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Pol Sci 14: Philippine Government and Politics Asst. Prof. Verna Dinah Q.

Viajar Course description: Development, organization, and operation of Philippine government and politics, with emphasis on the present Course objectives: At the end of the course, the students are able to: 1. Differentiate the major conceptual approaches of political analysis used in examining past and present developments in Philippine government and politics; 2. Explain the political history of Philippine government, politics and society in further understanding the present dynamics and configuration of Philippine government and politics; 3. Compare and/or contrast the organization, powers, and problems of central Philippine political institutions; and 4. Identify the important political actors and political processes affecting the nature and characteristics of Philippine government and politics Course requirements: 1. Readings The course is built around the readings. Please read carefully. Students will be gauged if they have read the assigned readings for the session during class participation. The course shall utilize and refer to the two textbooks of the Department for PS 14: a. Morada Noel M. and Encarnacion Tadem, Teresa S. [Eds.]. 2006. Philippine Politics and Governance: An Introduction. Quezon City: Department of Political Science, University of the Philippines and the Commission on Higher Education. [Henceforth PPGI Vol. 1] b. Morada, Noel M. and Encarnacion Tadem, Teresa S. [Eds.]. 2006. Philippine Politics and Governance: Challenges to Democratization and Development. Quezon City: Department of Political Science, University of the Philippines and the Commission on Higher Education. [Henceforth PPGC Vol. 2] 2. Examinations (50%) There will be two unit exams for the course: a mid-term exam (20%) and a final exam (30%). The examinations shall be a combination of objective and essay items. 3. Group report (20%) The class will be divided into six groups in the beginning of the semester. As part of the seminarlecture methodology of the course, students are involved in the learning process through group reports. The groups shall choose their topic and consult with the course instructor for a more directed research on the topic. The course instructor shall provide guide questions and advise on the report outline. The presentation shall not be more than 40 minutes to give time for the discussions. The group presentation will be assessed on the following criteria: content (30%), conciseness (20%), creativity (25%), and coordination (25%). The group is highly encouraged to use visual aids (i.e. powerpoint) for the report. The group must also prepare a report summary for the course instructor and hand-outs for the class. 4. Group term paper (20%)

After presentation, the groups will begin to work on their term papers. A group may opt to produce a term paper based on their topic or a topic of their choice upon the approval of the course instructor. The term papers must be submitted in class on the scheduled date, wordprocessed with 1.5 spacing and wide margins and not less than 4,000 words but not more than 5,000 words. 5. Class participation (10%) Students are expected to participate in the class discussions to enliven the discussions and promote collective learning. Students are encouraged to pose questions and opinions on the ideas, theories and debates on the study of Philippine government and politics. It is also another way to gauge if the students have read the assigned readings. 