = 1 
3

6(E I1 + E I2 )


symm

2(2E I1 + E I2 ) (3E I1 + E I2 ) 2

−6(E I1 + E I2 ) −2(2E I1 + E I2 ) 6(E I1 + E I2 )

2(E I1 + E I2 ) (E I1 + E I2 ) 2  . −2(2E I1 + 2E I2 )  (E I1 + 2E I2 ) 2

(E12.10)

The print output of the check E I1 = E I2 = E I is omitted to save space, but it reproduces the matrix (12.20).
EXERCISE 12.2 A Mathematica script for fe by analytical integration is shown in Figure E12.2.

ClearAll[q,q1,q2,ξ , ]; Le= ; Ne={2*(1-ξ )^2*(2+ξ ), (1-ξ )^2*(1+ξ )*Le, 2*(1+ξ )^2*(2-ξ ),-(1+ξ )^2*(1-ξ )*Le}/8; q=q1*(1-ξ )/2+q2*(1+ξ )/2; fe=Simplify[ (Le/2)*Integrate[q*Ne,{ξ ,-1,1}] ]; Print["fe^T for lin varying load q:\n",fe]; ClearAll[q]; fe=Simplify[fe/.{q1->q,q2->q}]; Print["check for q1=q2=q: ",fe]; γ fe^T for lin varying load q: 1 1 1 1 { 20 (7 q1 + 3 q2) (3 q1 + 2 q2) 2 20 (3 q1 + 7 q2) − 60 (2 q1 + 3 q2) 60
Figure E12.2. Script to solve Exercise 12.2

2

}

12–15

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–16

Transcribing the result: fe = [ 3(7q1 + 3q2 ) (3q1 + 2q2 ) 3(3q1 + 7q2 ) (2q1 + 3q2 ) ]T . (E12.11)

60

The output of the check qi = q j = q is omitted to save space, but it does reproduce (12.21).
EXERCISE 12.3 Following the hint, the shape function matrix is evaluated at x = a, or ξ = 2a/ − 1:

fe = P NT

ξ →2a/ −1

=

P
2

(a − )2 (2a + )

a(a − )2

a 2 (2a − 3 )

a 2 (a − )

T

.

(E12.12)

If a = 0 and a = the force vector reduces to [ P 0 0 0 ]T and [ 0 0 P 0 ]T , respectively, as expected.
EXERCISE 12.4 Figure E12.3 shows a Mathematica script that implements (E12.5) for a linearly varying

distributed moment m.
ClearAll[m,Le,ξ , ]; Le= ; Ne={2*(1- ξ )^2*(2+ξ ), (1-ξ )^2*(1+ξ )*Le, 2*(1+ ξ )^2*(2-ξ ),-(1+ξ )^2*(1-ξ )*Le}/8; m=m1*(1-ξ )/2+m2*(1+ξ )/2; fe=Integrate[m*D[Ne, ξ ],{ξ ,-1,1}]; fe=Simplify[fe]; Print["fe: ", fe]; fe: { − 1 (m1 + m2) 2
1 12

(m1 − m2)

1 2

(m1 + m2)

1 (m1 12

− m2)

}

Figure E12.3. Script to solve Exercise 12.4

This gives 1 (E12.13) [ −6(m 1 + m 2 ) (m 1 − m 2 ) 6(m 1 + m 2 ) (m 1 − m 2 ) ]T . 12 There is a shortcut for uniform m; that is, m 1 = m 2 = m. Moving m out of the integral (E12.5) gives fe =
1

fe = m
−1

T Nξ dξ = m NT

ξ =1 ξ =−1

= m [ −1

0

1

0 ]T .

(E12.14)

EXERCISE 12.5 Replacing m(x) = C δ(a) in the integral (E12.5) reduces it to

fe = C

dNT dx

=
x→a

2C dNT dξ

=
ξ →2a/ −1

C
2

6a(a − )

( − 3a)( − a)

6a( − a)

a(3a − 2 )
1 2

T

.

If a = 0 and a = , fe reduces to [ 0 C 0 0 ]T and [ 0 0 0 C ]T , respectively, as expected. If a = C [ −3/(2 ) −1/4 3/(2 ) −1/4 ]T , which is not that obvious.

(E12.15) we get

EXERCISE 12.6 The results of this exercise are collected on Table 12.1. The rules with 1, 2 and 3 points fail for monomial degrees 2, 4 and 6, respectively, and are exact for degrees up to one less. The property is extendible to any rule order: a Gauss rule with p points integrates exactly polynomials of degree 2 p − 1 or less, as proven in texts on numerical analysis. Note that since the rules are symmetric about x = 0 they are exact for any odd function about x = 0 because the integral of any such function from −1 to 1 is zero. Consequently odd-degree monomials, such as ξ or ξ 3 , are integrated exactly by all rules.

12–16

12–17
Table 12.1. Results From Exercise 12.6 Monomial degree 1 2 3 4 5 6
2 3

Solutions to Exercises

0 Exact One-point rule (E12.6) Two-point rule (E12.7) Three-point rule (E12.8)

2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0

0 0 0

2 5 2 9 2 5

0

2 7

0
2 3 2 3

0

6 25

EXERCISE 12.7 A Mathematica script to compute Ke by two-point Gauss rule is shown in Figure E12.4.

This result reproduces exactly (E12.10) because the polynomials being integrated for linearly varying E I are cubic in ξ (B, BT and E I are linear in ξ ). From Exercise 12.6, the 2-point Gauss rule integrates exactly polynomials of order up to and including 3.
ClearAll[EI,EI1,EI2,ξ , ]; Le= ; Be={{6*ξ ,(3*ξ -1)*Le,-6*ξ ,(3*ξ +1)*Le}}; EI=EI1*(1-ξ )/2+EI2*(1+ξ )/2; Ke1=(1/(2*Le^3))*(EI*Transpose[Be].Be)/.ξ -> Sqrt[3]/3; Ke2=(1/(2*Le^3))*(EI*Transpose[Be].Be)/.ξ ->-Sqrt[3]/3; Ke=Simplify[Ke1+Ke2]; Print["2-Gauss-pt Ke for var xsec beam:\n ",Ke//MatrixForm]; 2-Gauss-pt Ke for var xsec beam:
6 EI1 EI2
3

2 2 EI1 EI2
2

6 EI1 EI2
3

2 EI1 2 EI2
2

2 2 EI1 EI2
2

3 EI1 EI2 2 2 EI1 EI2
2

2 2 EI1 EI2
2

EI1 EI2 2 EI1 2 EI2
2

6 EI1 EI2
3

6 EI1 EI2
3

2 EI1 2 EI2
2

EI1 EI2

2 EI1 2 EI2
2

EI1 3 EI2

Figure E12.4. Script to solve Exercise 12.7

EXERCISE 12.8 A Mathematica script to compute Ke by two-point Gauss rule is shown in Figure E12.5.

ClearAll[q,q1,q2,ξ , ]; Le= ; Ne={2*(1-ξ )^2*(2+ξ ), (1-ξ )^2*(1+ξ )*Le, 2*(1+ξ )^2*(2-ξ ),-(1+ξ )^2*(1-ξ )*Le}/8; q=q1*(1-ξ )/2+q2*(1+ξ )/2; fe1=(Le/2)*(Ne*q)/.ξ -> Sqrt[3]/3; fe2=(Le/2)*(Ne*q)/.ξ ->-Sqrt[3]/3; fe=Simplify[fe1+fe2]; Print["2-Gauss-pt fe^T for var load q:\n ",fe]; 2-pt Gauss for var load q: 1 1 { 36 (13 q1 + 5 q2) (2 q1 + q2) 36

2

1 36

(5 q1 + 13 q2)

1 − 36 (q1 + 2 q2)

2

}

Figure E12.5. Script to solve Exercise 12.8

This result is different from (E12.11) because the polynomials being integrated for linearly varying q are quartic in ξ , and the 2-point Gauss rule is not exact for that order. But for uniform q the results would be the same.

12–17

Chapter 12: VARIATIONAL FORMULATION OF PLANE BEAM ELEMENT

12–18

EXERCISE 12.9 The derivation is presented in Przemieniecki [140], §5.6.

r = 4(1 − 4α 2 )/(5 − 4α 2 ). For α = 0 the ratio is 4/5 and the FEM result is 20% in error. As α grows the error increases, for example if α = 1/4, r = 12/19 = 0.6317 and the error is over 36%.

EXERCISE 12.10 The FEM result is v2 = q L 4 (1 − 4α 2 )2 /(96E I ). The ratio to the exact solution is

12–18

.

Advanced One-Dimensional Elements

13

13–1

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§13.1. Introduction §13.2. Generalized Interpolation §13.2.1. Legendre Polynomials . . . . . . . . . . . §13.2.2. Generalized Stiffnesses . . . . . . . . . . . §13.2.3. Transforming to Physical Freedoms: BE Model . . . §13.2.4. Transforming to Physical Freedoms: Shear-Flexible Model §13.2.5. Hinged Plane Beam Element . . . . . . . . . §13.2.6. Timoshenko Plane Beam Element . . . . . . . . §13.2.7. Shear-Curvature Recovery . . . . . . . . . . §13.2.8. Beam on Elastic Supports . . . . . . . . . . . §13.3. Interpolation with Homogeneous ODE Solutions §13.3.1. Exact Winkler/BE-Beam Stiffness . . . . . . . §13.4. Equilibrium Theorems §13.4.1. Self-Equilibrated Force System . . . . . . . . . §13.4.2. Handling Applied Forces . . . . . . . . . . §13.4.3. Flexibility Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . §13.4.4. Rigid Motion Injection . . . . . . . . . . . §13.4.5. Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §13.5. Flexibility Based Derivations §13.5.1. Timoshenko Plane Beam-Column . . . . . . . §13.5.2. Plane Circular Arch in Local System . . . . . . . §13.5.3. Plane Circular Arch in Global System . . . . . . §13.6. *Accuracy Analysis §13.6.1. *Accuracy of Bernoulli-Euler Beam Element . . . . §13.6.2. *Accuracy of Timoshenko Beam Element . . . . . §13. Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §13. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §13. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13–3 13–3 13–3 13–4 13–4 13–5 13–5 13–6 13–7 13–9 13–11 13–11 13–16 13–16 13–16 13–17 13–19 13–19 13–20 13–20 13–22 13–25 13–26 13–26 13–29 13–29 13–30 13–31

13–2

13–3
§13.1.

§13.2 GENERALIZED INTERPOLATION

Introduction

This Chapter develops special one-dimensional elements, such as thick beams, arches and beams on elastic foundations, that require mathematical and modeling resources beyond those presented in Chapters 11–12. The techniques used are less elementary,1 and may be found in books on Advanced Mechanics of Materials, e.g. [31,34]. Readers are expected to be familiar with ordinary differential equations and energy methods. The Chapter concludes with beam accuracy analysis based on the modified equation method. All of this Chapter material would be normally bypassed in an introductory finite element course. It is primarily provided for offerings at an intermediate level, for example a first graduate FEM course in Civil Engineering. Such courses may skip most of Part I as being undergraduate material. §13.2.

Generalized Interpolation

For derivation of special and C 0 beam elements it is convenient to use a transverse-displacement cubic interpolation in which the nodal freedoms v1 , v2 , θ1 and θ2 are replaced by generalized coordinates c1 to c4 : v(ξ ) = Nc1 c1 + Nc2 c2 + Nc3 c3 + Nc4 c4 = Nc c. (13.1)

Here Nci (ξ ) are generalized shape functions that satisfy the completeness requirement discussed in Chapter 19. Nc is a 1×4 matrix whereas c is a column 4-vector. Formula (13.1) is a generalized interpolation. It includes the Hermite interpolation (12.10–12.12) as an instance when c1 = v1 , c2 = v1 , c3 = v2 and c4 = v2 . §13.2.1. Legendre Polynomials An obvious generalized interpolation is the ordinary cubic polynomial v(ξ ) = c1 + c2 ξ + c3 ξ 2 + c4 ξ 3 , but this turns out not to be particularly useful. A more seminal expression is v(ξ ) = L 1 c1 + L 2 c2 + L 3 c3 + L 4 c4 = L c, where the L i are the first four Legendre polynomials L 1 (ξ ) = 1, L 2 (ξ ) = ξ, L 3 (ξ ) = 1 (3ξ 2 − 1), 2 L 4 (ξ ) = 1 (5ξ 3 − 3ξ ). 2 (13.3) (13.2)

Here c1 through c4 have dimension of length. Functions (13.3) and their first two ξ -derivatives are plotted in Figure 13.1. Unlike the shape functions (12.12), the L i have a clear physical meaning: L 1 Translational rigid body mode. L 2 Rotational rigid body mode. L 3 Constant-curvature deformation mode, symmetric with respect to ξ = 0. L 4 Linear-curvature deformation mode, antisymmetric with respect to ξ = 0. These properties are also shared by the standard polynomial c1 + c2 ξ + c3 ξ 2 + c4 ξ 3 . What distinguishes the set (13.3) are the orthogonality properties Q0 =
0

LT L d x = diag [ 1 1/3 1/5 1/7 ] , (L )T L d x =
0

Q2 =
0

(L )T L d x = (.) ≡

48
3

diag [ 0 0 3 25 ] ,

Q3 =

14400
5

diag [ 0 0 0 1 ] ,

in which

(13.4) Qn is called the covariance matrix for the n th derivative of the Legendre polynomial interpolation. The first-derivative covariance Q1 = 0 (L )T L d x is not diagonal, but this matrix is not used here.
1

d(.) . dx

They do not reach, however, the capstone level of Advanced Finite Element Methods.

13–3

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–4
15

1

L3
−1

L4
−0.5

L1 L2
0.5 1 −1 −0.5

6

0.5

dL4 /dξ dL3 /dξ 4 dL 2 /dξ
2 0.5 −2 1

d 2L3 /dξ 2
−1 −0.5

10 5 −5 −10 −15

d 2L4 /dξ 2

0.5

1

−0.5 −1

dL1 /dξ

d 2L1 /dξ2 and d 2 2 /dξ2 L

Figure 13.1. The Legendre polynomials and their first two ξ -derivatives shown over ξ ∈[−1, 1]. Those interpretable as beam rigid body modes (L 1 and L 2 ) in black; deformational modes (L 3 and L 4 ) in color.
Remark 13.1. The notation (13.2)–(13.3) is FEM oriented. L 1 through L 4 are called P0 through P3 in the mathematical

literature; e.g. Chapter 22 of the handbook [1]. The general definition for n = 0, 1 . . . is
n

L n+1 (ξ ) ≡ Pn (ξ ) =
k=0

n k

−n−1 k

1−ξ 2

k

=

1 2n

n

(13.5) where n is the binomial coefficient. Legendre polynomials are normalized by Pn (1) = 1, Pn (−1) = (−1)n . They can k also be indirectly defined by generating functions such as

k=0

n k

2

(ξ −1)n−k (ξ +1)k =

1 2n

n/2

k=0

n k

2n−2k n−2k ξ . n

Pn (ξ ) z =
n k=0

1 1 − 2ξ z + z 2

,

or alternatively
k=0

1 Pn (ξ ) z n = e x z J0 (z n!

1 − ξ 2 ).

(13.6)

They can also be defined through a 3-term recurrence relation: (n + 2)Pn+2 (ξ ) − (2n + 3) Pn+1 (ξ ) + (n + 1) Pn (ξ ) = 0 started with P0 (ξ ) = 1 and P1 (ξ ) = ξ . One important application of these polynomials in numerical analysis is the construction of one-dimensional Gauss integration rules: the abscissas of the n-point rule are the zeros of L n+1 (ξ ) = Pn (ξ ).

§13.2.2. Generalized Stiffnesses The beam stiffness matrix expressed in terms of the ci is called a generalized stiffness. Denote the beam bending and shear rigidities by R B and R S , respectively. Then Kc = KcB + KcS , where KcB comes from the bending energy and KcS from the shear energy. For the latter is its assumed that the mean shear distortion γ at a cross section is γ = ϒ 2 v , where ϒ is a dimensionless coefficient that depends on the mean-shear model used. Then KcB =
0

R B (L )T L d x,

KcS =
0

RS ϒ 2

4

(L )T L d x.

(13.7)

In the case of a Bernoulli-Euler (BE) beam, the shear contribution is dropped: Kc = KcB . Furthermore if the element is prismatic, R B = E I is constant. If so KcS = R B and KcB = E I Q2 , where Q2 is the second diagonal matrix in (13.4). With view to future use it is convenient to differentiate between symmetric and antisymmetric bending rigidities R Bs and R Ba , which are associated with the responses to modes L 3 and L 4 , respectively. Assuming R Bs and R Ba to be uniform along the element we get Kc = KcBs + KcBa , KcBs = 144R Bs
3

diag [ 0 0 1 0 ] ,

KcBa =

1200R Ba
3

diag [ 0 0 0 1 ] ,

(13.8)

If shear flexibility is accounted for, the contribution KcS of (13.7) is kept. Assuming R S to be constant over the element, Kc is split into 3 contributions (two bending and one shear): Kc = KcBs + KcBa + KcS , with KcS = R S ϒ 2
4

Q3 =

14400R S ϒ 2

diag [ 0 0 0 1 ] .

(13.9)

13–4

13–5

§13.2 GENERALIZED INTERPOLATION

§13.2.3. Transforming to Physical Freedoms: BE Model For a BE beam model, the generalized coordinates ci of (13.2) can be connected to the physical DOFs by

v1 1  θ1   0 v  = 1 2 θ2 0

−1 1 −1 c1 2/ −6/ 12/   c2  , 1 1 1   c3  c4 2/ 6/ 12/



c1 30 1  −36  c2  c  =  0 60 3 c4 6

5 30 −3 36 −5 0 3 −6

−5 v1 −3   θ1  . 5   v2  θ2 3



(13.10)

In compact form: ue = G B c and c = H B ue , with H B = G−1 . Here θ1 ≡ v1 and θ2 ≡ v2 , which reflects the B fundamental “plane sections remain plane” kinematic assumption of the BE model. The physical stiffness is 12Ra 1  6Ra HB = 3  −12Ra 6Ra

Ke = HT KcBs + KcBa B

6Ra (3Ra + Rs ) −6Ra (3Ra − Rs )

2

2

−12Ra −6Ra 12Ra −6Ra

6Ra (3Ra − Rs ) −6Ra (3Ra + Rs )

2

 .

(13.11)

2

If Rs = Ra = E I the well known stiffness matrix (12.20) is recovered, as can be expected. The additional freedom conferred by (13.11) is exhibited later in two unconventional applications. §13.2.4. Transforming to Physical Freedoms: Shear-Flexible Model A shear flexible beam has mean shear distortion γ = ϒ 2 v . If ϒ is constant and v(ξ ) interpolated by (13.2), v = 120 c4 / 3 . Thus γ = 120ϒc4 / is constant over the element. The end rotational freedoms become θ1 = v1 + γ and θ2 = v2 + γ . Using = 12ϒ to simplify the algebra, the transformations (13.10) change to v1  θ1     v2 5 3 θ2 1+ (13.12) In compact form, ue = G S c and c = G−1 ue = H S ue . Transforming Kc of (13.9) to physical freedoms yields S the stiffness used to construct the Timoshenko beam element in §13.2.6:

 1 v1  θ1   0 v =1  2 θ2 0

−1 1 −1 2 − 6 12+10 1 1 1 2 6 12+10



30 c1 c1 36+30  c2   c2  1  − 1+   ,   =   c3 c3 60  0 6 c4 c4 − 1+

5 3 − 1+ −5 3 1+

30 36+30 1+ 0 6 1+

−5 3 − 1+



Ke = HT Kc H S = S

R Bs

0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 −1 0

0 −1  12R Ba + R S 2 + 0 4 3 (1 + )2 1

2

4 2  −4 2

2
2

−2
2

−4 −2 4 −2

2
2

 

. (13.13) −2 
2

y
§13.2.5. Hinged Plane Beam Element The two-node prismatic plane BE beam element depicted in Figure 13.2 has a mechanical hinge at midspan (ξ = 0). The cross sections on both sides of the hinge can rotate respect to each other. The top figure also sketches a fabrication method sometimes used in short-span pedestrian bridges. Gaps on either side of the hinged section cuts are filled with a bituminous material that permits slow relative rotations. Both the curvature κ and the bending moment M must vanish at midspan. But in a element built via cubic interpolation of v(x), κ = v must vary linearly in both ξ and x.

z

y

hinge

x

1
/2 /2

2 x

Figure 13.2. Beam element with hinge located at midspan. The top figure sketches a hinge fabrication method.

13–5

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–6

Consequently the mean curvature, which is controlled by the Legendre function L 2 (shown in blue on Figure 13.1) must be zero. The kinematic constraint of zero mean curvature is enforced by setting the symmetric bending rigidity R Bs = 0 whereas the antisymmetric bending rigidity is the normal one: R Ba = E I . Plugging into (13.11) yields 4 3E I  2 Ke = 3  −4 2

2
2

−2
2

−4 −2 4 −2

2
2

 
3E I
3


[2 −2 ]

= −2 
2

2

 
. (13.14)

−2 

This matrix has rank one, as it can be expected from the last (dyadic) expression in (13.14). Ke has one nonzero eigenvalue: 6E I (4 + 2 )/ 3 , and three zero eigenvalues. The eigenvector associated with the nonzero eigenvalue pertains2 to the antisymmetric deformational mode L 3 . Matrix (13.14) can be derived by more sophisticated methods (e.g., mixed variational principles) but the present technique is the most expedient one.
Example 13.1.

y,v (a) 1 x (1) αL 1

EI constant

This example deals with the prismatic continuous beam shown in Figure 13.3(a). This has two spans with lengths αL and L, respectively, where α is a design parameter, and is subjected to uniform load q0 . The beam is free, simple supported and fixed at nodes 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There is a hinge at the center of the 2–3 span. Of interest is the design question: for which α > 0 is the tip deflection at end 1 zero? The beam is discretized with two elements: (1) and (2), going from 1 to 2 and 2 to 3, respectively, as shown in the figure. The stiffnesses for elements (1) and (2) are those of (12.20) and (13.14), respectively, whereas (12.21) is used to build the consistent node forces for both elements.

q0

;;
3

; ;
(b) 2
v1 θ1 θ2 = q0 L 2

2

hinge
L/2

(2) L

L/2

3 α = 0.362

Figure 13.3. Beam problem for Example 13.1. (a): beam problem, (b) deflection profile when α = 0.362. α Lα 2 /6 L(1 − α 2 )/6

Assembling and applying the support conditions v2 = v3 = θ3 = 0, provides the reduced stiffness equations EI L3 12/α 3 6L/α 2 6L/α 2 6L/α 2 4L 2 /α 2L 2 /α 6L/α 2 2L 2 /α 2 (4 + 3α)/α L . (13.15)

Solving for the node displacements gives v1 = q0 L 4 α(12α 2 + 9α 3 − 2)/(72E I ), θ1 = q0 L 3 (1 − 6α 2 − 6α 3 )/(36E I ) and θ2 = q0 L 3 (1 − 6α 2 )/(36E I ). The equation v1 = 0 is quartic in α and has four roots, which to 8 places are α1 = −1.17137898, α2 = −0.52399776, α3 = 0, and α4 = 0.3620434. Since the latter is the only positive root, the solution is α = 0.362. The deflection profile for this value is pictured in Figure 13.3(b).

§13.2.6. Timoshenko Plane Beam Element As observed in §12.2.2, the Timoshenko beam model [243] includes a first order correction for transverse shear flexibility. The key kinematic assumption changes to “plane sections remain plane but not necessarily normal to the deformed neutral surface.” This is illustrated in Figure 13.4(a) for a 2-node plane beam element. The cross section rotation θ differs from v by γ . Ignoring axial forces, the displacement field is analogous to that of the Bernoulli-Euler model (12.2) but with a shear correction: u(x, y) = −yθ,
2

v(x, y) = v(x),

with

θ=

∂v + γ = v + γ, ∂x

γ =

V . G As

(13.16)

Compare the vector in the last expression in (13.14) to the last row of H B in (13.10).

13–6

13–7

§13.2 GENERALIZED INTERPOLATION

(a) θ1 γ1
v' =|dv/dx|1 1

y, v
Deformed cross section

γ

θ2 γ2
v' =|dv/dx|2 2

(b) y M z V
Positive M, V conventions

(c) γ

v1
1

v(x)
2

v2 x, u

x

V(+)
A positive transverse shear force V produces a CCW rotation (+γ) of the beam cross section

Figure 13.4. Two-node Timoshenko plane beam element: (a) kinematics (when developed with cubic shape functions, γ1 = γ2 = γ ); (b) M and V sign conventions; (c) concurrence of sign conventions for V and γ .

Here V is the transverse shear force, γ the “shear rotation” (positive CCW) averaged over the cross section, G the shear modulus and As the effective shear area.3 The product R S = G As is the shear rigidity. . To correlate def with the notation of §13.2.4, note that V = E I v , γ = ϒ 2 v = V /(G As ), so ϒ = E I /(G As 2 ) and = 12ϒ = 12E I G As 2 (13.17)

This dimensionless ratio characterizes the “shear slenderness” of the beam element.4 It is not an intrinsic beam property because it involves the element length. As → 0 the Timoshenko model reduces to the BE model. Replacing R Bs = R Ba = E I and R S = G As = 12E I /( 2 ) into (13.13) yields the Timoshenko beam stiffness   12 6 −12 6 2 2 EI (4 + ) −6 (2 − )   6 Ke = 3 (13.18)  −12  −6 12 −6 (1 + ) 2 2 (2 − ) −6 (4 + ) 6 If = 0 this reduces to (12.20). The Mathematica module TimoshenkoBeamStiffness[Le,EI, ], listed in Figure 13.5, implements (13.18).
TimoshenkoBeamStiffness[Le_,EI_,Φ_]:=Module[{Ke}, Ke=EI/(Le*(1+Φ))*{{ 12/Le^2, 6/Le,-12/Le^2, 6/Le }, { 6/Le , 4+Φ, -6/Le , 2-Φ }, {-12/Le^2, -6/Le, 12/Le^2,-6/Le}, { 6/Le , 2-Φ, -6/Le , 4+Φ }}; Return[Ke]];

Figure 13.5. Module to produce stiffness matrix for Timoshenko beam element.

The calculation of the consistent node forces for uniform transverse load is covered in Exercise 13.2. A hinged Timoshenko beam is constructed in Exercise 13.3.
3

A concept defined in Mechanics of Materials; see e.g. Chapter 10 of Popov [201] or Chapter 12 of Timoshenko and Goodier [245]. As is calculated by equating the internal shear energy 1 V γ = 1 V 2 /(G As ) to that produced by the shear 2 2 stress distribution over the cross section. For a thin rectangular cross section and zero Poisson’s ratio, As = 5A/6. Note that in (13.8)–(13.9), 1200R Bs /
3

4

+ 14400 R S ϒ 2 / = 1200 E I (1 + )/ 3 , giving a simple interpretation for

.

13–7

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–8

EIzz and GA s constant along beam

y,v

P
x 1 L/2 L 2
2

P
3 (a) Finite element
discretization

Mz = PL 2

Figure 13.6. Example: cantilever beam discretized with two Timoshenko beam elements.

§13.2.7. Shear-Curvature Recovery When using the Timoshenko beam model, the following arises during postprocessing. Suppose that the element node displacement vector ue = ue is given following the solution process. Recover the mean shear T distorsion γ e and the curvature κ e over the element on the way to internal forces and stresses. The problem is not trivial because γ e is part of the rotational freedoms. The recovery process can be effectively done by passing first to generalized coordinates: ce = H S ue , and then to Bernoulli-Euler node displacements: e ue E = G B ce = G B H S ue = TBT ue , in which B T

;; ;;
1
def

L/2

Vy =−P

(b) Transverse shear force Vy (c) Bending moment Mz

+


T BT = −G B H S = I − 1+

 L1e 0
1 Le

0

0
1 2

0
1 Le

0
1 2 1 2

 
(13.19)

0
1 2

0
1 Le

0

Subtracting: uγ = ue − ue R = (I − G B H S )ue = [ 0 γ e 0 γ e ]T , Explicitly T B T γe = 1 e e e e (v − v2 ) + 1 (θ2 + θ1 ) 2 Le 1 (13.20)

The curvature is obtained from the Bernoulli-Euler vector: κ = Be ue E , where the curvature displacement B matrix Be is that given in the previous Chapter.
Example 13.2. Consider the prismatic cantilever beam of length L pictured in Figure 13.6(a). It is subject to two point

loads as shown. Shear flexibility is to be accounted for using the Timoshenko model. The bending and shear rigidities E Izz and G As are constant along the span. The objective is to find deflections, curvatures and shear distortions and associated bending moments and shear forces. It is sufficient to discretize the beam with two Timoshenko beam elements oflength L/2 as shown in the figure. The stiffness matrices for both elements are given by (13.18), in which L e = L/2 and = 12 E Izz /(G As (L/2)2 ) = 48 E Izz /(G As L 2 ). The master stiffness equations are 48 12L  2E Izz  −48  L 3 (1+ )  12L 0 0

12L ) −12L L 2 (2− ) 0 0 L 2 (4+

−48 −12L 96 0 −48 12L

12L ) 0 2L 2 (4+ ) −12L L 2 (2− ) L 2 (2−

0 0 −48 −12L 48 −12L

0 v1 0 0 θ1   0   12L   v2   −P  = . L 2 (2− )   θ2   0      P −12L v3 0 L 2 (4+ ) θ3



(13.21)

13–8

13–9
Setting the displacement B.C. v1 = θ1 = 0 and solving yields

§13.2 GENERALIZED INTERPOLATION

T P L2 . 0 0 L 1 L (22 + ) 3 4 24 2 4E Izz The mean element shear distortions are calculated from (13.22) using (13.20). This gives

u=

(13.22)

P L2 P =− (13.23) 48E Izz G As The element-level Bernoulli-Euler node displacements are obtained from (13.22) on subtracting the shear distortions (13.23) from the rotations: T T P L2 P L2 L L (22 + ) 3 + u(1) = u(2) = . (13.24) 0 0 L 1 , 1+ B B 4 12 24 2 12 4E Izz 4E Izz 4 γ (1) = 0, γ (2) = −
(1) (2) 1 Note that θ B2 = 1 = θ B2 = 1 + 12 , the “kink” being due to the shear distortion jump at node 2. The curvatures are now recovered as PL PL κ (1) = B(1) u(1) = , κ (2) = B(2) u(2) = (1 − ξ (2) ), (13.25) B B 2E Izz 4E Izz e e The transverse shear force resultant and bending moment are easily recovered as Vy = G As γ (e) and Mz = E Izz κ e , respectively. The results are drawn in Figure 13.6(b,c).

§13.2.8. Beam on Elastic Supports Sometimes beams, as well as other structural members, may be supported elastically along their span. Two common configurations that occur in structural engineering are: (i) (ii) Beam resting on a continuum medium such as soil. This is the case in foundations. Beam supported by discrete but closely spaced flexible supports, as in the “bed of springs” pictured in Figure 13.7. This occurs in railbeds (structurally rails are beams supported by crossties) and some types of grillworks.

The Winkler foundation is a simplified elastic-support model. It is an approximation for (i) because it ignores multidimensional elasticity effects as well as friction. It is a simplification of (ii) because the discrete nature of supports is smeared out. It is nonetheless popular, particularly in foundation and railway engineering, when the presence of physical uncertainties would not justify a more complicated model. Such uncertainties are inherent in soil mechanics. The Winkler model may be viewed as a “continuification” of case (ii). Take a beam slice going from x to x + d x. The spring-reaction force acting on the beam is taken to be d f F = −k F v(x) d x. Here v(x) is the transverse deflection and k F the Winkler foundation stiffness, which has dimension of force per length-squared. Force d f F has the opposite sign of v(x), pushing up if the beam moves down and pulling down if it moves up. Beam-foundation separation effects that may occur in case (i) are ignored here because that would lead to a nonlinear contact problem. The internal energy stored in the d x slice of Winkler springs is −/ v d f F = / k F v 2 d x. Consequently the e effect of elastic supports is to modify the internal energy U B of the beam element so that it becomes
y, v q(x)

x

beam

;;;;;;;;;
bed of springs

13–9

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS Figure 13.7. A beam supported by a bed of springs. Continuification of this configuration leads to the Winkler foundation model treated in this subsection.
e e U e = UB + UF , e with U F = 1 2 0

13–10

k F v 2 d x.

(13.26)

Therefore the total stiffness of the element is computed by adding the foundation stiffness to the beam stiffness. Care must be taken, however, that the same set of nodal freedoms is used. This is best handled by doing the generalized stiffness KcF first, and then using the appropriate generalized-to-physical transformation. If the transverse deflection v is interpolated with (13.2) as v = L c, the generalized Winkler foundation stiffness for constant k F is KcF = k F
0

L T L d x = k F Q0 ,

(13.27)

where Q0 is the first diagonal matrix in (13.4). This holds regardless of beam model. Now if the member resting on the foundation is modeled as a BE beam, one picks H B of (13.10) as generalized-to-physical transformation matrix to get   156 22 54 −13 k F  22 13 −3 2  4 2 , (13.28) Ke = k F HT Q0 H B =  54 F B 13 156 −22  420 4 2 −13 −3 2 −22 If instead the supported member is modeled as a Timoshenko beam, one picks H S of (13.12) to get Ke = k F HT Q0 H S F S 4(78+147 kF  (44+77 =  4(27+63 840(1+ )2 − (26+63

+35 2 ) +7 2 )  +35 2 )  +7 2 ) (13.29) The module TimoshenkoWinklerStiffness[Le,kF, ] listed in Figure 13.8 implements the stiffness (13.29). To get the BE-beam Winkler stiffness (13.28), invoke with = 0. Examples of use of this module are provided in §13.3.1.
TimoshenkoWinklerStiffness[Le_,kF_,Φ_]:=Module[{KeW}, KeW={{4*(78+147*Φ+70*Φ^2), Le*(44+77*Φ+35*Φ^2), 4*(27+63*Φ+35*Φ^2), -Le*(26+63*Φ+35*Φ^2)}, {Le*(44+77*Φ+35*Φ^2), Le^2*(8+14*Φ+7*Φ^2), Le*(26+63*Φ+35*Φ^2), -Le^2*(6+14*Φ+7*Φ^2)}, {4*(27+63*Φ+35*Φ^2), Le*(26+63*Φ+35*Φ^2), 4*(78+147*Φ+70*Φ^2), -Le*(44+77*Φ+35*Φ^2)}, {-Le*(26+63*Φ+35*Φ^2),-Le^2*(6+14*Φ+7*Φ^2), -Le*(44+77*Φ+35*Φ^2), Le^2*(8+14*Φ+7*Φ^2)}}* kF*Le/(840*(1+Φ)^2); Return[KeW]];

+70 2 ) (44+77 +35 2 ) 4(27+63 +35 2 ) − (26+63 2 (8+14 +7 2 ) (26+63 +35 2 ) − 2 (6+14 +35 2 ) +35 2 ) (26+63 +35 2 ) 4(78+147 +70 2 ) − (44+77 +35 2 ) − 2 (6+14 +7 2 ) − (44+77 +35 2 ) 2 (8+14

Figure 13.8. Stiffness matrix module for a Winkler foundation supporting a Timoshenko beam element.

13–10

13–11
§13.3.

§13.3 INTERPOLATION WITH HOMOGENEOUS ODE SOLUTIONS

Interpolation with Homogeneous ODE Solutions

For both BE and Timoshenko beam models, the Legendre polynomials L 1 (ξ ) through L 4 (ξ ) are exact solutions of the homogeneous, prismatic, plane beam equilibrium equation E I d 4 v/d x 4 = 0. When used as shape functions in the generalized interpolation (13.2), the resulting stiffness matrix is exact if the FEM model is loaded at the nodes, as further discussed in §13.6. The technique can be extended to more complicated onedimensional problems. It can be used to derive exact stiffness matrices if homogeneous solutions are available in closed form, and are sufficiently simple to be amenable to analytical integration. The following subsection illustrates the method for a BE beam resting on a Winkler elastic foundation. §13.3.1. Exact Winkler/BE-Beam Stiffness Consider again a prismatic, plane BE beam element resting on a Winkler foundation of stiffness k F , as pictured in Figure 13.7. The governing equilibrium equation for constant E I > 0 and k F > 0 is E I d 4 v/d x 4 + k F v = q(x). The general homogeneous solution over an element of length going from x = 0 to x = is v(x) = eζ c1 sin ζ + c2 cos ζ + e−ζ c3 sin ζ + c4 cos ζ , with ζ = χ x/ and χ =
4

kF . (13.30) 4E I

Here the ci are four integration constants to be determined from four end conditions: the nodal degrees of freedom v1 , v1 , v2 and v2 . These constants are treated as generalized coordinates and as before collected into vector c = [ c1 c2 c3 c4 ]T . The solution (13.30) is used as generalized interpolation with eζ sin ζ through e−ζ cos ζ as the four shape functions. Differentiating twice gives v = dv/d x and v = d 2 v/d x 2 . The TPE functional of the element in terms of the generalized coordinates can be expressed as
e c

=
0

1 2

E I (v )2 + 1 k F v 2 − q0 v d x = 1 cT (KcB + KcF ) c − cT fc . 2 2

(13.31)

This defines KcB and KcF as generalized element stiffnesses due to beam bending and foundation springs, respectively, whereas fc is the generalized force associated with a transverse load q(x). The nodal freedoms are linked to generalized coordinates by

0 1 0 1 v1 c1 χ/ χ/ χ/ −χ /  θ1     c2  v  =  c . eχ cos χ e−χ sin χ e−χ cos χ eχ sin χ 1 3 χ χ −χ −χ χ e (cos χ+ sin χ ) χ e (cos χ − sin χ ) χ e (cos χ − sin χ ) −χe (cos χ + sin χ ) θ1 c4 (13.32) In compact form this is ue = G F c. Inverting gives c = H F ue with H F = G−1 . The physical stiffness is F Ke = Ke + Ke with Ke = HT KcB H F and Ke = HT KcF H F . The consistent force vector is fe = HT fc . B F B F F F F Computation with transcendental functions by hand is unwieldy and error-prone, and at this point it is better to leave that task to a CAS. The Mathematica script listed in Figure 13.9 is designed to produce Ke , Ke and B F fe for constant E I and k F , and uniform transverse load q(x) = q0 . The script gives B1 B2 B5 −B4 F1 F2 F5 −F4 f1 EI χ  kF q0  f 2  B3 B4 B6  F3 F4 F6   , Ke = , fe = 2  , Ke = 3 2   B F B1 −B2  F1 −F2  f1  4 g 16χ 3 g 2 χ g symm B3 symm F3 − f2 (13.33)



13–11

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS
ClearAll[EI,kF,Le,χ,q0,x]; g=2-Cos[2*χ]-Cosh[2*χ]; Nf={Exp[ χ*x/Le]*Sin[χ*x/Le],Exp[ χ*x/Le]*Cos[χ*x/Le], Exp[-χ*x/Le]*Sin[χ*x/Le],Exp[-χ*x/Le]*Cos[χ*x/Le]}; Nfd=D[Nf,x]; Nfdd=D[Nfd,x]; KgF=kF*Integrate[Transpose[{Nf}].{Nf},{x,0,Le}]; KgB=EI*Integrate[Transpose[{Nfdd}].{Nfdd},{x,0,Le}]; fg= q0*Integrate[Transpose[{Nf}],{x,0,Le}]; {KgF,KgB,fg}=Simplify[{KgF,KgB,fg}]; Print["KgF=",KgF//MatrixForm]; Print["KgB=",KgB//MatrixForm]; GF=Simplify[{Nf/.x->0,Nfd/.x->0,Nf/.x->Le,Nfd/.x->Le}]; HF=Simplify[Inverse[GF]]; HFT=Transpose[HF]; Print["GF=",GF//MatrixForm]; Print["HF=",HF//MatrixForm]; facB=(EI*χ/Le^3)/(4*g^2); facF=(kF*Le)/(16*χ^3*g^2); KeB=Simplify[HFT.KgB.HF]; KeBfac=FullSimplify[KeB/facB]; Print["KeB=",facB," * ",KeBfac//MatrixForm] KeF=Simplify[HFT.KgF.HF]; KeFfac=FullSimplify[KeF/facF]; Print["KeF=",facF," * ",KeFfac//MatrixForm]; facf=(q0*Le)/(χ^2*g); fe=Simplify[ExpToTrig[HFT.fg]]; fefac=Simplify[fe/facf]; Print["fe=",facf," * ",fefac];

13–12

Figure 13.9. Script to produce the exact Winkler-BE beam stiffness matrix and consistent force vector.

BEBeamWinklerExactStiffness[Le_,EI_,kF_,q0_]:=Module[{B1,B2,B3,B4,B5,B6, F1,F2,F3,F4,F5,F6,f1,f2,facB,facF,facf,KeB,KeF,fe,χ}, χ=PowerExpand[Le*((kF/(4*EI))^(1/4))]; B1 =2*χ^2*(-4*Sin[2*χ]+Sin[4*χ]+4*Sin[χ]*(Cos[χ]*Cosh[2*χ]+ 8*χ*Sin[χ]*Sinh[χ]^2)+2*(Cos[2*χ]-2)*Sinh[2*χ]+Sinh[4*χ]); B2 =2*Le*χ*(4*Cos[2*χ]-Cos[4*χ]-4*Cosh[2*χ]+ Cosh[4*χ]8*χ*Sin[2*χ]*Sinh[χ]^2+8*χ*Sin[χ]^2*Sinh[2*χ]); B3 =-(Le^2*(8*χ*Cos[2*χ]-12*Sin[2*χ]+Cosh[2*χ]*(6*Sin[2*χ]-8*χ)+3*Sin[4*χ]+ 2*(6-3*Cos[2*χ]+4*χ*Sin[2*χ])*Sinh[2*χ]-3*Sinh[4*χ])); B4 =-4*Le*χ*(χ*Cosh[3*χ]*Sin[χ]-χ*Cosh[χ]*(-2*Sin[χ]+Sin[3*χ])+(χ*(Cos[χ]+ Cos[3*χ])+Cosh[2*χ]*(-2*χ*Cos[χ]+4*Sin[χ])+2*(-5*Sin[χ]+Sin[3*χ]))*Sinh[χ]); B5 =-4*χ^2*(2*Cos[χ]*(-2+Cos[2*χ]+Cosh[2*χ])*Sinh[χ]+Sin[3*χ]* (Cosh[χ]-2*χ*Sinh[χ])+Sin[χ]*(-4*Cosh[χ]+Cosh[3*χ]+2*χ*Sinh[3*χ])); B6 =2*Le^2*(Cosh[3*χ]*(-2*χ*Cos[χ]+3*Sin[χ])+Cosh[χ]*(2*χ*Cos[3*χ]+3*(Sin[3*χ]4*Sin[χ]))+(9*Cos[χ]-3*Cos[3*χ]-6*Cos[χ]*Cosh[2*χ]+16*χ*Sin[χ])*Sinh[χ]); F1 =2*χ^2*(-32*χ*Sin[χ]^2*Sinh[χ]^2+6*(-2+Cos[2*χ])* (Sin[2*χ]+Sinh[2*χ])+6*Cosh[2*χ]*(Sin[2*χ]+Sinh[2*χ])); F2 =2*Le*χ*(4*Cos[2*χ]-Cos[4*χ]-4*Cosh[2*χ]+Cosh[4*χ]+ 8*χ*Sin[2*χ]*Sinh[χ]^2-8*χ*Sin[χ]^2*Sinh[2*χ]); F3 =Le^2*(8*χ*Cos[2*χ]+4*Sin[2*χ]-2*Cosh[2*χ]*(4*χ+Sin[2*χ])-Sin[4*χ]+ 2*(Cos[2*χ]+4*χ*Sin[2*χ]-2)*Sinh[2*χ]+Sinh[4*χ]); F4 =4*Le*χ*(χ*Cosh[3*χ]*Sin[χ]-χ*Cosh[χ]*(-2*Sin[χ]+Sin[3*χ])+(χ*Cos[χ]+ χ*Cos[3*χ]+10*Sin[χ]-2*Cosh[2*χ]*(χ*Cos[χ]+2*Sin[χ])-2*Sin[3*χ])*Sinh[χ]); F5 =-4*χ^2*(6*Cos[χ]*(-2+Cos[2*χ]+Cosh[2*χ])*Sinh[χ]+Sin[3*χ]* (3*Cosh[χ]+2*χ*Sinh[χ])+Sin[χ]*(-12*Cosh[χ]+3*Cosh[3*χ]-2*χ*Sinh[3*χ])); F6 =-2* Le^2*(-(Cosh[3*χ]*(2*χ*Cos[χ]+Sin[χ]))+Cosh[χ]*(2*χ*Cos[3*χ]+ 4*Sin[χ]-Sin[3*χ])+(Cos[3*χ]+Cos[χ]*(2*Cosh[2*χ]-3)+16*χ*Sin[χ])*Sinh[χ]); f1=2*χ*(Cosh[χ]-Cos[χ])*(Sin[χ]-Sinh[χ]); f2=-(Le*(Sin[χ]-Sinh[χ])^2); g=2-Cos[2*χ]-Cosh[2*χ]; facf=(q0*Le)/(χ^2*g); facB=(EI*χ/Le^3)/(4*g^2); facF=(kF*Le)/(16*χ^3*g^2); KeB=facB*{{B1,B2,B5,-B4},{ B2,B3,B4,B6},{B5,B4,B1,-B2},{-B4,B6,-B2,B3}}; KeF=facF*{{F1,F2,F5,-F4},{ F2,F3,F4,F6},{F5,F4,F1,-F2},{-F4,F6,-F2,F3}}; fe=facf*{f1,f2,f1,-f2}; Return[{KeB,KeF,fe}]];

Figure 13.10. Module to get the exact BE-Winkler stiffness and consistent load vector.

