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Rationale
The Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan was conceived as per requirements of Republic Act 10121 also known as the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010. Its primary objective is to formulate necessary measures in preparation for the occurrence of any natural calamities, epidemics, fires, civil unrest and other related disturbances. This plan was made through the collective efforts of the different local government agencies of the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

During an event of a disaster or other unforeseen phenomenon, local officials and its administrative body initially makes the most of its available resources before requesting for assistance from other agencies or higher authorities. With the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan, all resources will be manipulated in a highly efficient approach thus maximizing its potential.

Although Disaster Risk Reduction and Management is a cooperative duty of both national and local government, its success will be largely dependent on the capabilities and participation of private organizations and the individuals within the area of the disaster and also to the resources they can provide. And to make this plan fully competent, regular trainings/ exercises and drills must be conducted to different levels of the local government to improve the peoples reaction capability, guarantee proper sequence of operations and spontaneity in reacting to urgent situations.

The need to formulate a Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan that will define the systematic procedure on how to effectively prepare for, respond to, face the consequences, capacitate the key actors in time of calamities are valuable steps to be undertaken by every local entity in order to improve the capability and capacity of every constituents for environmental adaptation.

Table of Contents
I. Rationale 3 II. Table of Contents 4 III. List of Tables and Figures 6 IV. Philippines in the Context of Disaster 8

V. Laguna Socio-Economic Profile 10 VI. Laguna DRRM Situationer / Hazard Profile 15 VII. Laguna Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (PDRRMC) 19 VIII. Proposed Organizational Chart of Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (PDRRMO) 30 IX. PDRRMO Functions .................................................... DRR-PMT Committees Advocacy, Research, Planning and IEC Committee 33 Institutional Strengthening Committee 33 Capacity Building Committee .. 33 Documentation and Knowledge Management Committee ... 33 Project Proposal of the Committee .. 33 X. DRRM Supplies and Equipment Inventory DRRM Equipment and Supplies Inventory .. 35 By District . 35 By City and Municipality ..37 DRRM Manpower Inventory . 53 XI. DRRM Training Programs First Aid and Basic Life Support 56 Search and Rescue 57 Fire Rescue .. 57
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Vehicular Extrication

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Camp Management . 58 Early Warning System 58 Protective Measures Against Natural and ManMade Calamities . 58 WASH in DRR Program . 58 XII. Equipment and Supplies Needed in DRRM Inventory Needs of Training Programs Inventory Needs of 24/7 Operations Center Summary of Expenses for Training Programs and Operations Center XIII. DRRM Early Warning and Feedback Framework 59 79 89 90

XIV. Rescuers Deployment Flowchart 90 XV. WASH DRR Program of PHO 91

XVI. Organizational Chart DRRM DepEd-Laguna 92 XVII. Assessment .. 93 XVIII. Issues and Concerns 97 XIX. Goals and Objectives .. 99 XX. Recommendations 100

XXI. Work Plans PDRRMO Plan ... 103 WASH in DRR Plan .. 107 Medical Response Plan .. 118 Nutrition / Infant Feeding Plan . 121