6. Attendance Students are expected to attend class on time. Students arriving in class after the course instructor has already started the class are marked late. Students arriving 40 minutes after class time will be marked absent but will not be prevented to attend the class. The University rule of no more than 6 unexcused absences shall be strictly enforced. Course methodology: The course is conducted twice a week for one and a half hours in fifteen weeks. The course shall be managed through a series of lecture and discussion sessions. Class interaction and debates will be highly encouraged to ensure an environment of collective learning. Other learning methods such as structured learning exercises, workshops, film showing, and field trips (if possible) will also be explored. Course outline: 1. Introduction to Philippine Government and Politics 1.1. Review of key terms and concepts in the study of Philippine politics 1.2. Significance of politics and governance 2. General facts on Philippine society and political economy 2.1 Present social and economic situation 2.2 Philippine political and economic geography 2.3 Population, religion, culture and ideology 2.4 Political and economic history 3. Conceptual approaches to the study of Philippine politics 3.1 Class approach 3.2 Elite approach 4. Philippine State and Society 4.1 The Citizens and the Public 4.2 Interest groups, social movements and civil society 4.3 Political parties and elections 5. The Philippine Government 5.1 Forms and systems of government 5.2 The executive and the presidency 5.3 The legislative and the legislature 5.4 The judicial process and the judiciary 5.5 The bureaucracy and local governments 5.6 The military and politics

6. Philippine Foreign Policy 7. Challenges and issues on democratization and development Reading Outline 1. Introduction to Philippine Government and Politics a. Abinales, Patricio N. and Donna Amoroso. 2005. State and Society in the Philippines. Pasig City: Anvil Publishing Chapter 1, pp. 1-9. b. Heywood, Andrew. 2002. Politics. New Hampshire: Plagrave Foundations, Chapter 1-5. c. Quilop, Raymund G. 2006. Nation-State Formation in the Philippines: An overview. In: Noel M. Morada and Teresa S. Encarnacion-Tadem (Eds.), Philippine Politics and Governance: An introduction/PPGI Vol. 1 Quezon City: Department of Political Science, University of the Philippines and Commission on Higher Education. Chapter 1, pp. 1-12. d. Ranney, Austin. 1993. Governing. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Chapter 1, pp. 1-23. 2. General facts on Philippine society and political economy a. Abinales, Patricio N. and Donna Amoroso. 2005. State and Society in the Philippines. Pasig City: Anvil Publishing Chapter 1, pp. 10-17, 66-74, 119-133, 134-166. b. Asian Development Bank. 2005. Poverty in the Philippines: Income, Assets, and Access. [Online] Available from http://www.adb.org/Documents/Books/Poverty-in-thePhilippines/default.asp. Manila: Asian Development Bank, pp. 15-40. c. Balisacan, Arsenio M. 2003. Poverty and Inequality. In: Arsenio M. Balisacan and Hal Hill. (Eds.), The Philippine Economy: Development, Policies, and Challenges. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, pp. 311-341. d. Balisacan, Arsenio M., Fuwa, N. and Debuque M. 2001. The Political Economy of Philippine Rural Development since the 1960s. Social Science Research Network Electronic Library (online on December 13, 2001). Available from www.h.chibau.ac.jp/mkt/Philippines.pdf [Accessed on 14 November 2004] e. Bautista, Germelino. 2003. An Assessment of the Philippine Economy. Kyoto Review. [Online] Available from http://kyotoreview.cseas.kyotou.ac.jp/issue/issue3/article_313.htm; [Accessed on 15 November 2004] f. Economist. Country briefings: Philippines. *Online+ Available from: http://www.economist.com/countries/Philippines/profile.cfm?folder=Profile-Factsheet. [Accessed on 19 October 2007] g. Malaluan, Nepomuceno A. 2006. Dire State of the Nation: The Crisis of Income and Employment in the Philippines. Quezon City: Focus on the Global South. h. United Nations Development Program. 2006. Human Development Report 2006: Philippine Human Development Indicators. [Online] Available from: http://hdr.undp.org/hdr2006/statistics/countries/country_fact_sheets/cty_fs_PHL.html [Accessed on 19 October 2007] 3. Conceptual Approaches a. Bello, Walden. 2004. The Anti-Development State: The Political Economy of Permanent Crisis in the Philippines. Quezon City: UP Sociology Department and Focus on the Global South, pp. 9-31. b. Guerrero, Amado (Jose Ma. Sison). 1979. Basic Problems of the Filipino People. Philippine Society and Revolution. 3rd Edition. Oakland, CA: International Association of Filipino Patriots, pp. 63-128.