13–12

13–13
y, v

§13.3 INTERPOLATION WITH HOMOGENEOUS ODE SOLUTIONS

;;;;;;;;;;; ;;;;;;;;;;; ;;;;;;;;;;; ;;;;;;;;;;;
EI constant

P : Load case (I) q0 : Load case (II)

A

x

C

B

k F constant L

L

2L

Figure 13.11. Example: fixed-fixed beam on Winkler elastic foundation.

in which g = 2 − cos 2χ − cosh 2χ, B1 = 2χ 2 (−4 sin 2χ + sin 4χ +4 sin χ (cos χ cosh 2χ +8χ sin χ sinh2 χ )+2(cos 2χ −2) sinh 2χ + sinh 4χ ), B2 = 2 χ (4 cos 2χ − cos 4χ −4 cosh 2χ + cosh 4χ−8χ sin 2χ sinh2 χ +8χ sin2 χ sinh 2χ ), B3 = −( 2 (8χ cos 2χ−12 sin 2χ + cosh 2χ (6 sin 2χ −8χ )+3 sin 4χ + 2(6−3 cos 2χ +4χ sin 2χ) sinh 2χ −3 sinh 4χ )), B4 = −4 χ (χ cosh 3χ sin χ−χ cosh χ (−2 sin χ + sin 3χ )+(χ (cos χ + cos 3χ ) + cosh 2χ (−2χ cos χ +4 sin χ )+2(−5 sin χ+ sin 3χ )) sinh χ ), B5 = −4χ 2 (2 cos χ (−2+ cos 2χ + cosh 2χ ) sinh χ + sin 3χ (cosh χ−2χ sinh χ ) + sin χ(−4 cosh χ+ cosh 3χ +2χ sinh 3χ )) B6 = 2 2 (cosh 3χ (−2χ cos χ +3 sin χ )+ cosh χ (2χ cos 3χ +3(−4 sin χ+ sin 3χ )) +(9 cos χ −3 cos 3χ −6 cos χ cosh 2χ +16χ sin χ ) sinh χ ) F1 = 2χ 2 (−32χ sin2 χ sinh2 χ +6(−2+ cos 2χ )(sin 2χ + sinh 2χ )+6 cosh 2χ (sin 2χ + sinh 2χ)), F2 = 2 χ (4 cos 2χ − cos 4χ −4 cosh 2χ + cosh 4χ+8χ sin 2χ sinh2 χ −8χ sin2 χ sinh 2χ ), F3 =
2

(8χ cos 2χ+4 sin 2χ −2 cosh 2χ (4χ + sin 2χ )− sin 4χ +2(cos 2χ +4χ sin 2χ −2) sinh 2χ + sinh 4χ ),

F4 = 4 χ (χ cosh 3χ sin χ −χ cosh χ (sin 3χ −2 sin χ )+(χ cos χ +χ cos 3χ +10 sin χ −2 cosh 2χ (χ cos χ+2 sin χ )−2 sin 3χ ) sinh χ ), F5 = −4χ 2 (6 cos χ (−2+ cos 2χ + cosh 2χ ) sinh χ + sin 3χ (3 cosh χ+2χ sinh χ ), + sin χ(−12 cosh χ +3 cosh 3χ −2χ sinh 3χ )) F6 = −2 2 (−(cosh 3χ(2χ cos χ + sin χ ))+ cosh χ (2χ cos 3χ +4 sin χ − sin 3χ ) +(cos 3χ + cos χ(2 cosh 2χ−3)+16χ sin χ ) sinh χ ), (13.34) These expressions are used to code module BEBeamWinklerExactStiffness[Le,EI,kF,q0], which is listed in Figure 13.10.
Example 13.3. A fixed-fixed BE beam rests on a Winkler foundation as shown in Figure 13.11. The beam has span 2L, and

f 1 = 2χ(cosh χ − cos χ )(sin χ − sinh χ ),

f 2 = − (sin χ − sinh χ )2 .

constant E I . The Winkler foundation coefficient k F is constant. As usual in foundation engineering we set k F = E I λ4 /L 4 , (13.35)

13–13

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS Table 13.1 - Results for Example of Figure 13.11 at Selected λ Values λ Load case (I): Central Point Load exact C I Ne = 2 Ne = 4 Ne = 8 0.999997 0.969977 0.668790 0.049152 0.003220 3.23×10−7 0.999997 0.970003 0.671893 0.065315 0.006648 8.03×10−7 Load case (II): Line Load Over Right Half exact C I I Ne = 2 Ne = 4 Ne = 8 0.999997 0.969977 0.668790 0.049152 0.003220 3.23×10−7 0.999997 0.968742 0.658316 0.041254 0.002393 2.62×10−7 0.999997 0.968666 0.657746 0.041317 0.002395 2.42×10−7

13–14

0.1 0.999997 1 0.970005 2 0.672185 0.067652 5 10 0.008485 100 8.48×10−6

0.999997 0.999997 0.970005 0.968661 0.672167 0.657708 0.067483 0.041321 0.008191 0.002394 1.63×10−6 2.40×10−7

where λ is a dimensionless rigidity to be kept as parameter.5 The beam is subjected to two load cases: (I) a central point load P at x = L, and (II) a uniform line load q0 over the right half x ≥ L. See Figure 13.11. All quantities are kept symbolic. The focus of interest is the deflection vC at midspan C (x = L). For convenience this I I I II is rendered dimensionless by taking vC (λ) = C I (λ)vC0 and vCI (λ) = C I I (λ)vC0 for load cases (I) and (II)), respectively. I = −P L 3 /(24E I ) and v I I = −q L 4 /(48E I ) are the midspan deflections of cases (I) and (II) for λ = 0, that is, Here vC0 0 C0 k F = 0 (no foundation). The exact deflection factors for this model are √ √ √ 13 4 6 2 cos 2λ + cosh 2λ − 2 137 8 =1− λ + λ ... C I (λ) = 3 √ √ 420 138600 λ sin 2λ + sinh 2λ (13.36) √ √ √ √ 163 4 48 (cos λ/ 2− cosh λ/ 2)(sin λ/ 2− sinh λ/ 2) 20641 8 =1− λ + λ + ... C I I (λ) = 4 √ √ 5040 19958400 λ sin 2λ + sinh 2λ Both load cases were symbolically solved with two exact elements of length L produced by the module of Figure 13.10. As can be expected, the answers reproduce the exact solutions (13.36). Using any number of those elements would match (13.36) as long as the midspan section C is at a node. Then both cases were solved with 2, 4, and 8 elements with the stiffness (13.28) produced by cubic polynomials. The results are shown in a log-log plot in Figure 13.12. Results for selected values of λ are presented in Table 13.1. As can be seen, for a “soft” foundation characterized by λ < 1, the cubic-polynomial elements gave satisfactory results and converged quickly to the exact answers, especially in load case (II). As λ grows over one, the deflections become rapidly smaller, and the polynomial FEM results exhibit higher relative errors. On the other hand, the absolute errors remain small. The conclusion is that exact elements are only worthwhile in highly rigid foundations (say λ > 5) and then only if results with small relative error are of interest.
0 −1 −2 −3 −4 −5 −6 −1 −0.5 0 0.5 1 2 poly elements 4 poly elements 8 poly elements 0 −1 2 exact elements −2 −3 −4 −5 −6 2 −1 −0.5 0 0.5 1

log10 CI
Load Case I: Central Point Load

log10 CII
Load Case II: Uniform Line Load Over Right Half

2 exact elements

2 poly elements 4 poly elements 8 poly elements

log 10 λ
1.5

log 10 λ
1.5 2

Figure 13.12. Log-log plots of C I (λ) and C I I (λ) for Example of Figure 13.11 over range λ ∈ [0.1, 100].

5

Note that λ is a true physical parameter, whereas χ is discretization dependant because it involves the element length.

13–14

13–15

§13.3 INTERPOLATION WITH HOMOGENEOUS ODE SOLUTIONS

Remark 13.2. To correlate the exact stiffness and consistent forces with those obtained with polynomial shape functions it is illuminating to expand (13.33) as power series in χ. The rationale is that as the element size gets smaller, χ = 4 k F /(4E I ) goes to zero for fixed E I and k F . Mathematica gives the expansions

Ke = K B0 + χ 8 K B8 + χ 12 K B12 + . . . , Ke = K F0 + χ 4 K F4 + χ 8 K F8 + . . . , fe = f0 + χ 4 f4 + . . . , B F in which Ke B0

(13.37)

Ke B12

25488 5352 23022 −5043 EI 5352 1136 2 5043 −1097 2   = eqn (12.20) , Ke = , B8 23022 5043 25488 −5352 4365900 3 2 −5352 2 1136 −5043 −1097   528960 113504 522090 −112631 2 EI 112631 −24273 2   113504 24384 =− , Ke = eqn (13.28), F0 3 522090 112631 528960 −113504 5959453500 2 −113504 2 24384 −112631 −24273 kF 4 e 3k F 4 e q0 K B8 , Ke = − K , fe = [6 F8 2E I 8E I B12 0 12 6 − ]T , fe = − 4 q0 [ 14 3 14 −3 ]T . 5040

(13.38)

Ke = − F4

Thus as χ → 0 we recover the stiffness matrices and force vector derived with polynomial shape functions, as can be expected. Note that K B0 and K F0 decouple, which allows them to coded as separate modules. On the other hand the exact stiffnesses are coupled if χ > 0. The foregoing expansions indicate that exactness makes little difference if χ < 1.

13–15

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–16

§13.4.

Equilibrium Theorems

One way to get high performance mechanical elements is to use equilibrium conditions whenever possible. These lead to flexibility methods. Taking advantage of equilibrium is fairly easy in one space dimension. It is more difficult in two and three, because it requires advanced variational methods that are beyond the scope of this book. This section surveys theorems that provide the theoretical basis for flexibility methods. These are applied to 1D element construction in §13.5. §13.4.1. Self-Equilibrated Force System First we establish a useful theorem that links displacement and force transformations. Consider a FEM discretized body such as that pictured in Figure 13.13(a). The generic potato intends to symbolize any discretized material body: an element, an element assembly or a complete structure. Partition its degrees of freedom into two types: r and s. The s freedoms (s stands for suppressed or supported) are associated with a minimal set of supports that control rigid body motions or RBMs. The r freedoms (r is for released) collect the rest. In the figure those freedoms are shown collected at invididual points Ps and Pr for visualization convenience. Node forces, displacements and virtual displacements associated with those freedoms are partitioned accordingly. Thus f us δus u= , δu = . (13.39) f= s , fr ur δur The dimension n s of fs , us and δus is 1, 3 and 6 in one-, two- and three-dimensional space, respectively. Figure 13.13(b) shows the force system {fs , fr } undergoing virtual displacements, which are exaggerated for visibility.6 Consider now the “rigid + deformational” displacement decomposition u = Gus + d, in which matrix G (of appropriate order) represents a rigid motion and d are deformational displacements. Evaluating this at the r freedoms gives ur = Gr us + dr , δur = Gr δus + δdr , (13.40) The first decomposition in (13.40), being linear in the actual displacements, is only valid only in geometrically linear analysis. That for virtual displacements is valid for a much broader class of problems. If the supported freedom motion vanishes: us = 0, then ur = dr . Thus dr represents a relative displacement of the unsupported freedoms with respect to the rigid motion Gus , and likewise for the virtual displacements. Because a relative motion is necessarily associated with deformations, the alternative name deformational displacements is justified.
T T The external virtual work is δW = δWs + δWr = δus fs + δur fr . If the force system in Figure 13.13(a) is in self equilibrium and the virtual displacements are imparted by rigid motions δdr = 0 and δur = Gr δus , the T T T T T virtual work must vanish: δW = δus fs + δus Gr fr = δus (fs + Gr fr ) = 0. Because the δus are arbitrary, it follows that T T fs + Gr fr = 0, fs = −Gr fr . (13.41)

These are the overall static equilibrium equations of a discrete mechanical system in self equilibrium. Sometimes it is useful to express the foregoing expressions in the complete-vector form u= us ur = I 0 δus us + , δu = δur Gr dr = I 0 f δus + , f= s fr Gr δdr =
T −Gr I

fr . (13.42)

Relations in (13.42) are said to be reciprocal.7
6 7

Under virtual displacements the forces are frozen for application of the Principle of Virtual Work. If the model is geometrically nonlinear, the first form in (13.42) does not hold.

13–16

13–17
(a)

§13.4 EQUILIBRIUM THEOREMS
(b)

δus fs
P s P fr r

δur
P r

fs
P s

fr

Figure 13.13. Body to illustrate equilibrium theorems. Nodal freedoms classified into supported (s) and released (r ), each lumped to a point to simplify diagram. (a) Self equilibrated node force system. (b) Force system of (a) undergoing virtual displacements; grossly exaggerated for visibility.
Remark 13.3. The freedoms in us are virtual supports, chosen for convenience in flexibility derivations. They should not

be confused with actual or physical supports. For instance Civil Engineering structures tend to have redundant physical supports, whereas aircraft or orbiting satellites have none. §13.4.2.

Handling Applied Forces

Consider now a generalization of the previous scenario. An externally applied load system of surface or body forces, not necessarily in self equilibrium, acts on the body. For example, the surface tractions pictured in Figure 13.14(a). To bring this under the framework of equilibrium analysis, a series of steps are required. First, the force system is replaced by a single resultant q, as pictured in 13.14(b).8 The point of application is Pq . Equilibrium is restored by introducing node forces qr and qs at the appropriate freedoms. The overall equilibrium condition is obtained by putting the system {q, qr , qs } through rigid-motion virtual displacements, as pictured in Figure 13.14(c). Point Pq moves T T T through δuq , and G evaluated at Pq is Gq . The virtual work is δW = δus (qs + Gr qr + Gq q) = 0 whence
T T qs + Gr qr + Gq q = 0.

(13.43)

If (13.43) is sufficient to determine qs and qr , the load system of Figure 13.14(a) can be effectively replaced by the nodal forces −qs and −qr , as depicted in 13.14(d). These are called the equivalent node forces. But in general (13.43) is insufficient to fully determine qs and qr . The remaining equations to construct the equivalent forces must come from a theorem that accounts for the internal energy, as discussed in §13.4.3. Adding (13.41) and (13.43) gives the general overall equilibrium condition
T T fs + qs + Gr (fr + qr ) + Gq q = 0,

(13.44)

which is applied in §13.4.4 to the recovery of supported freedoms.
Remark 13.4. The replacement of the applied force by a resultant is not strictly necessary, as it is always possible to write

out the virtual work by appropriately integrating distributed effects. The resultant is primarily useful as an instructional tool, because matrix Gq is not position dependent.
Remark 13.5. Conditions (13.41) and (13.43), which were derived through the PVW, hold for general mechanical systems

under mild reversibility requirements [253, §231], including geometric nonlinearities. From now on we restrict attention to systems linear in the actual displacements.

§13.4.3. Flexibility Equations The first step in FEM equilibrium analysis is obtaining discrete flexibility equations. The stiffness equations introduced in Chapter 2 relate forces to displacements. At the element level they are fe = Ke ue . By definition,
8

Although the figure shows a resultant point force, in general it may include a point moment that is not shown for simplicity. See also Remark 13.3.

13–17

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–18

(a) P s P r

(b)

qs
P s P q

qr
P r

t(x)
(c)

q δur
(d)

δus
P s

qs δuq
P q

qr
P r

−qs
P s

−q r
P r

q
Figure 13.14. Processing non-self-equilibrated applied loads with flexibility methods. (a) Body under applied distributed load. (b) Substitution by resultant and self equilibration. (c) Deriving overall equilibrium conditions through the PVW. (d) Replacing the applied loads by equivalent nodal forces.

flexibility equations relate displacements to forces: ue = Fe fe , where Fe is the element flexibility matrix. So the expectation is that the flexibility can be obtained as the inverse of the stiffness: Fe = (Ke )−1 . Right? Wrong. Recall that Ke for a disconnected free-free element is singular. Its ordinary inverse does not exist. Expectations go up in smoke. The same difficulty holds for a superelement or complete structure. To get a conventional flexibility matrix9 it is necessary to remove all rigid body motions in advance. This can be done through the virtual supports introduced in §13.4.1. The support motions us are fixed, say us = 0. Flexibility equations are sought between what is left of the kinematics. Dropping the element superscript for brevity, for a linear problem one gets (13.45) Frr fr = dr . Note that ur does not appear: only the deformational or relative displacements. To recover ur it is necessary to release the supports, but if that is naively done Frr ceases to exist. This difficulty is overcome in §13.4.4. There is another key difference with stiffness methods. The DSM assembly procedure covered in Chapter 3 (and extended in Chapter 25 to general structures) does not translate into a similar technique for flexibility methods. Although it is possible to assemble flexibilities of MoM elements, the technique is neither simple nor elegant. And it becomes dauntingly complex when tried on continuum-based elements [83]. So one of the main uses of flexibility equations today is as a stepping stone on the way to derive element stiffness equations, starting from (13.45). The procedural steps are explained in §13.4.4. But how should (13.45) be derived? There are several methods but only one, based on the Total Complementary Potential Energy (TCPE) principle of variational mechanics is described here. To apply TCPE, the complementary energy ∗ of the body must be be expressed as a function of the nodal forces fr . For fixed supports (us = 0) and a linear system, the functional can be expressed as
∗ T T T T (fr ) = U ∗ (fr ) − fr dr = 1 fr Frr fr + fr br − fr dr + 2 ∗ 0.

(13.46)

Here U ∗ is the internal complementary energy, also called the stress energy by many authors, e.g., [120], br is a term resulting from loading actions such as as thermal effects, body or surface forces, and ∗ is independent of 0
9

In the FEM literature it is often called simply the flexibility. The reason is that for a long time it was believed that getting a flexibility matrix required a supported structure. With the recent advent of the free-free flexibility (see Notes and Bibliography) it becomes necessary to introduce a “deformational” or “conventional” qualifier.

13–18

13–19

§13.4 EQUILIBRIUM THEOREMS

fr . Calculation of U ∗ in 1D elements involves expressing the internal forces (axial force, shear forces, bending moments, torque, etc.) in terms of fr from statics. Application examples are given in the next section.10 The TCPE principle states that ∗ is stationary with respect to variations in fr when kinematic compatibility is satisfied: ∂ ∗ = Frr fr + br − dr = 0, whence dr = Frr fr + br . (13.47) ∂fr By hypothesis the deformational flexibility Frr is nonsingular. Solving for fr gives the deformational stiffness equations −1 fr = Krr dr − qr , with Krr = Frr and qr = Krr br . (13.48) The matrix Krr is the deformational stiffness matrix, whereas qr is the equivalent load vector.. §13.4.4. Rigid Motion Injection Suppose that Frr and qr of (13.48) have been found, for example from the TPCE principle (13.47). The goal is to arrive at the free-free stiffness equations, which are partitioned in accordance with (13.39) as fs fr = Kss Kr s Ksr Krr us ur − qs , qr (13.49)

To justify the presence of Krr and qr here, set us = 0, whence ur = dr . Consequently the second equation reduces to fr = Krr dr − qr , which matches (13.48). Inserting fs and fr into (13.44) yields
T T T T (Kss + Gr Kr s )us + (Ksr + Gr Krr )ur + qs + Gr qr + Gq q = 0,

(13.50)

and replacing ur = Gr us + dr ,
T T T T T Kss + Gr Kr s + Ksr Gr + Gr Krr Gr us + Ksr + Gr Krr dr + qs + Gr qr + Gq q = 0.

(13.51)

Because us , dr and q can be arbitrarily varied, each bracket in (13.51) must vanish identically, giving
T T qs = −Gr qr − Gq q, T Ksr = −Gr Krr , T Kr s = Ksr = −Krr Gr ,

T T T T T T Kss = −Gr Kr s − Ksr Gr − Gr Krr Gr = Gr Krr Gr + Gr Krr Gr − Gr Krr Gr = Gr Krr Gr .

(13.52)

Inserting these into (13.49) yields fs fr =
T Gr Krr Gr −Krr Gr T −Gr Krr Krr

us ur

T T Gr qr − Gq q . qr

(13.53)

This can be put in the more compact form
T T fs −Gr u −Gr = Krr [ −Gr I ] s − fr I ur I with T = [ −Gr I ] and Tq = [ Gq 0 ] .

qr +

Gq T q = TT Krr T u − TT qr + Tq q, 0 (13.54)

−1 The end result is that the free-free stiffness is TT Frr T. Alternatively (13.54) may be derived by plugging dr = ur − Gr us into (13.48) and then into (13.44).

10

For 2D and 3D elements the process is more delicate and demands techniques, such as hybrid variational principles, that lie beyond the scope of this material.

13–19

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS
Remark 13.6. Let S be a n s × n s nonsingular matrix. The matrix R built by the prescription

13–20

R=

S GS

(13.55)

is called a rigid body motion matrix or simply RBM matrix. The columns of R represent nodal values of rigid motions, hence the name. The scaling provided by S may be adjusted to make R simpler. The key property is T R = 0 and thus K R = TT Krr T R = 0. Other properties are studied in [90].

§13.4.5. Applications Stiffness Equilibrium Tests. If one injects ur = Gus and qr = 0 into (13.54) the result is fr = 0 and fs = 0. That is, all node forces must vanish for arbitrary us . This test is useful at any level (element, superelement, full structure) to verify that a directly generated K (that is, a K constructed independently of overall equilibrium) is “clean” as regards rigid body modes. Element Stiffness from Flexibility. Here Frr is constructed at the supported element level, inverted to get Krr and rigid motions injected through (13.54). Applications to element construction are illustrated in §13.5. Experimental Stiffness from Flexibility. In this case Frr is obtained through experimental measurements on a supported structure or substructure.11 To insert this as a “user defined superelement” in a DSM code, it is necessary to produce a stiffness matrix. This is done again by inversion and RBM injection. §13.5.

Flexibility Based Derivations

The equilibrium theorems of the foregoing section are applied to the flexibility derivation of several onedimensional elements. §13.5.1. Timoshenko Plane Beam-Column A beam-column member combines axial and bending effects. A 2-node, straight beam-column has three DOFs at each node: the axial displacement, the transverse displacement and a rotation. If the cross section is doubly symmetric, axial and bending effects are decoupled. A prismatic, plane element of this kind is shown in Figure 13.15(a). End nodes are 1–2. The bending component is modeled as a Timoshenko beam. The element is subjected to the six node forces shown, and to a uniformly distributed load q0 . To suppress rigid motions node 1 is fixed as shown in Figure 13.15(b), making the beam a cantilever. Following the notation of §13.4.1–§13.4.2, 1 0 0 0 1 x , 0 0 0 (13.56) Further, Gr = G( ) and Gq = G( /2). The internal forces are the axial force F(x), the transverse shear V (x) and the bending moment M(x). These are directly obtained from statics by doing a free-body diagram at distance x from the left end as illustrated in Figure 13.15(c). With the positive convention as shown we get us = , dr = ur = , fs = , fr = , q= , G(x) = N (x) = − f x2 , V (x) = − f y2 − q0 ( − x), M(x) = m 2 + f y2 ( − x) + 1 q0 ( − x)2 . 2 (13.57) u x1 u y1 θ1 u x2 u y2 θ2 f x1 f y1 m1 f x2 f y2 m2 0 q 0

11

The classical static tests on an airplane wing are performed by applying transverse forces and torques to the wing tip with the airplane safely on the ground. These experimental influence coefficients can be used for model validation.

13–20

13–21

§13.5 FLEXIBILITY BASED DERIVATIONS

y,v

(b)
1

(a)
m1 fx1 1

fy1

E,I,G,As constant q0 x

q0

fy2

2
q0

fy2 m2 fx2

2

m2 f x2

Figure 13.15. Flexibility derivation of Timoshenko plane beam-column stiffness: (a) element and node forces, (b) removal of RBMs by fixing left node, (c) FBD that gives internal forces at varying x.

Useful check: d M/d x = V . Assuming a doubly symmetric section so that N and M are decoupled, the element TCPE functional is

;;
(c)
+F(x) x

+V(x) +M(x)

2

fy2 m2 f x2

=

1 2 0

N2 M2 V2 + + EA EI G As

T T T T d x − fr dr = 1 fr Frr fr + fr br − fr dr + 2

∗ 0,

 ∂2 ∗ in which Frr = = 0  ∂fr ∂fr
Term
∗ 0

EA
3

 (4 + ) , 24E I 2E I 
2 2

0

0

0  3 (4 + )  br = q0  12E I  .
2

(13.58)

EI 2E I is inconsequential, since it disappears on differentiation.

0

6E I

Applying the TCPE principle yields Frr fr = br − dr . This is inverted to produce the deformational stiffness relation fr = Krr dr + qr , in which  EA  0 0   0   12E I −1 − 2 6E I  3 Krr = Frr =  0 qr = q0 Krr br =  q0 /2  . (13.59) (1 + ) (1 + )  ,  2 −q0 /12 E I (4 + ) 0 − 2 6E I (1 + ) (1 + ) To use (13.54) the following transformation matrices are required:

 −1

T −Gr TT = 0

 0  0 =  1 
0 0

0 0 −1 0  − −1  , 0 0   1 0 0 1

1

Gq Tq = 0

0 0 = 0 
0 0

0 1 /2 0 0 0

0 0 1 , 0  0 0

q=

0 q0 0

.

(13.60)

Injecting the rigid body modes from (13.54), Ke = TT Krr T and fe = TT qr , yields

 1  0 EA  0 e  K =  −1 
f = q0
e

0 0 [ 0 1/2

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 −1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 /12 0

0 0 0 0 EI 0 0 + 3 (1 + 0 0  0 0 0 0 1/2 − /12 ]T .

0

0 0  ) 0 
0 0

0 12 6 0 −12 6

0 6 2 (4 + 0 −6 2 (2 −

0 0 ) 0 0 0 ) 0

0 −12 −6 0 12 −6

0 6 2 (2 − 0 −6 2 (4 +


)  ) (13.61)

 , 

13–21

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–22

ClearAll[Le,EI,GAs,Φ,q0,fx2,fy2,m2]; GAs=12*EI/(Φ*Le^2); F=fx2; V=-fy2-q0*(Le-x); M=m2+fy2*(Le-x)+(1/2)*q0*(Le-x)^2; Print["check dM/dx=V: ",Simplify[D[M,x]-V]]; Ucd=F^2/(2*EA)+M^2/(2*EI)+V^2/(2*GAs); Uc=Simplify[Integrate[Ucd,{x,0,Le}]]; Print["Uc=",Uc]; u2=D[Uc,fx2]; v2=D[Uc,fy2]; θ2=D[Uc,m2]; Frr={{ D[u2,fx2], D[u2,fy2], D[u2,m2]}, { D[v2,fx2], D[v2,fy2], D[v2,m2]}, { D[θ2,fx2], D[θ2,fy2], D[θ2,m2]}}; br={D[Uc,fx2],D[Uc,fy2],D[Uc,m2]}/.{fx2->0,fy2->0,m2->0}; Print["br=",br]; Frr=Simplify[Frr]; Print["Frr=",Frr//MatrixForm]; Krr=Simplify[Inverse[Frr]]; Print["Krr=",Krr//MatrixForm]; qr=Simplify[-Krr.br]; Print["qr=",qr]; TT={{-1,0,0},{0,-1,0},{0,-Le,-1},{1,0,0},{0,1,0},{0,0,1}}; T=Transpose[TT]; Simplify[Ke=TT.Krr.T]; Print["Ke=",Ke//MatrixForm]; GrT={{1,0,0},{0,1,0},{0,Le,1}}; Gr=Transpose[GrT]; GqT={{1,0,0},{0,1,0},{0,Le/2,1}}; Gq=Transpose[GqT]; Print["Gr=",Gr//MatrixForm," Gq=",Gq//MatrixForm]; qv={0,q0*Le,0}; Print["qs=",Simplify[-GrT.qr-GqT.qv]];

Figure 13.16. Script to derive the stiffness matrix and consistent load vector of the prismatic, plane Timoshenko beam element of Figure 13.15 by flexibility methods.

(a)
m1 fx1

y, v E,I,G,As constant fy1 fy2 fx2 x, u

(b)
fy2

1 2
m2

fx2

+V(ψ) +F(ψ)

(c)

+M(ψ) fy2 ψ fx2

1

|2φ|

|R|

2

m2

2

m2

Figure 13.17. Flexibility derivation of plane circular arch element: (a) element and node forces, (b) removal of RBMs by fixing left node, (c) free body diagram of varying cross section.

+ψ y x 1 C +H 2 1 −2φ O 2S −R +ds y x

O +2φ +R 2 2 +R

+ψ C −H x +2φ O 2S y +ds −R 1 2 +ds

O −2φ +H C +ψ 2S x y 1

−H +ds C

+ψ 2S

Figure 13.18. Sign conventions in derivation of circular arch element.

The bending component is the same stiffness found previously in §13.2.6; compare with (13.18). The node force vector is the same as the consistent one constructed in an Exercise. A useful verification technique is to support the beam element at end 2 and recompute Ke and fe . This should reproduce (13.61). All of the foregoing computations were carried out by the Mathematica script shown in Figure 13.16.

13–22

13–23
§13.5.2. Plane Circular Arch in Local System

§13.5 FLEXIBILITY BASED DERIVATIONS

In this and next subsection, the flexibility method is used to construct the stiffness matrix of a curved, prismatic, plane beam-column element with circular profile, pictured in Figure 13.17(a). The local system {x, y} is defined as shown there: x is a “chord axis” that passes through end nodes 1–2, and goes from 1 to 2. Axis y is placed at +90◦ from x. No load acts between nodes. In a curved plane element of this nature, axial extension and bending are intrinsically coupled. Thus consideration of three freedoms per node is mandatory. These are the translations along x and y, and the rotation θ about z. This element can be applied to the analysis of plane arches and ring stiffeners (as in airplane fuselages and submarine pressure hulls). If the arch curvature varies along the member, it should be subdivided into sufficiently small elements over each of which the radius magnitude is sensibly constant. Care must be taken as regards sign conventions to ensure correct results when the arch convexity and node numbering changes. Various cases are pictured in Figure 13.18. The conventions are as follows: (1) (2) The local node numbers define a positive arclength traversal along the element midline as going from 1 to 2. The curved length (not shown in figure) and the (chord) spanlength 2S are always positive. The arch rise H , the angular span 2φ and the arch radius R are signed quantities as illustrated in Figure 13.18. The rise is the distance from chord midpoint to arch crown C: it has the sign of its projection on y. The angular span 2φ is that subtended by the arch on moving from 1 to 2: it is positive if CCW. Finally, the radius R has the sign of φ so = 2Rφ is always positive. S = R sin φ, H = R(cos φ − 1) (13.62)

Some signed geometric relations:

The location of an arch section is defined by the “tilt angle” ψ measured from the circle center-to-crown symmetry line OC, positive CCW. See Figure 13.18. The differential arclength ds = R dψ always points in the positive traversal sense 1 → 2. The rigid motions are removed by fixing the left end as shown in in Figure 13.17(b). The internal forces F(ψ), V (ψ) and M(ψ) at an arbitrary cross section are obtained from the FBD of Figure 13.17(c) to be F = f x2 cos ψ + f y2 sin ψ, V = f x2 sin ψ − f y2 cos ψ, M = m 2 + f x2 R(cos φ− cos ψ)+ f y2 R(sin ψ− sin φ). (13.63) For typical straight beam-column members there are only two practically useful models: Bernoulli-Euler (BE) and Timoshenko. For curved members there are many more. These range from simple corrections to BE through theory-of-elasticity-based models. The model selected here is one of intermediate complexity. It is defined by the internal complementary energy functional U =
0 ∗

(F − M/R)2 M2 + 2E A 2E I

φ

ds =
−φ

(F − M/R)2 M2 + 2E A 2E I

R dψ.

(13.64)

The assumptions enbodies in this formula are: (1) the shear energy density V 2 /(2G As ) is neglected; (2) the cross section area A and moment of inertia I are unchanged with respect of those of the straight member. √ These assumptions are reasonable if |R| > 10 r , where r = + I /A is the radius of gyration of the cross section. Further corrections are treated in Exercises. To simplify the ensuing formulas it is convenient to take EA = EI
2 R2φ2

=

4E I
2 2

,

or

=

2r

with r 2 =

I . A

(13.65)

This defines as a dimensionless geometric parameter. Note that this is not an intrinsic measure of arch slenderness, because it involves the element length.12 The necessary calculations are carried out by the
12

In that respect it is similar to

of the Timoshenko beam element, defined by (13.17).

13–23

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–24

Mathematica script of Figure 13.21, which has been pared down to essentials to save space. The deformational flexibility and stiffness computed are Frr = F11 symm F12 F22 F13 F23 F33 ,
−1 Krr = Frr =

K 11 symm

K 12 K 22

K 13 K 23 K 33

,

in which (first expression is exact value, second a Taylor series expansion in φ) 16E I φ 3 3 sin φ F12 = sin φ − φ(1 + φ 2 4E I φ 3 F13 = F22 =
2

F11 =

3

2φ(2 + φ 2

2

) + 2φ(1 + φ 2
2

2

) cos 2φ − 3 sin 2φ =
3

3

60E I

15

2

+ φ 2 (2 − 15

2

) + O(φ 4 )

2E I φ 2
3

sin φ − φ(1 + φ 2 2φ(2 + φ 2
2 2

φ 1 − 3 2 + O(φ 3 ), 12E I 3 φ 2 ) cos φ = 1 − 3 2 + O(φ 3 ), 6E I ) cos φ =
2

16E I φ 3 2 sin φ F23 = (1 + φ 2 2E I φ

) − 2φ(1 + φ 2
2

) cos 2φ − sin 2φ =
2

3

60E I F33 =

20 + 3φ 2 (5 (1 + φ 2
2

2

− 2) + O(φ 4 ),

)=
2

12E I

6 + φ 2 (6

− 1) + O(φ 4 ),
2

EI

). (13.66)

Introduce d1 = φ(1 + φ K 11 =

2

)(φ + sin φ cos φ) − 2 sin φ and d2 = φ − sin φ cos φ. Then

4E I φ 4 EI (1 + φ 2 2 ) = 45 2 + φ 2 (15 2 + 45 4 − 1) + O(φ 4 ), K 12 = 0, 3d 45 3 1 4E I φ 2 6E I φ K 13 = 2 φ(1 + φ 2 2 ) cos φ − sin φ = 2 2 (3 2 − 1) + O(φ 3 ), d1 8E I φ 3 12E I sin φ EI K 22 = 3 = (5 + φ 2 ) + O(φ 4 ), K 23 = − K 22 = − 3 (30 + φ 2 ) + O(φ 4 ), 3 d2 5 2φ 5 EIφ 8φ 2 (3 + 2φ 2 2 ) − 9 + 16 cos 2φ − 7 cos 4φ − 8φ sin 2φ 2 + (1 + φ 2 2 ) cos 2φ K 33 = 8 d1 d2 EI = 180 2 + φ 2 (5 − 48 2 ) + O(φ 4 ), 45 2 (13.67) The constraint K 23 = −K 22 sin φ/(2φ) must be verified by any arch stiffness, regardless of the TCPE form used. The necessary transformation matrix to inject the rigid body modes T = [ −G I ] = −1 0 0 0 −1 0 0 −2R sin φ −1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 = −1 0 0 0 −1 0 0 − sin φ/φ −1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 . (13.68)

Applying the congruent transformation gives the free-free stiffness

 K  0 K 13 −K 11 0 −K 13 11 K 22 −K 23 0 −K 22 −K 23   0  K 13 −K 23 K 33 −K 13 K 23 K 36  e T  K = T Krr T =   −K 11 0 −K 13 K 11 0 K 13   
0 −K 13 −K 22 −K 23 K 23 K 36 0 K 13 K 22 K 23 K 23 K 33

(13.69)

13–24

13–25

§13.5 FLEXIBILITY BASED DERIVATIONS

ClearAll[φ,ψ,Ψ,Γ,R,F,M,V,Le,EA,EI]; EA=4*EI/(Ψ^2*Le^2); V=-fy2*Cos[ψ]+fx2*Sin[ψ]; F=fx2*Cos[ψ]+fy2*Sin[ψ]; M=m2+fx2*R*(Cos[ψ]-Cos[φ])+fy2*R*(Sin[ψ]+Sin[φ]); Ucd=(F-M/R)^2/(2*EA)+ M^2/(2*EI); Uc=Simplify[Integrate[Ucd*R,{ψ,-φ,φ}]]; Print["Uc=",Uc]; u2=D[Uc,fx2]; v2=D[Uc,fy2]; θ2=D[Uc,m2]; Frr=Simplify[{{ D[u2,fx2], D[u2,fy2], D[u2,m2]}, { D[v2,fx2], D[v2,fy2], D[v2,m2]}, { D[θ2,fx2], D[θ2,fy2], D[θ2,m2]}}]; Frr=FullSimplify[Frr/.{R->Le/(2*φ)}]; Print["Frr=",Frr//MatrixForm]; Krr=FullSimplify[Inverse[Frr]]; Print["Krr=",Krr//MatrixForm]; TT={{-1,0,0},{0,-1,0},{0,-2*R*Sin[φ],-1},{1,0,0},{0,1,0},{0,0, 1}}; TT=TT/.{R->Le/(2*φ)}; T=Transpose[TT]; Ke=Simplify[TT.Krr.T]; Print["Ke=",Ke//MatrixForm];

Figure 13.19. Script to produce circular arch element stiffness in local coordinates.

(a)
3 (x3 ,y3 )

x

_

(b)
2 3 2φ 1 1 R 3

(c) b H 2S a
2

2 (x2 ,y2) _ 1 (x 1 ,y1)

y

y

ϕ

x
Figure 13.20. Plane circular arch element in global coordinates: (a) geometric id (b) intrinsic geometry recovery.

The only new entry not in (13.67) is K 36 = −K 33 − K 23 sin φ/φ = EI (90 45
2

+ φ 2 (12ψ 2 − 5) + O(φ 4 )

As a check, if φ → 0 the entries reduce to that of the beam-column modeled with Bernoulli-Euler. For example K 11 → 4E I 2 / 3 = E A/ , K 22 → 12E I / 3 , K 33 → 4E I / , K 36 → 2E I / , etc. §13.5.3. Plane Circular Arch in Global System To use the circular arch element in a 2D finite element program it is necessary to specify its geometry in the {x, y} plane and then to transform the stiffness (13.69) to global coordinates. The first requirement can be handled by providing the coordinates of three nodes: {xi , yi }, i = 1, 2, 3. Node 3 (see Figure) is a geometric node that serves to define the element mean curvature but has no associated freedoms. (Section to be completed).

13–25

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–26

Figure 13.21. Module to produce plane circular arch element stiffness in global coordinates.

§13.6.

*Accuracy Analysis

This section presents the accuracy analysis of a repeating lattice of beam elements, analogous to that done for the bar element in §12.5. The analysis uses the method of modified differential equations (MoDE) mentioned in the Notes and Bibliography of Chapter 12. It is performed using a repeated differentiations scheme similar to that used in solving Exercise 12.8. Only the case of the Bernoulli-Euler model is worked out in detail. §13.6.1. *Accuracy of Bernoulli-Euler Beam Element Consider a lattice of repeating two-node, prismatic, plane Bernoulli-Euler beam elements of rigidity E I and length , as illustrated in Figure 13.22. The system is subject to an arbitrary lateral load q(x), which is assumed infinitely differentiable in x. From the lattice extract a patch of two elements: (1) and (2), connecting nodes i– j and j–k, respectively, as shown in Figure 13.22. The FEM patch equations at node j are

q(x)
i j k EI = const L vj = 1 Two-element patch ijk θj = 1 Trial functions at node j

xi = xj −

xj xk = xj +

 θi   vj  −12 −6 24 0 −12 6   = fj i (1) j (2) k 2 2 2  3 6 2 0 8 −6 2 θj  mj   vk Figure 13.22. Repeating beam lattice for accuracy analysis. θk (13.70) Expand v(x), θ(x) and q(x) in Taylor series about x = x j , truncating at n +1 terms for v and θ, and m +1 terms for q. Using ψ = (x − x j )/ , the series are v(x) = v j + ψ v j + (ψ 2 2 /2!)v j + . . . + (ψ n n /n!)v [n] , θ(x) = j θ j +ψ θ j +(ψ 2 2 /2!)θ j +. . .+(ψ n n /n!)θ [n] , and q(x) = q j +ψ q j +(ψ 2 2 /2!)q j +. . .+(ψ m m /m!)q [m] . j j Here v [n] , etc., is an abbreviation for d n v(x j )/d x n .13 Evaluate the v(x) and θ (x) series at i and k by setting j
EI
13

v 
i

Brackets are used instead of parentheses to avoid confusion with element superscripts. If derivatives are indexed by primes or roman numerals the brackets are omitted.

13–26

13–27

§13.6 *ACCURACY ANALYSIS

ψ = ±1, and insert in (13.70). Use the q(x) series evaluated over elements (1) and (2), to compute the consistent forces f j and m j as
1 1 1 1

fj =

(13.71) (1) (1) (2) Here N3 = 1 (1 + ξ (1) )2 (2 − ξ (1) ), N4 = − 8 (1 + ξ (1) )2 (1 − ξ (1) ) N1 = 1 (1 − ξ (2) )2 (2 + ξ (2) ), and 4 4 (2) N2 = 8 (1 − ξ (2) )2 (1 + ξ (2) ) are the Hermitian shape functions components of the j node trial function, whereas q (1) = q(ψ (1) ), ψ (1) = − 1 (1 − ξ (1) ) and q (2) = q(ψ (2) ), ψ (2) = 1 (1 + ξ (2) ) denote the lateral loads. 2 2 To show the resulting system in compact matrix form it is convenient to collect the derivatives at node j into vectors: v j = [ v j v j v j . . . v [n] ]T , j θ j = [ θ j θ j θ j . . . θ [n] ]T , j q j = [ q j q j q j . . . q [n] ]T . j (13.72)

2

−1

(1) N3 q (1) dξ (1) +

−1

(2) N1 q (2) dξ (2) , m j =

2

−1

(1) N4 q (1) dξ (1) +

−1

(2) N2 q (2) dξ (2) .

The resulting differential system can be compactly written Svv Sθv Svθ Sθθ vj θj Pv qj. Pθ

=

(13.73)

Here Svv , Svθ , Sθv and Sθθ are triangular Toeplitz matrices of order (n+1) × (n+1) whereas Pv and Pθ are generally rectangular matrices of order (n+1) × (m+1). Here is the expression of these matrices for n = 8, m = 4: 0 0  0  0  = EI 0  0  0  0 0

Svv

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

−12

0
−12

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

− 0
−12

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 − 0
−12

− 3 30

0
− 3 30

− 5 1680 − 3 30

0 0  0  0  Svθ = E I  0  0  0  

12

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 − 0
−12

0 0 0 0 0

0 − 0
−12

0 0 0 0
3

0 0 0

   0   − ,  0   −12  
0 0
5

0 

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 2 12 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 10 0 420 0  3 5 2 0 10 0 420   3 0 2 0 10 0  3  12 0 2 0 10   0 12 0 2 0   0 0 12 0 2   0 0 0 12 0   0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0
3 5 3

0 0  0  0  Sθv = E I  0  0  0 

−12

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

12 0 2 0 0 −2 0 − 0 − 0  10 420 3 5 −12 − −  0 12 0 2 0 −2 0 10 0 420    3  0 0 12 0 −12 0 0 −2 0 − 0   10 3   0 0 0 12 0 0 −12 0 −2 0 −   10  −12  , Sθθ = E I  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 −2 0    0 0 0 0 −12 0 −2  0 0 0 0   −12  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 −12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 6 0 180 0   3 5 2 0 6 0 180   3 0 2 0 6 0   3  12 0 2 0 6   0 12 0 2 0   0 0 12 0 2  0  0 0 0 12 12 0 0 0 0 (13.74)
3 5

6

0

5

180

0

7

10080

13–27

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–28
5

 0  0  0 Pv =  0  0  0 

0

3

15

0
3

5

560
3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 0 0 15   0 0 0  , 0 0 0  0 0 0 0   0 0 0 0  
15

0

0 

0 0

0 0  0  0  Pθ =  0  0  0 0 0

3

15

0
3

315

0
5

            

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

15

0
3

315

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

15

0
3

0 0 0 0 0 0

15

0 0 0 0 0

(13.75)

Elimination of θ j gives the condensed system Sv j = Pq j , with 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 S = Svv − Svθ S−1 Sθv , θθ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 −  720 0 0  0 0   0   0 , 0 0   0 0   0 0 0 0
5

P = Pv − Svθ S−1 Pθ . θv

(13.76) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5

0 −  720 0 0 0  0 0 0 0 0    0 0 0    P = Pv − Svθ S−1 Pθ =  0 0 0  θv 0 0 0 0    0 0 0 0    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (13.77) The nontrivial differential relations14 given by S v j = P q j are E I (v iv − 4 v viii /720) = q j − 4 q iv /720, j j j E I v v = q j , E I v vi = q j , E I v vii = q j , and E I v viii = q iv . The first one is a truncation of the infinite order j j j j j MoDE. Elimination of all v j derivatives but v iv yields j E I v iv = q j , j (13.78)

0 0 0 0 0 0  0 0  −1 S = Svv − Svθ Sθθ Sθv = E I  0 0 0 0  0 0 

exactly. That this is not a fluke can be confirmed by increasing n and while taking m = n − 4. The first 4 ˆ columns and last 4 rows of S, which are always zero, are removed to get S. The last 4 rows of P, which are ˆ With m = n−4 both matrices are of order n−3 × n−3. Then S = P for any ˆ ˆ also zero, are removed to get P. n, which leads immediately to (13.78). This was confirmed with Mathematica running n up to 24. The foregoing analysis shows that the BE cubic element is nodally exact for any smooth load over a repeating lattice if consistent load computation is used. Exercise 13.18 verifies that the property is lost if elements are not identical. Numerical experiments confirm these conclusions. The Laplace transform method only works part way: it gives a different infinite order MoDE but recovers (13.78) as n → ∞. These accuracy properties are not widely known. If all beam elements are prismatic and subjected only to point loads at nodes, overall exactness follows from a theorem by Tong [251], which is not surprising since the exact solution is contained in the FEM approximation. For general distributed loads the widespread belief is that the cubic element incurs O( 4 ) errors. The first study of this nature by Waltz et. al. [260] gave the modified differential equation (MoDE) for a uniform load q as v iv −
4

720

v viii + . . . =

q . EI

(13.79)

14

Derivatives of order 4 and higher are indicated by Roman numeral superscripts instead of primes.