DSWD Plan 122 PEO Plan 134 Work Financial Plan . 135

XXII. Annexes .. 137


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List of Tables and Figures


Figure 1 Proposed PDRRMO Organizational Chart 30 Figure 2. Sample Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction Management Map .. 34 Figure 3. Flood Hazard Map 15 Figure 4. Rain-Induced to Landslide Hazard Map .. 15 Figure 5. Earthquake-Induced to Landslide Hazard 16 Figure 6. Liquefaction Hazard Map . 16 Figure 7. Ground Rupture Hazard Map 17 Figure 8. Flooded Area due to Typhoon Ondoy .. 17 Figure 9. Water Resources of Laguna .. 18 Figure 10. Available DRRM Equipment in the Province of Laguna ... 35 DRRM Equipment per District Figure 11. 1st Congressional District .. 35 Figure 12. 2nd Congressional District . 36 Figure 13. 3rd Congressional District . 36 Figure 14. 4th Congressional District .. 37 DRRM Equipment Map per Municipality / City Figure 15. Bian City, Laguna 37 Figure 16. Cabuyao, Laguna 38 Figure 17. Calamba City, Laguna 38 Figure 18. Calauan, Laguna . 39 Figure 19. Cavinti, Laguna .. 39 Figure 20. Kalayaan, Laguna 40 Figure 21. Liliw, Laguna .. 40 Figure 22. Los Baos, Laguna . 41
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Figure 23. Luisiana, Laguna .................................... 41 Figure 24. Lumban, Laguna 42 Figure 25. Magdalena, Laguna 42 Figure 26. Nagcarlan, Laguna . 43 Figure 27. Paete, Laguna . 43 Figure 28. Pangil, Laguna 44 Figure 29. Pila, Laguna 44 Figure 30. San Pablo City, Laguna . 45 Figure 31. San Pedro, Laguna .. 45 Figure 32. Santa Rosa City, Laguna . 46 Figure 33. Santa Cruz, Laguna 46 Figure 34. Victoria, Laguna . 47 Figure 35. Famy, Laguna . 47 Figure 36. Sta. Maria, Laguna .. 48 Figure 37. Siniloan, Laguna . 48 Figure 38. Pakil, Laguna .. 49 Figure 39. Mabitac, Laguna ............................. 49 Figure 40. Rizal, Laguna .. 50 Figure 41. Majayjay, Laguna 50 Figure 42. Pagsanjan, Laguna ... 51 Figure 43. Alaminos, Laguna 51 Figure 44. Bay, Laguna ... 52 Figure 45. Early Warning and Feedback Framework .. 90 Figure 46. Rescuers and Responders Deployment Flowchart 90 Figure 47. Search and Rescue District Assignments .. 91 Figure 48. Organizational Chart of DRRM DepEd Laguna .. 92
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Introduction
Philippines in the Context of Disaster
The Region IV or Southern Tagalog Provinces, Philippines being called The Circum-Pacific Belt of fire and typhoons has always been subjected to constant natural disaster calamities. The great oceans and seas around it, while providing wide avenues for international trade and commerce, as well as source of tremendous marine resources, also serve as the spawning areas of destructive typhoons and monsoons. In whatever part of the region we are located, possibility of experiencing the gloom and stark reality on disasters such as fire, flood, typhoons, tornadoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruption, etc., and their resultant toll in the lives of and properties is always present. Everyone, even in the safety of their homes has not been spared the sight nor the feeling of loss by the disasters and calamities, not as an abstract tragedy, but the picture of stunned faces of the survivors. Therefore, the necessity of an advance and effective preparation of the populace in the face of the disasters, natural or provoked by man is a must. Thus, every Local Government Unit has a responsibility to ensure the welfare and safety of its constituents due to the increasing events of calamities caused by climate change and global warming affecting lives and properties, hampering the normal living condition and quality of life of the people.

Republic Act 10121 (Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction Act of 2010)


The passage of Republic Act 10121 An act strengthening the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management System, Providing for the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Framework and Institutionalizing the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan, Appropriating Funds therefore, for other Purposes greatly addresses the deficiencies of Presidential Decree 1566. With this law, local government units are now more empowered to address the problems posed by disasters that our country normally encounters especially natural calamities such as typhoons and storms and the devastating effects of global warming and climate change. R.A 10121 enables LGUs to employ proper measures that will help them to prevent loss of lives and properties to a much greater extent.
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R.A. 10121 mandates that local government units are to form their own local disaster risk reduction and management council and create the local disaster risk reduction and management office. The council is to be the policy making body while the office will be responsible for the implementation of the programs for disaster management. Hence, there is need for the issuance of an Executive Order by the Local Chief Executive to create both the council and the office.

The Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan aims to create a Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (PDRRMO) that will be composed of one head of office, an assistant and four (4) staff responsible for a) administration, b) research and planning, and c) operations and warning and d) training. The creation of this office will have to be ratified by the Sangguniang Panlalawigan.