c. De Dios, Emmanuel and Paul Hutchcroft. 2003. Political Economy. In: Balisacan, Arsenio M. and Hill, H. (Eds.), The Philippine Economy: Development, Policies, and Challenges. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, pp. 45-76. d. Hutchcroft, Paul D. 1997. The Politics of Privilege: Assessing the Impacts of rents, Corruption and Clientilism on Philippine Development. Quezon City: Institute for Popular Democracy. e. McCoy, Alfred W. 1994. An Anarchy of Families: The Historiography of State and Family in the Philippines. In: McCoy, Alfred W. [Ed.]. An Anarchy of Families: State and Family in the Philippines. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, pp. 1-32. f. Simbulan, Dante C. 2005. The Modern Principalia: The Historical Evolution of the Philippine Ruling Oligarchy. Quezon City: UP Press. Chapter 2 (The Philippine Elite: Historical Beginnings and Development), pp. 14-50. 4. Philippine State and Society 4.1. The Citizens and the Public a. Miranda, Felipe b. 200?. Public Opinion and Democratic Governance. In PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 2. b. Rivera, Temario C. 2006. The Middle Classes in Philippine Politics. In PPGC Vol. 2, Chapter 9, pp. 179-204. c. Rivera, Temario C. 1998. Democratic Governance and Late Industrialization. In: Sta. Ana, Filomeno S. III [Ed]. The state and the Market: Essays on a Socially Oriented Philippine Economy. Quezon City: Action for Economic Reform and FES. d. 1987 Philippine Constitution. Art. III: Bill of Rights, Art. IVL Citizenship, and Art. V: Suffrage. 4.2. Interest groups, social movements and civil society a. Encarnacion Tadem, Teresa S. 2006. Philippine Social Movements during Martial Law. In PPGC Vol. 2, Chapter 2, pp. 23-42. b. Encarnacion Tadem, Teresa S. and Jorge Tigno. 2006. Philippine Social Movements after Martial Law. In PPGC Vol. 2, Chapter 3, pp. 43-62. c. Fabros, Aya, et. al. 2006. Politics of Place and Identity: Social Movement Experiences in the Philippines. In: Fabros, Aya, Rocamora Joel and Velasco Djorina. *Eds.+ Social Movements: Experiences from the Philippines. Quezon City: Institute for Popular Democracy, pp. 11-45. d. Franco, Jennifer C. and Saturnino M. Borras Jr. 2005. Editors Introduction: Changing Patterns of Peasant Mobilizations for Land and Democracy. In Franco, Jennifer C. and Borras, Saturnino M. Jr. [Eds.] On Just Grounds: Struggling for Agrarian Justice and Citizenship Rights in the Rural Philippines. Quezon City: institute for Popular Democracy. Chapter 1, p. 1-23. e. Velasco, Djorina. 2006. Life on the Fast Track: Mobilizing the Urban Poor for Change. In: Fabros, Aya, Rocamora Joel and Velasco Djorina. [Eds.] Social Movements: Experiences from the Philippines. Quezon City: Institute for Popular Democracy, Chapter 2, pp. 103128. f. Viajar, Verna Q. 2006. Philippine Trade Unions in the Era of Globalization. In:Fabros, Aya, Rocamora Joel and Velasco Djorina. [Eds.] Social Movements: Experiences from the Philippines. Quezon City: Institute for Popular Democracy, Chapter 4, pp.163-199. 4.3 Political parties and elections

a. Co, Edna E. A., Tigno, Jorge V., et. al. 2005. Philippine Democracy Assessment: Free and Fair Elections and the Democratic Role of Political Parties. Manila: UP NCPAG and FriedrichEbert Stiftung. b. Rocamora, Joel. 2007. Political Parties in the 2007 Elections. Analysis. [Online]. Available from: http://ipd.orgph/main/. [Accessed on October 2007] c. Rocamora, Joel. 1998. Philippine Political Parties, Electoral System, and Political Reform. [Online] Available from http://www.philsol.nl/pir/JR-98a.htm [Accessed on October 2007]. d. The Dilemma of Philippine Campaign Politics: Alternative Campaign Strategies in the 2004 National Elections. 2005. Manila: Liberal Philippines Inc. e. Tigno, Jorge, V. 2006. Electoral and Party Politics during the Martial Law Period. In: PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 5. f. Velasco, Renato. Parties, Elections, and Democratization in Post-Martial Law Philippines. In: PPGI, Vol. 1, Chapter 6. 