13–28

13–29

§13. Notes and Bibliography

The above terms are correct. In fact a more complete expression, obtained in this study, is 7 8 q viii + . . . 720 3024 720 3024 259200 (13.80) 4 But the conclusion that “the principal error term” is of order [260, p. 1009] is incorrect. The misinterpretation is due to (13.80) being an ODE of infinite order. Truncation is fine if followed by elimination of higher derivatives. If this is done, the finite order MoDE (13.78) emerges regardless of where (13.80) is truncated; an obvious clue being the repetition of coefficients in both sides. The moral is that conclusions based on infinite order ODEs should be viewed with caution, unless corroborated by independent means. EI v iv − v viii + vx − =q− q iv + q vi − §13.6.2. *Accuracy of Timoshenko Beam Element Following the same procedure it can be shown that the infinite order MoDE for a Timoshenko beam element repeating lattice with the stiffness (13.18) and consistent node forces is EI v iv + j = qj −
2 4 6

7 8 v xii + . . . 259200

4

6

12
4

v vi − j

4

(1 + 5 − 5 720
6

2

)

v viii + j

6

(20 + 7
2

− 70 60480

2

+ 35

3

)

vx + . . . j

(1 + 5 ) iv qj + 720

This reduces to (13.80) if FOMoDE)

= 12E I /(G As 2 ). (13.81) = 0. Elimination of higher order derivatives gives the finite order MoDE (aka in which E I v iv = q j − j
2

(20 + 14 − 35 60480

)

q vi ) + . . . , j

12

qj = qj −

EI q . G As j

(13.82)

which repeats for any n > 8. This happens to be the exact governing differential equation for a statically loaded Timoshenko beam [95, p. 23]. Consequently the Timoshenko beam is nodally exact under the same conditions previously stated for the Bernoulii-Euler model. Notes and Bibliography The material in this Chapter interwines the very old and the very new. Before energy methods came to the FEM forefront by 1960 (see historical sketch in §1.7), ordinary differential equations (ODE) and flexibility methods were essential part of the toolbox repertoire of the professional structural engineer. Traces of that dominance may be found in the books by Przemieniecki [205], Pestel and Leckie [194] and the survey by Gallagher [108]. Energy derivations were popularized by Archer [11,12], Martin [170] and Melosh [178,179]. For one-dimensional elements, however, results are often identical. This can provide a valuable crosscheck. The Legendre interpolation (13.2) was introduced in [85,88] to study optimal mass-stiffness combinations for beam elements in the context of finite element templates [78]. The diagonal covariance matrices Qn given in (13.4) play a key role in model customization. The hinged element stiffness (13.14) is rederived in the Advanced FEM Lecture Notes [86] using a mixed variational principle. The separation of uncoupled rigidity effects in stiffness forms such as (13.8) and (13.9) is suggested by template theory [92]. The Timoshenko beam model was originally proposed in [243]. Timoshenko cleverly packaged the model with miscellaneous ingredients introduced earlier by Bresse and Hencky. It has become important as a tool for transient response and control simulations because its dynamic form is strictly hyperbolic.15 The Timoshenko beam element stiffness (13.18) first appeared in [255] in the guise of a spar element for use in aircraft structures;
15

The Bernoulli-Euler beam dynamic model is parabolic and thus exhibits an infinite transverse wave speed. Such a model is unsuitable for wave propagation problems.

13–29

Chapter 13: ADVANCED ONE-DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS

13–30

the end node freedoms of that element differring from the classical set used here. The particular form (13.18) is derived in Section 5.6 of [205] using ODEs. This beam model pertains to the class of “C 0 elements” that have been extensively studied in the FEM literature after 1968. The book of Hughes [142] provides a comprehensive treatment of such methods for beams and plates. The classical work on beams on elastic foundations is by Hetenyi [133]. Useful solutions are tabulated in Roark-Young’s handbook [212]. That the use of homogeneous solutions of governing differential equations yields nodally-exact stiffness equations was first proven generally by Tong [251] in a Galerkin context. This derivation procedure, however, was rarely used after the 1960s. Two obstacles: (1) it is largely restricted to either one dimensional elements, or to problems with special symmetries that can be modeled with ODEs;16 (2) rapidly increasing solution complexity in complicated problems discouraged hand derivations. Whereas the first limitation still holds, the increasing availability of CAS allows timely consideration of more difficult problems. The construction of the exact beam-on-Winkler-foundation element in §13.3 offers a case in point. Using Mathematica the complete derivation, checking and fully-symbolic testing took about 6 hours, whereas a hand derivation, coding and numerical testing would likely take weeks or months. The main application of exact elements appears to be a priori error estimation: how many simpler elements are needed to do the job of an exact one? The construction of stiffness matrices from flexibility information was historically one of the first techniques by which stiffness equations of MoM members were derived. The rigid body injection method of §13.4.4 largely follows Section 6.6 of [205]. The presentation of discrete-system equilibrium theorems in §13.4.2 includes a new ingredient missing from previous work: handling non-self-equilibrated loading systems. This extension removes the 40-year-old objection that flexibility methods (or more generally, schemes based on the TCPE principle) are unable to produce equivalent or consistent node forces. The use of equilibrium methods for multidimensional finite elements was pioneered by Fraeijs de Veubeke in the 1960s and early 1970s. His obsession with solution bounding got these methods seriously stuck, however, because of difficulties in interelement connections that maintain system-level equilibrium, as well as avoidance of spurious modes. More practical extensions lead to the so-called Trefftz and equilibrium hybrid methods. These are presently the topic of active research17 but require advanced variational techniques beyond the scope of this book. Another recent advance is the discovery of the free-free flexibility as the true dual of the free-free stiffness [82,90,83]. This extension relies heavily on projection operators. That Hermitian BE element models are nodally exact if consistent loads are used is stated in [148, Sec. 8.3] as the “beam theorem.” Despite the name, no proof is given; only anecdotal evidence — it was likely discovered by numerical experimentation. A proof based on Fourier series appears in [95]. As the study in §13.6 illustrates, modified equation methods in boundary value problems18 are delicate and should be used with care. Their intricacies baffled Strang and Fix who, upon doing Fourier analysis of a cubic beam element, incorrectly stated [228, p. 171] that only one of the discrete equations — that for v(x) — is consistent “and the others are completely inconsistent.” The alternative is the variational approach to error analysis. Although more robust and forgiving, predictions are often so conservative as to be of little value. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

16 17 18

For example, symmetrically loaded circular plates or shells of revolution. Along with discontinuous Galerkin methods, a reinvention of Fraeijs de Veubeke’s weakly diffusive models. They are more forgiving in initial value problems.

13–30

13–31
Homework Exercises for Chapter 13 Advanced One-Dimensional Elements

Exercises

EXERCISE 13.1 [A:15] Evaluate the strain and stress fields associated with the Timoshenko beam displacement field (13.16). EXERCISE 13.2 [A/C:20] Find the consistent node forces for a Timoshenko beam element under a uniform

transverse load q. Hint: find fc for the Legendre interpolation, then premultiply by HT . S
EXERCISE 13.3 [A/C:20] Construct the stiffness matrix a Timoshenko plane beam element with a hinge at the center. Hint: set R Bs = 0, R Ba = E I and R S = 12E I /( 2 ) in (13.13). EXERCISE 13.4 [A/C:15=5+10] Consider a cantilever beam of constant bending rigidity E I , constant shear rigidity G As and length L, which is modeled with one Timoshenko element. The beam is end loaded by a transverse force P. The support conditions are v1 = θ1 = 0.

(a) (b)

Find the end displacement v2 and end rotation θ2 in terms of P, E, G, I , As and L. Compare with the analytical values P L 3 /(3E I ) + P L/(G As ) and P L 2 /(2E I ), respectively. Why does the finite element model provides the exact answer with one element?

EXERCISE 13.5 [A:25] (Requires math ability). Discuss what happens in (13.18) if EXERCISE 13.6 [A:10] For a given number of elements N e of length

→ ∞. Is the result useful for a shear-only “spar” element? Hint: eliminate θ1 and θ2 by a master-slave MFC. = 2L/N e , relate χ and λ in Example

13.2.
EXERCISE 13.7 [A/C:40] (research paper level). Derive an exact Timoshenko-beam-on-Winkler-foundation equation method.element using the differential equation method. EXERCISE 13.8 [C:30] Write Mathematica code to verify the nodal exactness conclusion of §13.6.1 using the repeated differentiation approach. EXERCISE 13.9 [C:30] As above, but using the Laplace transform. Show that this only does half the job. EXERCISE 13.10 [A/C:35] Find the general symbolic expression of the terms in the infinite order MoDE

(13.80).
EXERCISE 13.11 [A/C:40] (research paper level) Analyze nodal accuracy if the length of the beam elements in the lattice of Figure 13.22 alternates between (1 ± α) , where 0 ≤ α ≤ 1 . 2 EXERCISE 13.12 [A/C:35] Using Mathematica, verify the results (13.81) and (13.82) in §13.6.2.

13–31

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6 Feb 2005 17:01

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The Plane Stress Problem

14

14–1

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§14.1. Introduction §14.1.1. Plate in Plane Stress . . . . §14.1.2. Mathematical Model . . . §14.2. Plane Stress Problem Description §14.2.1. Given Problem Data . . . . §14.2.2. Problem Unknowns . . . . §14.3. Linear Elasticity Equations §14.3.1. Governing Equations . . . . §14.3.2. Boundary Conditions . . . §14.3.3. Weak Forms versus Strong Form §14.3.4. Total Potential Energy . . . §14.4. Finite Element Equations §14.4.1. Displacement Interpolation . . §14.4.2. Element Energy . . . . . §14.4.3. Element Stiffness Equations . §14. Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . §14. References . . . . . . . . . . . §14. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

14–3 14–3 14–4 14–4 14–4 14–5 14–6 14–7 14–7 14–8 14–9 14–10 14–10 14–11 14–11 14–12 14–12 14–13

14–2

14–3 §14.1. Introduction

§14.1 INTRODUCTION

We now pass to the variational formulation of two-dimensional continuum finite elements. The problem of plane stress will serve as the vehicle for illustrating such formulations. As narrated in §1.7.1, continuum finite elements were invented in the aircraft industry (at Boeing, early 1950s) to solve this kind of problem when it arose in the design and analysis of delta wing panels [323]. The problem is presented here within the framework of the linear theory of elasticity. §14.1.1. Plate in Plane Stress In structural mechanics, a flat thin sheet of material is called a plate.1 The distance between the plate faces is called the thickness and denoted by h. The midplane lies halfway between the two faces. z The direction normal to the midplane is the transverse direction. Directions parallel to the midplane are called in-plane directions. The global axis z will be oriented along the transverse direction. Axes x and y are placed in the midplane, forming a right-handed Rectangular Cartesian Coordinate (RCC) system. Thus the midplane equation is z = 0. See Figure 14.1.

y x
Figure 14.1. A plate structure in plane stress.

A plate loaded in its midplane is said to be in a state of plane stress, or a membrane state, if the following assumptions hold: 1. 2. 3. 4. All loads applied to the plate act in the midplane direction, and are symmetric with respect to the midplane. All support conditions are symmetric about the midplane. In-plane displacements, strains and stresses can be taken to be uniform through the thickness. The normal and shear stress components in the z direction are zero or negligible.

The last two assumptions are not necessarily consequences of the first two. For the latter to hold, the thickness h should be small, typically 10% or less, than the shortest in-plane dimension. If the plate thickness varies it should do so gradually. Finally, the plate fabrication must exhibit symmetry with respect to the midplane. To these four assumptions we add the following restriction: 5. The plate is fabricated of the same material through the thickness. Such plates are called transversely homogeneous or (in aerospace) monocoque plates.

The last assumption excludes wall constructions of importance in aerospace, in particular composite and honeycomb sandwich plates. The development of mathematical models for such configurations requires a more complicated integration over the thickness as well as the ability to handle coupled bending and stretching effects, and will not be considered here.
1

If it is relatively thick, as in concrete pavements or Argentinian beefsteaks, the term slab is also used but not for plane stress conditions.

14–3

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–4
y

Midplane

Mathematical idealization

Plate

Γ Ω

x

Figure 14.2. Mathematical model of plate in plane stress.

Remark 14.1. Selective relaxation from assumption 4 leads to the so-called generalized plane stress state, in

which z stresses are accepted. The plane strain state is obtained if strains in the z direction are precluded. Although the construction of finite element models for those states has many common points with plane stress, we shall not consider those models here. For isotropic materials the plane stress and plane strain problems can be mapped into each other through a fictitious-property technique; see Exercise 14.1.
Remark 14.2. Transverse loading on a plate produces plate bending, which is associated with a more complex configuration of internal forces and deformations. This subject is studied in more advanced courses.

§14.1.2. Mathematical Model The mathematical model of the plate in plane stress is a two-dimensional boundary value problem (BVP). The BVP is posed over a plane domain with a boundary , as illustrated in Figure 14.2. In this idealization the third dimension is represented as functions of x and y that are integrated through the plate thickness. Engineers often work with internal plate forces, which result from integrating the in-plane stresses through the thickness. See Figure 14.3. §14.2. Plane Stress Problem Description §14.2.1. Given Problem Data Domain geometry. This is defined by the boundary illustrated in Figure 14.2.

Thickness. Most plates used as structural components have constant thickness. If the thickness does vary, in which case h = h(x, y), it should do so gradually to maintain the plane stress state. Material data. This is defined by the constitutive equations. Here we shall assume that the plate material is linearly elastic but not necessarily isotropic. Specified Interior Forces. These are known forces that act in the interior of the plate. There are of two types. Body forces or volume forces are forces specified per unit of plate volume; for example the plate weight. Face forces act tangentially to the plate faces and are transported to the midplane. For example, the friction or drag force on an airplane skin is of this type if the skin is modeled to be in plane stress. Specified Surface Forces. These are known forces that act on the boundary of the plate. In elasticity these are called surface tractions. In actual applications it is important to know whether these forces are specified per unit of surface area or per unit length. 14–4

14–5

§14.2

PLANE STRESS PROBLEM DESCRIPTION

In-plane internal forces
dx dy h pyy
y

y

+ sign conventions for internal forces, stresses and strains

Thin plate in plane stress z
dx dy

x

pxx

pxy

dy dx

x

In-plane stresses

In-plane body forces
dx dy

y
h

dx dy

x

x

σyy σxx σxy = σ yx

y x

h bx by

y

In-plane strains
dx dy h

In-plane displacements
dx dy h

x

eyy e xx e xy = eyx

y x

ux

uy

y

Figure 14.3. Notational conventions for in-plane stresses, strains, displacements and internal forces of a thin plate in plane stress.

Displacement Boundary Conditions. These specify how the plate is supported. Points on the plate boundary may be fixed, allowed to move in one direction, or subject to multipoint constraints. In addition symmetry and antisymmetry lines may be identified as discussed in Chapter 8. If no displacement boundary conditions are imposed, the plate structure is said to be free-free. §14.2.2. Problem Unknowns The unknown fields are displacements, strains and stresses. Because of the assumed wall fabrication homogeneity the in-plane components are assumed to be uniform through the plate thickness. Thus the dependence on z disappears and all such components become functions of x and y only. Displacements. The in-plane displacement field is defined by two components: u(x, y) = u x (x, y) u y (x, y) (14.1)

The transverse displacement component u z (x, y, z) component is generally nonzero because of Poisson’s ratio effects, and depends on z. However, this displacement does not appear in the governing equations. Strains. The in-plane strain field forms a tensor defined by three independent components: ex x , e yy and ex y . To allow stating the FE equations in matrix form, these components are conventionally arranged to form a 3-component “strain vector” e(x, y) = ex x (x, y) e yy (x, y) 2ex y (x, y) 14–5 (14.2)

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–6

Displacement Prescribed BCs Displacements displacements ^ u u=u ^ u on Γu
e = D u Kinematic in Ω

Body forces

b
Equilibrium DTσ + b = 0 in Ω (aka Balance)
Stresses

Γ

Strains

Constitutive
σ=Ee or e = Cσ in Ω

Force BCs
σT n = t or pT n = q ^ on Γt
^

e

σ

Prescribed tractions ^ or t ^ forces q

Figure 14.4. The Strong Form of the plane stress equations of linear elastostatics displayed as a Tonti diagram. Yellow boxes identify prescribed fields whereas orange boxes denote unknown fields. The distinction between Strong and Weak Forms is explained in §14.3.3.

The factor of 2 in ex y shortens strain energy expressions. The shear strain components ex z and e yz vanish. The transverse normal strain ezz is generally nonzero because of Poisson’s ratio effects. This strain does not enter the governing equations as unknown, however, because the associated stress σzz is zero. This eliminates the contribution of σzz ezz to the internal energy. Stresses. The in-plane stress field forms a tensor defined by three independent components: σx x , σ yy and σx y . As in the case of strains, to allow stating the FE equations in matrix form, these components are conventionally arranged to form a 3-component “stress vector” σ(x, y) = σx x (x, y) σ yy (x, y) σx y (x, y) (14.3)

The remaining three stress components: σzz , σx z and σ yz , are assumed to vanish. The plate internal forces are obtained on integrating the stresses through the thickness. Under the assumption of uniform stress distribution, px x = σx x h, p yy = σ yy h, px y = σx y h. (14.4)

These p’s also form a tensor. They are called membrane forces in the literature. See Figure 14.3. §14.3. Linear Elasticity Equations We shall develop plane stress finite elements in the framework of classical linear elasticity. The necessary governing equations are presented below. They are graphically represented in the Strong Form Tonti diagram of Figure 14.4.

14–6

14–7 §14.3.1. Governing Equations

§14.3

LINEAR ELASTICITY EQUATIONS

The three internal fields: displacements, strains and stresses 14.1–14.3 are connected by three field equations: kinematic, constitutive and internal-equilibrium equations. If initial strain effects are ignored, these equations read ex x ∂/∂ x 0 ux , e yy = 0 ∂/∂ y uy 2ex y ∂/∂ y ∂/∂ x E 11 E 12 E 13 ex x σx x σ yy = E 12 E 22 E 23 e yy , σx y E 13 E 23 E 33 2ex y σx x b 0 ∂/∂ x 0 ∂/∂ y . σ yy + x = by 0 0 ∂/∂ y ∂/∂ x σx y The compact matrix version of 14.5 is e = D u, σ = E e, DT σ + b = 0, (14.6)

(14.5)

Here E = ET is the 3 × 3 stress-strain matrix of plane stress elastic moduli, D is the 3 × 2 symmetric-gradient operator and its transpose the 2 × 3 tensor-divergence operator.2 If the plate material is isotropic with elastic modulus E and Poisson’s ratio ν, the moduli in the constitutive matrix E reduce to E 11 = E 22 = E/(1 − ν 2 ), E 33 = 1 E/(1 + ν) = G, E 12 = ν E 11 2 and E 13 = E 23 = 0. See also Exercise 14.1. §14.3.2. Boundary Conditions Boundary conditions prescribed on may be of two types: displacement BC or force BC (the latter is also called stress BC or traction BC). To write down those conditions it is conceptually convenient to break up into two subsets: u and t , over which displacements and force or stresses, respectively, are specified. See Figure 14.5. Displacement boundary conditions are prescribed on ˆ u = u.
u

in the form (14.7)

ˆ ˆ Here u are prescribed displacements. Often u = 0. This happens in fixed portions of the boundary, as the ones illustrated in Figure 14.5. Force boundary conditions (also called stress BCs and traction BCs in the literature) are specified on t . They take the form ˆ σn = t. (14.8) Here ˆ are prescribed surface tractions specified as a force per unit area (that is, not integrated t through the thickness), and σn is the stress vector shown in Figure 14.5.
2

The dependence on (x, y) has been omitted to reduce clutter.

14–7

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–8
n (unit t exterior normal)

^ u=0 ^ Boundary displacements u are prescribed on Γu (figure depicts fixity condition)

;;; ;; ;;; ;; ;;; ;;; ;; ;; ;;;
Γu

+

Γ t

^ t

σn

σnt σ nn

^n t ^ t

^ tt

Boundary tractions ^ or t ^ boundary forces q are prescribed on Γt

Stress BC details (decomposition of forces ^ q would be similar)

Figure 14.5. Displacement and force (stress, traction) boundary conditions for the plane stress problem.

An alternative form of 14.8 uses the internal plate forces: ˆ pn = q. (14.9)

ˆ t Here pn = σn h and q = ˆ h. This form is used more often than 14.8 in structural design, particularly when the plate wall construction is inhomogeneous. The components of σn in Cartesian coordinates follow from Cauchy’s stress transformation formula σx x n x + σx y n y σn = σx y n x + σ yy n y nx = 0 0 ny ny nx σx x σ yy σx y , (14.10)

in which n x and n y denote the Cartesian components of the unit normal vector ne (also called the ˆ ˆ direction cosines of the normal). Thus 14.8 splits into two scalar conditions: tx = σnx and t y = σny . The derivation of 14.10 is the subject of Exercise 14.4. It is sometimes convenient to write the condition 14.8 in terms of normal n and tangential t directions: ˆ σnn = tn , ˆ σnt = tt (14.11)

in which σnn = σnx n x + σny n y and σnt = −σnx n y + σny n x .
Remark 14.3. The separation of into u and t is useful for conciseness in the mathematical formulation, such as the energy integrals presented below. It does not exhaust, however, all BC possibilities. Frequently at points of one specifies a displacement in one direction and a force (or stress) in the other. An example of these are roller and sliding conditions as well as lines of symmetry and antisymmetry. To cover these situations one needs either a generalization of the split, in which u and t are permitted to overlap, or to define another portion m for “mixed” conditions. Such generalizations will not be presented here, as they become unimportant once the FE discretization is done.

14–8

14–9
Displacement Prescribed BCs Displacements displacements ^ u u=u ^ u on Γu
e = D u Kinematic in Ω

§14.3

LINEAR ELASTICITY EQUATIONS

Body forces

b
δΠ= 0 in Ω

Γ

Equilibrium (weak)

Strains

Constitutive
σ=Ee or e = Cσ in Ω

Stresses

Force BCs (weak)
δΠ = 0 on Γt

e

σ

Prescribed tractions ^ or t ^ forces q

Figure 14.6. The TPE-based Weak Form of the plane stress equations of linear elastostatics. Weak links are marked with grey lines.

§14.3.3. Weak Forms versus Strong Form We introduce now some further terminology from variational calculus. The Tonti diagram of Figure 14.4 is said to display the Strong Form of the governing equations because all relations are verified point by point. These relations, called strong links, are shown in the diagram with black lines. A Weak Form is obtained by relaxing one or more strong links. Those are replaced by weak links, which enforce relations in an average or integral sense rather than point by point. The weak links are then provided by the variational formulation chosen for the problem. Because in general many variational forms of the same problem are possible, there are many possible Weak Forms. On the other hand the Strong Form is unique. The Weak Form associated with the Total Potential Energy (TPE) variational form is illustrated in Figure 14.6. The internal equilibrium equations and stress BC become weak links, which are drawn by gray lines. These equations are given by the variational statement δ = 0, where the TPE functional is given in the next subsection. The FEM displacement formulation discussed below is based on this particular Weak Form. §14.3.4. Total Potential Energy As usual the Total Potential Energy functional for the plane stress problem is given by = U − W. The internal energy is the elastic strain energy: U=
1 2

(14.12)

h σT e d

=

1 2

h eT E e d .

(14.13)

The derivation details are relegated to Exercise E14.5. The external energy is the sum of contributions from known interior and boundary forces: W = h uT b d +
t

t h uT ˆ d .

(14.14)

14–9

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–10
t.

Note that the boundary integral over is taken only over over which tractions or forces are specified. §14.4. Finite Element Equations The necessary equations to apply the finite element method to the plane stress problem are collected here and expressed in matrix form. The domain of Figure 14.7(a) is discretized by a finite element mesh as illustrated in Figure 14.7(b). From this mesh we extract a generic element labeled e with n ≥ 3 node points. In subsequent derivations the number n is kept arbitrary. Therefore, the formulation is applicable to arbitrary two-dimensional elements, for example those sketched in Figure 14.8. To comfortably accommodate general element types, the node points will be labeled 1 through n. These are called local node numbers. Numbering will always start with corners.
(a)

That is, the portion of the boundary

(b)

Γ Ω
(c)

Ωe

Γe

Figure 14.7. Finite element discretization and extraction of generic element.

The element domain and boundary are denoted by e and e , respectively. The element has 2n degrees of freedom. These are collected in the element node displacement vector in a node by node arrangement: (14.15) ue = [ u x1 u y1 u x2 . . . u xn u yn ]T . §14.4.1. Displacement Interpolation The displacement field ue (x, y) over the element is interpolated from the node displacements. We shall assume that the same interpolation functions are used for both displacement components.3 Thus
n n

u x (x, y) =
i=1

Nie (x, y) u xi ,

u y (x, y) =
i=1

Nie (x, y) u yi ,

(14.16)

where Nie (x, y) are the element shape functions. In matrix form: u(x, y) = u x (x, y) = u y (x, y)
e N1 0

0 e N1

e N2 0

0 e N2

... ...

e Nn 0

0 e e e u = Nu . Nn

(14.17)

This N (with superscript e omitted to reduce clutter) is called the shape function matrix. It has dimensions 2 × 2n. For example, if the element has 4 nodes, N is 2 × 8. The interpolation condition on the element shape function Nie (x, y) states that it must take the value one at the i th node and zero at all others. This ensures that the interpolation 14.17 is correct at the nodes. Additional requirements on the shape functions are stated in later Chapters.
3

This is the so called element isotropy condition, which is studied and justified in advanced FEM courses.

14–10

14–11
3
2

§14.4
3

FINITE ELEMENT EQUATIONS

3

4 6 1 2 1 4

5 2

4 9 10 1 12 11 5

8

3 7 6 2

1

n=3

n=4

n=6

n = 12

Figure 14.8. Example plane stress finite elements, characterized by their number of nodes n.

Differentiating the finite element displacement field yields the strain-displacement relations:  ∂Ne  e e ∂ Nn ∂ N2 1 0 0 . . . ∂x 0 ∂x  ∂x  e e e  ∂ Nn  e ∂ N2 ∂ N1 e  0  0 ... 0 e(x, y) =  (14.18) ∂y ∂y ∂y  u = B u .   e e e e e ∂ N e ∂ Nn ∂ N1 ∂ N1 ∂ N2 ∂ N2 . . . ∂ yn ∂y ∂x ∂y ∂x ∂x This B = D N is called the strain-displacement matrix. It is dimensioned 3 × 2n. For example, if the element has 6 nodes, B is 3 × 12. The stresses are given in terms of strains and displacements by σ = E e = EBue , which is assumed to hold at all points of the element. §14.4.2. Element Energy To obtain finite element stiffness equations, the variation of the TPE functional is decomposed into contributions from individual elements: δ where Ue = and We =
e

e

= δU e − δW e = 0.
e

(14.19)
e

1 2

h σT e d
e

=

1 2

h eT Ee d
e

(14.20)

h uT b d

e

+
e

t h uT ˆ d

e

(14.21)

Note that in 14.21 te has been taken equal to the complete boundary e of the element. This is a consequence of the fact that displacement boundary conditions are applied after assembly, to a free-free structure. Consequently it does not harm to assume that all boundary conditions are of stress type insofar as forming the element equations. §14.4.3. Element Stiffness Equations Inserting the relations u = Nue , e = Bue and σ = Ee into nodal displacements e = 1 ue T Ke ue − ue T fe . 2 14–11
e

yields the quadratic form in the (14.22)

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–12

Here the element stiffness matrix is Ke =
e

h BT EB d

e

,

(14.23)

and the consistent element nodal force vector is fe =
e

h NT b d

e

+
e

t h NT ˆ d

e

.

(14.24)

In the second integral of 14.24 the matrix N is evaluated on the element boundary only. The calculation of the entries of Ke and fe for several elements of historical or practical interest is described in subsequent Chapters.
Notes and Bibliography The plane stress problem is well suited for introducing continuum finite elements, from both historical and technical standpoints. Some books use the Poisson equation for this purpose, but problems such as heat conduction cannot illustrate features such as vector-mixed boundary conditions and shear effects. The first continuum structural finite elements were developed at Boeing in the early 1950s to model delta-wing skin panels [63,323]. A plane stress model was naturally chosen for the panels. The paper that gave the method its name [55] used the plane stress problem as application driver. The technical aspects of plane stress can be found in any book on elasticity. A particularly readable one is the excellent textbook by Fung [134], which is unfortunately out of print. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

14–12

14–13
Homework Exercises for Chapter 14 The Plane Stress Problem

Exercises

EXERCISE 14.1 [A+C:15] Suppose that the structural material is isotropic, with elastic modulus E and Poisson’s ratio ν. The in-plane stress-strain relations for plane stress (σzz = σx z = σ yz = 0) and plane strain (ezz = ex z = e yz = 0) as given in any textbook on elasticity, are

plane stress:

σx x σ yy σx y σx x σ yy σx y

plane strain:

0 0 1−ν 2 1−ν E = ν (1 + ν)(1 − 2ν) 0 E = 1 − ν2

1 ν 0

ν 1 0

ex x e yy 2ex y ν 1−ν 0

, 0 0 1 (1 − 2ν) 2 ex x e yy 2ex y (E14.1) .

Show that the constitutive matrix of plane strain can be formally obtained by replacing E by a fictitious modulus E ∗ and ν by a fictitious Poisson’s ratio ν ∗ in the plane stress constitutive matrix. Find the expression of E ∗ and ν ∗ in terms of E and ν. You may also chose to answer this exercise by doing the inverse process: go from plane strain to plain stress by replacing a fictitious modulus and Poisson’s ratio in the plane strain constitutive matrix. This device permits “reusing” a plane stress FEM program to do plane strain, or vice-versa, as long as the material is isotropic. Partial answer to go from plane stress to plane strain: ν ∗ = ν/(1 − ν).
EXERCISE 14.2 [A:25] In the finite element formulation of near incompressible isotropic materials (as well

as plasticity and viscoelasticity) it is convenient to use the so-called Lam´ constants λ and µ instead of E and e ν in the constitutive equations. Both λ and µ have the physical dimension of stress and are related to E and ν by E νE , µ=G= . (E14.2) λ= (1 + ν)(1 − 2ν) 2(1 + ν) Conversely E= µ(3λ + 2µ) , λ+µ ν= λ . 2(λ + µ) (E14.3)

Substitute (E14.3) into (E14.1) to express the two stress-strain matrices in terms of λ and µ. Then split the stress-strain matrix E of plane strain as (E14.4) E = E µ + Eλ in which Eµ and Eλ contain only µ and λ, respectively, with Eµ diagonal and E λ33 = 0. This is the Lam´ or e {λ, µ} splitting of the plane strain constitutive equations, which leads to the so-called B-bar formulation of near-incompressible finite elements.4 Express Eµ and Eλ also in terms of E and ν. ¯ For the plane stress case perform a similar splitting in which where Eλ contains only λ = 2λµ/(λ + 2µ) with ¯ .5 Express Eµ and Eλ also in terms of E and ν. E λ33 = 0, and Eµ is a diagonal matrix function of µ and λ
4

5

Equation (E14.4) is sometimes referred to as the deviatoric+volumetric splitting of the stress-strain law, on account of its physical meaning in plane strain. That meaning is lost, however, for plane stress. ¯ For the physical significance of λ see [288, pp. 254ff].

14–13

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–14

EXERCISE 14.3 [A:20] Include thermoelastic effects in the plane stress constitutive field equations, assuming

a thermally isotropic material with coefficient of linear expansion α. Hint: start from the two-dimensional Hooke’s law including temperature: ex x = 1 (σx x − νσ yy ) + α E T, e yy = 1 (σ yy − νσx x ) + α E T, 2ex y = σx y /G, (E14.5) T in one vector

in which T = T (x, y) and G = 1 E/(1 + ν). Solve for stresses and collect effects of 2 of “thermal stresses.”
EXERCISE 14.4 [A:15] Derive the Cauchy stress-

to-traction equations 14.10 using force equilibrium along x and y and the geometric relations shown in Figure E14.1. (This is the “wedge method” in Mechanics of Materials.) Hint: tx ds = σx x dy + σx y d x, etc.

y x
σx x

ty dy ds dx

n(nx =dx/ds, ny =dy/ds)
tx

σx y = σy x

σyy

Figure E14.1. Geometry for deriving 14.10.

EXERCISE 14.5 [A:25=5+5+15] A plate is in linearly elastic plane stress. It is shown in courses in elasticity that the internal strain energy density stored per unit volume is

U = 1 (σx x ex x + σ yy e yy + σx y ex y + σ yx e yx ) = 1 (σx x ex x + σ yy e yy + 2σx y ex y ). 2 2 (a) Show that (E14.6) can be written in terms of strains only as U = 1 eT E e, 2 and hence justify 14.13. (b) Show that (E14.6) can be written in terms of stresses only as U = 1 σT C σ, 2 where C = E−1 is the elastic compliance (strain-stress) matrix. (c)

(E14.6)

(E14.7)

(E14.8)

Suppose you want to write (E14.6) in terms of the extensional strains {ex x , e yy } and of the shear stress σx y = σ yx . This is known as a mixed representation. Show that U=
1 2

ex x e yy σx y

T

A11 A12 A13

A12 A22 A23

A13 A23 A33

ex x e yy σx y

,

(E14.9)

and explain how the entries Ai j of the matrix A that appears in (E14.9) can be calculated6 in terms of the elastic moduli E i j .

6

The process of computing A is an instance of “partial inversion” of matrix E. It is closely related to the Schur complement concept covered in Appendix P.

14–14

14–15

Exercises

Note the following Table list relations between commonly used moduli for isotropic linear elastic material. Here K is the bulk modulus whereas M is the P-wave modulus used in seismology.

(λ, µ) K =

(E, µ)

(K , λ)

(K , µ) 9K µ 3K +µ 2µ K− 3

(λ, ν) λ 1+ν 3ν

(µ, ν) 2µ(1+ν) 3(1−2ν) λ(1+ν)(1−2ν) ν
2µν

(E, ν) E 3(1−2ν) 2µ(1+ν)

(K , ν)

(K , E)

Eµ 2µ λ+ 3 3(3µ−E) 3λ+2µ E = µ λ+ν 9K K −λ 3K −λ E−2µ λ= µ 3µ−E µ=G= µ K −λ 2 λ E −1 ν= 2µ 2(λ+µ) 4µ−E M= λ+2µ µ 3K −2λ 3µ−E

λ K −λ 3K −λ 3K −2µ λ 3K −λ 2(3K +µ) 4µ K+ λ 1−ν ν 3

1−2ν 9K µ 3K +µ µ 2−2ν 1−2ν

3K (1−2ν) 3K (3K −E) 3K Eν 9K −E (1+ν)(1−2ν) 1+ν λ(1−2ν) (1−2ν) E 3K 2ν 2(1+ν) 2(1+ν) 3K −E 6K E(1−ν) 1−ν 3K 3K +E 3K 1+ν 9K −E (1+ν)(1−2ν)

14–15

Introduction to FEM

The Plane Stress Problem

14

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Plate in Plane Stress
Thickness dimension or transverse dimension

z

y x
Inplane dimensions: in x,y plane

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Mathematical Idealization as a Two Dimensional Problem

y

Midplane
Γ

Plate

x

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Plane Stress Physical Assumptions
Plate is flat and has a symmetry plane (the midplane) All loads and support conditions are midplane symmetric Thickness dimension is much smaller than inplane dimensions Inplane displacements, strains and stresses uniform through thickness Transverse stresses σzz , σxz and σyz negligible, set to 0 Unessential but used in this course: Plate fabricated of homogeneous material through thickness

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Notation for Stresses, Strains, Forces, Displacements
In-plane internal forces
dx dy h pyy
y

y

+ sign conventions for internal forces, stresses and strains

Thin plate in plane stress

z
dx dy

x

pxx

pxy

dy dx

x

In-plane stresses

In-plane body forces
dx dy

y
h

dx dy

x

x

σxx

σyy σxy = σ yx

y x

h bx by

y

In-plane strains
dx dy h

In-plane displacements
dx dy h

x

e xx e xy = eyx

eyy

y x

ux

uy

y

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Inplane Forces are Obtained by Stress Integration Through Thickness
Inplane stresses
h

σ yy σx x σx y = σ y x

y

z x

y x
h

p yy px x px y

y

x

Inplane internal forces (also called membrane forces)

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Plane Stress Boundary Conditions

;; ; ;;; ;; ;; ;;; ;; ;;; ;; ;; ;;; ;;;
Γu

n (unit t exterior normal) σnt ^n t ^ t σ nn Stress BC details (decomposition of forces ^ q would be similar) ^ tt

+

Γ t

^ t

σn

^ u=0 ^ Boundary displacements u are prescribed on Γu (figure depicts fixity condition)

Boundary tractions ^ or t ^ boundary forces q are prescribed on Γt

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

The Plane Stress Problem
Given: geometry material properties wall fabrication (thickness only for homogeneous plates) applied body forces boundary conditions: prescribed boundary forces or tractions prescribed displacements Find: inplane displacements inplane strains inplane stresses and/or internal forces

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Matrix Notation for Internal Fields
u(x, y) =  u x (x, y) u y (x, y)

displacements

ex x (x, y) e(x, y) =  e yy (x, y)  2ex y (x, y)   σx x (x, y) σ(x, y) =  σyy (x, y)  σx y (x, y)


strains (factor of 2 in e xy simplifies "energy dot products")

stresses

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Governing Plane Stress Elasticity Equations in Matrix Form
   ex x ∂/∂ x 0 u  e yy  =  0 ∂/∂ y  x uy ∂/∂ y ∂/∂ x 2ex y      σx x E 11 E 12 E 13 ex x  σ yy  =  E 12 E 22 E 23   e yy  σx y E 13 E 23 E 33 2ex y   σx x 0 b ∂/∂ x 0 ∂/∂ y  σ yy  + x = 0 0 ∂/∂ y ∂/∂ x by σx y 
or

e = Du

σ = Ee

DT σ + b = 0

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Strong-Form Tonti Diagram of Plane Stress Governing Equations

Prescribed displacements
^ u

Displacement BCs ^ u=u on Γu

Displacements

Body forces

u e=Du in Ω

b DT + b = 0 σ Equilibrium in Ω σ=Ee or e = Cσ in Ω Constitutive

Γ

Kinematic

Strains

Stresses

Force BCs σT n = ^ t or pT n = q ^ on Γt

e

σ

Prescribed tractions t or forces q

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

TPE-Based Weak Form Diagram of Plane Stress Governing Equations

Prescribed displacements
^ u

Displacement BCs Displacements ^ u=u u on Γu Kinematic

Body forces

b

Γ
Equilibrium (weak) Force BCs (weak)

e=Du in Ω σ=Ee in Ω
Constitutive

δΠ= 0 in Ω

Strains

Stresses

e

σ

δΠ = 0 on Γt

Prescribed tractions t or forces q

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Total Potential Energy of Plate in Plane Stress
=U −W U=
1 2

h σT e d

=

1 2

h eT Ee d h uT ˆ d t
t

W =

h uT b d
body forces

+

boundary tractions

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Discretization into Plane Stress Finite Elements

(a)

(b)
(c)

Γ Ω

e

Γe

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Plane Stress Element Geometries and Node Configurations
3
2

3 4 6 1 2 1

3 5 2 4 10 1

4 9 12 11 5

8

3 7 6 2

1

n=3

n=4

n=6

n = 12

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Total Potential Energy of Plane Stress Element


e

Γe

= Ue − W e
e

Ue = We =

1 2

e

h σT e d h uT b d
e

= +

1 2

h eT E e d
e

e

h uT t d
e

e

e

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Constructing a Displacement Assumed Element
n nodes, n=4 in figure Node displacement vector
u e = [ u x1 u y1 u x2 . . . u xn u yn ]T

Displacement interpolation over element
u(x, y) =
u x (x,y) u y (x,y) = N1 0
e

0 e N1

N2 0

e

0 N2e

... ...

Nne 0

0 e e u Nn

= N ue

N is called the shape function matrix It has order 2 x 2n

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Element Construction (cont'd)
Differentiate the displacement interpolation wrt x,y to get the strain-displacement relation
e ∂ N1  ∂x   e (x, y) =  0   e ∂ N1 ∂y

0
e ∂ N1

∂ N2 ∂x 0

e

0
e ∂ N2

... ... ...

∂ Nne ∂x 0 ∂ Nne ∂y

 0 ∂ Nne ∂y e ∂ Nn ∂x    e u =  

∂y e ∂ N1 ∂x

e ∂ N2

∂y

∂y e ∂ N2 ∂x

B ue

B is called the strain-displacement matrix It has order 3 x 2n

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Element Construction (cont'd)
Element total potential energy
e

=

1 2

u e Ke u e − u e f e

T

T

Element stiffness matrix

Ke =
Consistent node force vector

h BT E B d
e

e

fe =

h NT b d
e

e

+

t h NT ˆ d
e

e

due to: body force

due to: surface tractions

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Requirements on Finite Element Shape Functions

Interpolation Condition Ni takes on value 1 at node i, 0 at all other nodes Continuity (intra- and inter-element) and Completeness Conditions are covered later in the course (Chs. 18-19)

IFEM Ch 14 – Slide 20

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–16

Homework Exercises for Chapter 14 - The Plane Stress Problem Solutions
EXERCISE 14.1 Here is the solution to go from plane strain to plane stress:
ClearAll[Em,Ν,Emstar,Νstar]; Efac=Em*(1-Ν)/((1+Ν)*(1-2Ν)); Emat=Efac*{{1,Ν/(1-Ν),0},{Ν/(1-Ν),1,0},{0,0,(1-2*Ν)/(2*(1-Ν))}}; Print["Plane strain E matrix:", Emat//MatrixForm]; EEmat=Simplify[Emat/.{Em->Emstar,Ν->Νstar}]; sol=Solve[{EEmat[[1,1]]==Em/(1-Ν^2),EEmat[[1,2]]==Em*Ν/(1-Ν^2)}, {Emstar,Νstar}]; sol=Simplify[sol]; Print["replacement rule:",sol]; Print["Check - this should be the plane stress E matrix:", Simplify[EEmat/.sol[[1]]]//MatrixForm];
Em 1 Ν 1 2Ν 1 Ν Em Ν 1 2Ν 1 Ν Em 1 Ν 1 2Ν 1 Ν

0 0
Em 2 1 Ν

Plane strain E matrix:

Em Ν 1 2Ν 1 Ν

0 replacement rule: Emstar

0

Em 1 2 Ν , Νstar 1 Ν 2

Ν 1

Ν
Em 1 Ν2 Em Ν 1 Ν2 Em Ν 1 Ν2 Em 1 Ν2

0 0
Em 2 2Ν

Check

this should be the plane stress E matrix:

0

0

Figure E14.2. Solution for Exercise 14.1. Plane strain to plane stress.