The work and financial plans of the calamity fund will also have to be approved by the Sangguniang Panlalawigan as submitted by the local disaster risk reduction and management office. The Sangguniang Panlalawigan would also have to formulate ordinances and resolutions supporting the developmental plans of the PDRRMO to ensure the implementation of its programs

Socio-Ecoomic Profile of the Province of Laguna


GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

The Province of Laguna is located directly at the southern end of Rizal province and is about thirty (30) kilometers south of Metro Manila. It is bounded in the east by the mighty Sierra Madre Range, Quezon Province in the south, and on the north western part are the provinces of Batangas and Cavite.

With a total land area of 175,973 hectares or 1,759.73 square kilometres, Laguna is considered as the second smallest province of Region IV-A (CALABARZON).

The province has twenty six (26) municipalities, four cities, and 674 barangays; it is divided into four political districts. Last January 2010, the Municipality of Binan became a chartered city in Laguna increasing the number of cities to four and reducing the number of municipalities to 26.

The First District is considered the smallest in the province, with only a

total land area of

11,066 square kilometres or about 6.3 percent of the provinces total land area, and comprised of three municipalities.

The Second District is composed of three municipalities and Calamba City with an aggregate area of 33,278 square kilometers or 18.9 percent of the total land area of Laguna. On the other hand, the Third District is made up of seven municipalities and San Pablo City with 51,323 square kilometers or 29.2 percent of the total land area of the province.

Lastly, the Fourth District is geographically the biggest district in Laguna; it consists of 16 municipalities and has a total land area of 80,311 square kilometers or 45.6 percent of the total land area of the province.

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From the twenty six (26) municipalities and four (4) cities, eighteen (18) belongs to the lakeshore namely: San Pedro, Bian City, Sta. Rosa City, Cabuyao, Calamba City, Los Baos, Bay, Calauan, Victoria, Pila, Sta. Cruz, Lumban, Kalayaan, Pangil, Pakil, Paete, Siniloan and Mabitac. The lakeshore areas has total coastal length of 109.2 kilometers or about 49.64 percent of the total coastal length of Laguna de Bay.

DEMOGRAPHIC (REGIONAL AND NATIONAL CONTEXT)

The total population of the province in 2007 reached 2,473,530, which is approximately 21.06 percent of the total population of the CALABARZON, and 2.79 percent of the national population.

Comparing all the provinces of the CALABARZON, Laguna ranks second to Cavite Province in terms of population size; the province contributes a 21.1 percentage share in the regional population as shown by the 2007 census. However, despite the increasing population size of the province, it is notable that Laguna has reduced its annual growth rate of 4.08 percent (1995-2000) to 3.22 (2000-2007). The annual population growth rate of the province from 1995 to 2007 is 3.55 percent. In terms of population density, the province had an increase from 1,117.3 in 2000 to 1,405.8 in 2007.

The major factors that contributed to the population growth of the province are attributed to the: (a) influx of workers coming from Metro Manila and nearby provinces, and (b) increase in the number of residential subdivisions being constructed due to overspill of Metro Manila population.

SIZE AND DISTRIBUTION

In the province, the municipalities and cities which have the highest population are: Calamba City, San Pedro, Sta. Rosa City, Binan City, and San Pablo City.

Calamba City has the largest population size among the cities and municipalities in the whole province with 360,281 in the 2007 census. It has a percentage share of 14.6 percent to the total population of Laguna. San Pedro comes second with a population of 281,808 and a percentage share of 11.4, while Sta. Rosa City has a 266,943 population and a percentage share of 10.8 percent. The City of

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Bian ranks fourth in population with 262,735 and a percentage share of 10.6 percent. The City of San Pablo has a population of 237,259 and a percentage share of 9.6 percent.

Based on the 2007 Census, Calamba City is ranked fourth in population size among other municipalities and cities within the region. Antipolo City has the highest population in the region.

Notably, the other municipalities and cities of Laguna with the largest population size also belong to the top 20 in the CALABARZON. The Municipality of San Pedro ranks seventh, while Sta. Rosa City ranks eight, Bian City ranks ninth, San Pablo City ranks fourteenth, and Sta. Cruz at twenty, respectively.

It is estimated by the province that the population of the said municipalities and cities will continue to increase as a consequence of their roles as trading /commercial, and industrial areas of Laguna. Hence, among the challenges foreseen is the need to meet the growing demand of population for social services, and maximum utilization of land for settlements.