5. The Philippine Government 5.1 Forms and Systems of Government a. Abad, Florencio B. Should the Philippines Turn Parliamentary? *Online+ Available from: http://www.fnfasia.org/pdf/Towards%20a%20Parliamentary%20Govt.pdf [Accessed on October 2007] b. Abueva, Jose V. Some Advantages of Federalism and Parliamentary Government for the Philippines. Bagong Diskusyon sa UP. [Online] Available from: http://up.edu.ph c. Caoili, Olivia C. et. al. 1994. Views on the Parliamentary Versus Presidential Government. Quezon City: Center for Integrative and Development Studies, State of the Nation Reports. d. Majul, Cesar Adib. 1967. The Political and Constitutional Ideas of the Philippine Revolution. 2nd Edition (1996), Chapter 3, pp. 43-58. 5.2 The Executive and the Presidency a. Genato, Rebullida, Ma. Lourdes G. 2006. Executive Power and Presidential Leadership. (Martial Law and Post-Martial Law Independence) In: PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 8 and 9. b. Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. 2003. The PCIJ Guide to Government. Quezon City: PCIJ, Chapter 1. c. 1987 Philippine Constitution. Art. VII 5.3 The Legislative Process and the Legislature a. Caoili, Olivia C. 2006. The Philippine Legislature: The Martial Law Period and The Restored Philippine Congress. In: PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 12 and 13. b. Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. 2003. The PCIJ Guide to Government. Quezon City: PCIJ, Chapter 2. c. 1987 Philippine Constitution. Art. VI 5.4 The Judicial Process and the Judiciary a. Atienza, Maria Ela L. and Ferdinand C. Baylon. 2006. The Judiciary. In: PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 14. b. Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. 2003. The PCIJ Guide to Government. Quezon City: PCIJ, Chapter entitled Courts. c. 1987 Philippine Constitution. Art. VIII

5.5 The Bureaucracy and Local Governments a. Atienza, Maria Ela L. Local Governments and Devolution in the Philippines. In: PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 16. b. Genato Rebullida, Ma. Lourdes G. and Cecilia Serrano. 2006. Bureaucracy and Public Management in Democracy, Development and Governance in the Philippines. In: PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 10. c. Republic Act 7610: The Local Government Code of the Philippines. October 1991. d. 1987 Philippine Constitution. Art. VIII 5.6 The Military and Politics a. Hernandez, Carolina G. 2006. The Philippine Military. In: PPGI, Vol. 1, Chapter 15. b. Miranda, Felipe. 1992. The Politicization of the Military, State of the Nation Reports. Quezon City: UP Press and UP CIDS, pp. 1-17. c. Miranda, Felipe. 1996. The Philippine Military at the Crossroads of Democratization. SWS occasional Paper, Jan. 1996. Quezon City: Social Weather Stations. 6. Philippine Foreign Policy a. Morales, Natalia Maria Lourdes M. 2006. Post-EDSA Philippine Foreign Relations, 19862001. In: PPGI, Vol. 1, Chapter 21. b. Ronas, Malaya C. 2006. Philippine Foreign Relations, 1972-1986. In: PPGI Vol. 1, Chapter 20. 7. Challenges and Issues on Democratization and Development a. Ileto, Reynaldo C. 1998. The Unfinished Revolution in Political Discourse. In: Filipinos and their Revolution: Event, Discourse and Historiography. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University, pp. 177-202. b. Lande, Carl. 1965. Leaders, Factions, and Parties: The Structure of Philippine Politics. New Haven: Yale University Press. c. Miranda, Felipe. [Ed]. 1997. Democratization: Philippine Perspectives. Quezon City: University of the Philippines. d. Rivera, Temario C. 1998. Democratic Governance and Late Industrialization. In: Sta. Ana, Filomeno S. III [Ed.]. The State and the Market: Essays on a Socially Oriented Philippine Economy. Quezon City: Action for Economic Reforms and FES.