(1 + 2ν) ν and ν ∗ = 1 + ν . (1 + ν)2 Here is to go from plane stress to plane strain: It gives E ∗ = E
ClearAll[Em,Ν,Emstar,Νstar]; Efac=Em/(1-Ν^2); Emat=Simplify[Efac*{{1,Ν,0},{Ν,1,0},{0,0,(1-Ν)/2}}]; Print["Plane stress E matrix:", Emat//MatrixForm]; EEmat=Simplify[Emat/.{Em->Emstar,Ν->Νstar}]; sol=Solve[{EEmat[[1,1]]==Em*(1-Ν)/((1+Ν)*(1-2Ν)), EEmat[[1,2]]==Em*Ν/((1+Ν)*(1-2Ν))}, {Emstar,Νstar}]; sol=Simplify[sol]; Print["replacement rule:",sol]; Print["Check - this should be the plane strain E matrix:", Simplify[EEmat/.sol[[1]]]//MatrixForm];
Em 1 Ν2 Em Ν 1 Ν2 Em Ν 1 Ν2 Em 1 Ν2

0 0
Em 2 2Ν

Plane stress E matrix:

0 replacement rule: Emstar

0

1

Em , Νstar Ν2

Ν 1 Ν
Em 1 Ν 1 Ν 2 Ν2 Em Ν 1 Ν 2 Ν2 Em Ν 1 Ν 2 Ν2 Em 1 Ν 1 Ν 2 Ν2

0 0
Em 2 2Ν

Check

this should be the plane strain E matrix:

0

0

Figure E14.3. Solution for Exercise 14.1. Plane stress to plane strain.

14–16

14–17
It gives E ∗ = E and ν ∗ = ν . Credit is given for doing it either way. 1−ν 1 − ν2 λ + 2µ λ 0 E 2(1 + ν) λ 0 λ + 2µ 0 0 µ 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 +

Solutions to Exercises

EXERCISE 14.2 For plane strain:

E=

2 0 0

0 2 0

0 0 1

+λ 1 1 0 1 1 0

1 1 0 0 0 0

1 1 0

0 0 0 = Eµ + E λ .

(E14.10)

=

Eν (1 + ν)(1 − 2ν)

For plane stress:  4µ(λ + µ)  2λµ 0 + 2µ λ + 2µ  λ 2λµ 4µ(λ + µ)  = E=  λ + 2µ λ + 2µ 0 0 0 µ =µ 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 ¯ +λ 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 =

¯ 2µ−λ 0 0 ¯ 0 0 2µ−λ 0 0 µ 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 +

¯ +λ

2 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 = Eµ + Eλ .

(E14.11)

E 2(1 + ν)

Eν 1−ν 2

¯ (The second step above is actually unnecessary, one could go directly to the third expression.) Here λ = 2 ¯ ¯ e 2λµ/(λ + 2µ) = Eν/(1 − ν ) is a modified Lam´ constant; the inverse relation being λ = 2λµ/(2µ − λ).
EXERCISE 14.3 A solution using Mathematica is shown in Figure E14.4. In this script gxy stands for 2ex y .

ClearAll[Em,ν,α,Gm,exx,eyy,gxy,sxx,syy,sxy,∆T]; Gm=Em/(2*(1+ν)); s={sxx,syy,sxy}; e={exx,eyy,gxy}; eqs={exx==(sxx-ν*syy)/Em+α*∆T,eyy==(syy-ν*sxx)/Em+α*∆T,gxy==sxy/Gm}; s=Simplify[s/.Solve[eqs,s][[1]]]; Emat=Simplify[Table[Coefficient[s[[i]],e[[j]]],{i,1,3},{j,1,3}]]; Tmat=Simplify[Table[Coefficient[s[[i]],∆T],{i,1,3}]]; Print["Emat=",Emat//MatrixForm,", Tmat=",Tmat];
Em −1+ν 2 Em ν −1+ν 2 Em ν −1+ν 2 Em −1+ν 2

0 0
Em 2+2 ν

Emat=

,

Tmat=

Em α Em α , ,0 −1 + ν −1 + ν

0

0

Figure E14.4. Solution for Exercise 14.3.

Transcribing the answer: 0 ex x 1 Eα T, (E14.12) e yy − 0 1 1−ν 0 1−ν 2ex y 2 The only difference with respect to the first of E14.1 is the thermal stress vector, which vanishes if T = 0. This form may be found in any book on elasticity. = E 1 − ν2
EXERCISE 14.4

σx x σ yy σx y

1 ν 0

ν 1 0

Equilibrium along x and y give tx ds = σx x d x + σ yx dy and t y ds = σx y d x + σ yy dy, respectively. Dividing through by ds and setting d x/ds = n x , dy/ds = n y , σ yx = σx y , yields 14.10.

14–17

Chapter 14: THE PLANE STRESS PROBLEM

14–18

EXERCISE 14.5

The verification of (a) and (b) is immediate on expanding the quadratic forms. Item (c) is more difficult. A brute force solution using Mathematica for an arbitrary material matrix E is shown in Figure E14.5.

ClearAll[exx,eyy,gxy,sxx,syy,sxy,E11,E22,E33,E12,E13,E23]; Emat={{E11,E12,E13},{E12,E22,E23},{E13,E23,E33}}; s={sxx,syy,sxy}; e={exx,eyy,gxy}; m={exx,eyy,sxy}; eqs={sxx==E11*exx+E12*eyy+E13*gxy,syy==E12*exx+E22*eyy+E23*gxy, sxy==E13*exx+E23*eyy+E33*gxy}; sol=Simplify[Simplify[Solve[eqs,{sxx,syy,gxy}]]]; Print[sol]; U=Simplify[(e.Emat.e/2)/.sol[[1]]]; fac[i_,j_]:=If[i==j,1,1/2]; A=Table[fac[i,j]*Coefficient[U,m[[i]]*m[[j]]],{i,1,3},{j,1,3}]; Print["A=",A//MatrixForm];
sxx syy E11 exx E12 exx
E13 2 E11 E33 2 E33

E12 eyy E22 eyy

E23 eyy E33 E23 E13 exx E23 eyy E33 0 0
1 2 E33

E13 E13 exx

sxy sxy

, , gxy E13 exx E23 eyy E33 sxy

2 E13 E23 2 E12 E33 4 E33 E23 2 E22 E33 2 E33

A

2 E13 E23 2 E12 E33 4 E33

0

0

Figure E14.5. Solution for Exercise 14.5.

Transcribing the result, the matrix for item (c) is

 E E − E2 11 33 13 2E 33  A= 
symm

E 12 E 33 − 2E 13 E 23 4E 33 2 E 22 E 33 − E 23 2E 33

0


(E14.13)

  0 
1 2E 33

To do this by hand, one may start by establishing the following transformation: ex x e yy 2ex y = 1 0 −E 13 /E 33 0 1 −E 23 /E 33 0 0 1/E 33 ex x e yy σx y (E14.14)

or e = Tm, in which m is the mixed vector of strains and stresses required for this item. The last relation in (E14.14) follows on solving σx y = E 13 ex x + E 23 e yy + E 33 (2ex y ) for 2ex y . Since the energy density U is invariant, 2U = eT Ee = mT TT E T m = mT A m. (E14.15) So A = TT E T, which would reproduce (E14.12).

14–18

.

Three-Node Plane Stress Triangles

15

15–1

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§15.1. Introduction §15.2. Background §15.2.1. Parametric Representation of Functions . . . . . §15.2.2. Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §15.2.3. Triangular Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . §15.2.4. Linear Interpolation . . . . . . . . . . . . §15.2.5. Coordinate Transformations . . . . . . . . §15.2.6. Partial Derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . §15.2.7. *Homogeneous Polynomials in Triangular Coordinates §15.2.8. *Interesting Points and Lines . . . . . . . . . §15.3. The Turner Triangle §15.3.1. Displacement Interpolation . . . . . . . . . §15.3.2. Strain-Displacement Equations . . . . . . . . §15.3.3. Stress-Strain Equations . . . . . . . . . . §15.3.4. The Stiffness Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . §15.3.5. The Consistent Nodal Force Vector . . . . . . §15.3.6. Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . §15.3.7. *Consistency Verification . . . . . . . . . §15.3.8. *Checking Continuity . . . . . . . . . . . §15.3.9. *Checking Completeness . . . . . . . . . §15.3.10. *Tonti Matrix Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . §15.4. *Derivation Using Natural Strains and Stresses §15.4.1. *Natural Strains and Stresses . . . . . . . . §15.4.2. *Covariant Node Displacements . . . . . . . §15.4.3. *The Natural Stiffness Matrix . . . . . . . . §15.5. *The Veubeke Equilibrium Triangle §15.5.1. *Kinematic Relations . . . . . . . . . . . §15.5.2. *Stiffness Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . §15.5.3. *Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . §15.5.4. *Spurious Kinematic Modes . . . . . . . . §15.6. *Shear Locking in Turner Triangles §15.6.1. *The Inplane Bending Test . . . . . . . . . §15.6.2. *Energy Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . §15.6.3. *Convergence as Mesh is Refined . . . . . . . §15. Notes and Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §15. References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §15. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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15–3 15–3 15–3 15–4 15–4 15–5 15–5 15–6 15–7 15–7 15–8 15–8 15–8 15–8 15–9 15–9 15–10 15–11 15–11 15–12 15–12 15–12 15–13 15–14 15–14 15–14 15–15 15–15 15–16 15–17 15–18 15–18 15–19 15–19 15–20 15–21 15–23

15–2

15–3 §15.1. Introduction

§15.2

BACKGROUND

This Chapter derives element stiffness equations of three-node triangles constructed with linear displacements for the plane stress problem formulated in Chapter 14. These elements have six displacement degrees of freedom, which are placed at the connection nodes. There are two main versions that differ on where the connection nodes are located: 1. 2. The Turner triangle has connection nodes located at the corners. The Veubeke equilibrium triangle has connection nodes located at the side midpoints.

The triangle geometry is defined by the corner locations or geometric nodes in both cases. Of the two versions, the Turner triangle is by far the most practically important one in solid and structural mechanics.1 Thus most of the material in this Chapter is devoted to it. It enjoys several important properties: (i) It belongs to both the isoparametric and subparametric element families, which are introduced in the next Chapter.

(ii) It allows closed form derivations for the stiffness matrix and consistent force vector without need for numerical integration. (iii) It cannot be improved by the addition of internal degrees of freedom. Properties (ii) and (iii) are shared by the Veubeke equilibrium triangle. Since this model is rarely used in structural applications it is covered only as advanced material in §15.5. The Turner triangle is not a good performer for structural stress analysis. It is still used in problems that do not require high accuracy, as well as in non-structural applications such as thermal and electromagnetic analysis. One reason is that triangular meshes are easily generated over arbitrary two-dimensional domains using techniques such as Delaunay triangulation. §15.2. Background §15.2.1. Parametric Representation of Functions The concept of parametric representation of functions is crucial in modern FEM. Together with multidimensional numerical integration, it is a key enabling tool for developing elements in two and three space dimensions.2 Without these tools the developer would become lost in an algebraic maze as element geometry and shape functions get more complicated. The essentials of parametric representation can be illustrated through a simple example. Consider the following alternative representations of the unit-circle function, x 2 + y 2 = 1: (I) y = 1 − x 2, (II) x = cos θ and y = sin θ. (15.1)

The direct representation (I) fits the conventional function notation, i.e., y = f (x). Given a value of x, it returns one or more y. On the other hand, the parametric representation (II) is indirect: both x
1

The triangle was one of the two plane-stress continuum elements presented by Turner, Clough, Martin and Topp in their 1956 paper [323]. This publication is widely regarded as the start of the present FEM. The derivation was not done, however, with assumed displacements. See Notes and Bibliography at the end of this Chapter. Numerical integration is not useful for the triangular elements covered here, but essential in the more complicated iso-P models covered in Chapters 16ff.

2

15–3

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–4

and y are given in terms of one parameter, the angle θ . Elimination of θ through the trigonometric identity cos2 θ + sin2 θ = 1 recovers x 2 + y 2 = 1. But there are situations in which working with the parametric form throughout the development is more convenient. Continuum finite elements provide a striking illustration of this point. §15.2.2. Geometry The geometry of the 3-node triangle shown in Figure 15.1(a) is specified by the location of its three corner nodes on the {x, y} plane. Nodes are labelled 1, 2, 3 while traversing the sides in counterclockwise fashion. Their location is defined by their Cartesian coordinates: {xi , yi } for i = 1, 2, 3.

(a)

3 (x3 ,y3)

(b)
Area A > 0 2 (x2 ,y2)

3

2

The Turner triangle has six degrees of freedom, 1 1 (x 1 ,y1) defined by the six corner displacement compox nents { u xi , u yi }, for i = 1, 2, 3. The interpoz up, toward you lation of the internal displacements { u x , u y } from these six values is studied in §15.3, after Figure 15.1. The three-node, linear-displacement plane stress triangular element: (a) geometry; (b) area triangular coordinates are introduced. The and positive boundary traversal. triangle area can be obtained as 1 1 1 2A = det x1 x2 x3 = (x2 y3 − x3 y2 ) + (x3 y1 − x1 y3 ) + (x1 y2 − x2 y1 ). (15.2) y1 y2 y3 The area given by 15.2 is a signed quantity. It is positive if the corners are numbered in cyclic counterclockwise order (when looking down from the +z axis), as illustrated in Figure 15.1(b). This convention is followed in the sequel. §15.2.3. Triangular Coordinates Points of the triangle may also be located in terms of a parametric coordinate system: ζ1 , ζ 2 , ζ3 . (15.3) In the literature these 3 parameters receive an astonishing number of names, as the list collected in Table 15.1 shows. In the sequel the name triangular coordinates will be used to emphasize the close association with this particular geometry. Equations ζi = constant (15.4) represent a set of straight lines parallel to the side opposite to the i th corner, as depicted in Figure 15.2. The equations of sides 2–3, 3–1 and 1–2 are ζ1 = 0, ζ2 = 0 and ζ3 = 0, respectively. The three corners have coordinates (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,0,1). The three midpoints of the sides have coordinates ( 1 , 1 , 0), (0, 1 , 1 ) and ( 1 , 0, 1 ), the centroid has coordinates ( 1 , 1 , 1 ), and so on. The 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 coordinates are not independent because their sum is unity: ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 = 1. 15–4 (15.5)

y

15–5
3
ζ1 = 0 ζ2 = 0

§15.2
3
ζ2 = 1

BACKGROUND

3
/ / /

ζ3 = 1

/ / /

2 1

/ / /

2 1

2
ζ3 = 0

1

ζ1 = 1

Figure 15.2. Triangular coordinates ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 .

Table 15.1 Names of element parametric coordinates Name natural coordinates isoparametric coordinates shape function coordinates barycentric coordinates M¨ bius coordinates o triangular coordinates area (also written “areal”) coordinates Applicable to all elements isoparametric elements isoparametric elements simplices (triangles, tetrahedra, ...) triangles all triangles straight-sided triangles

Triangular coordinates normalized as per ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 = 1 are often qualified as “homogeneous” in the mathematical literature.

Remark 15.1. In pre-1970 FEM publications, triangular coordinates were often called area coordinates, and

occasionally areal coordinates. This comes from the following interpretation: ζi = A jk /A, where A jk is the area subtended by the subtriangle formed by the point P and corners j and k, in which j and k are 3-cyclic permutations of i. Historically this was the way coordinates were defined in 1960s papers. However this relation does not carry over to general isoparametric triangles with curved sides and thus it is not used here.

§15.2.4. Linear Interpolation Consider a function f (x, y) that varies linearly over the triangle domain. In terms of Cartesian coordinates it may be expressed as f (x, y) = a0 + a1 x + a2 y, (15.6)

where a0 , a1 and a2 are coefficients to be determined from three conditions. In finite element work such conditions are often the nodal values taken by f at the corners: f1, f2, f3. The expression in triangular coordinates makes direct use of those three values: ζ1 f (ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) = f 1 ζ1 + f 2 ζ2 + f 3 ζ3 = [ f 1 f 2 f 3 ] ζ2 ζ3 Formula 15.8 is called a linear interpolant for f . 15–5 = [ ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 ] f1 f2 f3 . (15.8) (15.7)

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–6

§15.2.5. Coordinate Transformations Quantities that are closely linked with the element geometry are best expressed in triangular coordinates. On the other hand, quantities such as displacements, strains and stresses are usually expressed in the Cartesian system {x, y}. Thus we need transformation equations through which it is possible to pass from one coordinate system to the other. Cartesian and triangular coordinates are linked by the relation 1 x y 1 x1 y1 1 x2 y2 1 x3 y3 ζ1 ζ2 ζ3

=

.

(15.9)

The first equation says that the sum of the three coordinates is one. The next two express x and y linearly as homogeneous forms in the triangular coordinates. These are obtained by applying the linear interpolant 15.8 to the Cartesian coordinates: x = x1 ζ1 + x2 ζ2 + x3 ζ3 and y = y1 ζ1 + y2 ζ2 + y3 ζ3 . Assuming A = 0, inversion of 15.9 yields 1 x . y (15.10) Here x jk = x j − xk , y jk = y j − yk , A is the triangle area given by 15.2 and A jk denotes the area subtended by corners j, k and the origin of the x–y system. If this origin is taken at the centroid of the triangle, A23 = A31 = A12 = A/3. 1 = 2A 1 = 2A §15.2.6. Partial Derivatives From equations 15.9 and 15.10 we immediately obtain the following relations between partial derivatives: ∂y ∂x = xi , = yi , (15.11) ∂ζi ∂ζi 2A ∂ζi = y jk , ∂x 2A ∂ζi = xk j . ∂y (15.12) ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 x2 y3 − x3 y2 x3 y1 − x1 y3 x1 y2 − x2 y1 y2 − y3 y3 − y1 y1 − y2 x3 − x2 x1 − x3 x2 − x1 1 x y 2A23 2A31 2A12 y23 y31 y12 x32 x13 x21

In 15.12 j and k denote the 3-cyclic permutations of i. For example, if i = 2, then j = 3 and k = 1. The derivatives of a function f (ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) with respect to x or y follow immediately from 15.12 and application of the chain rule: 1 ∂f = ∂x 2A 1 ∂f = ∂y 2A ∂f y + ∂ζ1 23 ∂f x + ∂ζ1 32 ∂f y + ∂ζ2 31 ∂f x + ∂ζ2 13 ∂f y ∂ζ3 12 ∂f x ∂ζ3 21

(15.13)

15–6

15–7
(a) 3
Μ1 Μ2 Η2 C Μ3

§15.2 BACKGROUND
(b) 3
Η1 Η Η3

(c) RC 2
Μ2

3
Μ1

2 1

OC
Μ3

2

1

1

Figure 15.3. Interesting points and lines of a triangle.

which in matrix form is  ∂f  1  ∂x   ∂f  = 2A ∂y y23 x32 y31 x13 y12 x21

 ∂f  ∂ζ1   ∂f   ∂ζ  2  ∂f ∂ζ3

    .   

(15.14)

With these mathematical ingredients in place we are now in a position to handle the derivation of straight-sided triangular elements, and in particular the Turner and Veubeke triangles.
§15.2.7. *Homogeneous Polynomials in Triangular Coordinates Because ζ1 , ζ2 and ζ3 are not independent, polynomial functions in those variables are not unique. For example 3 − 2ζ1 + ζ2 − 3ζ3 and ζ1 + 4ζ2 are identical, since they differ by 3 − 3(ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 )=0. To achieve uniqueness it is necessary to write the function as a homogeneous polynomial, as in the second form of this example. To reduce the general linear polynomial c000 + c100 ζ1 + c010 ζ2 + c001 ζ3 to homogeneous form, subtract c000 (1 − ζ1 − ζ2 − ζ3 ), which is zero, to get P1 = (c100 − c000 )ζ1 + (c010 − c000 )ζ2 + (c001 − c000 )ζ3 .
2 2 2 To reduce the general quadratic polynomial c000 +c100 ζ1 +c010 ζ2 +c001 ζ3 +c200 ζ1 +c020 ζ2 +c002 ζ3 +c110 ζ1 ζ2 + c011 ζ2 ζ3 + c101 ζ3 ζ1 to homogeneous form, subtract (c000 + c100 ζ1 + c010 ζ2 + c001 ζ3 )(1 − ζ1 − ζ2 − ζ3 ).

And so on. All polynomial expressions used in this book for triangles are expressed in homogeneous form. §15.2.8. *Interesting Points and Lines Some distinguished lines and points of a straight-sided triangle are briefly described here for use in other developments as well as in Exercises. The triangle medians are three lines that join the corners to the midpoints of the opposite sides, as pictured in Figure 15.3(a). The midpoint opposite corner i is labeled Mi . The medians 1–M1 , 2–M2 and 3–M3 have equations ζ2 = ζ3 , ζ3 = ζ1 and ζ1 = ζ2 , respectively, in triangular coordinates. They intersect at the centroid C of coordinates { 1 , 1 , 1 }. Other names for the centroid are 3 3 3 barycenter and center of gravity. If you make a real triangle out of cardboard, you can balance the triangle at this point. It can be shown that the centroid trisects the medians, that is to say, the distance from a corner to the centroid is twice the distance from the centroid to the opposite side of the triangle. The altitudes are three lines that connect each corner with their projections onto the opposing sides, as depicted in Figure 15.3(b). The projection of corner i is identified Hi , so the altitudes are 1–H1 , 2–H2 and 3–H3 . Locations Hi are called altitude feets. The altitudes intersect at the triangle orthocenter H . The lengths of those segments are the triangle heights. The triangular coordinates of Hi and H , as well as the altitude equations, are worked out in an Exercise.

15–7

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–8

Another interesting point is the center OC of the circumscribed circle, or circumcircle. This is the unique circle that passes through the three corners, as shown in Figure 15.3(c). It can be geometrically constructed by drawing the normal to each side at the midpoints. Those three lines, called the perpendicular side bisectors, intersect at OC . A famous theorem by Euler asserts that the centroid, the orthocenter and the circumcircle center fall on a straight line, called the Euler line. Furthermore, C lies between OC and H , and the distance OC –H is three times the distance H –C.

§15.3. The Turner Triangle The simplest triangular element for plane stress (and in general, for 2D problems of variational index m = 1) is the three-node triangle with linear shape functions, with degrees of freedom located at the corners. The shape functions are simply the triangular coordinates. That is, Nie = ζi for i = 1, 2, 3. When applied to the plane stress problem, this element is called the Turner triangle. §15.3.1. Displacement Interpolation For the plane stress problem we select the linear interpolation 15.8 for the displacement components u x and u y at an arbitrary point P(ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ): u x = u x1 ζ1 + u x2 ζ2 + u x3 ζ3 , u y = u y1 ζ1 + u y2 ζ2 + u y3 ζ3 . (15.15)

The interpolation is illustrated in Figure 15.4. The two expressions in 15.15 can be combined in a matrix form that befits the expression (14.17) for an arbitrary plane stress element:   u x1  u y1    ux ζ 0 ζ2 0 ζ3 0  u x2  = 1   = N ue , uy 0 ζ1 0 ζ2 0 ζ3  u y2    u x3 u y3 (15.16) where N is the matrix of shape functions. §15.3.2. Strain-Displacement Equations

u y3
3

P(ζ1 ,ζ 2 ,ζ 3 )

u x by linear u y interpolation

}

ux3 uy uy2 ux2
2

P uy1
1

ux

ux1
Figure 15.4. Displacement interpolation over triangle.

The strains within the elements are obtained by differentiating the shape functions with respect to x and y. Using 15.14, 15.16 and the general form (14.18) we get   u x1 u  y23 0 y31 0 y12 0  y1  1 u  (15.17) e = D N ue = 0 x32 0 x13 0 x21  x2  = B ue , u  2A x y23 x13 y31 x21 y12  y2  32 u x3 u y3 in which D denotes the symbolic strain-to-displacement differentiation operator given in (14.6), and B is the strain-displacement matrix. Note that the strains are constant over the element. This is the origin of the name constant strain triangle (CST) given it in many finite element publications. 15–8

15–9 §15.3.3. Stress-Strain Equations

§15.3

THE TURNER TRIANGLE

The stress field σ is related to the strain field by the elastic constitutive equation in (14.5), which is repeated here for convenience: σ= σx x σ yy σx y = E 11 E 12 E 13 E 12 E 22 E 23 E 13 E 23 E 33 ex x e yy 2ex y = E e, (15.18)

where E i j are plane stress elastic moduli. The constitutive matrix E will be assumed to be constant over the element. Because the strains are constant, so are the stresses. §15.3.4. The Stiffness Matrix The element stiffness matrix is given by the general formula (14.23), which is repeated here Ke =
e

h BT EB d ,

(15.19)

where e is the triangle domain, and h the plate thickness that appears in the plane stress problem. Since B and E are constant, they can be taken out of the integral: Ke = BT EB
e

hd

(15.20)

If h is uniform over the element the remaining integral in 15.20 is simply h A, and we obtain the closed form y23  0 h  y31  e T K = Ah B EB =  4A  0  y12 0  0 x32 0 x13 0 x21  x32 y23   x13   y31   x21 y12

E 11 E 12 E 13 E 12 E 22 E 23 E 13 E 23 E 33

y23 0 y31 0 y12 0 0 x32 0 x13 0 x21 x32 y23 x13 y31 x21 y12

.

(15.21) Exercise 15.1 deals with the case of a linearly varying plate thickness. §15.3.5. The Consistent Nodal Force Vector For simplicity we consider here only internal body forces3 defined by the vector field b= bx by (15.22)

3

For consistent force computations corresponding to distributed boundary loads over a side, see Exercise 15.4.

15–9

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–10

Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness[ncoor_,Emat_,h_,numer_]:=Module[{ x1,x2,x3,y1,y2,y3,x21,x32,x13,y12,y23,y31,A,Be,Ke}, {{x1,y1},{x2,y2},{x3,y3}}=ncoor; A=Simplify[(x2*y3-x3*y2+(x3*y1-x1*y3)+(x1*y2-x2*y1))/2]; {x21,x32,x13,y12,y23,y31}={x2-x1,x3-x2,x1-x3,y1-y2,y2-y3,y3-y1}; Be={{y23,0,y31,0,y12,0},{0,x32,0,x13,0,x21}, {x32,y23,x13,y31,x21,y12}}/(2*A); If [numer, Be=N[Be]]; Ke=A*h*Transpose[Be].Emat.Be; Return[Ke]];
Figure 15.5. Implementation of Turner triangle stiffness matrix calculation as a Mathematica module.

which is specified per unit of volume. The consistent nodal force vector fe is given by the general formula (14.23) of the previous Chapter: ζ1 0  ζ h 2 0 e  ζ3 0   0 ζ1   0 b d . ζ2   0 ζ3

fe =
e

h NT b d

=

(15.23)

The simplest case is when the body force components 15.22 as well as the thickness h are constant over the element. Then we need the integrals ζ1 d
e

=
e

ζ2 d

=
e

ζ3 d

= 1A 3

(15.24)

which replaced into 15.23 gives fe = Ah [ bx 3 b y ]T . (15.25)

by

bx

by

bx

This agrees with the simple element-by-element force-lumping procedure, which assigns one third of the total force along the {x, y} directions: Ahbx and Ahb y , to each corner.
Remark 15.2. The integrals 15.24 are particular cases of the general integration formula of monomials in triangular coordinates:

1 2A

i k ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 d
e

j

=

i! j! k! , (i + j + k + 2)!

i ≥ 0, j ≥ 0, k ≥ 0.

(15.26)

which can be derived through the Beta function. Here i, j, k are integer exponents. This formula only holds for triangles with straight sides, and thus does not apply for higher order elements with curved sides. Formulas 15.24 are obtained by setting exponents i = 1, j = k = 0 in 15.26, and permuting {i, j, k} cyclically.

15–10

15–11

§15.3 THE TURNER TRIANGLE
ncoor={{0,0},{3,1},{2,2}}; Emat=8*{{8,2,0},{2,8,0},{0,0,3}}; Ke=Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,1,False]; Print["Ke=",Ke//MatrixForm]; Print["eigs of Ke=",Chop[Eigenvalues[N[Ke]]]]; Show[Graphics[RGBColor[1,0,0]],Graphics[AbsoluteThickness[2]], Graphics[Polygon[ncoor]],Axes->True];
11 5 − 10 −2 −1 −3 5 11 2 10 −7 − 21 − 10 2 44 − 20 − 34 18 −2 10 − 20 44 22 − 54 −1 −7 − 34 22 35 − 15 −3 − 21 18 − 54 − 15 75
2 1.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3

Ke =

eigs of Ke = {139.33, 60., 20.6704, 0, 0, 0}

Figure 15.6. Test statements to exercise the module of Figure 15.5, and outputs.

§15.3.6. Implementation The implementation of the Turner triangle in any programming language is very simple. A Mathematica module that returns Ke is shown in Figure 15.5. The module needs only 8 lines of code. It is invoked as Ke=Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,h,numer]; The arguments are ncoor Emat h numer Element node coordinates, arranged as a list: { { x1,y1 },{ x2,y2 },{ x3,y3 } }. A two-dimensional list storing the 3 × 3 plane stress matrix of elastic moduli as { { E11,E12,E13 },{ E12,E22,E23 },{ E13,E23,E33 } }. Plate thickness, assumed uniform over the triangle. A logical flag: True to request floating-point computation, else False. (15.27)

This module is exercised by the statements listed at the top of Figure 15.6, which form a triangle with corner coordinates { { 0,0 },{ 3,1 },{ 2,2 } }, isotropic material matrix with E 11 = E 22 = 64, E 12 = 16, E 33 = 24, others zero, (that is, E = 60 and ν = 1 ) and unit thickness. The results are 4 shown at the bottom of Figure 15.6. The computation of stiffness matrix eigenvalues is always a good programming test, since 3 eigenvalues must be exactly zero and the other 3 real and positive, as explained in Chapter 19. The last test statement draws the triangle (this plot was moved to the right of the numeric output to save space.)
§15.3.7. *Consistency Verification It remains to check whether the interpolation 15.15 for element displacements meets the completeness and continuity criteria studied in Chapter 19 for finite element trial functions. Such consistency conditions are sufficient to insure convergence toward the exact solution of the mathematical model as the mesh is refined. The variational index for the plane stress problem is m = 1. According to the rules stated in §19.3, the trial functions should be 1-complete, C 0 continuous, and C 1 piecewise differentiable.

15–11

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–12

§15.3.8. *Checking Continuity Along any triangle side, the variation of u x and u y is linear and uniquely determined by the value at the nodes on that side. For example, over side 1–2 of an individual triangle, which has equation ζ3 = 0: u x = u x1 ζ1 + u x2 ζ2 + u x3 ζ3 = u x1 ζ1 + u x2 ζ2 , u y = u y1 ζ1 + u y2 ζ2 + u y3 ζ3 = u y1 ζ1 + u y2 ζ2 .
The variation of u x and u y over side 1-2 depends only on the nodal values ux1, ux2 , u y1 and u y2.

(15.28)

An identical argument holds for that side when it belongs to an adjacent triangle, such as elements (e1) and (e2) shown in Figure 15.7. Since the node values on all elements that meet at a node are the same, u x and u y match along the side, and the trial function is C 0 interelement continuous. Because the functions are continuous inside the elements, it follows that the continuity requirement is met. §15.3.9. *Checking Completeness

(e1) 1 (e2)

2

Figure 15.7. Interelement continuity check.

The completeness condition for variational order m = 1 requires that the shape functions Ni = ζi be able to represent exactly any linear displacement field: u x = α0 + α1 x + α2 y, u y = β0 + β1 x + β1 y. (15.29)

To check this we obtain the nodal values associated with the motion 15.29: u xi = α0 + α1 xi + α2 yi and u yi = β0 + β1 xi + β2 yi for i = 1, 2, 3. Replace these in 15.16 and see if 15.29 is recovered. Here are the detailed calculations for component u x : ux =
i

u xi ζi =
i

(α0 + α1 xi + α2 yi )ζi =
i

(α0 ζi + α1 xi ζi + α2 yi ζi ) (15.30)

= α0
i

ζi + α1
i

(xi ζi ) + α2
i

(yi ζi ) = α0 + α1 x + α2 y.

Component u y can be similarly verified. Consequently 15.16 satisfies the completeness requirement for the plane stress problem — and in general, for any problem of variational index 1. Finally, a piecewise linear trial function is obviously C 1 piecewise differentiable and consequently has finite energy. Thus the two completeness requirements are satisfied. Stiffness §15.3.10. *Tonti Matrix Diagram u f

f = V B TE B u = K u

For further developments covered in more advanced courses, it is convenient to split the governing equations of the element. In the case of the Turner triangle they are, omitting element superscripts: e = Bu, σ = Ee, f = AT σ = V BT σ. (15.31)

Kinematic

Equilibrium

e=Bu

f=VB σ
Constitutive

T

Here V = h m A is the volume of the element, h m being the mean thickness. The equations 15.31 may be graphically represented with the diagram shown in Figure 15.8. This is a discrete Tonti diagram similar to those of Chapter 6.

e

σ=Ee

σ

Figure 15.8. Tonti matrix diagram for Turner triangle.

15–12

15–13

§15.4 *DERIVATION USING NATURAL STRAINS AND STRESSES

(a)

3 L1 = L32

(b)

3

φ1

(c)

d6

3

d5 d3 1 d2 d1

L2 = L13 2 L3 = L21 1 1

φ2

φ3

2

2

d4

x

Figure 15.10. Additional quantities appearing in natural strain and stress calculations: (a) side lengths, (b) side directions, (c) covariant node displacements.

§15.4.

*Derivation Using Natural Strains and Stresses
(a) ε13= ε2
3 3

The foregoing derivation of the Turner triangle uses Cartesian strains and stresses, as well as {x, y} displacements. The only intrinsic quantities are the triangle coordinates. This advanced section examines the derivation of the element stiffness matrix through natural strains, natural stresses and covariant displacements. Although the procedure does not offer obvious shortcuts over the previous derivation, it becomes important in the construction of more complicated high performance elements. It also helps reading recent literature in assumed strain elements. §15.4.1. *Natural Strains and Stresses

ε32 = ε1
2

(b) τ13= τ2

τ32 = τ1
2

ε21= ε3
1

τ21= τ3
1

Figure 15.9. Geometry-intrinsic fields for the Turner triangle: (a) natural strains i , (b) natural stresses τi .

Natural strains are extensional strains directed parallel to the triangle sides, as shown in Figure 15.9(a). Natural strains are denoted by 21 ≡ 3 , 32 ≡ 1 , and 13 ≡ 2 . Similarly, natural stresses are normal stresses directed parallel to the triangle sides, as shown in Figure 15.9(b). Natural stresses are denoted by τ21 ≡ τ3 , τ32 ≡ τ1 , and τ13 ≡ τ2 . Because both natural stresses and strains are constant over the triangle, no node value association is needed. The natural strains can be related to Cartesian strains by the following tensor transformation4 =
1 2 3 2 c1 2 =  c2 2 c3

2 s1 2 s2 2 s3

s1 c1 s2 c2  s3 c3

ex x e yy 2ex y

= T−1 e. e

(15.32)

Here c1 = x32 /L 1 , s1 = y32 /L 1 , c2 = x13 /L 2 , s2 = y13 /L 2 , c3 = x21 /L 3 , and s3 = y21 /L 3 , are sines and cosines of the side directions with respect to {x, y}, as illustrated in Figure 15.10(a,b). The inverse of this relation is e= ex x e yy 2ex y y31 y21 L 2 y12 y32 L 2 y23 y13 L 2 1 2 3 1   = x31 x21 L 2 x12 x32 L 2 x23 x13 L 2 1 2 3 4A2 (y31 x12 + x13 y21 )L 2 (y12 x23 + x21 y32 )L 2 (y23 x31 + x32 y13 )L 2 1 2 3

1 2 3

= Te . (15.33)

4

This is the “straingage rosette” transformation studied in Mechanics of Materials books.

15–13

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–14

Note that Te is constant over the triangle. From the invariance of the strain energy density σT e = τT it follows that the stresses transform as τ = Te σ and σ = T−1 τ. That strain energy density may be expressed as e U = 1 eT Ee = 2
1 T En 2

,

T En = Te ETe .

(15.34)

Here En is a stress-strain matrix that relates natural stresses to natural strains as τ = En . It may be therefore called the natural constitutive matrix. §15.4.2. *Covariant Node Displacements Covariant node displacements di are directed along the side directions, as shown in Figure 15.10(c), which defines the notation used for them. They are related to the Cartesian node displacements by

d 
1

c

3

 d2   c2 d   0 d= 3=  d4   0   
d5 d6 0 0

s3 s2 0 0 0 0

0 0 c1 c3 0 0

0 0 s1 s3 0 0

0 0 0 0 c2 c1

0 u x1 0   u y1  0   u x2     = Td u. 0   u y2    s2 u x3 s1 u y3



(15.35)

The inverse relation is

L y 3 31 u y1  L 3 x13    u x2    = 1  0 u=  2A  0  u y2  
x1

u 

u x3 u y3

0 0

L 2 y21 L 2 x12 0 0 0 0

0 0 L 1 y12 L 1 x21 0 0

0 0 L 3 y32 L 3 x23 0 0
1

0 0 0 0 L 2 y23 L 2 x32

0 d1 0   d2  0   d3     = T−1 d. d 0   d4    L 1 y13 d5 L 1 x31 d6
2



(15.36)

The natural strains are evidently given by the relations (d4 − d1 )/L 3 . Collecting these in matrix form:

= (d6 − d3 )/L 1 ,

= (d2 − d5 )/L 2 and

3

=

d 
1

=

1 2 3

=

0 0 −1/L 3

0 1/L 2 0

−1/L 1 0 0

0 0 1/L 3

0 −1/L 2 0

1/L 1 0 0

 d2   d3    = B d.  d4   
d5 d6

(15.37)

§15.4.3. *The Natural Stiffness Matrix The natural stiffness matrix for constant thickness h is Ke = (Ah) BT En B , n The Cartesian stiffness matrix is
T Ke = Td Kn Td . T En = Te E Te .

(15.38) (15.39)

Comparing with Ke = (Ah) BT E B we see that B = T e B Td , B = T−1 BT−1 . e d (15.40)

15–14

15–15
(a) 3 (x3 ,y3) 5 6 2 (x2 ,y2) 4 1 (x 1 ,y1) x

§15.5 *THE VEUBEKE EQUILIBRIUM TRIANGLE

(b) u y6 6

uy5 5 ux5 ux6 uy4 4 ux4

(c)

y

Figure 15.11. The Veubeke equilibrium triangle: (a) geometric definition; (b) degreeof-freedom configuration; (c) element patch showing how triangles are connected at the midpoints.

§15.5.

*The Veubeke Equilibrium Triangle

The Veubeke equilibrium triangle5 differs from the Turner triangle in the degree-of-freedom configuration. As illustrated in Figure 15.11, those are moved to the midpoints {4, 5, 6} while the corner nodes {1, 2, 3} still define the geometry of the element. In the FEM terminology introduced in Chapter 6, the geometric nodes {1, 2, 3} and the connection nodes {4, 5, 6} no longer coincide. The node displacement vector collects the freedoms shown in Figure 15.11(b): ue = [ u x4 u y4 u x5 u y5 u x6 u y6 ]T . (15.41)

The quickest way to formulate the stiffness matrix of this element is to relate 15.41 to the node displacements of the Turner triangle, renamed for convenience as ue = [ u x1 T §15.5.1. *Kinematic Relations The node freedom vectors 15.41 and 15.42 are easily related since by linear interpolation along the sides one obviously has u x4 = 1 (u x1 + u x2 ), u y4 = 1 (u y1 + u y2 ), etc. Expressing those links in matrix form gives 2 2 u y1 u x2 u y2 u x3 u y3 ]T . (15.42)

u 
x4

1 0  u y4  0 1  u x5  1  0 0  =   u y5  2  0 0   
u x6 u y6 1 0

1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

0 1 0 1 0 0

0 0 1 0 1 0

0 u x1 0   u y1  0   u x2   , 1   u y2    u x3 0 1 u y3



In compact form: ue = TV T ue and ue = TT V T T N4 = ζ1 + ζ2 − ζ3 ,

0 −1 0 1 0 u x4 1 0 −1 0 1   u y4  0 1 0 −1 0   u x5   . 1 0 1 0 −1   u y5    u x3 u x6 −1 0 1 0 1 0 u y3 u y6 0 −1 0 1 0 1 (15.43) ue , with TV T = T−1 . The shape functions are TV
x1

u 

 1  u y1   0  u x2   1  =  u y2   0   



N5 = −ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 ,

N6 = ζ1 − ζ2 + ζ3 .

(15.44)

Renaming the Turner triangle strain-displacement matrix of 15.17 as BT , the corresponding matrix that relates e = B ue in the Veubeke equilibrium triangle becomes B = BT TT V = 1 A y21 0 x12 0 x12 y21 y32 0 x23 0 x23 y32 y13 0 x31 0 x31 y13 (15.45)

5

The qualifier equilibrium distinguishes this element from others created by Fraeijs de Veubeke, including the 6-node plane stress comforming triangle. See Notes and Bibliography for the original derivation from an equilibrium field.

15–15

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–16

Trig3VeubekeMembraneStiffness[ncoor_,Emat_,h_,numer_]:=Module[{ x1,x2,x3,y1,y2,y3,x12,x23,x31,y21,y32,y13,A,Be,Te,Ke}, {{x1,y1},{x2,y2},{x3,y3}}=ncoor; A=Simplify[(x2*y3-x3*y2+(x3*y1-x1*y3)+(x1*y2-x2*y1))/2]; {x12,x23,x31,y21,y32,y13}={x1-x2,x2-x3,x3-x1,y2-y1,y3-y2,y1-y3}; Be={{y21,0,y32,0,y13,0}, {0,x12,0,x23,0,x31}, {x12,y21,x23,y32,x31,y13}}/A; If [numer,Be=N[Be]]; Ke=A*h*Transpose[Be].Emat.Be; Return[Ke]];
Figure 15.12. Implementation of Veubeke equilibrium triangle stiffness matrix as a Mathematica module.

§15.5.2. *Stiffness Matrix The element stiffness matrix is given by the general formula (14.23). For constant plate thickness h one obtains the closed form

y
h Ke = A h BT E B = A

21

 0  y32   0 
y13 0

0 x12 0 x23 0 x31

x12 y21  x23   y32   x31 y13


E 11 E 12 E 13 E 12 E 22 E 23 E 13 E 23 E 33 y21 0 y32 0 y13 0 0 x12 0 x23 0 x31 x12 y21 x23 y32 x31 y13 . (15.46)

The computation of consistent body forces is left as an Exercise. §15.5.3. *Implementation The implementation of the Veubeke equilibrium triangle as a Mathematica module that returns Ke is shown in Figure 15.12. It needs only 8 lines of code. It is invoked as Ke=Trig3VeubekeMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,h,numer]; (15.47)

The arguments have the same meaning as those of the module Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness described in §15.3.6.
ncoor={{0,0},{3,1},{2,2}}; Emat=8*{{8,2,0},{2,8,0},{0,0,3}}; Ke=Trig3VeubekeMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,1,False]; Print["Ke=",Ke//MatrixForm]; Print["eigs of Ke=",Chop[Eigenvalues[N[Ke]]]];
140 − 60 −4 − 28 − 136 88 − 60 300 − 12 − 84 72 − 216 −4 − 12 44 20 − 40 −8 − 28 − 84 20 44 8 40 − 136 72 − 40 8 176 − 80 88 − 216 −8 40 − 80 176

Ke=

eigs of Ke={557.318, 240., 82.6816, 0, 0, 0}

Figure 15.13. Test statements to exercise the module of Figure 15.12, and outputs.

15–16

15–17
4 7 9 5 7 9 5 8 13 10 5 6 3 6 2

§15.5 *THE VEUBEKE EQUILIBRIUM TRIANGLE

Type I

8 1

Spurious mode:

9

4

Thickness h/2 4 3 6 2 3 12 7 11 2

7 10 5

3 6 2

4

7 9,10

3 6 2

Type II

8 1 4

+

8 1

=

8 1 8 5

Type III

9 1

Spurious mode:

9 6

7

Figure 15.14. Three macroelement assemblies fabricated with Veubeke equilibrium triangles to investigate spurious kinematic modes. Red-filled and white-filled circles mark geometric and connection nodes, respectively.

This module is exercised by the statements listed at the top of Figure 15.13, which form a triangle with corner coordinates { { 0,0 },{ 3,1 },{ 2,2 } }, isotropic material matrix with E 11 = E 22 = 64, E 12 = 16, E 33 = 24, others zero, and unit thickness. The results are shown at the bottom of Figure 15.13. This is the same triangle used to test module Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness in §15.3.6. Note that the element is rank sufficient. §15.5.4. *Spurious Kinematic Modes Although an individual Veubeke equilibrium triangle is rank sufficient, assemblies are prone to the appearance of spurious mechanisms. That is, kinematic modes that produce no strain energy although they are not rigid body modes. These will be illustrated by studying the three macroelements pictured in Figure 15.14. For simplicity the macroelements are of rectangular shape, but the conclusions apply to more general geometries. Type I macroelement is built with two triangles. It has four geometric nodes: 1–4, five connection nodes: 5–9, and 10 degrees of freedom. The eigenvalue analysis of the assembled stiffness K is given as an Exercise. It shows that K has 4 zero eigenvalues. Since there are 3 rigid body modes in 2D, one is spurious. It is easily shown that the spurious mode corresponds to the relative rotation of the two triangles with center node 9 as pivot, as pictured to the right of the macroelement. Type II macroelement is built with four crisscrossed triangles of thickness h/2 as illustrated in the Figure. It has four geometric nodes: 1–4, six connection nodes: 5–10, and 12 degrees of freedom. (Note that although 9 and 10 occupy the same location for this geometry, they should be considered as two separate nodes.) The eigenvalue analysis of the assembled stiffness K is given as an Exercise. It shows that K has 3 zero eigenvalues and therefore this macroelement has no spurious modes. Type III macroelement is of Union-Jack type and is built with 4 triangles. It has five geometric nodes: 1–5, eight connection nodes: 6–13, and 16 degrees of freedom. The eigenvalue analysis of the assembled stiffness K is given as an Exercise. It shows that K has 4 zero eigenvalues and consequently one spurious mode. This correspond to the triangles rotating about the midpoints 6–9 as pivots, as pictured to the right of the macroelement. These examples show that this element, when used in a stiffness code, is prone to spurious pivot modes where sides of adjacent triangles rotate relatively from each other about the midpoint connector. This is a consequence

15–17

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

M
y x 4 Type I: Crisscrossed 1

4 b = a/γ 1 Thickness h/2 34

3

M
z a 3 2 4 1 3 2

Cross section

z

+
2 1 2

5

Type II: Union-Jack

; ;
y b h

15–18

Figure 15.15. The bending test with two macroelement types.

of the element being nonconforming: full determination of linearly varying side displacements requires two nodes over that side, and there is only one. Even if a rank sufficiently macroelement mesh unit such as Type II of Figure 15.14 can be constructed, there is no guarantee that spurious pivot modes will not occur when those mesh units are connected. For this reason this element is rarely used in DSM-based structural programs, but acquires importance in applications where flux conservation is important. §15.6.

*Shear Locking in Turner Triangles

A well known deficiency of the 3-node Turner triangle is inability to follow rapidly varying stress fields. This is understandable since stresses within the element, for uniform material properties, are constant. But its 1D counterpart: the 2-node bar element, is nodally exact for displacements under some mild assumptions stated in Chapter 11, and correctly solves loaded-at-joints trusses with one element per member. On the other hand, the triangle can be arbitrarily way off under unhappy combinations of loads, geometry and meshing. What happens in going from 1D to 2D? New effects emerge, notably shear energy and inplane bending. These two can combine to produce shear locking: elongated triangles can become extraordinarily stiff under inplane bending because of spurious shear energy.6 The bad news for engineers is that wrong answers caused by locking are non-conservative: deflections and stresses can be so grossly underestimated that safety margins are overwhelmed. To characterize shear locking quantitatively it is convenient to use macroelements in which triangles are combined to form a 4-node rectangle. This simplifies repetition to form regular meshes. The rectangle response under in-plane bending is compared to that of a Bernoulli-Euler beam segment. It is well known that the latter is exact under constant moment. The response ratio of macroelement to beam is a good measure of triangle performance under bending. Such benchmarks are technically called higher order patch tests. Test results can be summarized by one number: the energy ratio, which gives a scalar measure of relative stiffness. §15.6.1. *The Inplane Bending Test The test is defined in Figure 15.15. A Bernoulli-Euler plane beam of thin rectangular cross-section of height b and thickness h is bent under applied end moments M. The beam is fabricated of isotropic material with elastic modulus E and Poisson’s ratio ν. Except for possible end effects the exact solution of the beam problem (from both the theory-of-elasticity and beam-theory standpoints) is a constant bending moment M(x) = M along the span. The associated curvature is κ = M/(E Izz ) = 12M/(Eb3 h). The exact energy taken by a
6

The deterioration can be even more pronounced for its spatial counterpart: the 4-node tetrahedron element, because shear effects are even more important in three dimensions.

15–18

15–19

§15.6 *SHEAR LOCKING IN TURNER TRIANGLES
1 24 2 Eb3 hθa /a. In the latter

1 beam segment of length a is Ubeam = 1 Mκa = 6M 2 a/(Eb3 h) = 24 Eb3 hκ 2 a = 2 θa = κa is the relative rotation of two cross sections separated by a.

To study the bending performance of triangles the beam is modeled with one layer of identical rectangular macroelements dimensioned a ×b and made up of triangles, as illustrated in Figure 15.15. The rectangle aspect ratio is γ = a/b. All rectangles undergo the same deformations and thus it is enough to study a individual macroelement 1-2-3-4. Two types are considered here: Crisscrossed (CC). Formed by overlaying triangles 1-2-4, 3-4-2, 2-3-1 and 4-1-2, each with thickness h/2. Using 4 triangles instead of 2 makes the macroelement geometrically and physically symmetric since 2 triangles are attached to each corner. Union-Jack (UJ). Formed by placing a fifth node at the center and dividing the rectangle into 4 triangles: 1-2-5, 2-3-5, 3-4-5, 4-1-5. By construction this element is also geometrically and physically symmetric. §15.6.2. *Energy Ratios The assembled macroelement stiffnesses are KCC and + KU J , of orders 8 × 8 and 10 × 10, respectively. For the latter the internal node 5 is statically condensed producing an 8 × 8 stiffness KU . To test performance we apply four alternating corner loads as shown in Figure 15.16. The resultant bending moment is M = Pb.

−θa/2 P 4 b = a/γ P 1 a

θa/2 3 P 2 P

Figure 15.16. Bending a macroelement by applying a relative edge rotation.

Although triangles cannot copy curvatures pointwise,7 macroelement edges can rotate since constituent triangles can expand or contract. Because of symmetries, the rotations of sides 1-2 and 3-4 are −θa /2 and θa /2, as illustrated in Figure 15.16. The corresponding corner x displacements are ±bθa /4 whereas the y displacements are zero. Assemble these into a node displacement 8-vector u M . u M = 1 bθa [ −1 4 0 1 0 −1 0 1 0 ]T (15.48)

The internal energy taken by a macroelement of 8 × 8 stiffness K M under 15.48 is U M = 1 uT K M u M , which 2 M can be expressed as a function of E, ν, a, b, h and θa .8 The ratio r M = U M /Ubeam is called the energy ratio. If r M > 1 the macroelement is stiffer than the beam because it take more energy to bend it to conform to the same edge rotations, and the 2D model is said to be overstiff. Results for zero Poisson’s ratio, computed with the script of Figure 15.17, are 3 rCC = 3 + γ 2 , 2 rU J = 3(1 + γ 2 )2 . 2 + 4γ 2 (15.49)

If for example γ = a/b = 10, which is an elongated rectangular shape of 10:1 aspect ratio, rCC = 153 and the crisscrossed macroelement is 153 times stiffer than the beam. For the Union-Jack configuration rU J = 10201/134 = 76.13; about twice better but still way overstiff. If γ = 1, rCC = 4.5 and rU J = 2: overstiff but not dramatically so. The effect of a nonzero Poisson’s ratio is studied in Exercise 15.10.

7 8

That is the reason why they can be so stiff under bending. The load P could be recovered via K M u M , but this value is not needed to compute energy ratios.

15–19

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES
ClearAll[a,b,Em,h,γ ]; b=a/γ ; Iz=h*b^3/12; Ubeam=Simplify[(1/2)*Em*Iz*θa^2/a]; Emat=Em*{{1,0,0},{0,1,0},{0,0,1/2}}; nc={{-a,-b},{a,-b},{a,b},{-a,b},{0,0}}/2; enCC={{1,2,4},{3,4,2},{2,3,1},{4,1,3}}; enUJ={{1,2,5},{2,3,5},{3,4,5},{4,1,5}}; r={0,0}; For [m=1,m<=2,m++, mtype={"CC","UJ"}[[m]]; nF={8,10}[[m]]; K=Table[0,{nF},{nF}]; f=Table[0,{nF}]; For [e=1,e<=4,e++, If [mtype=="CC", enl=enCC[[e]], enl=enUJ[[e]]]; {n1,n2,n3}=enl; encoor={nc[[n1]],nc[[n2]],nc[[n3]]}; ht=h; If [mtype=="CC", ht=h/2]; Ke=Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness[encoor,Emat,ht,False]; eft={2*n1-1,2*n1,2*n2-1,2*n2,2*n3-1,2*n3}; For [i=1,i<=6,i++, For [j=1,j<=6,j++, ii=eft[[i]]; jj=eft[[j]]; K[[ii,jj]]+=Ke[[i,j]] ]]; ]; KM=K=Simplify[K]; If [mtype=="UJ", {K,f}= Simplify[CondenseLastFreedom[K,f]]; {KM,f}=Simplify[CondenseLastFreedom[K,f]]]; Print["KM=",KM//MatrixForm]; uM={1,0,-1,0,1,0,-1,0}*θa*b/4; UM=uM.KM.uM/2; rM=Simplify[UM/Ubeam]; Print["rM=",rM]; r[[m]]=rM; ]; Plot[Evaluate[r],{γ ,0,10}];

15–20

Figure 15.17. Script to compute energy ratios for the two macroelements of Figure 15.15.

§15.6.3. *Convergence as Mesh is Refined Note that if γ = a/b → 0, rCC → 3 and rU J → 1.5. So even if the beam of Figure 15.15 is divided into an infinite number of macroelements along x the solution will not converge. It is necessary to subdivide also along the height. If 2n (n ≥ 1) identical macroelement layers are placed along the beam height while γ is kept fixed, the energy ratio becomes r (2n) = 22n − 1 + r (1) r (1) − 1 =1+ , 22n 22n (15.50)

where r (1) is the ratio 15.49 for one layer. If r (1) = 1, r (2n) = 1 for all n ≥ 1, so bending exactness is maintained as expected. If n = 1 (two layers), r (2) = (3 + r (1) )/4 and if n = 2 (four layers), r (4) = (7 + r (1) )/8. If n → ∞, r (2n) → 1, but convergence can be slow. For example, suppose that γ = 1 (unit aspect ratio a = b) and that r (1) = rCC = 4.5. To get within 1% of the exact solution, 1 + 3.5/22n < 1.01. This is satisfed if n ≥ 5, meaning 10 layers of elements along y. If the beam span is 10 times the height, 1000 macroelements or 4000 triangles are needed for this simple problem, which is exactly solvable by one beam element. The stress accuracy of triangles is examined in Chapter 28. Notes and Bibliography As a plane stress structural element, the Turner triangle was first developed in the 1956 paper by Turner et. al. [323]. The target application was modeling of delta wing skin panels. Arbitrary quadrilaterals were formed by assembling triangles as macroelements. Because of its geometric flexibility, the element was soon adopted in aircraft structural analysis codes in the late 1950’s. It moved to Civil Engineering applications through the research and teaching at Berkeley of Ray Clough, who gave the method its name in [55]. The derivation method of [323] would look unfamiliar to present FEM practicioners used to the displacement method. It was based on assumed stress modes. More precisely: the element, referred to a local Cartesian system {x, y}, is put under three constant stress states: σx x , σ yy and σx y , collected in array σ. Lumping the

15–20

15–21

§15.

References

stress field to the nodes gives the node forces: f = Lσ. The strain field computed from stresses is e = E−1 σ. This is integrated to get a deformation-displacement field, to which 3 rigid-body modes are added as integration constants. Evaluating at the nodes produces e = Au, and the stiffness matrix follows on eliminating σ and e: K = LEA. For constant thickness and material properties it happens that L = V AT and so K = V AT EA happily turned out to be symmetric. This A is the B of 15.17 times 2A, so in the end the stiffness matrix (for constant plate thickness) turns out to be the same as 15.21. The derivation from assumed displacements evolved later. It is not clear who worked it out first, although it is mentioned in [55,342]. The equivalence of the two forms, through energy principles, had been noted by Gallagher [136]. Early displacement derivations typically started from linear polynomials in Cartesian coordinates. For example Przemieniecki [261] begins with u x = c1 x + c2 y + c3 , u y = c4 x + c5 y + c6 . (15.51)

Here the ci play the role of generalized coordinates, which have to be eventually eliminated in favor of node displacements. The same approach is used by Clough in a widely disseminated 1965 article [57]. Even for this simple element the approach is unnecessarily complicated and leads to long hand computations. The elegant derivation in triangular coordinates was popularized by Argyris [12]. The idea of using piecewise linear interpolation over a triangular mesh actually precedes [323] by 13 years. As noted in Chapter 1, it appears in an article by Courant [70], where it is applied to a Poisson’s equation modeling St. Venant’s torsion. The idea did not influence early work in FEM, however, since as noted above the derivation in [323] was not based on displacement interpolation. The Veubeke equilibrium triangle appears in [128, p. 170] and is further elaborated in [129, p. 176]. It is constructed there as an equilibrium element, that is, the stress field inside the triangle is assumed to be σx x = β1 , σ yy = β2 and σx y = β3 , where {β1 , β2 , β3 } are stress parameters. (A field of constant stresses satisfies identically the plane-stress differential equilibrium equations for zero body forces.) Stress parameters can be uniquely expressed in terms of generalized edge loads, which turn out to be virtual-work conjugate to midside displacements.9 The direct displacement derivation given here as a “Turner triangle mapping” is new. As previously noted, this element is rarely used in structural mechanics because of the danger of spurious kinematic modes discussed in §15.5.4. It has importance, however, in some non-structural applications. The completeness check worked out in §15.4.2 is a specialization case of a general proof developed by Irons in the mid 1960s (see [190, §3.9] and references therein) for general isoparametric elements. The check works because the Turner triangle is isoparametric. What are here called triangular coordinates were introduced by M¨ bius in his 1827 book [233].10 They are o often called barycentric coordinates on account on the interpretation discussed in [71]. Other names are listed in Table 15.1. Triangles possess many fascinating geometric properties studied even before Euclid. An exhaustive development can be found, in the form of solved exercises, in [289]. It is unclear when the monomial integration formula 15.26 was first derived. As an expression for integrands expressed in triangular coordinates it was first stated in [88]. The natural strain derivation of §15.4 is patterned after that developed for the so-called ANDES (Assumed Natural Deviatoric Strain) elements [231]. For the Turner triangle it provides nothing new aside of fancy terminology. Energy ratios of the form used in §15.6 were introduced in [39] as a way to tune up the stiffness of Free-Formulation elements.
9

The initial step of assuming stresses exactly mimics that of [323] a decade earlier. What is fundamentally different in Fraeijs de Veubeke’s derivation is the use of energy theorems (in this case, PVW) to pass from generalized edge loads to mean edge displacements. The approach is characteristic of FEM Generation 2. He is better remembered for the “M¨ bius strip” or “M¨ bius band,” the first one-sided 3D surface in mathematics. o o

10

15–21

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–22

References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

15–22

15–23
Homework Exercises for Chapter 15 The Linear Plane Stress Triangle

Exercises

EXERCISE 15.1 [A:15] Assume that the 3-node plane stress triangle has variable thickness defined over the element by the linear interpolation formula

h(ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) = h 1 ζ1 + h 2 ζ2 + h 3 ζ3 ,

(E15.1)

where h 1 , h 2 and h 3 are the thicknesses at the corner nodes. Show that the element stiffness matrix is still given by 15.21 but with h replaced by the mean thickness h m = (h 1 + h 2 + h 3 )/3. Hint: use 15.20 and 15.26.
EXERCISE 15.2 [A:20] The exact integrals of triangle-coordinate monomials over a straight-sided triangle

are given by the formula 15.26, where A denotes the area of the triangle, and i, j and k are nonnegative integers. Tabulate the right-hand side for combinations of exponents i, j and k such that i + j + k ≤ 3, beginning with i = j = k = 0. Remember that 0! = 1. (Labor-saving hint: don’t bother repeating exponent permutations; for example i = 2, j = 1, k = 0 and i = 1, j = 2, k = 0 are permutations of the same thing. Hence one needs to tabulate only cases in which i ≥ j ≥ k).
EXERCISE 15.3 [A/C:20] Compute the consistent node force vector fe for body loads over a Turner triangle,

if the element thickness varies as per E15.1, bx = 0, and b y = b y1 ζ1 + b y2 ζ2 + b y3 ζ3 . Check that for h 1 = h 2 = h 3 = h and b y1 = b y2 = b y3 = b y you recover 15.25. For area integrals use 15.26. Partial result: f y1 = (A/60)[b y1 (6h 1 + 2h 2 + 2h 3 ) + b y2 (2h 1 + 2h 2 + h 3 ) + b y3 (2h 1 + h 2 + 2h 3 )]. Derive the formula for the consistent force vector fe of a Turner triangle of constant thickness h, if side 1–2 (ζ3 = 0, ζ2 = 1 − ζ1 ), is subject to a linearly varying boundary force q = h ˆ such that t qx = qx1 ζ1 + qx2 ζ2 = qx1 (1 − ζ2 ) + qx2 ζ2 , q y = q y1 ζ1 + q y2 ζ2 = q y1 (1 − ζ2 ) + q y2 ζ2 . (E15.2)
y qy1
1

EXERCISE 15.4 [A/C:20]

3

q y = q y1 (1−ζ 2 ) + q y2 ζ 2 qy2
2

qx2

This “ line boundary force” q has dimension of force per unit of side length. Procedural Hint. Use the last term of the line integral (14.21), in which ˆ is replaced by q/ h, and show that since the t contribution of sides 2-3 and 3-1 to the line integral vanish, W = (u ) f =
e e T e
e

q x1 x

q x = q x1 (1−ζ 2 ) + q x2 ζ 2

Figure E15.1. Line force on triangle side 1–2 for Exercise 15.4.
1

u qd

T

e

=
0

uT q L 21 dζ2 ,

(E15.3)

where L 21 is the length of side 1–2. Replace u x (ζ2 ) = u x1 (1 − ζ2 ) + u x2 ζ2 ; likewise for u y , qx and q y , integrate and identify with the inner product shown as the second term in (E15.3). Partial result: f x1 = L 21 (2qx1 +qx2 )/6, f x3 = f y3 = 0. Note. The following Mathematica script solves this Exercise. If you decide to use it, explain the logic. ClearAll[ux1,uy1,ux2,uy2,ux3,uy3,z2,L12]; ux=ux1*(1-z2)+ux2*z2; uy=uy1*(1-z2)+uy2*z2; qx=qx1*(1-z2)+qx2*z2; qy=qy1*(1-z2)+qy2*z2; We=Simplify[L12*Integrate[qx*ux+qy*uy,{z2,0,1}]]; fe=Table[Coefficient[We,{ux1,uy1,ux2,uy2,ux3,uy3}[[i]]],{i,1,6}]; fe=Simplify[fe]; Print["fe=",fe];

15–23

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–24

EXERCISE 15.5 [C+N:15] Compute the entries of Ke for the following plane stress triangle:

x1 = 0, y1 = 0, x2 = 3, y2 = 1, x3 = 2, y3 = 2, E= 100 25 0 25 100 0 0 0 50 , h = 1. (E15.4)

This may be done by hand (it is a good exercise in matrix multiplication) or (more quickly) using the script of Figure 15.5. Partial result: K 11 = 18.75, K 66 = 118.75.
EXERCISE 15.6 [A+C:15] Show that the sum of the rows (and columns) 1, 3 and 5 of Ke as well as the sum

of rows (and columns) 2, 4 and 6 must vanish, and explain why. Check it with the foregoing script.
∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ ∗ of T 1 are { { x1 , y1 },{ x2 , y2 },{ x3 , y3 } } and those of T 2 are { { x1 , y1 },{ x2 , y2 },{ x3 , y3 } }. A point P in ∗ T has Cartesian coordinates { x, y } and triangular coordinates { ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 }. A point P in T ∗ has Cartesian coordinates { x ∗ , y ∗ } and the same triangular coordinates. Show that { x ∗ , y ∗ } and { x, y } are connected by the affine transformation

EXERCISE 15.7 [A:10]. Consider two triangles T and T ∗ , both with positive area. The corner coordinates

1 x∗ y∗

=

1 ∗ x1 ∗ y1

1 ∗ x2 ∗ y2

1 ∗ x3 ∗ y3

1 x1 y1

1 x2 y2

1 x3 y3

−1

1 x y

(E15.5)

(The indicated inverse exists if T has positive area, as assumed.)
EXERCISE 15.8 [A:15]. Let point P have triangular coordinates
3 (a) P1 P 2 hP2 hP1
P(ζP,ζP ,ζP ) 1 2 3

{ζ1P , ζ2P , ζ3P }, as shown in Figure E15.2. Find the distances h P1 , h P2 and h P3 of P to the three triangle sides, and the triangular coordinates of points P1 , P2 and P3 shown in the Figure (Pi is projection on the side opposite to corner i.) Show that h Pi = ζ Pi h i = 2ζ Pi A/L k j , for i = 1, 2, 3, j = 2, 3, 1 and k = 3, 1, 2, in which L ji denotes the length of the side that joins corners i and j and h i is the distance from corner i to the opposite side, as illustrated in Figure E15.2. (Note: the distances {h P1 , h P2 , h P3 } are called the trilinear coordinates of a point P with respect to the vertices of the triangle. They were introduced by Pl¨ cker in 1835. They are essentially scaled versions u of the triangular coordinates.)

h3

hP3

2

1

P 3 L 21

Figure E15.2. Distances of arbitrary point P to three triangle sides.

EXERCISE 15.9 [A:10]. Express the distances from the triangle centroid to the 3 sides in term of the triangle area and the side lengths. Answer: 2 A/L 21 , 2 A/L 32 and 2 A/L 13 , where A is the area of the triangle assumed 3 3 3 positive and L ji is the length of side that joins corners i and j, cf. Figure E15.2, Hint: the area of each subtriangle subtended by the centroid and two corners is 1 A. 3 EXERCISE 15.10 [A:20] Find the triangular coordinates of the altitude feet points H1 , H2 and H3 pictured in Figure 15.3. Once these are obtained, find the equations of the altitudes in triangular coordinates, and the coordinates of the orthocenter H . Answer for H3 : ζ1 = 1 + (L 2 − L 2 )/(2L 2 ), where L ji is the length of 13 32 21 2 side that joins corners i and j; cf. Figure E15.2. EXERCISE 15.11 [C+D:20] Let p(ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) represent a polynomial expression in the natural coordinates.

The integral p(ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) d
e

(E15.6)

15–24

15–25

Exercises

over a straight-sided triangle can be computed symbolically by the following Mathematica module:

IntegrateOverTriangle[expr_,tcoord_,A_,max_]:=Module [{p,i,j,k,z1,z2,z3,c,s=0}, p=Expand[expr]; {z1,z2,z3}=tcoord; For [i=0,i<=max,i++, For [j=0,j<=max,j++, For [k=0,k<=max,k++, c=Coefficient[Coefficient[Coefficient[p,z1,i],z2,j],z3,k]; s+=2*c*(i!*j!*k!)/((i+j+k+2)!); ]]]; Return[Simplify[A*s]] ]; This is referenced as int=IntegrateOverTriangle[p,{ z1,z2,z3 },A,max]. Here p is the polynomial to be integrated, z1, z2 and z3 denote the symbols used for the triangular coordinates, A is the triangle area and max the highest exponent appearing in a triangular coordinate. The module name returns the integral. For example, if p=16+5*b*z2^2+z1^3+z2*z3*(z2+z3) the call int=IntegrateOverTriangle[p,{ z1,z2,z3 },A,3] returns int=A*(97+5*b)/6. Explain how the module works.
EXERCISE 15.12 [C+D:25] Explain the logic of the script listed in Figure 15.17. Then extend it to account for isotropic material with arbitrary Poisson’s ratio ν. Obtain the macroelement energy ratios as functions of γ and ν. Discuss whether the effect of a nonzero ν makes much of a difference if γ >> 1. EXERCISE 15.13 [A/C:25] Verify the conclusions of §15.5.4 as regards rank sufficiency or deficiency of the three Veubeke macroelement assemblies pictured in Figure 15.14. Carry out tests with rectangular macroelements dimensioned a × b, constant thickness h, elastic modulus E and Poisson’s ratio 0. EXERCISE 15.14 [C+D:25] To find whether shear is the guilty party in the poor performance of elongated triangles (as alledged in §15.6) run the script of Figure 15.17 with a zero shear modulus. This can be done by setting Emat=Em*{ { 1,0,0 },{ 0,1,0 },{ 0,0,0 } } in the third line. Discuss the result. Can Em be subsequently reduced to a smaller (fictitious) value so that r ≡ 1 for all aspect ratios γ ? Is this practical?

HomogenizedLinTrigCoorFunction[expr_,{ζ 1_,ζ 2_,ζ 3_}]:=Module[ {f=expr,repζ 0,C0}, repζ 0={ζ 1->0,ζ 2->0,ζ 3->0}; C0=Simplify[f/.repζ 0]; f=Simplify[f-C0(1-ζ 1-ζ 2-ζ 3)]; Return[f]]; HomogenizedQuadTrigCoorFunction[expr_,{ζ 1_,ζ 2_,ζ 3_}]:=Module[ {f,repζ 0,C0,C1,C2,C3}, repζ 0={ζ 1->0,ζ 2->0,ζ 3->0}; f=HomogenizedLinTrigCoorFunction[expr,{ζ 1,ζ 2,ζ 3}]; C1=Coefficient[f,ζ 1]/.repζ 0; C2=Coefficient[f,ζ 2]/.repζ 0; C3=Coefficient[f,ζ 3]/.repζ 0; {C1,C2,C3}=Simplify[{C1,C2,C3}]; f=Simplify[Expand[f-(C1*ζ 1+C2*ζ 2+C3*ζ 3)(1-ζ 1-ζ 2-ζ 3)]]; Return[f]];
Figure E15.3. Two Mathematica modules that homogenize linear and quadratic polynomials expressed in triaangular coordinates.

EXERCISE 15.15 [C:15] The two Mathematica modules listed in Figure E15.3 homogenize linear and

quadratic polynomials, respectively, expressed in triangular coordinates. Explain their logic.

15–25

Section 15: THREE-NODE PLANE STRESS TRIANGLES

15–26

EXERCISE 15.16 [C+D:25] Access the file Trig3PlaneStress.nb from the course Web site by clicking

on the appropriate link in Chapter 15 Index. This is a Mathematica Notebook that does plane stress FEM analysis using the 3-node Turner triangle. Download the Notebook into your directory. Load into Mathematica. Execute the top 7 input cells (which are actually initialization cells) so the necessary modules are compiled. Each cell is preceded by a short comment cell which outlines the purpose of the modules it holds. Notes: (1) the plot-module cell may take a while to run through its tests; be patient; (2) to get rid of unsightly messages and silly beeps about similar names, initialize each cell twice. After you are satisfied everything works fine, run the cantilever beam problem, which is defined in the last input cell. After you get a feel of how this code operate, study the source. Prepare a hierarchical diagram of the modules,11 beginning with the main program of the last cell. Note which calls what, and briefly explain the purpose of each module. Return this diagram as answer to the homework. You do not need to talk about the actual run and results; those will be discussed in Part III. Hint: a hierarchical diagram for Trig3PlaneStress.nb begins like Main program in Cell 8 - drives the FEM analysis GenerateNodes - generates node coordinates of regular mesh GenerateTriangles - generate element node lists of regular mesh ........

11

A hierarchical diagram is a list of modules and their purposes, with indentation to show dependence, similar to the table of contents of a book. For example, if module AAAA calls BBBB and CCCC, and BBBB calld DDDD, the hierarchical diagram may look like: AAAA - purpose of AAAA BBBB - purpose of BBBB DDDD - purpose of DDDD CCCC - purpose of CCCC

15–26

15–27
Hint on Exercise 15.3 (added October 19, 2011) If doing this Exercise by hand, you should process as follows. First, multiply NT by b:

Exercises

ζ

1

0 ζ NT .b =  2 0 
ζ3 0

0 ζ1  0 0  ζ2  b y1 ζ1 + b y2 ζ2 + b y3 ζ3  0 ζ3

to get a 6-vector. Entries 1,3 and 5 are zero. Entry 2 is (b y1 ζ1 + b y2 ζ2 + b y3 ζ3 )ζ1 , and so on for entries 4 and 6. Next, scale this vector by h = h 1 ζ1 + h 2 ζ2 + h 3 ζ3 . Entries 1,3 and 5 remain zero, whereas entries 2, 4 and 6 become cubic polynomials in the ζi . For example, the second entry is (h 1 ζ1 + h 2 ζ2 + h 3 ζ3 ) (b y1 ζ1 + b y2 ζ2 + b y3 ζ3 )ζ1 Expand these in term of cubic monomials. For example, the expanded second entry becomes
2 h 1 b y1 ζ 3 + h 1 b y2 ζ1 ζ2 + 7 more terms 3 3 3 Next, collect the ζi monomials that appear in entries 2, 4 and 6. The 10 possible monomials are ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 , 2 2 2 2 2 2 ζ1 ζ2 , ζ1 ζ3 , ζ2 ζ1 , ζ2 ζ3 , ζ3 ζ1 , ζ3 ζ2 , and ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 . Move all monomial coefficients such as b y1 h 1 , etc., outside the area integral, and apply the formula (15.26) to the monomial integrals. Three cases: 3 ζ1 d
e

=
e

3 ζ2 d

=
e

3 ζ3 d

=

A 10 A 20

2 ζ1 ζ2 d
e

=
e

2 ζ1 ζ3 d

=
e

2 ζ2 ζ1 d

= ... =

ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 =
e

A 60

Finally, collect the common factor A, collect the h factors of the b yi as in (E15.2) and you are done. Well, not quite. It is instructive to check your results for the special cases h 1 = h 2 = h 3 = h (constant thickness), and b y1 = b y2 = b y3 = b y (constant body force). If both the thickness h and the body force b y are constant, the total force on the element, which is then b y h A, should divide equally in 3 for each node. This would agree with the element-by-element force lumping recipe of Section 7). If you are good in Mathematica, the result can be obtained in milliseconds, but you need to use the module listed under Exercise 15.11.

15–27

Introduction to FEM

Three-Node Plane Stress Triangles

15

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Triangles are Still Popular Because of Geometric Versatility and Ease of Automated Mesh Generation

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

The Turner Triangle Geometry and its Nodal Configuration

(a)

3 (x3 ,y3)

(b)
3 Area A > 0

y

2 (x2 ,y2)

2

x z up, towards you

1 (x1 ,y1)

1

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Positive Element Boundary Traversal Convention
3 Area A > 0
y

2

x z up, towards you

1

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Triangular Coordinates

ζ1
3
ζ1 = 0 ζ2 = 0

ζ2
3
ζ2 = 1

ζ3
3
/ / /
ζ3 = 1

/ / /

2 1

/ / /

2 1

2
ζ3 = 0

1

ζ1 = 1

ζ 1 + ζ2 + ζ3 = 1

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

Using Triangular Coordinates to Formulate Linear Interpolation
Cartesian form

f (x, y) = a0 + a1 x + a2 y
Variation defined by 3 corner values Natural form

f1, f2, f3 ζ1 f 3 ]  ζ2  ζ3  

f (ζ 1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) = f 1 ζ1 + f 2 ζ2 + f 3 ζ3 = [ f 1 = [ ζ1 ζ2 f1 ζ3 ]  f 2  f3  

f2

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Relating Triangular & Cartesian Coordinates I
Triangular to Cartesian:
ζ1 ζ2 ζ3

1 x y

=

1 x1 y1

1 x2 y2

1 x3 y3

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Relating Triangular & Cartesian Coordinates II
Cartesian to Triangular:
ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 1 = 2A x2 y3 − x3 y2 x3 y1 − x1 y3 x1 y2 − x2 y1 2A23 2A31 2A12 y23 y31 y12 y2 − y3 y3 − y1 y1 − y2 x32 x13 x21 1 x y x3 − x2 x1 − x3 x2 − x1 1 x y

1 = 2A

Here A jk

x jk = x j − xk yjk = yj − yk denotes the area subtended by corners j, k and the origin of the x-y system

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Partial Derivatives for CartesianTriangular Coordinate Transformations
∂x = xi ∂ζ i 2A ∂ζi = yjk ∂x ∂y = yi ∂ζ i 2A ∂ζi = xk j ∂y

i = 1,2,3

j = 2,3,1 k = 3,1,2

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Cartesian Partial Derivatives of a General Triangular-Coordinates Function

f = f ( ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 )
∂f 1 = ∂x 2A 1 ∂f = ∂y 2A  ∂f  1  ∂x   ∂f  = 2A ∂y y23 x32 y31 x13 y12 x21 ∂f y23 + ∂ζ1 ∂f x32 + ∂ζ1 ∂f y31 + ∂ζ2 ∂f x13 + ∂ζ2 ∂f y12 ∂ζ3 ∂f x21 ∂ζ3  ∂f  ∂ζ1   ∂f   ∂ζ  2  ∂f ∂ζ3        

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

Displacement Interpolation over Turner Triangle
ux uy

uy3
3

P(ζ 1 ,ζ 2 ,ζ3 ) ux3 uy ux uy2 ux2
2

}

by linear interpolation

uy1
1

ux1

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Displacement Interpolation (Cont'd)
u x = u x1 ζ1 + u x2 ζ2 + u x3 ζ3 u y = u y1 ζ1 + u y2 ζ2 + u y3 ζ3
In matrix form

ux uy

=

ζ1 0

0 ζ1

ζ2 0

0 ζ2

ζ3 0

0 ζ3

 u x1  u y1     u x2  e    u y2  = N u    u x3  u y3 

The shape functions are Ni = ζi , i =1,2,3

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Strain-Displacement Relations
  u x1  u  0  y1     u x2  = B u e x21    u y2  y12  u x3  u y3 

y 1  23 e =D N ue = 0 2A x32

0 x32 y23

y31 0 x13

0 x13 y31

y12 0 x21

Stress-Strain Relations
  E 11 σx x σ =  σ yy  =  E 12 σx y E 13  E 12 E 22 E 23   ex x E 13 E 23   e yy  = Ee E 33 2ex y

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Element Stiffness Matrix of Turner Triangle
K
e

=

h BT EB d
e

Because B and E are constant over the triangle area:
Ke = BT EB
y
23

hd
e

 0 1  y31  = 4A2  0 
y12 0

0 x32 0 x13 0 x21

x32  y23  x13   y31   x21 y12

E 11 E 12 E 13

E 12 E 22 E 23

E 13 E 23 E 33

y23 0 x32

0 x32 y23

y31 0 x13

0 x13 y31

y12 0 x21

0 x21 y12

hd
e

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

If the Plate Thickness h is Constant

y

23

 0 h  y31  Ke = 4A  0 
y12 0

0 x32 0 x13 0 x21

x32  y23  x13   y31   x21 y12

E 11 E 12 E 13

E 12 E 22 E 23

E 13 E 23 E 33

y23 0 x32

0 x32 y23

y31 0 x13

0 x13 y31

y12 0 x21

0 x21 y12

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Consistent Node Force Vector for Body Forces
b= bx by ζ1 0  ζ h 2 0  ζ 3 0   0 ζ1   0 b d ζ2   0 ζ3

fe =

h ( Ne ) T b d
e

=

e

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

If Body Forces are Constant over Element
Using *
Ωe

ζ 1 dΩ =

Ωe

ζ 2 dΩ = 

Ωe

ζ 3 dΩ =

1 3

A

we get

 bx  by    Ah  bx    fe = 3  by     bx  by

same result as straightforward "load lumping"

* These area integrals are instances of a general formula given on the next slide

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Integrating Triangular Coordinate Monomials
Integrals
Ωe

ζ 1 dΩ =

Ωe

ζ 2 dΩ =

Ωe

ζ 3 dΩ =

1 3

A

(*)

used in the previous slide are instances of the general formula
1 i! j! k! j i k ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 dΩ = 2A Ω e (i + j + k + 2)!

where exponents i, j, k are nonnegative integers: i ≥ 0, j ≥ 0, k ≥ 0. To get (*) set i = 1, j = k = 0, then permute cyclically. The general formula is valid for triangles with straight sides and constant metric. It does not extend to curved-side triangles, a restriction not mentioned in FEM textbooks.

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Line Forces on Turner Triangle Side
3

q y = q y1 (1−ζ 2 ) + q y2 ζ 2 qy2
2

y

qx2

qy1
x
1

q x1

q x = q x1 (1−ζ 2 ) + q x2 ζ 2

Lumping to node forces given as Exercise 15.4

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Implementation of Turner Triangle Stiffness Computation as Mathematica Module
Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness[ncoor_,Emat_,h_,numer_]:=Module[{ x1,x2,x3,y1,y2,y3,x21,x32,x13,y12,y23,y31,A,Be,Ke}, {{x1,y1},{x2,y2},{x3,y3}}=ncoor; A=Simplify[(x2*y3-x3*y2+(x3*y1-x1*y3)+(x1*y2-x2*y1))/2]; {x21,x32,x13,y12,y23,y31}={x2-x1,x3-x2,x1-x3,y1-y2,y2-y3,y3-y1}; Be={{y23,0,y31,0,y12,0},{0,x32,0,x13,0,x21}, {x32,y23,x13,y31,x21,y12}}/(2*A); If [numer, Be=N[Be]]; Ke=A*h*Transpose[Be].Emat.Be; Return[Ke]];

Can be downloaded from web site

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 20

Introduction to FEM

Testing the Turner Triangle Stiffness Module
ncoor={{0,0},{3,1},{2,2}}; Emat=8*{{4,1,0},{1,4,0},{0,0,2}}; Ke=Trig3TurnerMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,1,False]; Print["Ke=",Ke//MatrixForm]; Print["eigs of Ke=",Chop[Eigenvalues[N[Ke]]]]; Show[Graphics[RGBColor[1,0,0]],Graphics[AbsoluteThickness[2]], Graphics[Polygon[ncoor]],Axes->True];
6 3 3 6 −4 2 Ke = −2 4 −2 −5 − 1 − 10 −4 2 24 − 12 − 20 10 −2 4 − 12 24 14 − 28 −2 −5 − 20 14 22 −9 −1 − 10 10 − 28 −9 38
2 1.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3

eigs of Ke = {75.5334, 32.8648, 11.6017, 0, 0, 0}

IFEM Ch 15 – Slide 21

15–21
Homework Exercises for Chapter 15.

Solutions to Exercises

The Linear Plane Stress Triangle

Solutions
EXERCISE 15.1 From (15.21):

Ke = BT EB
e

(h 1 ζ1 + h 2 ζ2 + h 3 ζ3 ) d

e

.

(E15.6)

From (15.27): ζ1 d
e

e

=
e

ζ2 d

e

=
e

ζ3 d

e

=

A . 3

(E15.7)

Replacing we get Ke = Ah m BT EB, (E15.8) where h m = (h 1 + h 2 + h 3 )/3 is the mean thickness. This also happens to be the thickness at the centroid.
EXERCISE 15.2 Tabulation of the right-hand side of (15.27) for i + j + k ≤ 3:

i 0 1 2 1 3 2 1

j 0 0 0 1 0 1 1

k 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

i! j! k! (i + j + k + 2)! 1/2 1/6 1/12 1/24 1/20 1/60 1/120

that with i = 2, j = 1, k = 0 to 2A/60; and that with i = j = k = 1 to A/60. The x forces vanish: f xi = 0, i = 1, 2, 3. For the y forces: f y1 =

EXERCISE 15.3 Use (15.27). The integral with monomial exponents i = 3, j = k = 0 evaluates to 6A/60;

A b y1 (6h 1 + 2h 2 + 2h 3 ) + b y2 (2h 1 + 2h 2 + h 3 ) + b y3 (2h 1 + h 2 + 2h 3 ) (E15.9) 60 f y2 and f y3 follow by 3-cyclic permutation. Verification for b y1 = b y2 = b y3 = b y and h 1 = h 2 = h 3 = h gives h Ab y /3 at the three corners, which is the element-by-element lumping.
EXERCISE 15.4

f x1 = 1 h L 21 (2qx1 + qx2 ), 6 f y1 = 1 h L 21 (2q y1 + q y2 ), 6 Here L 21 =

f x2 = 1 h L 21 (qx1 + 2qx2 ), 6 f y2 = 1 h L 21 (q y1 + 2q y2 ), 6 f x3 = f y3 = 0.

(E15.10)

2 2 x21 + y21 is the length of side 1-2.

EXERCISE 15.5

 18.75  9.375  −12.5 Ke =   −6.25 

−6.25 −3.125

9.375 18.75 6.25 12.5 −15.625 −31.25

−12.5 −6.25 −6.25 6.25 12.5 −15.625 75.0 −37.5 −62.5 −37.5 75.0 43.75 −62.5 43.75 68.75 31.25 −87.5 −28.125

−3.125 −31.25  31.25   −87.5   −28.125 118.75


(E15.11)

15–21

Section 15: THE LINEAR PLANE STRESS TRIANGLE

15–22

motion along x and consequently the element node forces obtained from fe = Ke ue must be exactly zero. These forces are the sum of columns 1, 3 and 5. A similar result is obtained for columns 2, 4 and 6 on switching x and y. Because the stiffness matrix is symmetric, the same result holds on replacing “columns” by “rows.” (The result extends to any mechanical finite element.)
EXERCISE 15.7 Not assigned. EXERCISE 15.8 Not assigned. EXERCISE 15.9 Not assigned. EXERCISE 15.10 Not assigned. EXERCISE 15.11 Not assigned EXERCISE 15.12 The answer should be a hierarchical diagram such as

EXERCISE 15.6 Set u x1 = u x2 = u x3 = 1 and u y1 = u y2 = u y3 = 0. This is a translational rigid body

Main program in Cell 8 - drives the FEM analysis GenerateNodes - generates node coordinates of regular mesh GenerateTriangles - generate element node lists of regular mesh GenerateEndAxialForces - generates end axial forces on cantilever GenerateEndMomentForces - generates end moment forces on cantilever GenerateEndShearForces - generates end-shear loads on cantilever Plot2DMesh - plots a 2D mesh LinearSolutionOfPlaneStressModel - drives solution of FEM problem AssembleMasterStiffOfPlaneStressModel - assembles master stiffness StiffnessOf3NodePlaneStressTriangle - forms element stiffness MergeElemIntoMasterStiff - merges element stiffness into master stiffness ModifyNodeForcesForDBC - modifies node forces for displacement BC ModifyMasterStiff - modifies master stiffness for displacement BC (Linear solution: done by Mathematica built-in Inverse function) StressesInPlaneStressModel - recovers element stresses ContourPlotNodeFuncOver2DMesh - Contourplots a node-defined function over 2D mesh PlotFunctionOverTriangle - plot function over triangle ContourPolyColor - picks polygon display color PlotFunctionOverQuadrilateral - like title says ContourPolyColor - picks polygon display color ContourPlotElemFuncOver2DMesh - Contourplots an element-defined function over 2D mesh PlotFunctionOverTriangle - plot function over triangle ContourPolyColor - picks polygon display color PlotFunctionOverQuadrilateral - like title says ContourPolyColor - picks polygon display color

15–22

.

The Isoparametric Representation

16

16–1

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§16.1. Introduction §16.2. Isoparametric Representation §16.2.1. Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . §16.2.2. Equalizing Geometry and Displacements . . §16.3. General Isoparametric Formulation §16.4. Triangular Elements §16.4.1. The Linear Triangle . . . . . . . . §16.4.2. The Quadratic Triangle . . . . . . . §16.4.3. *The Cubic Triangle . . . . . . . . §16.5. Quadrilateral Elements §16.5.1. Quadrilateral Coordinates and Iso-P Mappings §16.5.2. The Bilinear Quadrilateral . . . . . . §16.5.3. The Biquadratic Quadrilateral . . . . . §16.6. Completeness Properties of Iso-P Elements §16.6.1. *Completeness Analysis . . . . . . . §16.6.2. Completeness Checks . . . . . . . . §16.6.3. *Completeness for Higher Variational Index §16.7. Iso-P Elements in One and Three Dimensions §16. Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §16. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §16. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16–3 16–3 16–3 16–4 16–5 16–5 16–6 16–6 16–6 16–6 16–6 16–7 16–7 16–8 16–8 16–9 16–11 16–11 16–11 16–11 16–12

16–2

16–3 §16.1. Introduction

§16.2

ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

The procedure used in Chapter 15 to formulate the stiffness equations of the linear triangle can be formally extended to quadrilateral elements as well as higher order triangles. But one quickly encounters technical difficulties: 1. 2. The construction of shape functions that satisfy consistency requirements for higher order elements with curved boundaries becomes increasingly complicated. Integrals that appear in the expressions of the element stiffness matrix and consistent nodal force vector can no longer be evaluated in simple closed form.

These two obstacles can be overcome through the concepts of isoparametric elements and numerical quadrature, respectively. The combination of these two ideas transformed the field of finite element methods in the late 1960s. Together they support a good portion of what is presently used in production finite element programs. In the present Chapter the concept of isoparametric representation is introduced for two dimensional elements. This representation is illustrated on specific elements. In the next Chapter these techniques, combined with numerical integration, are applied to quadrilateral elements. §16.2. Isoparametric Representation §16.2.1. Motivation The linear triangle presented in Chapter 15 is an isoparametric element although was not originally derived as such. The two key equations are (15.10), which defines the triangle geometry, and (15.16), which defines the primary variable, in this case the displacement field. These equations are reproduced here for convenience: 1 x y = 1 x1 y1 1 x2 y2 1 x3 y3 ζ1 ζ2 ζ3 , (16.1) (16.2)

e e e u x = u x1 N1 + u x2 N2 + u x3 N3 = u x1 ζ1 + u x2 ζ2 + u x3 ζ3 , e e e u y = u y1 N1 + u y2 N2 + u y3 N3 = u y1 ζ1 + u y2 ζ2 + u y3 ζ3 .

The interpretation of these equations is as follows. The triangular coordinates define the element geometry via (16.1). The displacement expansion (16.2) is defined by the shape functions, which are in turn expressed in terms of the triangular coordinates. For the linear triangle, shape functions and triangular coordinates coalesce. These relations are diagrammed in Figure 16.1. Evidently geometry and displacements are not treated equally. If we proceed to higher order triangular elements while keeping straight sides, only the displacement expansion is refined whereas the geometry definition remains the same. 16–3

Triangular coordinates ζ1 , ζ 2 , ζ 3

Geometry 1, x, y

Shape functions Ni(e)

Displacement interpolation ux , uy

Figure 16.1. Superparametric representation of triangular element.

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–4
Geometry 1, x, y

Triangular coordinates ζ1 , ζ 2 , ζ 3

Shape functions Ni(e) Displacement interpolation ux , uy

Figure 16.2. Isoparametric representation of triangular elements.

Elements built according to the foregoing prescription are called superparametric, a term that emphasizes that unequal treatment. §16.2.2. Equalizing Geometry and Displacements On first inspection (16.2) and (16.1) do not look alike. Their inherent similarity can be displayed, however, if the second one is rewritten and adjoined to (16.1) to look as follows:       1 1 1 1 1 1 1 e x2 x3  ζ1 x2 x 3  N1  x1  x   x1       e (16.3) y2 y3  ζ2 =  y1 y2 y3  N2 .  y  =  y1       e u x1 u x2 u y3 ζ3 u x1 u x2 u y3 N3 ux uy u y1 u y2 u y3 u y1 u y2 u y3 This form emphasizes that geometry and displacements are given by the same parametric representation, as shown in Figure 16.2. The key idea is to use the shape functions to represent both the element geometry and the problem unknowns, which in structural mechanics are displacements. Hence the name isoparametric element (“iso” means equal), often abbreviated to iso-P element. This property may be generalized to arbitrary elements by replacing the term “triangular coordinates” by the more general one “natural coordinates.” This generalization is illustrated in Figure 16.3.
Geometry 1, x, y Shape functions Ni(e) Displacement interpolation ux , uy

Natural coordinates

Figure 16.3. Isoparametric representation of arbitrary two-dimensional elements: triangles or quadrilaterals. For 3D elements, expand the geometry list to {1, x, y, z} and the displacements to {u x , u y , u z }.

16–4

16–5

§16.4

TRIANGULAR ELEMENTS

Under this generalization, natural coordinates (triangular coordinates for triangles, quadrilateral coordinates for quadrilaterals) appear as parameters that define the shape functions. The shape functions connect the geometry with the displacements.
Remark 16.1. The terms isoparametric and superparametric were introduced by Irons and coworkers at

Swansea in 1966. See Notes and Bibliography at the end of this Chapter. There are also subparametric elements whose geometry is more refined than the displacement expansion.

§16.3. General Isoparametric Formulation The generalization of (16.3) to an arbitrary two-dimensional element with n nodes is straightforward. Two set of relations, one for the element geometry and the other for the element displacements, are required. Both sets exhibit the same interpolation in terms of the shape functions. Geometric relations:
n n n

1=
i=1

Nie ,

x=
i=1

xi Nie ,

y=
i=1

yi Nie .

(16.4)

Displacement interpolation:
n n

ux =
i=1

u xi Nie ,

uy =
i=1

u yi Nie .

(16.5)

These two sets of equations may be combined in matrix form as e   N1     1 1 ... 1 1 e x 2 . . . x n   N2   x   x1  .      y2 . . . yn   .  .  y  =  y1  .      u x1 u x2 . . . u xn  ux uy u y1 u y2 . . . u yn Ne
n

(16.6)

The first three scalar equations in (16.6) express the geometry definition, and the last two the displacement expansion. Note that additional rows may be added to this matrix expression if more variables are interpolated by the same shape functions. For example, suppose that the thickness h and a temperature field T are both interpolated from the n node values:     1 1 ... 1 1  e x 2 . . . x n  N1  x   x1 e     y2 . . . yn   N2   y   y1  .      (16.7)  u x  =  u x1 u x2 . . . u xn   .  .  .        u y   u y1 u y2 . . . u yn      e h h1 h2 . . . hn Nn T1 T2 . . . Tn T Note that the column of shape functions does not change. To illustrate the use of the isoparametric concept, we take a look at specific 2D isoparametric elements that are commonly used in structural and non-structural applications. These are separated into triangles and quadrilaterals because different natural coordinates are used. 16–5

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–6

§16.4. Triangular Elements §16.4.1. The Linear Triangle The three-noded linear triangle, studied in Chapter 15 and pictured in Figure 16.4, may be presented as an isoparametric element:     1 1 1 1 e x2 x 3  N1  x   x1     e (16.8) y2 y3  N2 .  y  =  y1     e u x1 u x2 u x3 N3 ux uy u y1 u y2 u y3 The shape functions are simply the triangular coordinates:
e N1 = ζ1 , e N2 = ζ2 , e N 3 = ζ3 .

3

2 1
Figure 16.4. The 3-node linear triangle.

(16.9)

The linear triangle is the only triangular element that is both superparametric and isoparametric. §16.4.2. The Quadratic Triangle The six node triangle shown in Figure 16.5 is the next complete-polynomial member of the isoparametric triangle family. The isoparametric definition is  e     N1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  Ne  2  x   x1 x2 x3 x4 x5 x6   N e      3   y  =  y1 y2 y3 y4 y5 y6   N e      4  u x1 u x2 u x3 u x4 u x5 u x6  N e  ux  5 uy u y1 u y2 u y3 u y4 u y5 u y6 e N6 (16.10) The shape functions are
e e e N1 = ζ1 (2ζ1 − 1), N2 = ζ2 (2ζ2 − 1), N3 = ζ3 (2ζ3 − 1), e e e N4 = 4ζ1 ζ2 , N5 = 4ζ2 ζ3 , N6 = 4ζ3 ζ1 .

(a)

3 5 6 2 4

(b)

3 5 2 4

6

1

1
Figure 16.5. The 6-node quadratic triangle: (a) the superparametric version, with straight sides and midside nodes at midpoints; (b) the isoparametric version.

(16.11)

The element may have parabolically curved sides defined by the location of the midnodes 4, 5 and 6. The triangular coordinates for a curved triangle are no longer straight lines, but form a curvilinear system as can be observed in Figure 16.5(b).
§16.4.3. *The Cubic Triangle The cubic triangle has ten nodes. This shape functions of this element are the subject of an Exercise in Chapter 18. The implementation is studied in Chapter 24.

16–6

16–7 §16.5. Quadrilateral Elements

§16.5

QUADRILATERAL ELEMENTS

§16.5.1. Quadrilateral Coordinates and Iso-P Mappings Before presenting examples of quadrilateral η η elements, we must introduce the appropriate η=1 η=1 natural coordinate system for that geometry. ξ=1 The natural coordinates for a triangular ξ=−1 ξ element are the triangular coordinates ζ1 , ζ2 and ζ3 . The natural coordinates for a ξ=−1 quadrilateral element are ξ and η, which are η=−1 η=−1 illustrated in Figure 16.6 for both straight sided and curved side quadrilaterals. These are called quadrilateral coordinates. Figure 16.6. Quadrilateral coordinates.

ξ ξ=1

These coordinates vary from −1 on one side to +1 at the other, taking the value zero over the quadrilateral medians. This particular variation range (instead of taking, say, 0 to 1) was chosen by Irons and coworkers to facilitate use of the standard Gauss integration formulas. Those formulas are discussed in the next Chapter.
Remark 16.2. In some FEM derivations it is convenient to visualize the quadrilateral coordinates plotted as Cartesian coordinates in the {ξ, η} plane. This is called the reference plane. All quadrilateral elements in the reference plane become a square of side 2, called the reference element, which extends over ξ ∈ [−1, 1], η ∈ [−1, 1]. The transformation between {ξ, η} and {x, y} dictated by the second and third equations of (16.4), is called the isoparametric mapping. A similar version exists for triangles. An important application of this mapping is discussed in §16.6; see Figure 16.9 there.

§16.5.2. The Bilinear Quadrilateral The four-node quadrilateral shown in Figure 16.7 is the simplest member of the quadrilateral family. It is defined by   1 1  x   x1     y  =  y1    u x1 ux uy u y1  1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2 1 x3 y3 u x3 u y3  1  e N1 x4  e   N2  y4   e  .  N3 u x4 e N4 u y4

η 4 η=1 ξ=−1 3 ξ=1

ξ

(16.12)

1

η=−1

2

Figure 16.7. The 4-node bilinear quadrilateral.

The shape functions are
e N1 = 1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η), 4 e N3 = 1 (1 + ξ )(1 + η), 4 e N2 = 1 (1 + ξ )(1 − η), 4 e N4 = 1 (1 − ξ )(1 + η). 4

(16.13)

These functions vary linearly on quadrilateral coordinate lines ξ = const and η = const, but are not linear polynomials as in the case of the three-node triangle. 16–7

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–8
η

(a)
4

η η=1 7 9

3

(b)
4 6 ξ=1 ξ

3

η=1 7 6 ξ=1 η=−1 5 2 ξ

8 ξ=−1 1 η=−1 5

8 ξ=−1 1

2

Figure 16.8. Two widely used higher order quadrilaterals: (a) the nine-node biquadratic quadrilateral; (b) the eight-node “serendipity” quadrilateral.

§16.5.3. The Biquadratic Quadrilateral The nine-node quadrilateral shown in Figure 16.8(a) is the next complete member of the quadrilateral family. It has eight external nodes and one internal node. It is defined by   1 1  x   x1     y  =  y1    u x1 ux uy u y1  1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2 1 x3 y3 u x3 u y3 1 x4 y4 u x4 u y4 1 x5 y5 u x5 u y5 1 x6 y6 u x6 u y6 1 x7 y7 u x7 u y7 1 x8 y8 u x8 u y8
e   N1  1 e x 9   N2   .  y9   .  .  .   u x9  u y9 Ne 9

(16.14)

This element is often referred to as the Lagrangian quadrilateral in the FEM literature, a term explained in the Notes and Bibliography. Its shape functions are
e N1 = 1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η)ξ η, 4 e N2 = − 1 (1 + ξ )(1 − η)ξ η, 4 ··· e N5 = − 1 (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η)η, 2 e N6 = 1 (1 + ξ )(1 − η2 )ξ, 2 ··· e N9 = (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η2 ) (16.15)

These functions vary quadratically along the coordinate lines ξ = const and η = const. The shape function associated with the internal node 9 is called a bubble function because of its geometric shape, which is pictured in §18.4.2. Figure 16.8(a) depicts a widely used eight-node variant called the “serendipity” quadrilateral. (A name that originated from circumstances surrounding the element discovery.) The internal node is eliminated by kinematic constraints as worked out in an Exercise of Chapter 18. §16.6. Completeness Properties of Iso-P Elements Some general conclusions as regards the range of applications of isoparametric elements can be obtained from a completeness analysis. More specifically, whether the general prescription (16.6) that combines (16.4) and (16.5) satisfies the completeness criterion of finite element trial expansions. This is one of the conditions for convergence to the analytical solution. The requirement is treated generally in Chapter 19, and is stated here in recipe form. 16–8

16–9

§16.6

COMPLETENESS PROPERTIES OF ISO-P ELEMENTS

§16.6.1. *Completeness Analysis The plane stress problem has variational index m = 1. A set of shape functions is complete for this problem if they can represent exactly any linear displacement motions such as u x = α0 + α1 x + α2 y, To carry out the check, evaluate (16.16) at the nodes u xi = α0 + α1 xi + α2 yi u yi = β0 + β1 xi + β2 yi , i = 1, . . . n. (16.17) u y = β0 + β1 x + β2 y. (16.16)

Insert this into the displacement expansion (16.5) to see whether the linear displacement field (16.16) is recovered. Here are the computations for the displacement component u x :
n

ux =
i=1

(α0 + α1 xi + α2 yi ) Nie = α0
i

Nie + α1
i

xi Nie + α2
i

yi Nie = α0 + α1 x + α2 y. (16.18)

For the last step we have used the geometry definition relations (16.4), reproduced here for convenience:
n n n

1=
i=1

Nie ,

x=
i=1

xi Nie ,

y=
i=1

yi Nie .

(16.19)

A similar calculation may be made for u y . It appears that the isoparametric displacement expansion represents (16.18) for any element, and consequently meets the completeness requirement for variational order m = 1. The derivation carries without essential change to three dimensions.1 Can you detect a flaw in this conclusion? The fly in the ointment is the last replacement step of (16.18), which assumes that the geometry relations (16.19) are identically satisfied. Indeed they are for all the example elements presented in the previous sections. But if the new shape functions are constructed directly by the methods of Chapter 18, a posteriori checks of those identities are necessary.

§16.6.2. Completeness Checks The first check in (16.19) is easy: the sum of shape functions must be unity. This is also called the unit sum condition. It can be easily verified by hand for simple elements. Here are two examples.
Example 16.1. Check for the linear triangle: directly from the definition of triangular coordinates,
e e e N1 + N2 + N3 = ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 = 1.

(16.20)

1

This derivation is due to B. M. Irons. See for example [145, p. 75]. The property was known since the mid 1960s and contributed substantially to the rapid acceptance of iso-P elements.

16–9

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–10

ξ−η plane
η

good mapping (compatible)
ξ

bad mapping (incompatible) (e1)

x−y plane

2 1 2

(e1)
η

(e1) 1 2 2 y (e2)

2
ξ

1 (e2)

(e2) 2

x

Figure 16.9. Good and bad isoparametric mappings of 4-node quadrilateral from the {ξ, η} reference plane onto the {x, y} physical plane.

Example 16.2. Check for the 4-node bilinear quadrilateral:
e e e e N1 + N2 + N3 + N4 = 1 (1 − ξ − η + ξ η) + 1 (1 + ξ − η − ξ η) 4 4

+ 1 (1 + ξ + η + ξ η) + 1 (1 − ξ + η − ξ η) = 1 4 4

(16.21)

For more complicated elements see Exercises 16.2 and 16.3. The other two checks are less obvious. For specificity consider the 4-node bilinear quadrilateral. The geometry definition equations are
4 4

x=
i=1

xi Nie (ξ, η),

y=
i=1

yi Nie (ξ, η).

(16.22)

Given the corner coordinates, {xi , yi } and a point P(x, y) one can try to solve for {ξ, η}. This solution requires nontrivial work because it involves two coupled quadratics, but can be done. Reinserting into (16.22) simply gives back x and y, and nothing is gained.2 The correct question to pose is: is the correct geometry of the quadrilateral preserved by the mapping from {ξ, η} to {x, y}? In particular, are the sides straight lines? Figure 16.9 illustrate these questions. Two side-two squares: (e1) and (e2), contiguous in the {ξ, η} reference plane, are mapped to quadrilaterals (e1) and (e2) in the {x, y} physical plane through (16.22). The common side 1-2 must remain a straight line to preclude interelement gaps or interpenetration. We are therefore lead to consider geometric compatibility upon mapping. But this is equivalent to the question of interelement displacement compatibility, which is stipulated as item (C) in §18.1. The statement “the displacement along a side must be uniquely determined by nodal displacements on that side” translates to “the coordinates of a side must be uniquely determined by nodal coordinates on that side.” Summarizing:
2

This tautology is actually a blessing, since finding explicit expressions for the natural coordinates in terms of x and y rapidly becomes impossible for higher order elements. See, for example, the complications that already arise for the bilinear quadrilateral in §23.3.

16–10

16–11 Unit-sum condition + interelement compatibility → completeness.

§16.

References

(16.23)

This subdivision of work significantly reduces the labor involved in element testing.
§16.6.3. *Completeness for Higher Variational Index The completeness conditions for variational index 2 are far more demanding because they involve quadratic motions. No simple isoparametric configurations satisfy those conditions. Consequently isoparametric formulations have limited importance in the finite element analysis of plate and shell bending.

§16.7. Iso-P Elements in One and Three Dimensions The reader should not think that the concept of isoparametric representation is confined to twodimensional elements. It applies without conceptual changes to one and three dimensions as long as the variational index remains one.3 Three-dimensional solid elements are covered in an advanced course. The use of the isoparametric formulation to construct a 3-node bar element is the topic of Exercises 16.4 through 16.7.
Notes and Bibliography A detailed presentation of the isoparametric concept, with annotated references to the original 1960 papers may be found in the textbook [145]. This matrix representation for isoparametric elements used here was introduced in [66]. The term Lagrangian element in the mathematical FEM literature identifies quadrilateral and hexahedra (brick) elements that include all polynomial terms ξ i η j (in 2D) or ξ i η j µk (in 3D) with i ≤ n, j ≤ n and k ≤ n, as part of the shape function interpolation. Such elements have (n + 1)2 nodes in 2D and (n + 1)3 nodes in 3D, and the interpolation is said to be n-bicomplete. For example, if n = 2, the biquadratic quadrilateral with (2 + 1)2 = 9 nodes is Lagrangian and 2-bicomplete. (The qualifier “Lagrangian” in this context refers to Lagrange’s interpolation formula, not to Lagrange multipliers.) References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R

3

A limitation explained in §16.6.3.

16–11

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–12

Homework Exercises for Chapter 16 The Isoparametric Representation
EXERCISE 16.1 [D:10] What is the physical interpretation of the shape-function unit-sum condition discussed in §16.6? Hint: the element must respond exactly in terms of displacements to rigid-body translations in the x and y directions. EXERCISE 16.2 [A:15] Check by algebra that the sum of the shape functions for the six-node quadratic

triangle (16.11) is exactly one regardless of natural coordinates values. Hint: show that the sum is expressable 2 as 2S1 − S1 , where S1 = ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 .
EXERCISE 16.3 [A/C:15] Complete the table of shape functions (16.23) of the nine-node biquadratic quadri-

lateral. Verify that their sum is exactly one.
EXERCISE 16.4 [A:20] Consider a three-node bar element referred to the natural coordinate ξ . The two end

nodes and the midnode are identified as 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The natural coordinates of nodes 1, 2 and 3 are ξ = −1, ξ = 1 and ξ = 0, respectively. The variation of the shape functions N1 (ξ ), N2 (ξ ) and N3 (ξ ) is sketched in Figure E16.1. These functions must be quadratic polynomials in ξ :
e N1 (ξ ) = a0 + a1 ξ + a2 ξ 2 , e N2 (ξ ) = b0 + b1 ξ + b2 ξ 2 , e N3 (ξ ) = c0 + c1 ξ + c2 ξ 2 .

(E16.1)

1

N1 (ξ)
e

N2 (ξ)
e

e N 3 (ξ)

1

1

1 ξ=−1

3 ξ=0

2 1 ξ=1 ξ=−1

3 ξ=0

2 ξ=1

1 ξ=−1

3 ξ=0

2 ξ=1

Figure E16.1. Isoparametric shape functions for 3-node bar element (sketch). Node 3 has been drawn at the 1–2 midpoint but it may be moved away from it, as in Exercises E16.5 and E16.6.

Determine the coefficients a0 , through c2 using the node value conditions depicted in Figure E16.1; for example e N1 = 1, 0 and 0 for ξ = −1, 0 and 1 at nodes 1, 3 and 2, respectively. Proceeding this way show that
e N1 (ξ ) = − 1 ξ(1 − ξ ), 2 e N2 (ξ ) = 1 ξ(1 + ξ ), 2 e N3 (ξ ) = 1 − ξ 2 .

(E16.2)

Verify that their sum is identically one.
EXERCISE 16.5

[A/C:15+10+15+5] A 3-node straight bar element is defined by 3 nodes: 1, 2 and 3, with axial coordinates x1 , x2 and x3 , respectively, as illustrated in Figure E16.2. The element has axial rigidity E A and length = x2 − x1 . The axial displacement is u(x). The 3 degrees of freedom are the axial node displacements u 1 , u 2 and u 3 . The isoparametric definition of the element is 1 x u = 1 x1 u1 1 x2 u2 1 x3 u3
e N1 e N2 e N3

,

(E16.3)

in which Nie (ξ ) are the shape functions (E16.2) of the previous Exercise. Node 3 lies between 1 and 2 but is not necessarily at the midpoint x = 1 . For convenience define 2 x1 = 0, x2 = , x3 = ( 1 + α) , 2 (E16.4)

16–12

16–13
axial rigidity EA x, u 1 (ξ= −1) x1 = 0 3 (ξ=0) x 3 = /2+α
= L (e)
Figure E16.2. The 3-node bar element in its local system.

Exercises

2 (ξ=1) x2 =

where − 1 < α < 1 characterizes the location of node 3 with respect to the element center. If α = 0 node 3 2 2 is located at the midpoint between 1 and 2. See Figure E16.2. (a) From (E16.4) and the second equation of (E16.3) get the Jacobian J = d x/dξ in terms of , α and ξ . Show that: (i) if − 1 < α < 1 then J > 0 over the whole element −1 ≤ ξ ≤ 1; (ii) if α = 0, J = /2 4 4 is constant over the element. Obtain the 1 × 3 strain-displacement matrix B relating e = du/d x = B ue , where ue is the column 3-vector of node displacements u 1 , u 2 and u 3 . The entries of B are functions of , α and ξ . Hint: B = dN/d x = J −1 dN/dξ , where N = [ N1 N2 N3 ] and J comes from item (a). Show that the element stiffness matrix is given by
1

(b)

(c)

Ke =
0

E A BT B d x =
−1

E A BT B J dξ.

(E16.5)

Evaluate the rightmost integral for arbitrary α but constant E A using the 2-point Gauss quadrature rule (E13.7). Specialize the result to α = 0, for which you should get K 11 = K 22 = 7E A/(3 ), K 33 = 16E A/(3 ), K 12 = E A/(3 ) and K 13 = K 23 = −8E A/(3 ), with eigenvalues {8E A/ , 2E A/ , 0}. Note: use of a CAS is recommended for this item to save time. (d) What is the minimum number of Gauss points needed to integrate Ke exactly if α = 0?

EXERCISE 16.6 [A/C:20] This Exercise is a continuation of the foregoing one, and addresses the question of why Ke was computed by numerical integration in item (c). Why not use exact integration? The answer is that the exact stiffness for arbitrary α is numerically useless. To see why, try the following script in Mathematica:

ClearAll[EA,L,alpha,xi]; (* Define J and B={{B1,B2,B3}} here *) Ke=Simplify[Integrate[EA*Transpose[B].B*J,{xi,-1,1}, Assumptions->alpha>0&&alpha<1/4&&EA>0&&L>0]]; Print["exact Ke=",Ke//MatrixForm]; Print["exact Ke for alpha=0",Simplify[Ke/.alpha->0]//MatrixForm]; Keseries=Normal[Series[Ke,{alpha,0,2}]]; Print["Ke series about alpha=0:",Keseries//MatrixForm]; Print["Ke for alpha=0",Simplify[Keseries/.alpha->0]//MatrixForm]; At the start of this script define J and B with the results of items (a) and (b), respectively. Then run the script. The line Print["exact Ke for alpha=0",Simplify[Ke/.alpha->0]//MatrixForm] will trigger error messages. Comment on why the exact stiffness cannot be evaluated directly at α = 0 (look at the printed expression before this one). A Taylor series expansion about α = 0 circumvents these difficulties but the 2-point Gauss integration rule gives the correct answer without the gyrations.

16–13

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–14

ξ=ξL 1 (ξ= −1) x1 = 0

load q

ξ=ξR x, u 2 (ξ=1) x2 =

3 (ξ=0) x 3 = /2+α
= L (e)

Figure E16.3. The 3-node bar element under a “box” axial load q.

EXERCISE 16.7 [A/C:20] Construct the consistent force vector for the 3-node bar element of the foregoing exercise, if the bar is loaded by a uniform axial force q (given per unit of x length) that extends from ξ = ξ L through ξ = ξ R , and is zero otherwise. Here −1 ≤ ξ L < ξ R ≤ 1. See Figure E16.3. Use
ξR

fe =
−ξ L

q NT J dξ,

(E16.6)

with the J = d x/dξ found in Exercise 16.5(a) and analytical integration. The answer is quite complicated and nearly hopeless by hand. Specialize the result to α = 0, ξ L = −1 and ξ R = 1.

16–14

Introduction to FEM

Isoparametric Representation

16

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Isoparametric Representation of Finite Elements
Element geometry and displacements are represented by same set of shape functions (iso = same)

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Strong and Weak Points of Isoparametric Formulations for Structural Mechanics
Advantages Unification: same steps for all iso-P elements No need to distinguish straight vs. curved side elements Quick construction of shape functions Disadvantages Low-order iso-P elements may be poor performers (overstiff) Method does not extend to problems with variational index higher than 1 (e.g., plate bending and shells)

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

Before Isoparametric Concept was Discovered, FEM Developers Did "SuperParametric" Elems

Element shape functions refined, more nodes and DOFs added But element geometry was kept simple with straight sides

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

For the 3 Node Linear Triangle, Recall:
Geometric Description
   1 1  x  =  x1 y y1 1 x2 y2   1 ζ1 x3   ζ2  y3 ζ3

Displacement Interpolation
u x = u x1 N1 + u x2 N2 + u x3 N3 = u x1 ζ1 + u x2 ζ2 + u x3 ζ3
e u y = u y1 N1 + u y2 N2 + u y3 N3e = u y1 ζ1 + u y2 ζ2 + u y3 ζ3 e e e e

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

SuperParametric Representation (Triangles)
Triangular coordinates ζ1 , ζ 2 , ζ 3 Geometry 1, x, y

Shape functions Nie

Displacement interpolation ux , u y

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Isoparametric Representation (Iso=Equal) for Triangular Elements

Geometry 1, x, y Triangular coordinates ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 Shape functions Nie Displacement interpolation u x , uy

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Isoparametric Representation for any 2D Element
Geometry 1, x, y Shape functions Nie Displacement interpolation ux , uy

Natural coordinates

Only change wrt previous slide

In 3D: 1,x,y becomes 1,x,y,z etc

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

Iso-P Representation of 2D Plane Stress Elements with n Nodes
Element Geometry:
n n n e x i Ni i=1

1=
i=1

Nie

,

x=

,

y=
i=1

yi Nie

Displacement Interpolation
n

n

ux =
i=1

e u xi Ni

,

uy =
i=1

u yi Ni

e

Matrix Form of Above
 1   1  x   x1     y  =  y1    ux u x1 uy u y1 1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2 ... ... ... ... ...  e  N1 1  e x n   N2  yn   .  . u xn  . u yn Ne
n

      

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

More Rows May be Added to Interpolate other Quantities from Node Values
  1 1  x   x1     y   y1     ux  =  u    x1  uy   u    y1 thickness h  h   h 1 T1 temperature T T   ... 1  e . . . x n  N1  e . . . yn   N2  . . . u xn   .  . . . . . u yn    . . . hn  N e n . . . Tn

1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2 h2 T2

      

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

The Linear Triangle
3

2 1

 1   1  x   x1     y  =  y1    ux u x1 uy u y1 N1e = ζ1 ,
e

1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2

1  e  x 3  N1  e y3   N2   e u x3 N3 u y3 N3e = ζ3

N2 = ζ2 ,

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

The Quadratic Triangle
3 5 2 1 4 6

 1   1  x   x1     y  =  y1    u x1 ux uy u y1
e

1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2

1 x3 y3 u x3 u y3

1 x4 y4 u x4 u y4

1 x5 y5 u x5 u y5

1  N e x6   2e   N3 y6   e   N4 u x6  e N 5 u y6 e N6
1

Ne        

N1 = ζ1 (2ζ1 − 1) N2e = ζ2 (2ζ2 − 1) N3e = ζ3 (2ζ3 − 1)

N4e = 4ζ1 ζ2 N5e = 4ζ2 ζ3 N6 = 4ζ3 ζ1
e

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

The Cubic Triangle
3 7 6 0 2 4 1 5

8 9

Shape functions developed as Exercise in Chapter 18

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Quadrilateral Coordinates ξ, η
η η=1 ξ=−1 ξ=1 ξ ξ=−1 η=−1 η=−1 η=1 ξ ξ=1 η

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

4-Node Bilinear Quadrilateral
η

4
ξ=−1

η=1

3
ξ=1 ξ

1
 1   1  x   x1     y  =  y1    ux u x1 uy u y1

η=−1
1  N e x4   1e  N y4   2e   N3 u x4 N4e u y4    

2
N1 = 1 (1 − ξ)(1 − η) 4 N2e = 1 (1 + ξ)(1 − η) 4 N3 = 1 (1 + ξ)(1 + η) 4
e e

1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2

1 x3 y3 u x3 u y3

N4 = 1 (1 − ξ)(1 + η) 4

e

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

9 Node Biquadratic Quadrilateral
η

3

4 8
ξ=−1

η=1 7

9
η=−1 5

6
ξ=1

ξ

1
 1   1  x   x1     y  =  y1    ux u x1 uy u y1

2
1 x2 y2 u x2 u y2 1 x3 y3 u x3 u y3 1 x4 y4 u x4 u y4 1 x5 y5 u x5 u y5 1 x6 y6 u x6 u y6 1 x7 y7 u x7 u y7 1 x8 y8 u x8 u y8  e 1  N 1e  x 9   N2  y9   : :  : u x9  u y9 Ne
9

      

N1e = 1 (1 − ξ)(1 − η)ξη 4 N2e = − 1 (1 + ξ)(1 − η)ξη 4

...

N5e = − 1 (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η)η 2 N6e = 1 (1 + ξ)(1 − η2 )ξ 2

...

e N9 = (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η2 )

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

8 Node "Serendipity" Quadrilateral
η 4 η=1 7 6 ξ=1 η=−1 5 2 ξ 3

8 ξ=−1 1

Derivation of shape functions is an Exercise in Chapter 18

IFEM Ch 16 – Slide 17

16–15

Solutions to Exercises

Homework Exercises for Chapter 16 - The Isoparametric Representation Solutions
EXERCISE 16.1 Verification of this condition is necessary so that constant functions are interpolated cor-

rectly over the element. If the function happens to be a displacement component such as u x or u y , the constant value corresponds to a rigid body motion, which must be represented exactly. To illustrate this point suppose that for an n-node element, c = u x1 = u x2 = . . . = u xn , which represents a rigid body motion u x = c (constant over the element). Then
n e e e u x = u x1 N1 + u x2 N2 + . . . u xn Nn = i=1 n

u xi Nie = c
i=1

Nie = c × 1 = c.

(E16.7)

EXERCISE 16.2 Check for the 6-node quadratic triangle:
6 2 2 2 Nie = 2(ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 + 2ζ1 ζ2 + 2ζ2 ζ3 + 2ζ3 ζ1 ) − (ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 ) i=1

(E16.8)

= 2(ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 )2 − (ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 ) = 2 × 1 − 1 = 1 where the fact that ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 = 1 has been used.
EXERCISE 16.3 The complete shape functions of the 9-node biquadratic quadrilateral are:
e N1 e N2 e N3 e N4

= 1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η)ξ η, 4 = − 1 (1 + ξ )(1 − η)ξ η, 4 = 1 (1 + ξ )(1 + η)ξ η, 4 = − 1 (1 − ξ )(1 + η)ξ η, 4

e N5 e N6 e N7 e N8

= − 1 (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η)η, 2 = 1 (1 + ξ )(1 − η2 )ξ, 2 = 1 (1 − ξ 2 )(1 + η)η, 2 = − 1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η2 )ξ, 2

e N9 = (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η2 ).

(E16.9)

Check that sum is unity:
4 8 8

Nie
i=1

=ξ η ,
2 2 i=5

Nie

= ξ + η − 2ξ η ,
2 2 2 2 i=1

Nie = ξ 2 + η2 − ξ 2 η2 .

(E16.10)

e Since N9 = 1 − ξ 2 − η2 + ξ 2 η2 , we see that 8 e N9 = 1 − i=1 9

Nie ,

whence
i=1

Nie = 1.

(E16.11)

N1 = 1, 0 and 0 at ξ = −1, 0 and 1 (nodes 1, 3 and 2, respectively), yield a0 = 0, a2 = −1/2 and a2 = 1/2, whence N1 = −(1/2)ξ + (1/2)ξ 2 = −ξ(1 − ξ )/2. A similar technique can be used for N2 and N3 . The complete set is given in (E16.2). Unit sum check: N1 + N2 + N3 = − 1 ξ + 1 ξ 2 + 1 ξ + 1 ξ 2 + 1 − ξ 2 = 1. 2 2 2 2

EXERCISE 16.4 To construct N1 assume the quadratic polynomial N1 (ξ ) = a0 +a1 ξ +a2 ξ 2 . The conditions

This “brute force” technique for constructing shape functions works well for this 1D element, but leads to complicated algebra in 2D and 3D. A quicker and more elegant method that directly builds the functions as product of linear factors is explained in Chapter 18.

16–15

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–16

ClearAll[L,α,ξ ,EA]; Ne={-ξ *(1-ξ )/2,ξ *(1+ξ )/2,1-ξ ^2}; J=(L-4*L*α*ξ )/2; B=Simplify[D[Ne,ξ ]/J]; BTBJ=Transpose[{B}].{B}*J; w1=w2=1; Ke=Simplify[EA*((w1*BTBJ/.ξ ->-Sqrt[1/3])+(w2*BTBJ/.ξ ->Sqrt[1/3]))]; Print["Ke=",Ke//MatrixForm];
Figure E16.4. Mathematica script for item (c) of Exercise 16.5.

EXERCISE 16.5

(a)

From the definition of element geometry in the second row of (E16.3):
e e e x = x 1 N1 + x 2 N2 + x 3 N3 = 1 ξ(ξ 2

+ 1) +

1 2

+ α (1 − ξ 2 ) ,

(E16.12)

we get J=

∂x = ∂ξ

1 2

− 2ξ α .

(E16.13)

(In 1D, the Jacobian is a scalar and is the same as its determinant.) J is linear in ξ . Consequently its max/min values over the element occur at the end nodes: J1 = J |ξ =−1 = ( 1 − 2α) , 2 J2 = J |ξ =1 = ( 1 + 2α) 2 (E16.14)

Both J1 and J2 are obviously positive if − 1 < α < 1 , and if so J > 0 inside the element. If α = 0, 4 4 J = 1 is constant over the element. 2 (b) The strain displacement matrix linking e = B ue is given by B= (c) dNe dξ dNe = = J −1 dx dξ d x
e e ∂ N1 ∂ N2 ∂ Nee ∂ξ ∂ξ ∂ξ

=

(1 2

1 [ξ − − 2αξ )

1 2

ξ+

1 2

−2ξ ] (E16.15)

From Chapter 12 the element strain energy is (12.18). Replacing the e = B ue of item (b) gives def U e = 1 (ue )T 0 BT E B d x ue = 1 (ue )T Ke ue , whence 2 2 K =
e 0

dx dξ = B EB d x = B EB dξ −1
T T

1

1

BT E B J dξ.
−1

(E16.16)

For the two-point Gauss rule the Mathematica script of Figure E16.4 gives Ke = If α = 0 this reduces to Ke = EA 3 EA (3 − 16α 2 ) 7 − 16 α 1 −8(1 − 2α) 7 1 −8 1 −8(1 − 2α) 7 + 16 α −8 (1 + 2 α) −8(1 + 2 α) 16 1 7 −8 −8 −8 16 (E16.17)

(E16.18)

(d)

If α = 0, from item (a) J = 1 is constant whereas B is linear in ξ . Because E A is constant, E A BT B J 2 is a quadratic polynomial in ξ . This is exactly integrated by a Gauss rule with 2 or more points.

16–16

16–17

Solutions to Exercises

ClearAll[L,α,ξ ,EA]; Ne={-ξ *(1-ξ )/2,ξ *(1+ξ )/2,1-ξ ^2}; J=(L-4*L*α*ξ )/2; B=Simplify[{D[Ne,ξ ]/J}]; Print["B=",B]; Ke = Simplify[Integrate[EA*Transpose[B].B*J, {ξ , -1, 1}, Assumptions -> EA>0 && L>0 && α > 0 && α < 1/2]]; Print["Ke exact:",Ke]; Print["Ke exact for α=0:",(Ke/.α->0)//MatrixForm]; Keseries=Normal[Series[Ke,{α,0,2}]]; Print["Keseries=",Keseries//MatrixForm]; Print["Ke series for α=0:", Simplify[Keseries/.α->0]//MatrixForm];
Figure E16.5. Mathematica script for Exercise 16.6.

1 2Ξ 1 2Ξ 4Ξ , , L 4LΑΞ L 4LΑΞ L 4LΑΞ EA Π 8 Α 4 Π Α 32 Α2 4 Ke exact: B EA Log 1 4 Α 32 L Α3 EA 1 2 Α 8 Α Log 1 4 Α 16 L Α3 EA 8Α 1 4 Α2 Log 1 4 Α 32 L Α3 EA Π 1 2Α 2 8 Α 1 4Α 8Α 1 4Α
2

Π Α2 4Α
2

1

1 2 Α 2 Log 32 L Α3 Log 1 4 Α , , Log 1 4Α 4Α 1 2Α ,

1

1

2

Log 1

,

Log 1 1 1


2

EA 1 EA 1

2Α 2Α

8Α 8Α

Log 1 4 Α 16 L Α3 Log 1 4 Α 16 L Α3

2 Α 2 Log 1 32 L Α3 EA Log 1 4 Α , 4Α ,

1

2Α 8Α

2

Log 1

, 4Α ,

Log 1

EA 8 Α

Log 1 4 Α Log 1 16 L Α3 Log 1 4 Α Log 1 4 Α 8 L Α3

(bunch of error messages deleted to save space)
Indeterminate Indeterminate Indeterminate Ke exact for Α 0: Indeterminate Indeterminate Indeterminate Indeterminate Indeterminate Indeterminate
7 EA 3L 16 EA Α 3L EA 3L 8 EA 3L 272 EA Α2 15 L 7 EA 3L 8 EA 3L 8 EA 3L 8 EA 3L 16 EA 3L EA 3L 112 EA Α2 15 L 272 EA Α2 15 L 128 EA Α2 5L 8 EA 3L 8 EA 3L 16 EA Α 3L 16 EA Α 3L 16 EA 3L 128 EA Α2 5L 128 EA Α2 5L

Keseries

112 EA Α2 15 L 16 EA Α 3L 7 EA 3L EA 3L 8 EA 3L 128 EA Α2 5L EA 3L 7 EA 3L 8 EA 3L

16 EA Α 3L 16 EA Α 3L

256 EA Α2 5L

Ke series for Α 0:

Figure E16.6. Results of running the script of Figure E16.5 under Mathematica 4.2.

EXERCISE 16.6 The script used for this item is shown in Figure E16.5. Results of running the script under

Mathematica 4.2 are given in Figure E16.6. The stiffness entries given by exact integration are typified by K 11 = (E A/(32α 3 ))(iπ − 8α − 4iπα + 32α 2 + 4iπ α 2 − (1 − 2α)2 log(4α − 1) + (1 − 2α)2 log(1 + 4α)), K 12 = (E A/(32α 3 ))(8(α + (4α 2 − 1) log(1−4α)+(1−4α 2 ) log(1+4α), etc. The entries are complex expressions because of the particular choice of path integration made by Mathematica to integrate rational functions in ξ . Evaluation at α = 0 fails because entries become 0/0.

16–17

Chapter 16: THE ISOPARAMETRIC REPRESENTATION

16–18

These indeterminate limits can be resolved by expanding Ke in Taylor series about α = 0, and then evaluating the series at α = 0. This reproduces the result (E16.18). All these numerical difficulties and gyrations are bypassed with 2-point Gauss quadrature.

ClearAll[L,α,ξ L,ξ R]; Ne={-ξ *(1-ξ )/2,ξ *(1+ξ )/2,1-ξ ^2}; J=(L-4*L*α*ξ )/2; fe=FullSimplify[Integrate[q*Ne*J,{ξ ,ξ L,ξ R}]]; Print["fe:", fe]; Print["fe for full bar with α=0:",Simplify[fe/.{ξ L->-1,ξ R->1,α->0}] ];

Figure E16.7. Mathematica script for Exercise 16.6.

EXERCISE 16.7 The Mathematica script of Figure E16.7 gives the complicated result:

qL f = 24
e

2 3 4 2 3ξ L − 2(1 + 4α)ξ L + 6αξ L + ξ R (−3 + 2(1 + α(4 − 3ξ R ))ξ R ) 2 3 4 2 −3ξ L + (−2 + 8α)ξ L + 6αξ L + ξ R (3 − 2ξ R (−1 + α(4 + 3ξ R ))) 2 2 2 3 4 −4(ξ L (3 − ξ L + 3αξ L (−2 + ξ L )) − 3ξ R + 6αξ R + ξ R − 3αξ R )

(E16.19)

If α = 0, ξ L = −1 and ξ R = 1 so the load extends over the whole bar, this expression simplifies to fe = qL [1 6 1 4 ]T . (E16.20)

This is nothing but Simpson’s rule for integration.

16–18

.

Isoparametric Quadrilaterals

17

17–1

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§17.1. Introduction §17.2. Partial Derivative Computation §17.2.1. The Jacobian . . . . . . . §17.2.2. Shape Function Derivatives . . §17.2.3. Computing the Jacobian Matrix . §17.2.4. The Strain-Displacement Matrix §17.2.5. *A Shape Function Implementation §17.3. Numerical Integration by Gauss Rules §17.3.1. One Dimensional Rules . . . §17.3.2. Implementation of 1D Rules . . §17.3.3. Two Dimensional Rules . . . §17.3.4. Implementation of 2D Gauss Rules §17.4. The Stiffness Matrix §17.5. *Integration Variants §17.5.1. *Weighted Integration . . . . §17.5.2. *Selective Integration . . . . . §17. Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . §17. References . . . . . . . . . . . . §17. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . .

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17–3 17–3 17–3 17–4 17–4 17–5 17–5 17–6 17–6 17–7 17–8 17–8 17–9 17–11 17–11 17–11 17–12 17–12 17–13

17–2

17–3 §17.1. Introduction

§17.2

PARTIAL DERIVATIVE COMPUTATION

In this Chapter the isoparametric representation of element geometry and shape functions discussed in the previous Chapter is used to construct quadrilateral elements for the plane stress problem. Formulas given in Chapter 14 for the stiffness matrix and consistent load vector of general plane stress elements are of course applicable to these elements. For a practical implementation, however, we must go through more specific steps: 1. 2. 3. Construction of shape functions. Computations of shape function derivatives to form the strain-displacement matrix. Numerical integration over the element by Gauss quadrature rules.

The first topic was dealt in the previous Chapter in recipe form, and is systematically covered in the next one. Assuming the shape functions have been constructed (or readily found in the FEM literature) the second and third items are combined in an algorithm suitable for programming any isoparametric quadrilateral. The implementation of the algorithm in the form of element modules is partly explained in the Exercises of this Chapter, and covered more systematically in Chapter 23. We shall not deal with isoparametric triangles here to keep the exposition focused. Triangular coordinates, being linked by a constraint, require “special handling” techniques that would complicate and confuse the exposition. Chapter 24 discusses isoparametric triangular elements in detail. §17.2. Partial Derivative Computation Partial derivatives of shape functions with respect to the Cartesian coordinates x and y are required for the strain and stress calculations. Because shape functions are not directly functions of x and y but of the natural coordinates ξ and η, the determination of Cartesian partial derivatives is not trivial. The derivative calculation procedure is presented below for the case of an arbitrary isoparametric quadrilateral element with n nodes. §17.2.1. The Jacobian In quadrilateral element derivations we will need the Jacobian of two-dimensional transformations that connect the differentials of {x, y} to those of {ξ, η} and vice-versa. Using the chain rule:  ∂x ∂x   ∂ξ ∂ξ  dx dξ dξ dx  ∂ξ ∂η  dξ  ∂x ∂y  dx = = JT = J−T , = . ∂ y ∂ y  dη ∂η ∂η  dy dy dη dη dy ∂ξ ∂η ∂x ∂y (17.1) Here J denotes the Jacobian matrix of (x, y) with respect to (ξ, η), whereas J−1 is the Jacobian matrix of (ξ, η) with respect to (x, y):  ∂x ∂y   ∂ξ ∂η  J= ∂(x, y)  ∂ξ ∂ξ  = = ∂x ∂y  ∂(ξ, η) ∂η ∂η 1 ∂(ξ, η)  ∂ x ∂ x  J11 J12 =  ∂ξ ∂η  = , J−1 = J21 J22 ∂(x, y) J ∂y ∂y J22 −J12 , −J21 J11

(17.2) where J = |J| = det(J) = J11 J22 − J12 J21 . In FEM work J and J−1 are called simply the Jacobian and inverse Jacobian, respectively; the fact that it is a matrix being understood. The scalar symbol 17–3

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–4

J is reserved for the determinant of J. In one dimension J and J coalesce. Jacobians play a crucial role in differential geometry. For the general definition of Jacobian matrix of a differential transformation, see Appendix D.
Remark 17.1. Observe that the matrices relating the differentials in (17.1) are the transposes of what we call J and J−1 . The reason is that coordinate differentials transform as contravariant quantities: d x = (∂ x/∂ξ ) dξ + (∂ x/∂η) dη, etc. But Jacobians are arranged as in (17.2) because of earlier use in covariant transformations: ∂φ/∂ x = (∂ξ/∂ x)(∂φ/∂ξ ) + (∂η/∂ x)(∂φ/∂η), as in (17.5) below.

The reader is cautioned that notations vary among application areas. As quoted in Appendix D, one author puts it this way: “When one does matrix calculus, one quickly finds that there are two kinds of people in this world: those who think the gradient is a row vector, and those who think it is a column vector.”
Remark 17.2. To show that J and J−1 are in fact inverses of each other we form their product:

J J=

−1

∂x ∂ξ ∂x ∂ξ

∂ξ ∂ x ∂η ∂ x + ∂η ∂ x ∂ξ ∂ x ∂η ∂ y + ∂η ∂ y

∂y ∂ξ ∂y ∂ξ

∂ y ∂η ∂ξ ∂ x + ∂η ∂ x ∂ y ∂η ∂ξ ∂ y + ∂η ∂ y

=

∂x ∂x ∂x ∂y

∂y ∂x ∂y ∂y

=

1 0

0 , 1

(17.3)

where we have taken into account that x = x(ξ, η), y = y(ξ, η) and the fact that x and y are independent coordinates. This proof would collapse, however, if instead of {ξ, η} we had the triangular coordinates {ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 } because rectangular matrices have no conventional inverses. This case requires special handling and is covered in Chapter 24.

§17.2.2. Shape Function Derivatives The shape functions of a quadrilateral element are expressed in terms of the quadrilateral coordinates ξ and η introduced in §16.5.1. The derivatives with respect to x and y are given by the chain rule: ∂ Nie ∂ξ ∂ Nie ∂η ∂ Nie = + , ∂x ∂ξ ∂ x ∂η ∂ x This can be put in matrix form as  ∂Ne 
i i

∂ Nie ∂ Nie ∂ξ ∂ Nie ∂η = + . ∂y ∂ξ ∂ y ∂η ∂ y

(17.4)

 ∂ξ

 ∂x   ∂x  ∂ N e  =  ∂ξ ∂y ∂y

 ∂Ne   ∂Ne  ∂η   ∂ Nie  i i  ∂ξ  ∂ x   ∂ξ  ∂(ξ, η)  ∂ξ  −1 ∂η   ∂ Nie  = ∂(x, y)  ∂ Nie  = J  ∂ Nie  . ∂y ∂η ∂η ∂η

(17.5)

where J−1 is defined in (17.2). The computation of J is addressed in the next subsection. §17.2.3. Computing the Jacobian Matrix To compute the entries of J at any quadrilateral location we make use of the last two geometric relations in (16.4), which are repeated here for convenience:
n n

x=
i=1

xi Nie , 17–4

y=
i=1

yi Nie .

(17.6)

17–5

§17.2 PARTIAL DERIVATIVE COMPUTATION
Quad4IsoPShapeFunDer[ncoor_,qcoor_]:= Module[ {Nf,dNx,dNy,dNξ ,dNη,i,J11,J12,J21,J22,Jdet,ξ ,η,x,y}, {ξ ,η}=qcoor; Nf={(1-ξ )*(1-η),(1+ξ )*(1-η),(1+ξ )*(1+η),(1-ξ )*(1+η)}/4; dNξ ={-(1-η), (1-η),(1+η),-(1+η)}/4; dNη= {-(1-ξ ),-(1+ξ ),(1+ξ ), (1-ξ )}/4; x=Table[ncoor[[i,1]],{i,4}]; y=Table[ncoor[[i,2]],{i,4}]; J11=dNξ .x; J12=dNξ .y; J21=dNη.x; J22=dNη.y; Jdet=Simplify[J11*J22-J12*J21]; dNx= ( J22*dNξ -J12*dNη)/Jdet; dNx=Simplify[dNx]; dNy= (-J21*dNξ +J11*dNη)/Jdet; dNy=Simplify[dNy]; Return[{Nf,dNx,dNy,Jdet}] ];

Figure 17.1. A shape function module for the 4-node bilinear quadrilateral.

Differentiating with respect to the quadrilateral coordinates, ∂x = ∂ξ
n i=1

∂ Nie xi , ∂ξ

∂y = ∂ξ

n i=1

∂ Nie yi , ∂ξ

∂x = ∂η

n i=1

∂ Nie xi , ∂η

∂y = ∂η

n

yi
i=1

∂ Nie . ∂η y1  y2  . . .  . yn

(17.7)

because the xi and yi do not depend on ξ and η. In matrix form:  ∂x J= J11 J12 J21 J22  ∂ξ = ∂x ∂η  ∂Ne ∂y  1 ∂ξ   ∂ξ = PX =  e ∂y  ∂ N1 ∂η ∂η
e ∂ N2 ∂ξ e ∂ N2 ∂η

... ...

 e ∂ Nn  x 1 ∂ξ   x2  e . ∂ Nn   . . ∂η xn

(17.8)

Given a quadrilateral point of coordinates ξ , η we calculate the entries of J using (17.8). The inverse Jacobian J−1 is then obtained by numerically inverting this 2 × 2 matrix.
Remark 17.3. The symbolic inversion of J for arbitrary ξ , η in general leads to extremely complicated

expressions unless the element has a particularly simple geometry, (for example rectangles as in Exercises 17.1–17.3). This was one of the difficulties that motivated the use of Gaussian numerical quadrature, as discussed in §17.3 below.

§17.2.4. The Strain-Displacement Matrix The strain-displacement matrix B that appears in the computation of the element stiffness matrix is given by the general expression (14.18), which is reproduced here for convenience:   ∂Ne e e ∂ Nn ∂ N2 1 0 0 . . . ∂x 0   ∂x   ∂x ex x e e e  ∂ Nn  e ∂ N2 ∂ N1 e   e yy  =  0 0 ... 0 (17.9) e=  ∂y ∂y ∂ y  u = Bu .   e e e e e 2ex y ∂ N e ∂ Nn ∂ N1 ∂ N1 ∂ N2 ∂ N2 . . . ∂ yn ∂y ∂x ∂y ∂x ∂x The nonzero entries of B are partials of the shape functions with respect to x and y. The calculation of those partials is done by computing J via (17.8), inverting and using the chain rule (17.5).
§17.2.5. *A Shape Function Implementation

17–5

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–6

To make the foregoing discussion more specific, Figure 17.1 shows the shape function module for the 4-node bilinear quadrilateral. This is a code fragment that returns the value of the shape functions and their {x, y} derivatives at a given point of quadrilateral coordinates {ξ, η}. The module is invoked by saying { Nf,Nfx,Nfy,Jdet }=Quad4IsoPShapeFunDer[ncoor,qcoor] where the arguments are ncoor qcoor Nf Nfx Nfy Jdet Quadrilateral node coordinates arranged in two-dimensional list form: { { x1,y1 },{ x2,y2 },{ x3,y3 },{ x4,y4 } }. Quadrilateral coordinates { eta,xi } of the point. Value of shape functions, arranged as list { Nf1,Nf2,Nf3,Nf4 }. Value of x-derivatives of shape functions, arranged as list { Nfx1,Nfx2,Nfx3,Nfx4 }. Value of y-derivatives of shape functions, arranged as list { Nfy1,Nfy2,Nfy3,Nfy4 }. Jacobian determinant. (17.10)

The module returns:

Example 17.1. Consider a 4-node bilinear quadrilateral shaped as an axis-aligned 2:1 rectangle, with 2a and a as the x and y dimensions, respectively. The node coordinate array is ncoor={ { 0,0 },{ 2*a,0 },{ 2*a,a },{ 0,a } }. The shape functions and their {x, y} derivatives are to be evaluated at the rectangle center ξ = η = 0. The appropiate call is

{ Nf,Nfx,Nfy,Jdet }=Quad4IsoPShapeFunDer[ncoor,{ 0,0 }] This returns Nf={ 1/8,1/8,3/8,3/8 }, Nfx={ -1/(8*a),1/(8*a),3/(8*a),-3/(8*a) }, Nfy={ -1/(2*a),-1/(2*a),1/(2*a),1/(2*a) } and Jdet=a^2/2.

§17.3. Numerical Integration by Gauss Rules The use of numerical integration is essential for practical evaluation of integrals over isoparametric element domains. The standard practice has been to use Gauss integration because such rules use a minimal number of sample points to achieve a desired level of accuracy. This economy is important for efficient element calculations, since we shall see that a matrix product is evaluated at each sample point. The fact that the location of the sample points in Gauss rules is usually given by non-rational numbers is of no concern in digital computation. §17.3.1. One Dimensional Rules The classical Gauss integration rules are defined by
1 −1 p

ξ = −1

ξ=1 p=1 p=2 p=3 p=4 p=5

Figure 17.2. The first five one-dimensional Gauss rules p = 1, 2, 3, 4 depicted over the line segment ξ ∈ [−1, +1]. Sample point locations are marked with black circles. The radii of these circles are proportional to the integration weights.

F(ξ ) dξ ≈
i=1

wi F(ξi ).

(17.11)

Here p ≥ 1 is the number of Gauss integration points (also known as sample points), wi are the integration weights, and ξi are sample-point abcissae in the interval [−1,1]. The use of the canonical 17–6

17–7

§17.3 NUMERICAL INTEGRATION BY GAUSS RULES Table 17.1 - One-Dimensional Gauss Rules with 1 through 5 Sample Points Points 1 2 3 4 5 Rule
1 −1 1

√ √ F(ξ ) dξ ≈ F(−1/ 3) + F(1/ 3) −1 √ √ 1 F(ξ ) dξ ≈ 5 F(− 3/5) + 8 F(0) + 5 F( 3/5) 9 9 9 −1
1 −1 1 −1

F(ξ ) dξ ≈ 2F(0)

F(ξ ) dξ ≈ w14 F(ξ14 ) + w24 F(ξ24 ) + w34 F(ξ34 ) + w44 F(ξ44 ) F(ξ ) dξ ≈ w15 F(ξ15 ) + w25 F(ξ25 ) + w35 F(ξ35 ) + w45 F(ξ45 ) + w55 F(ξ55 )

√ √ For the 4-point rule,√34 = −ξ24 = (3 − 2 6/5)/7, ξ44 = −ξ14 = (3 + 2 6/5)/7, ξ √ w14 = w44 = 1 − 1 5/6, and w24 = w34 = 1 + 1 5/6. 2 6 2 6 √ √ 1 For the 5-point rule, ξ55 = −ξ15 = 3 5 + 2 10/7, ξ45 = −ξ35 = 1 5 − 2 10/7, ξ35 = 0, 3 √ √ w15 = w55 = (322 − 13 70)/900, w25 = w45 = (322 + 13 70)/900 and w35 = 512/900.

interval [−1,1] is no restriction, because an integral over another range, say from a to b, can be transformed to [−1, +1] via a simple linear transformation of the independent variable, as shown in the Remark below. The first five one-dimensional Gauss rules, illustrated in Figure 17.2, are listed in Table 17.1. These integrate exactly polynomials in ξ of orders up to 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9, respectively. In general a onedimensional Gauss rule with p points integrates exactly polynomials of order up to 2 p − 1. This is called the degree of the formula.
Remark 17.4. A more general integral, such as F(x) over [a, b] in which = b − a > 0, is transformed to the canonical interval [−1, 1] through the mapping x = 1 a(1 − ξ ) + 1 b(1 + ξ ) = 1 (a + b) + 1 ξ , or 2 2 2 2 ξ = (2/ )(x − 1 (a + b)). The Jacobian of this mapping is J = d x/dξ = / . Thus 2
b 1 1

F(x) d x =
a −1

F(ξ ) J dξ =
−1

F(ξ ) 1 dξ. 2

(17.12)

Remark 17.5. Higher order Gauss rules are tabulated in standard manuals for numerical computation. For

example, the widely used Handbook of Mathematical Functions [1] lists (in Table 25.4) rules with up to 96 points. For p > 6 the abscissas and weights of sample points are not expressible as rational numbers or radicals, and can only be given as floating-point numbers.

§17.3.2. Implementation of 1D Rules The Mathematica module shown in Figure 17.3 returns either exact or floating-point information for the first five unidimensional Gauss rules. To get information for the i th point of the p th rule, in which 1 ≤ i ≤ p and p = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, call the module as { xii,wi }=LineGaussRuleInfo[{ p,numer },i] (17.13) Logical flag numer is True to get numerical (floating-point) information, or False to get exact information. The module returns the sample point abcissa ξi in xii and the weight wi in wi. If p is not in the implemented range 1 through 5, the module returns { Null,0 }. 17–7

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS
LineGaussRuleInfo[{rule_,numer_},point_]:= Module[ {g2={-1,1}/Sqrt[3],w3={5/9,8/9,5/9}, g3={-Sqrt[3/5],0,Sqrt[3/5]}, w4={(1/2)-Sqrt[5/6]/6, (1/2)+Sqrt[5/6]/6, (1/2)+Sqrt[5/6]/6, (1/2)-Sqrt[5/6]/6}, g4={-Sqrt[(3+2*Sqrt[6/5])/7],-Sqrt[(3-2*Sqrt[6/5])/7], Sqrt[(3-2*Sqrt[6/5])/7], Sqrt[(3+2*Sqrt[6/5])/7]}, g5={-Sqrt[5+2*Sqrt[10/7]],-Sqrt[5-2*Sqrt[10/7]],0, Sqrt[5-2*Sqrt[10/7]], Sqrt[5+2*Sqrt[10/7]]}/3, w5={322-13*Sqrt[70],322+13*Sqrt[70],512, 322+13*Sqrt[70],322-13*Sqrt[70]}/900, i=point,p=rule,info={{Null,Null},0}}, If [p==1, info={0,2}]; If [p==2, info={g2[[i]],1}]; If [p==3, info={g3[[i]],w3[[i]]}]; If [p==4, info={g4[[i]],w4[[i]]}]; If [p==5, info={g5[[i]],w5[[i]]}]; If [numer, Return[N[info]], Return[Simplify[info]]]; ];

17–8

Figure 17.3. A Mathematica module that returns the first five one-dimensional Gauss rules.

Example 17.2.

{ xi,w }=LineGaussRuleInfo[{ 3,False },2] returns xi=0 and w=8/9, whereas { xi,w }=LineGaussRuleInfo[{ 3,True },2] returns (to 16 places) xi=0. and w=0.888888888888889.

§17.3.3. Two Dimensional Rules The simplest two-dimensional Gauss rules are called product rules. They are obtained by applying the one-dimensional rules to each independent variable in turn. To apply these rules we must first reduce the integrand to the canonical form:
1 −1 1 −1

F(ξ, η) dξ dη =

1

1


−1 −1

F(ξ, η) dξ.

(17.14)

Once this is done we can process numerically each integral in turn:
1 −1 1 −1

F(ξ, η) dξ dη =

1

1

p1

p2


−1 −1

F(ξ, η) dξ ≈
i=1 j=1

wi w j F(ξi , η j ).

(17.15)

where p1 and p2 are the number of Gauss points in the ξ and η directions, respectively. Usually the same number p = p1 = p2 is chosen if the shape functions are taken to be the same in the ξ and η directions. This is in fact the case for all quadrilateral elements presented here. The first four two-dimensional Gauss product rules with p = p1 = p2 are illustrated in Figure 17.4. §17.3.4. Implementation of 2D Gauss Rules The Mathematica module listed in Figure 17.5 implements two-dimensional product Gauss rules having 1 through 5 points in each direction. The number of points in each direction may be the same or different. If the rule has the same number of points p in both directions the module is called in either of two ways: { { xii,etaj },wij }=QuadGaussRuleInfo[{ p, numer }, { i,j }] { { xii,etaj },wij }=QuadGaussRuleInfo[{ p, numer },k ] 17–8 (17.16)

17–9
p = 1 (1 x 1 rule)

§17.4

THE STIFFNESS MATRIX

p = 2 (2 x 2 rule)

p = 3 (3 x 3 rule)

p = 4 (4 x 4 rule)

Figure 17.4. The first four two-dimensional Gauss product rules p = 1, 2, 3, 4 depicted over a straight-sided quadrilateral region. Sample points are marked with black circles. The areas of these circles are proportional to the integration weights.

The first form is used to get information for point {i, j} of the p × p rule, in which 1 ≤ i ≤ p and 1 ≤ j ≤ p. The second form specifies that point by a “visiting counter” k that runs from 1 through p 2 ; if so {i, j} are internally extracted1 as j=Floor[(k-1)/p]+1; i=k-p*(j-1). If the integration rule has p1 points in the ξ direction and p2 points in the η direction, the module may be called also in two ways: { { xii,etaj },wij }=QuadGaussRuleInfo[{ { p1,p2 }, numer },{ i,j }] { { xii,etaj },wij }=QuadGaussRuleInfo[{ { p1,p2 }, numer },k ] (17.17)

The meaning of the second argument is as follows. In the first form i runs from 1 to p1 and j from 1 to p2 . In the second form k runs from 1 to p1 p2 ; if so i and j are extracted by j=Floor[(k-1)/p1]+1; i=k-p1*(i-1). In all four forms, logical flag numer is set to True if numerical information is desired and to False if exact information is desired. The module returns ξi and η j in xii and etaj, respectively, and the weight product wi w j in wij. This code is used in the Exercises at the end of the chapter. If the inputs are not in range, the module returns { { Null,Null },0 }.
Example 17.3. { { xi,eta },w }=QuadGaussRuleInfo[{ 3,False },{ 2,3 }] returns xi=0, eta=Sqrt[3/5]

and w=40/81.
Example 17.4. { { xi,eta },w }=QuadGaussRuleInfo[{ 3,True },{ 2,3 }] returns (to 16-place precision)

xi=0., eta=0.7745966692414834 and w=0.49382716049382713.

1

Indices i and j are denoted by i1 and i2, respectively, inside the module.

17–9

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS
QuadGaussRuleInfo[{rule_,numer_},point_]:= Module[ {ξ ,η,p1,p2,i,j,w1,w2,m,info={{Null,Null},0}}, If [Length[rule]==2, {p1,p2}=rule, p1=p2=rule]; If [p1<0, Return[QuadNonProductGaussRuleInfo[ {-p1,numer},point]]]; If [Length[point]==2, {i,j}=point, m=point; j=Floor[(m-1)/p1]+1; i=m-p1*(j-1) ]; {ξ ,w1}= LineGaussRuleInfo[{p1,numer},i]; {η,w2}= LineGaussRuleInfo[{p2,numer},j]; info={{ξ ,η},w1*w2}; If [numer, Return[N[info]], Return[Simplify[info]]]; ];

17–10

Figure 17.5. A Mathematica module that returns two-dimensional product Gauss rules.

§17.4. The Stiffness Matrix The stiffness matrix of a general plane stress element is given by the expression (14.23), which is reproduced here: Ke =
e

h BT EB d

e

(17.18)

Of the terms that appear in (17.18) the strain-displacement matrix B has been discussed previously. The thickness h, if variable, may be interpolated via the shape functions. The stress-strain matrix E is usually constant in elastic problems, but we could in principle interpolate it as appropriate should it vary over the element. To integrate (17.18) numerically by a two-dimensional product Gauss rule, we have to reduce it to the canonical form (17.14), that is Ke =
1 −1 1 −1

F(ξ, η) dξ dη.

(17.19)

If ξ and η are the quadrilateral coordinates, everything in (17.19) already fits this form, except the element of area d e . To complete the reduction we need to express d e in terms of the differentials dξ and dη. The desired relation is (see Remark below) d
e

y
∂y dη ∂η

∂x dη η ∂η

C B

= d x d y = det J dξ dη = J dξ dη. (17.20)

dΩe
A x

ξ
∂y dξ ∂ξ

We therefore have F(ξ, η) = h B EB detJ.
T

O

(17.21)

∂x dξ ∂ξ

This matrix function can be numerically integrated over the domain −1 ≤ ξ ≤ +1, −1 ≤ η ≤ +1 by an appropriate Gauss product rule. 17–10

Figure 17.6. Geometric interpretation of the Jacobian-determinant formula.

17–11

§17.5 *INTEGRATION VARIANTS

Remark 17.6. To geometrically justify the area transformation formula (17.20), consider the element of area

OACB depicted in Figure 17.6. The area of this differential parallelogram can be computed as dA = OB × OA = ∂x ∂ξ = ∂y ∂ξ ∂x ∂η ∂y ∂η ∂y ∂x ∂y ∂x dξ dη − dη dξ ∂ξ ∂η ∂η ∂ξ

(17.22)

dξ dη = |J| dξ dη = det J dξ dη.

This formula can be extended to any number of dimensions, as shown in textbooks on differential geometry; for example [94,116,228]. §17.5.

*Integration Variants

Several deviations from the standard integration schemes described in the foregoing sections are found in the FEM literature. Two variations are described below and supplemented with motivation Exercises. §17.5.1. *Weighted Integration It is sometimes useful to form the element stiffness as a linear combination of stiffnesses produced by two different integration rules Such schemes are known as weighted integration methods. They are distinguished from the selective-integration schemes described in the next subsection in that the constitutive properties are not modified. For the 4-node bilinear element weighted integration is done by combining the stiffnesses Ke and Ke 1×1 2×2 produced by 1×1 and 2×2 Gauss product rules, respectively: Ke = (1 − β)Ke + βKe . β 1×1 2×2 (17.23)

Here β is a scalar in the range [0, 1]. If β = 0 or β = 1 one recovers the element integrated by the 1×1 or 2×2 rule, respectively.2 The idea behind (17.23) is that Ke is rank-deficient and too soft whereas Ke is rank-sufficient but too stiff. 1×1 2×2 A combination of too-soft and too-stiff hopefully “balances” the stiffness. An application of this idea to the mitigation of shear locking for modeling in-plane bending is the subject of Exercise E17.4. §17.5.2. *Selective Integration In the FEM literature the term selective integration is used to described a scheme for forming Ke as the sum of two or more matrices computed with different integration rules and different constitutive properties.3 We consider here the case of a two-way decomposition. Split the plane stress constitutive matrix E into two: E = EI + EII (17.24)

This is called a stress-strain splitting. Inserting (17.24) into (17.13) the expression of the stiffness matrix becomes Ke =
e

h BT EI B d

e

+
e

h BT EII B d

e

= Ke + Ke . I II

(17.25)

2

For programming the combination (17.23) may be regarded as a 5-point integration rule with weights w1 = 4(1−β) at √ √ the sample point at ξ = η = 0 and wi = β (i = 2, 3, 4, 5) at the four sample points at ξ = ±1/ 3, η = ±1/ 3. This technique is also called “selective reduced integration” to reflect the fact that one of the rules (the “reduced rule”) underintegrates the element.

3

17–11

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–12

If these two integrals were done through the same integration rule, the stiffness would be identical to that obtained by integrating h BT E B d e . The trick is to use two different rules: rule (I) for the first integral and rule (II) for the second. In practice selective integration is mostly useful for the 4-node bilinear quadrilateral. For this element rules (I) and (II) are the 1×1 and 2×2 Gauss product rules, respectively. Exercises E17.5–7 investigate stress-strain splittings (17.24) that improve the in-plane bending performance of rectangular elements. Notes and Bibliography The 4-node quadrilateral has a checkered history. It was first derived as a rectangular panel with edge reinforcements (not included here) by Argyris in his 1954 Aircraft Engineering series [8, p. 49 in the Butterworths reprint]. Argyris used bilinear displacement interpolation in Cartesian coordinates.4 After much flailing, a conforming generalization to arbitrary geometry was published in 1964 by Taig and Kerr [234] using quadrilateral-fitted coordinates called {ξ, η} but running from 0 to 1. (Reference [234] cites an 1961 English Electric Aircraft internal report as original source but [145, p. 520] remarks that the work goes back to 1957.) Bruce Irons, who was aware of Taig’s work while at Rolls Royce, changed the {ξ, η} range to [−1, 1] to fit Gauss quadrature tables. He proceeded to create the seminal isoparametric family as a far-reaching extension upon moving to Swansea [17,63,141–145]. Gauss integration is also called Gauss-Legendre quadrature. Gauss presented these rules, derived from first principles, in 1814; cf. Sec 4.11 of [111]. Legendre’s name is often adjoined because the abcissas of the 1D sample points turned out to be the zeros of Legendre polynomials. A systematic description is given in [226]. For references in multidimensional numerical integration, see Notes and Bibliography in Chapter 24. Selective and reduced integration in FEM developed in the early 1970s, and by now there is a huge literature. An excellent textbook source is [139]. References Referenced items have been moved to Appendix R.

4

This work is probably the first derivation of a continuum-based finite element by assumed displacements. As noted in §1.7.1, Argyris was aware of the ongoing work in stiffness methods at Turner’s group in Boeing, but the plane stress models presented in [251] were derived by interelement flux assumptions. Argyris used the unit displacement theorem, displacing each DOF in turn by one. The resulting displacement pattern is what is now called a shape function.

17–12

17–13
Homework Exercises for Chapter 17 Isoparametric Quadrilaterals

Exercises

The Mathematica module Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness listed in Figure E17.1 computes the element stiffness matrix of the 4-node bilinear quadrilateral. This module is useful as a tool for the Exercises that follow.
Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor_,Emat_,th_,options_]:= Module[{i,k,p=2,numer=False,h=th,qcoor,c,w,Nf, dNx,dNy,Jdet,Be,Ke=Table[0,{8},{8}]}, If [Length[options]==2, {numer,p}=options,{numer}=options]; If [p<1||p>4, Print["p out of range"]; Return[Null]]; For [k=1, k<=p*p, k++, {qcoor,w}= QuadGaussRuleInfo[{p,numer},k]; {Nf,dNx,dNy,Jdet}=Quad4IsoPShapeFunDer[ncoor,qcoor]; If [Length[th]==4, h=th.Nf]; c=w*Jdet*h; Be={Flatten[Table[{dNx[[i]], 0},{i,4}]], Flatten[Table[{0, dNy[[i]]},{i,4}]], Flatten[Table[{dNy[[i]],dNx[[i]]},{i,4}]]}; Ke+=Simplify[c*Transpose[Be].(Emat.Be)]; ]; Return[Simplify[Ke]] ];

Figure E17.1. Mathematica module to compute the stiffness matrix of a 4-node bilinear quadrilateral in plane stress.

The module makes use of the shape function module Quad4IsoPShapeFunDer listed in Figure 17.1, and of the Gauss integration modules QuadGaussRuleInfo and (indirectly) LineGaussRuleInfo, listed in Figures 17.5 and 17.3, respectively. All modules are included in the web-posted Notebook Quad4Stiffness.nb.5 The module is invoked as Ke=Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,thick,options] The arguments are: ncoor Emat Quadrilateral node coordinates arranged in two-dimensional list form: { { x1,y1 },{ x2,y2 },{ x3,y3 },{ x4,y4 } }. A two-dimensional list storing the 3 × 3 plane stress matrix of elastic moduli: E= E 11 E 12 E 13 E 12 E 22 E 23 E 13 E 23 E 33 (E17.2) (E17.1)

arranged as { { E11,E12,E33 },{ E12,E22,E23 },{ E13,E23,E33 } }. Must be symmetric. If the material is isotropic with elastic modulus E and Poisson’s ratio ν, this matrix becomes E= E 1 − ν2 1 ν 0 ν 1 0 0 0 1 (1 − ν) 2 (E17.3)

5

This Notebook does not include scripts for doing the Exercises below, although it has some text statements at the bottom of the cell. You will need to enter the Exercise scripts yourself.

17–13

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–14

thick

The plate thickness specified either as a four-entry list: { h1,h2,h3,h4 } or as a scalar: h. The first form is used to specify an element of variable thickness, in which case the entries are the four corner thicknesses and h is interpolated bilinearly. The second form specifies uniform thickness.

options

Processing options. This list may contain two items: { numer,p } or one: { numer }. numer is a logical flag with value True or False. If True, the computations are done in floating point arithmetic. For symbolic or exact arithmetic work set numer to False.6 p specifies the Gauss product rule to have p points in each direction. p may be 1 through 4. For rank sufficiency, p must be 2 or higher. If p is 1 the element will be rank deficient by two.7 If omitted p = 2 is assumed.

The module returns Ke as an 8 × 8 symmetric matrix pertaining to the following arrangement of nodal displacements: (E17.4) ue = [ u x1 u y1 u x2 u y2 u x3 u y3 u x4 u y4 ]T .

y 4 b = a/γ 1

η

3

Uniform thickness h = 1 Isotropic material with elastic modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν

ξ a 2 x

Figure E17.2. Element for Exercises 17.1 to 17.3.

For the following three exercises we consider the specialization of the general 4-node bilinear quadrilateral to a rectangular element dimensioned a and b in the x and y directions, respectively, as depicted in Figure E17.2. The element has uniform unit thickness h. The material is isotropic with elastic modulus E and Poisson’s ratio ν and consequently E reduces to (E17.3). The stiffness matrix of this element can be expressed in closed form.8 For convenience define γ = a/b (rectangle aspect ratio), ψ1 = (1 + ν)γ , ψ2 = (1 − 3ν)γ , ψ3 = 2 + (1 − ν)γ 2 , ψ4 = 2γ 2 + (1 − ν), ψ5 = (1 − ν)γ 2 − 4, ψ6 = (1 − ν)γ 2 − 1, ψ7 = 4γ 2 − (1 − ν) and ψ8 = γ 2 − (1 − ν). Then the stiffness matrix in closed form is

    Eh e  K = 2)  24γ (1 − ν   

4ψ3

3ψ1 4ψ4

2ψ5 3ψ2 4ψ3

−3ψ2 4ψ8 −3ψ1 4ψ4

−2ψ3 −3ψ1 −4ψ6 3ψ2 4ψ3

−3ψ1 −2ψ4 −3ψ2 −2ψ7 3ψ1 4ψ4

−4ψ6 −3ψ2 −2ψ3 3ψ1 2ψ5 3ψ2 4ψ3

symm

3ψ2 −2ψ7  3ψ1   −2ψ4  . −3ψ2   4ψ8   −3ψ1 4ψ4

(E17.5)

6

The reason for this option is speed. A symbolic or exact computation can take orders of magnitude more time than a floating-point evaluation. This becomes more pronounced as elements get more complicated. The rank of an element stiffness is discussed in Chapter 19. This closed form can be obtained by either exact integration, or numerical integration with a 2 × 2 or higher Gauss rule.

7 8

17–14

17–15

Exercises

EXERCISE 17.1 [C:20] Exercise the Mathematica module of Figure E17.1 with the following script:

ClearAll[Em,nu,a,b,h]; Em=48; h=1; a=4; b=2; nu=0; ncoor={{0,0},{a,0},{a,b},{0,b}}; Emat=Em/(1-nu^2)*{{1,nu,0},{nu,1,0},{0,0,(1-nu)/2}}; For [p=1, p<=4, p++, Ke= Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,h,{True,p}]; Print["Gauss integration rule: ",p," x ",p]; Print["Ke=",Chop[Ke]//MatrixForm]; Print["Eigenvalues of Ke=",Chop[Eigenvalues[N[Ke]]]] ]; Verify that for integration rules p=2,3,4 the stiffness matrix does not change and has three zero eigenvalues, which correspond to the three two-dimensional rigid body modes. On the other hand, for p = 1 the stiffness matrix is different and displays five zero eigenvalues, which is physically incorrect. (This phenomenon is analyzed further in Chapter 19.) Question: why does the stiffness matrix stays exactly the same for p ≥ 2? Hint: take a look at the entries of the integrand h BT EB J ;for a rectangular geometry are those polynomials in ξ and η, or rational functions? If the former, of what polynomial order in ξ and η are the entries?
EXERCISE 17.2 [C:20] Check the rectangular element stiffness closed form given in (E17.5). This may be

done by hand (takes a while) or (quicker) running the script of Figure E17.3, which calls the Mathematica module of Figure E17.1.

ClearAll[Em,Ν,a,b,h,Γ]; b=a/Γ; ncoor={{0,0},{a,0},{a,b},{0,b}}; Emat=Em/(1-Ν^2)*{{1,Ν,0},{Ν,1,0},{0,0,(1-Ν)/2}}; Ke= Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,h,{False,2}]; scaledKe=Simplify[Ke*(24*(1-Ν^2)*Γ/(Em*h))]; Print["Ke=",Em*h/(24*Γ*(1-Ν^2)),"*\n",scaledKe//MatrixForm];
Figure E17.3. Script suggested for Exercise E17.2.

The scaling introduced in the last two lines is for matrix visualization convenience. Verify (E17.5) by printout inspection and report any typos to instructor.
EXERCISE 17.3 [A/C:25=5+10+10] A Bernoulli-Euler plane beam of thin rectangular cross-section with span L, height b and thickness h (normal to the plane of the figure) is bent under end moments M as illustrated in Figure E17.4. The beam is fabricated of isotropic material with elastic modulus E and Poisson’s ratio ν. The exact solution of the beam problem (from both the theory-of-elasticity and beam-theory standpoints) is a constant bending moment M along the span. Consequently the beam deforms with uniform curvature 1 κ = M/(E Iz ), in which Iz = 12 hb3 is the cross-section second moment of inertia about z.

The beam is modeled with one layer of identical 4-node iso-P bilinear quadrilaterals through its height. These are rectangles with horizontal dimension a; in the Figure a = L/4. The aspect ratio b/a is denoted by γ . By analogy with the exact solution, all rectangles in the finite element model will undergo the same deformation. We can therefore isolate a typical element as illustrated in Figure E17.4. The exact displacement field for the beam segment referred to the {x, y} axes placed at the element center as shown in the bottom of Figure E17.4, are u x = −κ x y, u y = 1 κ(x 2 + νy 2 ), 2 (E17.6)

17–15

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–16

M

M
z

y b h

Cross section

L

M

M

y 4 b=γa 1 a
Figure E17.4. Pure bending of Bernoulli-Euler plane beam of thin rectangular cross section, for Exercises 17.3–7. The beam is modeled by one layer of 4-node iso-P bilinear quadrilaterals through its height.

3 x 2

where κ is the deformed beam curvature M/E I . The stiffness equations of the typical rectangular element are given by the close form expression (E17.5). The purpose of this Exercise is to compare the in-plane bending response of the 4-node iso-P bilinear rectangle to that of a Bernoulli-Euler beam element (which would be exact for this configuration). The quadrilateral element will be called x-bending exact if it reproduces the beam solution for all {γ , ν}. This comparison is distributed into three items. (a) Check that (E17.6), as a plane stress 2D elasticity solution, is in full agreement with Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. This can be done by computing the strains ex x = ∂u x /∂ x, e yy = ∂u y /∂ y and 2ex y = ∂u y /∂ x + ∂u x /∂ y. Then get the stresses σx x , σ yy and σx y through the plane stress constitutive matrix (E17.3) of an isotropic material. Verify that both σ yy and σx y vanish for any ν, and that σx x = −E κ y = −M y/Iz , which agrees with equation (13.4) in Chapter 13. Compute the strain energy Uquad = 1 (ubeam )T Ke ubeam absorbed by the 4-node element under nodal 2 displacements ubeam constructed by evaluating (E17.6) at the nodes 1,2,3,4. To simplify this calculation, it is convenient to decompose that vector as follows:
x ubeam = ubeam + ubeam = 1 κab [ −1 0 1 0 −1 0 1 0 ]T 4 y

(b)

+ 1 κ(a 2 + νb2 ) [ 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 ]T 8 Explain why Ke ubeam must vanish and consequently
x x Uquad = 1 (ubeam )T Ke ubeam . 2 y

(E17.7)

(E17.8)

This energy can be easily computed by Mathematica by using the first 4 lines of the script of the previous x Exercise, except that here ncoor={ { -a,-b },{ a,-b },{ a,b },{ -a,b } }/2. If vector ubeam is formed in u as a one-dimensional list, Uquad=Simplify[u.Ke.u/2]. This should come out as a function of M, E, ν, h, a and γ because κ = M/(E Iz ) = 12M/(Eha 3 γ 3 ). (c) From Mechanics of Materials, or equation (13.7) of Chapter 13, the strain energy absorbed by the beam segment of length a under a constant bending moment M is Ubeam = 1 Mκa = M 2 a/(2E Iz ) = 2

17–16

17–17

Exercises

6M 2 /(Eha 2 γ 3 ). Form the energy ratio r = Uquad /Ubeam and show that it is a function of the rectangle aspect ratio γ = b/a and of Poisson’s ratio ν only: 1 + 2/γ 2 − ν . (E17.9) (2/γ 2 )(1 − ν 2 ) This happens to be the ratio of the 2D model solution to the exact (beam) solution. Hence r = 1 means that we get the exact answer, that is the 2D model is x-bending exact. If r > 1 the 2D model is overstiff, and if r < 1 the 2D model is overflexible. Evidently r > 1 for all γ if 0 ≤ ν ≤ 1 . Moreover if 2 b << a, r >> 1; for example if a = 10b and ν = 0, r ≈ 50 and the 2D model gives only about 2% of the correct solution. This phenomenon is referred to in the FEM literature as shear locking, because overstiffness is due to the bending motion triggering spurious shear energy in the element. Remedies to shear locking at the element level are studied in advanced FEM courses. Draw conclusions as to the adequacy or inadequacy of the 2D model to capture inplane bending effects, and comment on how you might improve results by modifying the discretization of Figure E17.4.9 r = r (γ , ν) =
EXERCISE 17.4 [A+C:20] A naive remedy to shear locking can be attempted with the weighted integration

methodology outlined in §17.6.1. Let Ke and Ke denote the element stiffnesses produced by 1×1 and 1×1 2×2 2×2 Gauss product rules, respectively. Take Ke = (1 − β)Ke + βKe β 1×1 2×2 (E17.10) where β is adjusted so that shear locking is reduced or eliminated. It is not difficult to find β if the element is rectangular and isotropic. For the definition of x-bending exact please read the previous Exercise. Inserting Ke into the test introduced there verify that β r= Whence show that if β(1 + 2γ 2 − ν) . (2/γ 2 )(1 − ν 2 ) (E17.11)

2/γ 2 (1 − ν 2 ) , (E17.12) 1 + 2/γ 2 − ν then r ≡ 1 for all {γ , ν} and the element is x-bending exact. A problem with this idea is that it does not make it y-bending exact because r (γ ) = r (1/γ ) if γ = 1. Moreover the device is not easily extended to non-rectangular geometries or non-isotropic material. β=
EXERCISE 17.5 [A+C:35] (Advanced) To understand this Exercise please begin by reading Exercise 17.3, and the concept of shear locking. The material is again assumed isotropic with elastic modules E and Poisson’s ratio ν. The 4-node rectangular element will be said to be bending exact if r = 1 for any {γ , ν} if the bending test described in Exercise 17.3 is done in both x and y directions. A bending-exact element is completely shear-lock-free.

The selective integration scheme outlined in §17.6.2 is more effective than weighted integration (covered in the previous exercise) to fully eliminate shear locking. Let the integration rules (I) and (II) be the 1×1 and 2×2 product rules, respectively. However the latter is generalized so the sample points are located at {−χ, χ}, {χ, −χ }, {χ , χ} and {−χ , χ }, with weight 1.10 Consider the stress-strain splitting α β 0 1 ν 0 1−α ν−β 0 E E E β α 0 = + (E17.13) E= ν 1 0 ν−β 1−α 0 = EI + EII , 1−ν 2 0 0 1−ν 1−ν 2 1−ν 2 1−ν 0 0 0 0 0 2 2
9

Note that even if we make a → 0 and γ = b/a → ∞ by taking an infinite number of rectangular elements along x, the energy ratio r remains greater than one if ν > 0 since r → 1/(1 − ν 2 ). Thus the 2D model would not generally converge to the correct solution if we keep one layer through the height. For a rectangular geometry these sample points lie on the diagonals. In the case of the standard 2-point Gauss product √ rule χ = 1/ 3.

10

17–17

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–18

where α and β are scalars. Show that if χ= 1 − ν2 3(1 − α) (E17.14)

the resulting element stiffness Ke + Ke is bending exact for any {α, β}. As a corollary show that that if α = ν 2 , I II which corresponds to the splitting E E= 1−ν 2 1 ν 0 ν 1 0 0 0 1−ν 2 E = 1−ν 2 ν2 β 0 2 0 β ν 0 0 1−ν 2 E + 1−ν 2 1−ν 2 ν−β 0 ν−β 1−ν 2 0 0 0 0 = EI + EII , (E17.15)

√ then χ = 1/ 3 and rule (II) becomes the standard 2×2 Gauss product rule. What are two computationally convenient settings for β?
EXERCISE 17.6 [A+C:35] (Advanced) A variation on the previous exercise on selective integration to make

the isotropic rectangular 4-node element bending exact. Integration rule (I) is not changed. However rule (II) has four sample points located at {0, −χ }, {χ , 0}, {0, χ} and {−χ , 0} each with weight 1.11 Show that if one selects the stress-strain splitting (E17.13) and χ= 2(1 − ν 2 ) 3(1 − α) (E17.16)

the resulting element stiffness Ke + Ke is bending exact for any {α, β}. Discuss which choices of α reduce χ I II √ √ to 1/ 3 and 2/3, respectively.
EXERCISE 17.7 [A+C:40] (Advanced, research paper level, requires a CAS to be tractable) Extend Exercise

17.5 to consider the case of general anisotropic material: E= E 11 E 12 E 13 E 12 E 22 E 23 E 13 E 23 E 33 (E17.17)

The rules for the selective integration scheme are as described in Exercise 17.5. The appropriate stress-strain splitting is E = EI + EII = in which β is arbitrary and 1 − α1 = 3χ 2 E 1 |E| = , 2 2C 3χ 11 11 (E 22 E 33 − E 23 ) 1 − α2 = 3χ 2 E 1 |E| = , 2 2C 3χ 22 22 (E 11 E 33 − E 13 ) E 11 α1 E 12 β E 13 E 12 β E 22 α2 E 23 E 13 E 23 E 33 + E 11 (1 − α1 ) E 12 (1 − β) 0 E 12 (1 − β) E 22 (1 − α2 ) 0 0 0 0 (E17.18)

2 2 2 |E| = det(E) = E 11 E 22 E 33 + 2E 12 E 13 E 23 − E 11 E 23 − E 22 E 13 − E 33 E 12 ,

(E17.19) Show that the√ resulting rectangular element is bending exact for any E and χ = 0. (In practice one would select χ = 1/ 3.)

2 C11 = E 11 (E 22 E 33 − E 13 )/|E|,

2 C22 = E 22 (E 11 E 33 − E 13 )/|E|.

11

This is called a 4-point median rule, since the four points are located on the quadrilateral medians.

17–18

Introduction to FEM

Isoparametric Quadrilaterals

17

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 1

Introduction to FEM

Isoparametric Quadrilaterals

Implementation Steps for Element Stiffness Matrix: 1. Construct Shape Functions in Quad Coordinates (Chapter 18 is devoted to this topic) 2. Compute x-y Derivatives of Shape Functions and Build Strain-Displacement Matrix B 3. Integrate h B TE B over element

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 2

Introduction to FEM

Partial Derivative Computation
η η=1 ξ=−1 ξ=1 ξ ξ=−1 ξ=1 η=−1 η=−1 η=1 ξ η

Shape functions are written in terms of ξ and η But Cartesian partials (with respect to x, y ) are required to get strains & stresses

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 3

Introduction to FEM

The Jacobian and Inverse Jacobian
 ∂x dx dy  ∂ξ = ∂y ∂ξ  ∂ξ dξ dη  ∂x =  ∂η ∂x ∂x  ∂η  dξ ∂ y  dη ∂η ∂ξ  ∂y  dx ∂η  dy ∂y = JT dξ dη

= J−T

dx dy

in which
 ∂x J= ∂(x, y)  ∂ξ = ∂x ∂(ξ , η) ∂η

∂y  ∂ξ  = ∂y  ∂η

J11 J12 , J21 J22

J−1 =

∂(ξ , η)  ∂x =  ∂ξ ∂(x, y) ∂y

 ∂ξ

∂η  ∂x  ∂η  ∂y

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 4

Introduction to FEM

Shape Function Partial Derivatives
Using chain rule
e ∂ Nie ∂ Nie ∂η ∂ Ni ∂ξ = + ∂ξ ∂ x ∂η ∂ x ∂x

∂ Ni ∂ Nie ∂ Nie ∂ξ = + ∂ξ ∂ y ∂y ∂η ∂ξ ∂x ∂η ∂x

e

∂η ∂y ∂η ∂y

Main problem is to get

∂ξ ∂y

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 5

Introduction to FEM

The Jacobian and Inverse-Jacobian Matrices
Compute the 2 x 2 Jacobian matrix  ∂x ∂y  ∂(x, y) ∂ξ ∂ξ  J= =    ∂(ξ , η) ∂x ∂y
∂η ∂η ∂η  ∂x   ∂η ∂y

Then invert to get J−1 =

∂(ξ , η) =  ∂x  ∂(x, y) ∂ξ ∂y

 ∂ξ

These are the quantities we need for the S.F. partials

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 6

Introduction to FEM

Computing the Jacobian Matrix
Use the element geometry definition (n: number of nodes)
n

x=
i =1

xi Nie
n i=1 n

n

y=
∂y = ∂ξ ∂y = ∂η
i =1 n i=1 n i=1

yi Nie
∂N yi i , ∂ξ
∂ Nie yi . ∂η
e

∂x = ∂ξ ∂x = ∂η

∂ Ni e , xi ∂ξ

∂ Nie xi , ∂η i=1

Store as entries of J and invert to get J −1  ∂x ∂y   ∂ξ  ∂ξ ∂ξ  J−1 =  ∂ x J=    ∂ξ ∂x ∂y ∂y ∂η ∂η

∂η  ∂x  ∂η  ∂y

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 7

Introduction to FEM

Partial Derivative Computation Sequence Summary
At a specific point of quad coordinates ξ and η: Compute
∂x ∂y ∂x ∂y ∂ξ ∂ξ ∂η ∂η

from node coordinates and S.F.s

Form J and invert to get J−1 and J = det J Apply the chain rule to get the x , y partials of the S.F.s

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 8

Introduction to FEM

The Strain Displacement Matrix B
Use those S.F.s partials to build the strain-displacement matrix B:
∂ N1  ∂x   e=  0    ∂ N1e ∂y 
e

0 ∂ N1 ∂y ∂ N1 ∂x
e

∂ N2e ∂x 0
e ∂ N2 ∂y

0 ∂ N2 ∂y ∂ N2 ∂x
e

... ... ...

e ∂ Nn ∂x

   ∂ Nn  u e = B ue  ∂y   e  ∂ Nn ∂x
e

0

0 ∂ N ne ∂y

e

e

Unlike the 3-node triangle, here B = B(ξ,η) varies over quad

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 9

Introduction to FEM

Quad 4 Element Formation in Mathematica: Shape Functions and Their Derivatives
Quad4IsoPShapeFunDer[ncoor_,qcoor_]:= Module[ {Nf,dNx,dNy,dNξ ,dNη,i,J11,J12,J21,J22,Jdet,ξ ,η,x1,x2,x3,x4, y1,y2,y3,y4,x,y}, {ξ ,η}=qcoor; {{x1,y1},{x2,y2},{x3,y3},{x4,y4}}=ncoor; Nf={(1-ξ )*(1-η),(1+ξ )*(1-η),(1+ξ )*(1+η),(1-ξ )*(1+η)}/4; dNξ ={-(1-η), (1-η),(1+η),-(1+η)}/4; dNη= {-(1-ξ ),-(1+ξ ),(1+ξ ), (1-ξ )}/4; x={x1,x2,x3,x4}; y={y1,y2,y3,y4}; J11=dNξ .x; J12=dNξ .y; J21=dNη.x; J22=dNη.y; Jdet=Simplify[J11*J22-J12*J21]; dNx= ( J22*dNξ -J12*dNη)/Jdet; dNx=Simplify[dNx]; dNy= (-J21*dNξ +J11*dNη)/Jdet; dNy=Simplify[dNy]; Return[{Nf,dNx,dNy,Jdet}] ];

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 10

Introduction to FEM

One Dimensional Gauss Integration Rules
1 −1 p

F(ξ ) dξ =
i=1

wi F (ξ i )

One point Two points Three points For 4 and 5 points see Notes

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 11

Introduction to FEM

Graphical Representation of the First Five One-Dimensional Gauss Integration Rules
p=1 p=2 p=3 p=4 ξ = −1 p=5 ξ=1

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 12

Introduction to FEM

Quad 4 Element Formation in Mathematica: 1D Gauss Quadrature Rule Information
LineGaussRuleInfo[{rule_,numer_},point_]:= Module[ {g2={-1,1}/Sqrt[3],w3={5/9,8/9,5/9}, g3={-Sqrt[3/5],0,Sqrt[3/5]}, w4={(1/2)-Sqrt[5/6]/6, (1/2)+Sqrt[5/6]/6, (1/2)+Sqrt[5/6]/6, (1/2)-Sqrt[5/6]/6}, g4={-Sqrt[(3+2*Sqrt[6/5])/7],-Sqrt[(3-2*Sqrt[6/5])/7], Sqrt[(3-2*Sqrt[6/5])/7], Sqrt[(3+2*Sqrt[6/5])/7]}, g5={-Sqrt[5+2*Sqrt[10/7]],-Sqrt[5-2*Sqrt[10/7]],0, Sqrt[5-2*Sqrt[10/7]], Sqrt[5+2*Sqrt[10/7]]}/3, w5={322-13*Sqrt[70],322+13*Sqrt[70],512, 322+13*Sqrt[70],322-13*Sqrt[70]}/900, i=point,p=rule,info={Null,0}}, If [p==1, info={0,2}]; If [p==2, info={g2[[i]],1}]; If [p==3, info={g3[[i]],w3[[i]]}]; If [p==4, info={g4[[i]],w4[[i]]}]; If [p==5, info={g5[[i]],w5[[i]]}]; If [numer, Return[N[info]], Return[Simplify[info]]]; ];

Works for p = 1,2,3,4,5

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 13

Introduction to FEM

Two Dimensional Product Gauss Rules
Canonical form of integral:
1 −1 1 −1

F(ξ , η) dξ dη =

1

1


−1 −1

F(ξ , η) dξ.

Gauss integration rules with p 1 points in the ξ direction and p 2 points in the η direction:
1 −1 1 −1

F(ξ , η) dξ dη =

1

1

p1

p2


−1 −1

F(ξ , η) dξ ≈
i=1 j=1

wi w j F(ξ i , η j )

Usually p1 = p 2

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 14

Introduction to FEM

Graphical Representation of the First Four 2D Product-Type Gauss Integration Rules
with Equal # of Points p in Each Direction
p = 1 (1 x 1 rule) p = 2 (2 x 2 rule)

p = 3 (3 x 3 rule)

p = 4 (4 x 4 rule)

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 15

Introduction to FEM

Quad 4 Element Formation in Mathematica: 2D Gauss Quadrature Rule Information
QuadGaussRuleInfo[{rule_,numer_},point_]:= Module[ {xi,eta,p1,p2,i1,i2,w1,w2,k,info=Null}, If [Length[rule]==2, {p1,p2}=rule, p1=p2=rule]; If [Length[point]==2, {i1,i2}=point, k=point; i2=Floor[(k-1)/p1]+1; i1=k-p1*(i2-1) ]; {xi, w1}= LineGaussRuleInfo[{p1,numer},i1]; {eta,w2}= LineGaussRuleInfo[{p2,numer},i2]; info={{xi,eta},w1*w2}; If [numer, Return[N[info]], Return[Simplify[info]]]; ];

Works for any combination of p1 = 1,2,3,4,5 and p 2 = 1,2,3,4,5 Calls 1D Gauss rule module LineGaussRuleInfo twice

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 16

Introduction to FEM

Geometric Interpretation of Jacobian Determinant J = det J = |J|
y
∂y dη ∂η ∂x dη η ∂η

C B

dΩe
A x

ξ
∂y dξ ∂ξ

O
∂x dξ ∂ξ

d

e

∂x ∂x ∂y ∂x ∂y ∂ξ = OB × OA = dξ dη − dη dξ = ∂ y ∂ξ ∂η ∂η ∂ξ ∂ξ = |J|dξ dη = J dξ dη.

∂x ∂η ∂y ∂η

dξ dη

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 17

Introduction to FEM

Gauss Integration of Stiffness Matrix
K
e

=

e

h BT EB d

Rewrite in canonical form:

K
where

e

=

1 −1

1 −1

F(ξ , η) dξ dη

d

= d x d y = det J dξ dη F(ξ , η) = h BT E B det J

Then apply the rule to F (a 2n x 2n matrix)
1 −1 1 −1

F(ξ , η) dξ dη =

1

1

p1

p2


−1 −1

F(ξ , η) dξ ≈
i=1 j=1

wi w j F (ξ i , η j )

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 18

Introduction to FEM

Quad 4 Element Formation in Mathematica: Stiffness Computation Module
Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor_,Emat_,th_,options_]:= Module[{i,k,p=2,numer=False,h=th,qcoor,c,w,Nf, dNx,dNy,Jdet,Be,Ke=Table[0,{8},{8}]}, If [Length[options]==2, {numer,p}=options,{numer}=options]; If [p<1||p>4, Print["p out of range"]; Return[Null]]; For [k=1, k<=p*p, k++, {qcoor,w}= QuadGaussRuleInfo[{p,numer},k]; {Nf,dNx,dNy,Jdet}=Quad4IsoPShapeFunDer[ncoor,qcoor]; If [Length[th]==4, h=th.Nf]; c=w*Jdet*h; Be={Flatten[Table[{dNx[[i]], 0},{i,4}]], Flatten[Table[{0, dNy[[i]]},{i,4}]], Flatten[Table[{dNy[[i]],dNx[[i]]},{i,4}]]}; Ke+=Simplify[c*Transpose[Be].(Emat.Be)]; ]; Return[Simplify[Ke]] ];

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 19

Introduction to FEM

Quad4 Element Formation in Mathematica
HW Exercises 17.1 through 17.3
Uniform thickness h = 1 Isotropic material with elastic modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν

y 4 b = a/γ

η

3 ξ 2 x

1

a

IFEM Ch 17 – Slide 20

17–19

Solutions to Exercises

Homework Exercises for Chapter 17: Isoparametric Quadrilaterals Solutions
EXERCISE 17.1 This exercise can be done using the Mathematica script listed in Figure E17.5. Running

that code produces the results shown in Figure E17.6.
ClearAll[Em,ν,a,b,h]; Em=48; h=1; a=4; b=2; ν=0; ncoor={{0,0},{a,0},{a,b},{0,b}}; Emat=Em/(1-ν^2)*{{1,ν,0},{ν,1,0},{0,0,(1-ν)/2}}; For [p=1, p<=4, p++, Ke= Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,h,{True,p}]; Print["Gauss integration rule: ",p," x ",p]; Print["Ke=",Chop[Ke]//MatrixForm]; Print["Eigenvalues of Ke=",Chop[Eigenvalues[N[Ke]]]] ];

Figure E17.5. Script to do Exercise 17.1.
Gauss integration rule: 1 x 1 18. 6. 6. − 6. − 18. − 6. 6. 27. 6. 21. − 6. − 27. 6. 6. 18. − 6. − 6. − 6. − 6. 21. − 6. 27. 6. − 21. Ke = 18. − 6. − 6. 6. 18. 6. − 6. − 27. − 6. − 21. 6. 27. − 6. − 6. − 18. 6. 6. 6. 6. − 21. 6. − 27. − 6. 21. Eigenvalues of Ke= {896., 60., 24., 0, 0, 0, 0, 0} Gauss integration rule: 2 x 2 24. 6. 0 − 6. − 12. − 6. 6. 36. 6. 12. − 6. − 18. 0 6. 24. − 6. − 12. − 6. − 6. 12. − 6. 36. 6. − 30. − 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 24. 6. − 6. − 18. − 6. − 30. 6. 36. − 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 0 6. 6. − 30. 6. − 18. − 6. 12. Eigenvalues of Ke= {896., 60., 36., 24., 24., 0, 0, 0} Gauss integration rule: 3 x 3 24. 6. 0 − 6. − 12. − 6. 6. 36. 6. 12. − 6. − 18. 0 6. 24. − 6. − 12. − 6. − 6. 12. − 6. 36. 6. − 30. Ke = − 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 24. 6. − 6. − 18. − 6. − 30. 6. 36. − 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 0 6. 6. − 30. 6. − 18. − 6. 12. Eigenvalues of Ke= {896., 60., 36., 24., 24., 0, 0, 0} Gauss integration rule: 4 x 4 24. 6. 0 − 6. − 12. − 6. 6. 36. 6. 12. − 6. − 18. 0 6. 24. − 6. − 12. − 6. − 6. 12. − 6. 36. 6. − 30. Ke = − 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 24. 6. − 6. − 18. − 6. − 30. 6. 36. − 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 0 6. 6. − 30. 6. − 18. − 6. 12. Eigenvalues of Ke= {896., 60., 36., 24., 24., 0, 0, 0}

− 6. − 6. − 18. 6. 6. 6. 18. − 6.

6. − 21. 6. − 27. − 6. 21. − 6. 27.

− 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 0 6. 24. − 6.

6. − 30. 6. − 18. − 6. 12. − 6. 36.

− 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 0 6. 24. − 6. − 12. − 6. − 12. 6. 0 6. 24. − 6.

6. − 30. 6. − 18. − 6. 12. − 6. 36. 6. − 30. 6. − 18. − 6. 12. − 6. 36.

Figure E17.6. Results from running the script of Figure E17.5.

17–19

Chapter 17: ISOPARAMETRIC QUADRILATERALS

17–20

The Ke given by the 1 × 1 Gauss rule has a rank deficiency of two because it has five zero eigenvalues instead of three. This behavior is explained in Chapter 19. The 2 × 2, 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 rules produce the same stiffness matrix. This matrix has three zero eigenvalues, which correspond to the three independent rigid body modes in two dimensions. The reason for the repeating stiffness matrices is that the integrand hBT EB J is at most quadratic in ξ and η because h and E are constant, B is linear in ξ and η, and for a rectangle J is constant over the element. A 2-point product Gauss rule is exact for up to cubic polynomials in the ξ and η directions, so it does quadratics exactly.
EXERCISE 17.2 The verification can be done in several ways: (1) doing it all by hand, (2) using the suggested

Mathematica script of Figure E17.3 and visually comparing to (E17.5) entry by entry, or (3) doing a fully automatic verification. The script shown in the top cell of Figure E17.7 takes the latter approach. (Any of the 3 ways gets credit, but the last one is quicker.)
ClearAll[Em,ν,a,b,γ ,h,ψ1,ψ2,ψ3,ψ4,ψ5,ψ6,ψ7,ψ8]; ψ1=(1+ν)*γ ; ψ2=(1-3*ν)*γ ; ψ3=2+(1-ν)*γ ^2; ψ4=2*γ ^2+(1-ν); ψ5=(1-ν)*γ ^2-4; ψ6=(1-ν)*γ ^2-1; ψ7=4*γ ^2-(1-ν); ψ8=γ ^2-(1-ν); b=a/γ ; kfac=Em*h/(24*γ *(1-ν^2)); Kr=kfac*{{4ψ3, 3ψ1, 2ψ5,-3ψ2,-2ψ3,-3ψ1,-4ψ6, 3ψ2}, {0, 4ψ4, 3ψ2, 4ψ8,-3ψ1,-2ψ4,-3ψ2,-2ψ7}, {0,0, 4ψ3,-3ψ1,-4ψ6,-3ψ2,-2ψ3, 3ψ1}, {0,0,0, 4ψ4, 3ψ2,-2ψ7, 3ψ1,-2ψ4}, {0,0,0,0, 4ψ3, 3ψ1, 2ψ5,-3ψ2}, {0,0,0,0,0, 4ψ4, 3ψ2, 4ψ8}, {0,0,0,0,0,0, 4ψ3,-3ψ1}, {0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 4ψ4}}; For[i=2,i<=8,i++,For[j=1,j<=i-1,j++,Kr[[i,j]]=Kr[[j,i]]]]; Emat=Simplify[Em/(1-ν^2)*{{1,ν,0},{ν,1,0},{0,0,(1-ν)/2}}]; ncoor={{0,0},{a,0},{a,b},{0,b}}; Ke=Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor,Emat,h,{False,2}]; dK=Simplify[Kr-Ke]; Print["This should be the null matrix:", dK//MatrixForm]; 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

This should be the null matrix:

Figure E17.7. Script to do Exercise 17.2 and results.

The code of Figure E17.7 builds the alleged exact stiffness (E17.5) in Kr (the 2 For loops symmetrize that matrix), then invokes Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness with symbolic inputs placing the returned stiffness in Ke. The difference Ke-Kr is printed upon simplification. If the two matrices are identical for any symbolic input the difference should be the null matrix of order 8, which can be easily inspected. As shown in the bottom cell of Figure E17.7, the matrices match.
EXERCISE 17.3

The verification (a) is immediate. The script shown in Figure E17.8 does (b), computes the energy ratio r for (c), and plots it for Poisson’s ratios ν = 0, 1 , 1 . The plots show that r never exceeds 1. 4 2

17–20

17–21

Solutions to Exercises

ClearAll[Em,ν,a,b,h,Iz,M]; b=γ *a; Iz=h*b^3/12; kappa=M/(Em*Iz); ncoor={{-a/2,-b/2},{a/2,-b/2},{a/2,b/2},{-a/2,b/2}}; Emat=Em/(1-ν^2)*{{1,ν,0},{ν,1,0},{0,0,(1-ν)/2}}; Ke= Quad4IsoPMembraneStiffness[ncoor,{Emat,0,0},{h},{False,2}]; Ke=Simplify[Ke]; u=kappa*a*b*{-1,0,1,0,-1,0,1,0}/4; Uquad=Simplify[u.Ke.u/2]; Ubeam=Simplify[M*kappa*a/2]; Print["Uquad=",Uquad, ", Ubeam=",Ubeam]; r=Simplify[Ubeam/Uquad]; Print["r=Ubeam/Uquad=",r]; Plot[{r/.ν->0,r/.ν->1/4,r/.ν->1/2},{γ ,0.1,10}];
3 M2 1 2 Γ2 a2 Em h Γ5 1 Ν Ν2 6 M2 a2 Em h Γ3

Uquad

,

Ubeam

r Ubeam Uquad
1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 2

2 Γ2 1 Ν2 1 2 Γ2 Ν

4

6

8

10

Figure E17.8. Script to do Exercise 17.3 and results.

EXERCISE 17.4 Not assigned. EXERCISE 17.5 Not assigned. EXERCISE 17.6 Not assigned. EXERCISE 17.7 Not assigned.

17–21

.

Shape Function Magic

18

18–1

Chapter 18: SHAPE FUNCTION MAGIC

18–2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

§18.1. Requirements §18.2. Direct Fabrication of Shape Functions §18.3. Triangular Element Shape Functions §18.3.1. The Three-Node Linear Triangle . . . . §18.3.2. The Six-Node Quadratic Triangle . . . §18.4. Quadrilateral Element Shape Functions §18.4.1. The Four-Node Bilinear Quadrilateral . . §18.4.2. The Nine-Node Biquadratic Quadrilateral §18.4.3. The Eight-Node “Serendipity” Quadrilateral §18.5. Does the Magic Wand Always Work? §18.5.1. Hierarchical Corrections . . . . . . §18.5.2. Transition Element Example . . . . . §18.6. *Mathematica Modules to Plot Shape Functions §18. Notes and Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §18. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . §18. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18–3 18–3 18–4 18–4 18–5 18–6 18–6 18–7 18–9 18–10 18–10 18–11 18–12 18–14 18–14 18–15

18–2

18–3 §18.1. Requirements

§18.2

DIRECT FABRICATION OF SHAPE FUNCTIONS

This Chapter explains, through a series of examples, how isoparametric shape functions can be directly constructed by geometric considerations. For a problem of variational index 1, the isoparametric shape function Nie associated with node i of element e must satisfy the following conditions: (A) Interpolation condition. Takes a unit value at node i, and is zero at all other nodes. (B) Local support condition. Vanishes over any element boundary (a side in 2D, a face in 3D) that does not include node i. (C) Interelement compatibility condition. Satisfies C 0 continuity between adjacent elements over any element boundary that includes node i. (D) Completeness condition. The interpolation is able to represent exactly any displacement field which is a linear polynomial in x and y; in particular, a constant value. Requirement (A) follows directly by interpolation from node values. Conditions (B), (C) and (D) are consequences of the convergence requirements discussed further in the next Chapter.1 For the moment these three conditions may be viewed as recipes. One can readily verify that all isoparametric shape function sets listed in Chapter 16 satisfy the first two conditions from construction. Direct verification of condition (C) is also straightforward for those examples. A statement equivalent to (C) is that the value of the shape function over a side (in 2D) or face (in 3D) common to two elements must uniquely depend only on its nodal values on that side or face. Completeness is a property of all element isoparametric shape functions taken together, rather than of an individual one. If the element satisfies (B) and (C), in view of the discussion in §16.6 it is sufficient to check that the sum of shape functions is identically one. §18.2. Direct Fabrication of Shape Functions Contrary to the what the title of this Chapter implies, the isoparametric shape functions listed in Chapter 16 did not come out of a magician’s hat. They can be derived systematically by a judicious inspection process. By “inspection” it is meant that the geometric visualization of shape functions plays a crucial role. The method is based on the following observation. In all examples given so far the isoparametric shape functions are given as products of fairly simple polynomial expressions in the natural coordinates. This is no accident but a direct consequence of the definition of natural coordinates. All shape functions of Chapter 16 can be expressed as the product of m factors: Nie = ci L 1 L 2 . . . L m , where L j = 0, j = 1, . . . m. (18.2) are the homogeneous equation of lines or curves expressed as linear functions in the natural coordinates, and ci is a normalization coefficient.
1

(18.1)

Convergence means that the discrete FEM solution approaches the exact analytical solution as the mesh is refined.

18–3

Chapter 18: SHAPE FUNCTION MAGIC

18–4

(a)

3

(b) 3

(c)
ζ1 = 0

3 2 1 1
Figure 18.1. The three-node linear triangle: (a) element geometry; (b) equation of side opposite corner 1; (c) perspective view of the shape function N1 = ζ1 .

2

1

2

For two-dimensional isoparametric elements, the ingredients in (18.1) are chosen according to the following five rules. R1 Select the L j as the minimal number of lines or curves linear in the natural coordinates that cross all nodes except the i th node. (A sui generis “cross the dots” game.) Primary choices in 2D are the element sides and medians. R2 Set coefficient ci so that Nie has the value 1 at the i th node. R3 Check that Nie vanishes over all element sides that do not contain node i. R4 Check the polynomial order over each side that contains node i. If the order is n, there must be exactly n + 1 nodes on the side for compatibility to hold. R5 If local support (R3) and interelement compatibility (R4) are satisfied, check that the sum of shape functions is identically one. The examples that follow show these rules in action for two-dimensional elements. Essentially the same technique is applicable to one- and three-dimensional elements. §18.3. Triangular Element Shape Functions This section illustrates the use of (18.1) in the construction of shape functions for the linear and the quadratic triangle. The cubic triangle is dealt with in Exercise 18.1. §18.3.1. The Three-Node Linear Triangle Figure 18.1 shows the three-node linear triangle that was studied in detail in Chapter 15. The three shape functions are simply the triangular coordinates: Ni = ζi , for i = 1, 2, 3. Although this result follows directly from the linear interpolation formula of §15.2.4, it can be also quickly derived from the present methodology as follows. The equation of the triangle side opposite to node i is L j -k = ζi = 0, where j and k are the cyclic permutations of i. Here symbol L j -k denotes the left hand side of the homogeneous equation of the natural coordinate line that passes through node points j and k. See Figure 18.1(b) for i = 1, j = 2 and k = 3. Hence the obvious guess is Nie
guess

=

ci L i .

(18.3)

18–4

18–5

§18.3

TRIANGULAR ELEMENT SHAPE FUNCTIONS

(a)

3

(b)
5 2 4

3

ζ1 = 0

(c)

3

ζ1 = 0

6

6
ζ1 = 1/2

5 6 2 4 4 1

5 2

1

1

ζ2 = 0

Figure 18.2. The six-node quadratic triangle: (a) element geometry; (b) lines e e (in red) whose product yields N1 ; (c) lines (in red) whose product yields N4 .

This satisfies conditions (A) and (B) except the unit value at node i; this holds if ci = 1. The local support condition (B) follows from construction: the value of ζi is zero over side j–k. Interelement compatibility follows from R4: the variation of ζi along the 2 sides meeting at node i is linear and that there are two nodes on each side; cf. §15.4.2. Completeness follows since e e e e N1 + N2 + N3 = ζ1 + ζ2 + ζ3 = 1. Figure 18.1(c) depicts N1 = ζ1 , drawn normal to the element in perspective view. §18.3.2. The Six-Node Quadratic Triangle The geometry of the six-node quadratic triangle is shown in Figure 18.2(a). Inspection reveals two types of nodes: corners (1, 2 and 3) and midside nodes (4, 5 and 6). Consequently we can expect two types of associated shape functions. We select nodes 1 and 4 as representative cases. For both cases we try the product of two linear functions in the triangular coordinates because we expect the shape functions to be quadratic. These functions are illustrated in Figures 18.2(b,c) for corner node 1 and midside node 4, respectively. For corner node 1, inspection of Figure 18.2(b) suggests trying
e N1 guess

=

c1 L 2-3 L 4-6 ,

(18.4)

e Why is (18.4) expected to work? Clearly N1 will vanish over 2-5-3 and 4-6. This makes the function zero at nodes 2 through 6, as is obvious upon inspection of Figure 18.2(b), while being nonzero at node 1. This value can be adjusted to be unity if c1 is appropriately chosen. The equations of the lines that appear in (18.4) are

L 2-3 : Replacing into (18.3) we get

ζ1 = 0,

L 4- 6 :

ζ1 −

1 2

= 0.

(18.5) (18.6)

e N1 = c1 ζ1 (ζ1 − 1 ), 2

e To find c1 , evaluate N1 (ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) at node 1. The triangular coordinates of this node are ζ1 = 1, e ζ2 = ζ3 = 0. We require that it takes a unit value there: N1 (1, 0, 0) = c1 × 1 × 1 = 1 whence 2 c1 = 2 and finally e N1 = 2ζ1 (ζ1 − 1 ) = ζ1 (2ζ1 − 1), (18.7) 2

18–5

Chapter 18: SHAPE FUNCTION MAGIC

18–6
3

6 1 5 4 2

3 1 4

6 5 2

N1 = ζ 1(2ζ1 − 1)

e

N4e = 4ζ1ζ 2

e e Figure 18.3. Perspective view of shape functions N1 and N4 for the quadratic triangle. The plot is done over a straight side triangle for programming simplicity.

as listed in §16.5.2. Figure 18.3 shows a perspective view. The other two corner shape functions follow by cyclic permutations of the corner index. For midside node 4, inspection of Figure 18.2(c) suggests trying
e N4 guess

=

c4 L 2-3 L 1-3

(18.8)

Evidently (18.8) satisfies requirements (A) and (B) if c4 is appropriately normalized. The equation e of sides L 2-3 and L 1-3 are ζ1 = 0 and ζ2 = 0, respectively. Therefore N4 (ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) = c4 ζ1 ζ2 . To find c4 , evaluate this function at node 4, the triangular coordinates of which are ζ1 = ζ2 = 1 , 2 e ζ3 = 0. We require that it takes a unit value there: N4 ( 1 , 1 , 0) = c4 × 1 × 1 = 1. Hence c4 = 4, 2 2 2 2 which gives e (18.9) N4 = 4ζ1 ζ2 as listed in §16.5.2. Figure 18.3 shows a perspective view of this shape function. The other two midside shape functions follow by cyclic permutations of the node indices. It remains to carry out the interelement continuity check. Consider node 1. The boundaries containing node 1 and common to adjacent elements are 1–2 and 1–3. Over each one the variation e of N1 is quadratic in ζ1 . Therefore the polynomial order over each side is 2. Because there are three nodes on each boundary, the compatibility condition (C) of §18.1 is verified. A similar check can be carried out for midside node shape functions. Exercise 16.1 verified that the sum of the Ni is unity. Therefore the element is complete. §18.4. Quadrilateral Element Shape Functions Three quadrilateral elements, with 4, 9 and 8 nodes, respectively, which are commonly used in computational mechanics serve as examples to illustrate the construction of shape functions. Elements with more nodes, such as the bicubic quadrilateral, are not treated as they are rarely used. §18.4.1. The Four-Node Bilinear Quadrilateral The element geometry and natural coordinates are shown in Figure 18.4(a). Only one type of node (corner) and associated shape function is present. Consider node 1 as typical. Inspection of 18–6

18–7

§18.4

QUADRILATERAL ELEMENT SHAPE FUNCTIONS

(a)
4

η 3 ξ

η=1

(b)
4

(c)
3 ξ=1 1 4 3

1 2

1 2 2

Figure 18.4. The four-node bilinear quadrilateral: (a) element geometry; (b) sides (in red) e that do not contain corner 1; (c) perspective view of the shape function N1 .

Figure 18.4(b) suggests trying
e N1 guess

=

c1 L 2-3 L 3-4

(18.10)

This plainly vanishes over nodes 2, 3 and 4, and can be normalized to unity at node 1 by adjusting c1 . By construction it vanishes over the sides 2–3 and 3–4 that do not belong to 1. The equation of side 2-3 is ξ = 1, or ξ − 1 = 0. The equation of side 3-4 is η = 1, or η − 1 = 0. Replacing in (18.10) yields e N1 (ξ, η) = c1 (ξ − 1)(η − 1) = c1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η). (18.11) To find c1 , evaluate at node 1, the natural coordinates of which are ξ = η = −1:
e N1 (−1, −1) = c1 × 2 × 2 = 4c1 = 1.

(18.12)

Hence c1 =

1 4

and the shape function is
e N1 = 1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η), 4

(18.13)

as listed in §16.6.2. Figure 18.4(c) shows a perspective view. For the other three nodes the procedure is the same, traversing the element cyclically. It can be verified that the general expression of the shape functions for this element is Nie = 1 (1 + ξi ξ )(1 + ηi η). 4 (18.14)

e The continuity check proceeds as follows, using N1 as example. Node 1 belongs to interelement e boundaries 1–2 and 1–3. Over side 1–2, η = −1 is constant and N1 is a linear function of ξ . To see e this, replace η = −1 in (18.13). Over side 1–3, ξ = −1 is constant and N1 is a linear function of η. Consequently the polynomial variation order is 1 over both sides. Because there are two nodes on each side the compatibility condition is satisfied. The sum of the shape functions is one, as shown in (16.21); thus the element is complete.

18–7

Chapter 18: SHAPE FUNCTION MAGIC

18–8
η=1 η=0 4 7 9 5 2 η=1 3 6 ξ=0 ξ=1

η 3 4 8 1 7 9 6 ξ

8 1

5 2 η=1

η=0 4 ξ = −1 8 1

7 9 5

3 4 6 ξ=1 ξ = −1 8 1 2 η = −1 7 9 5

3 6 ξ=1

2

Figure 18.5. The nine-node biquadratic quadrilateral: (a) element geometry; (b,c,d): lines e e e (in red) whose product makes up the shape functions N1 , N5 and N9 , respectively.

(a)
8

4 7 3 9 6 5

(b)
8

4 7 3 9 6 5 2
e N5

1

1

2
e N1

=
5

1 (ξ 4

− 1)(η − 1)ξ η
1 8

= 1 (1 − ξ 2 )η(η − 1) 2
4 7 9 3

(c)

(d)
8 4 7 1

2 6 3

9

6 5 2

N5e = 1 (1 − ξ 2 )η(η − 1) (back view) 2

N9e = (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η2 )

Figure 18.6. Perspective view of the shape functions for nodes 1, 5 and 9 of the nine-node biquadratic quadrilateral.

18–8

18–9

§18.4

QUADRILATERAL ELEMENT SHAPE FUNCTIONS

η 3 4 8 1 5 2 7 4 6 ξ 1 8

η=1 7 3 ξ + η = −1 4 6 ξ=1 5 2 1 ξ = −1 8

η=1 7 3 6

ξ=1

5 2

Figure 18.7. The eight-node serendipity quadrilateral: (a) element geometry; (b,c): e e lines (in red) whose product make up the shape functions N1 and N5 , respectively.

§18.4.2. The Nine-Node Biquadratic Quadrilateral The element geometry is shown in Figure 18.5(a). This element has three types of shape functions, which are associated with corner nodes, midside nodes and center node, respectively. The lines whose product is used to construct three types of shape functions are illustrated in Figure 18.5(b,c,d) for nodes 1, 5 and 9, respectively. The technique has been sufficiently illustrated in previous examples. Here we summarize the calculations for nodes 1, 5 and 9, which are taken as representatives of the three types:
e N1 = c1 L 2-3 L 3-4 L 5-7 L 6-8 = c1 (ξ − 1)(η − 1)ξ η. e N5 = c5 L 2-3 L 1-4 L 6-8 L 3-4 = c5 (ξ − 1)(ξ + 1)η(η − 1) = c5 (1 − ξ 2 )η(1 − η).

(18.15) (18.16)

e N9 = c9 L 1-2 L 2-3 L 3-4 L 4-1 = c9 (ξ − 1)(η − 1)(ξ + 1)(η + 1) = c9 (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η2 ) (18.17)

Imposing the normalization conditions we find c1 = 1 , 4 c5 = − 1 , 2 c9 = 1, (18.18)

and we obtain the shape functions listed in §16.6.3. Perspective views are shown in Figure 18.6. The remaining Ni ’s are constructed through a similar procedure. Verification of the interelement continuity condition is immediate: the polynomial variation order of Nie over any side that belongs to node i is two and there are three nodes on each side. Exercise 16.2 checks that the sum of shape function is unity. Thus the element is complete. §18.4.3. The Eight-Node “Serendipity” Quadrilateral This is an eight-node quadrilateral element that results when the center node 9 of the biquadratic quadrilateral is eliminated by kinematic constraints. The geometry and node configuration is shown in Figure 18.7(a). This element was widely used in commercial codes during the 70s and 80s but it is gradually being phased out in favor of the 9-node quadrilateral. 18–9

Chapter 18: SHAPE FUNCTION MAGIC

18–10

(a)
4 5 1

3

(b)

3

(c)
4 3 6

(d)
4 7 2 1 5 2 3 6

2

1 4 2

1 5

Figure 18.8. Node configurations for which the magic recipe does not work.

The 8-node quadrilateral has two types of shape functions, which are associated with corner nodes and midside nodes. Lines whose products yields the shape functions for nodes 1 and 5 are shown in Figure 18.7(b,c). Here are the calculations for shape functions of nodes 1 and 5, which are taken again as representative cases.
e N1 = c1 L 2-3 L 3-4 L 5-8 = c1 (ξ − 1)(η − 1)(1 + ξ + η) = c1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η)(1 + ξ + η), (18.19) e N5 = c5 L 2-3 L 3-4 L 4-1 = c5 (ξ − 1)(ξ + 1)(η − 1) = c5 (1 − ξ 2 )(1 − η).

(18.20) (18.21)

Imposing the normalization conditions we find c1 = − 1 , 4 c5 =
1 2

The other shape functions follow by appropriate permutation of nodal indices. The interelement continuity and completeness verification are similar to that carried out for the nine-node element, and are relegated to exercises. §18.5. Does the Magic Wand Always Work? The “cross the dots” recipe (18.1)-(18.2) is not foolproof. It fails for certain node configurations although it is a reasonable way to start. It runs into difficulties, for instance, in the problem posed in Exercise 18.6, which deals with the 5-node quadrilateral depicted in Figure 18.8(a). If for node 1 one tries the product of side 2–3, side 3–4, and the diagonal 2–5–4, the shape function is easily e worked out to be N1 = − 1 (1 − ξ )(1 − η)(ξ + η). This satisfies conditions (A) and (B). However, 8 it violates (C) along sides 1–2 and 4–1, because it varies quadratically over them with only two nodes per side. §18.5.1. Hierarchical Corrections A more robust technique relies on a correction approach, which employs a combination of terms such as (18.1). For example, a combination of two patterns, one with m factors and one with n factors, is (18.22) Nie = ci L c L c . . . L c + di L d L d . . . L d , 1 2 m 1 2 n Here two normalization coefficients: ci and di , appear. In practice trying forms such as (18.22) from scratch becomes cumbersome. The development is best done hierarchically. The first term is 18–10

18–11

§18.5 DOES THE MAGIC WAND ALWAYS WORK?

taken to be that of a lower order element, called the parent element, for which the one-shot approach works. The second term is then a corrective shape function that vanishes at the nodes of the parent element. If this is insufficient one more corrective term is added, and so on. The technique is best explained through examples. Exercise 18.6 illustrates the procedure for the element of Figure 18.8(a). The next subsection works out the element of Figure 18.8(b). §18.5.2. Transition Element Example The hierarchical correction technique is useful for transition elements, which have corner nodes but midnodes only over certain sides. Three examples are pictured in Figure 18.8(b,c,d). Shape functions that work can be derived with one, two and three hierarchical corrections, respectively.
e As an example, let us construct the shape function N1 for the 4-node transition triangle shown in Figure 18.8(b). Candidate lines for the recipe (18.1) are obviously the side 2–3: ζ1 = 0, and the median 3–4: ζ1 = ζ2 . Accordingly we try e N1 guess

=

c1 ζ1 (ζ1 − ζ2 ),

N1 (1, 0, 0) = 1 = c1 .

(18.23)

e This function N1 = ζ1 (ζ1 − ζ2 ) satisfies conditions (A) and (B) but fails compatibility: over side e 2 1–3 of equation ζ2 = 0, because N1 (ζ1 , 0, ζ3 ) = ζ1 . This varies quadratically but there are only 2 nodes on that side. Thus (18.23) is no good. e To proceed hierarchically we start from the shape function for the 3-node linear triangle: N1 = ζ1 . This will not vanish at node 4, so apply a correction that vanishes at all nodes but 4. From knowledge of the quadratic triangle midpoint functions, that is obviously ζ1 ζ2 times a coefficient to be determined. The new guess is e N1 guess

=

ζ1 + c1 ζ1 ζ2 .
1 2

(18.24)
1 + c1 4 = 0, whence

e e Coefficient c1 is determined by requiring that N1 vanish at 4: N1 ( 1 , 1 , 0) = 2 2 c1 = −2 and the shape function is e N1 = ζ1 − 2ζ1 ζ2 .

(18.25)

This is easily checked to satisfy compatibility on all sides. The verification of completeness is left to Exercise 18.8.
e Note that since N1 = ζ1 (1 − 2ζ2 ), (18.25) can be constructed as the normalized product of lines ζ1 = 0 and ζ2 = /. The latter passes through 4 and is parallel to 1–3. As part of the opening moves in the shape function game this would be a lucky guess indeed. If one goes to a more complicated element no obvious factorization is possible.

18–11

Chapter 18: SHAPE FUNCTION MAGIC

18–12

Cell 18.1 Mathematica Module to Draw a Function over a Triangle Region

PlotTriangleShapeFunction[xytrig_,f_,Nsub_,aspect_]:=Module[ {Ni,line3D={},poly3D={},zc1,zc2,zc3,xyf1,xyf2,xyf3, xc,yc, x1,x2,x3,y1,y2,y3,z1,z2,z3,iz1,iz2,iz3,d}, {{x1,y1,z1},{x2,y2,z2},{x3,y3,z3}}=Take[xytrig,3]; xc={x1,x2,x3}; yc={y1,y2,y3}; Ni=Nsub*3; Do [ Do [iz3=Ni-iz1-iz2; If [iz3<=0, Continue[]]; d=0; If [Mod[iz1+2,3]==0&&Mod[iz2-1,3]==0, d= 1]; If [Mod[iz1-2,3]==0&&Mod[iz2+1,3]==0, d=-1]; If [d==0, Continue[]]; zc1=N[{iz1+d+d,iz2-d,iz3-d}/Ni]; zc2=N[{iz1-d,iz2+d+d,iz3-d}/Ni]; zc3=N[{iz1-d,iz2-d,iz3+d+d}/Ni]; xyf1={xc.zc1,yc.zc1,f[zc1[[1]],zc1[[2]],zc1[[3]]]}; xyf2={xc.zc2,yc.zc2,f[zc2[[1]],zc2[[2]],zc2[[3]]]}; xyf3={xc.zc3,yc.zc3,f[zc3[[1]],zc3[[2]],zc3[[3]]]}; AppendTo[poly3D,Polygon[{xyf1,xyf2,xyf3}]]; AppendTo[line3D,Line[{xyf1,xyf2,xyf3,xyf1}]], {iz2,1,Ni-iz1}],{iz1,1,Ni}]; Show[ Graphics3D[RGBColor[1,0,0]],Graphics3D[poly3D], Graphics3D[Thickness[.002]],Graphics3D[line3D], Graphics3D[RGBColor[0,0,0]],Graphics3D[Thickness[.005]], Graphics3D[Line[xytrig]],PlotRange->All, BoxRatios->{1,1,aspect},Boxed->False] ]; ClearAll[f1,f4]; xyc1={0,0,0}; xyc2={3,0,0}; xyc3={Sqrt[3],3/2,0}; xytrig=N[{xyc1,xyc2,xyc3,xyc1}]; Nsub=16; f1[zeta1_,zeta2_,zeta3_]:=zeta1*(2*zeta1-1); f4[zeta1_,zeta2_,zeta3_]:=4*zeta1*zeta2; PlotTriangleShapeFunction[xytrig,f1,Nsub,1/2]; PlotTriangleShapeFunction[xytrig,f4,Nsub,1/2.5];

§18.6.

*Mathematica Modules to Plot Shape Functions

A Mathematica module called PlotTriangleShape Functions, listed in Cell 18.1, has been developed to draw perspective plots of shape functions Ni (ζ1 , ζ2 , ζ3 ) over a triangular region. The region is assumed to have straight sides to simplify the logic. The test statements that follow the module produce the shape function plots shown in Figure 18.3 for the 6-node quadratic triangle. Argument Nsub controls the plot resolution while aspect controls the x yz box aspect ratio. The remaining arguments are self explanatory. Another Mathematica module called PlotQuadrilateralShape Functions, listed in Cell 18.2, has been developed to produce perspective plots of shape functions Ni (ξ, η) over a quadrilateral region. The region is assumed to have straight sides to simplify the logic. The test statements that follow the module produce

18–12

18–13

§18.6

*MATHEMATICA MODULES TO PLOT SHAPE FUNCTIONS

Cell 18.2 Mathematica Module to Draw a Function over a Quadrilateral Region

PlotQuadrilateralShapeFunction[xyquad_,f_,Nsub_,aspect_]:=Module[ {Ne,Nev,line3D={},poly3D={},xyf1,xyf2,xyf3,i,j,n,ixi,ieta, xi,eta,x1,x2,x3,x4,y1,y2,y3,y4,z1,z2,z3,z4,xc,yc}, {{x1,y1,z1},{x2,y2,z2},{x3,y3,z3},{x4,y4,z4}}=Take[xyquad,4]; xc={x1,x2,x3,x4}; yc={y1,y2,y3,y4}; Ne[xi_,eta_]:=N[{(1-xi)*(1-eta),(1+xi)*(1-eta), (1+xi)*(1+eta),(1-xi)*(1+eta)}/4]; n=Nsub; Do [ Do [ ixi=(2*i-n-1)/n; ieta=(2*j-n-1)/n; {xi,eta}=N[{ixi-1/n,ieta-1/n}]; Nev=Ne[xi,eta]; xyf1={xc.Nev,yc.Nev,f[xi,eta]}; {xi,eta}=N[{ixi+1/n,ieta-1/n}]; Nev=Ne[xi,eta]; xyf2={xc.Nev,yc.Nev,f[xi,eta]}; {xi,eta}=N[{ixi+1/n,ieta+1/n}]; Nev=Ne[xi,eta]; xyf3={xc.Nev,yc.Nev,f[xi,eta]}; {xi,eta}=N[{ixi-1/n,ieta+1/n}]; Nev=Ne[xi,eta]; xyf4={xc.Nev,yc.Nev,f[xi,eta]}; AppendTo[poly3D,Polygon[{xyf1,xyf2,xyf3,xyf4}]]; AppendTo[line3D,Line[{xyf1,xyf2,xyf3,xyf4,xyf1}]], {i,1,Nsub}],{j,1,Nsub}]; Show[ Graphics3D[RGBColor[1,0,0]],Graphics3D[poly3D], Graphics3D[Thickness[.002]],Graphics3D[line3D], Graphics3D[RGBColor[0,0,0]],Graphics3D[Thickness[.005]], Graphics3D[Line[xyquad]], PlotRange->All, BoxRatios->{1,1,aspect},Boxed->False] ]; ClearAll[f1,f5,f9]; xyc1={0,0,0}; xyc2={3,0,0}; xyc3={3,3,0}; xyc4={0,3,0}; xyquad=N[{xyc1,xyc2,xyc3,xyc4,xyc1}]; Nsub=16; f1[xi_,eta_]:=(1/2)*(xi-1)*(eta-1)*xi*eta; f5[xi_,eta_]:=(1/2)*(1-xi^2)*eta*(eta-1); f9[xi_,eta_]:=(1-xi^2)*(1-eta^2); PlotQuadrilateralShapeFunction[xyquad,f1,Nsub,1/2]; PlotQuadrilateralShapeFunction[xyquad,f5,Nsub,1/2.5]; PlotQuadrilateralShapeFunction[xyquad,f9,Nsub,1/3];

the shape function plots shown in Figure 18.6(a,b,d) for the 9-node biquadratic quadrilateral. Argument Nsub controls the plot resolution while aspect controls the x yz box aspect ratio. The remaining arguments are self explanatory.

18–13

Chapter 18: SHAPE FUNCTION MAGIC

18–14

Notes and Bibliography The name “shape functions” for interpolation functions directly expressed in terms of physical coordinates (the node displacements in the case of isoparametric elements) was coined by Irons. The earliest published reference seems to be the paper [18]. This was presented in 1965 at the first Wright-Patterson conference, the first all-FEM meeting that strongly influenced th