DENSITY AND URBANIZATION

The average population density of Laguna for the year 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2007 is 553.2, 778.0, 1,172.7, and 1,405.7 persons per square kilometers, respectively. Over the given period, the Municipality of San Pedro registered the highest population density with 12,469.4 per square kilometres. This is followed by Bian City (6,039.9), Sta. Rosa City (6,827.2) and Sta. Cruz (2,640.3).

Except for the Municipality of Sta. Cruz, the high population density of the said municipalities and city is attributed to their proximity to Metro Manila. Among all the municipalities of Laguna, San Pedro is the nearest to Metro Manila followed by Bian City and Sta. Rosa City. The strategic location of these areas has provided opportunity for them to provide expansion to meet housing demands, as well as provide cheaper alternative locations for businesses. On the hand, the Municipality of Sta. Cruz is the provincial seat of Laguna, which is a contributing factor to its increasing density.

The towns of Mabitac (240.2), Sta. Maria (204.6), Lumban (293.8), Cavinti (290.8) and Majayjay (341.2) reflected the lowest population density in the province.

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The increase in population of Laguna was mainly due to its increasing urban population. More than three-fifths (66.22%) of the provinces population reside in the urban areas and only 33.77 percent in the rural areas. During the past ten years, the urban population has grown by an annual average of 4.2 percent, as against the rural areas with only 2.3 percent average annual growth rate. In the province, it is expected that population in the urban areas will continue to increase predominantly, due to the rapid development of residential subdivisions, construction of physical and social infrastructure facilities and services, and the establishment of industrial estates and parks.

In 2007, the municipality of San Pedro had the highest number of urban population with 281,808, followed by Sta. Rosa City (266,943), Bian City (262,735) and Calamba City (212,998), respectively.

On the other hand, the Municipality of Cabuyao had the highest rural population with 165,862 followed by Calamba City (147,283), and San Pablo City (104,963), respectively. These areas have vast agricultural lands, which contribute to their rural population.

ECONOMIC

For the last two decades, the Province of Laguna emerged as one of the countrys most important economic hubs. The province enjoys economic success in both agricultural and industrial activities. Notably, the municipalities and cities in the first and second districts of the province, which are nearer to Metro Manila, have become highly industrialized areas. On the other hand, the municipalities and city in the third and fourth districts primarily engage in agricultural production, cottage and small-scale industries.

The development of industrial estates in the province, especially in the first and second districts played a key role in Lagunas, as well as the Philippines economic development, contributing substantial foreign exchange earnings and providing employment.

Large-scale industries like textile, manufacturing, electronics, food processing, machines and car assembly plants are located in the first and second districts of the province. Laguna hosts well-known manufacturing companies such as Alaska Milk, Asia Brewery, Coca-Cola, Purefoods, and Nestle,
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among others. It is also dubbed as the Detroit of the Philippines given the existence of majority of car manufacturers, particularly in the City of Sta. Rosa. The province is also labelled as the Silicon

Valley of the Philippines due to the number of operating semi-conductor manufacturers available.

The economic boom experienced by Laguna for the last two decades is attributed to its able workforce, proximity to Metro Manila, and investment-friendly policies of the provinces LGUs.

Based on the 1995-2000 census, Laguna had a population growth rate of 4.08 percent, which is lower than that of the provinces of Rizal (5.70%) and Cavite (5.45%), respectively. Out of Lagunas total workforce of 1,296,000 in 2006, 84.2 percent were employed resulting to the provinces 67.5 percent labor force participation rate for the same year. The labor force participation rate of Laguna is higher than most provinces in the CALABARZON.

Districts three and four, which are composed of the provinces inner municipalities and city Calauan, San Pablo City, Alaminos, Pila to Sta. Maria, are the major agricultural areas that produce a rich supply of rice, fruits, vegetables, fish, forestry and mining products. Aside from crop production, animal husbandry is also predominant in Laguna particularly in Sta. Maria and Nagcarlan. Farm livestock includes carabaos, cattle, horses, goats, swine, ducks and chicken. Many residents in districts two, three and four have also taken-up agriculture-based cottage industries such cutflower growing, food processing, footwear, embroidery, basket weaving and woodcarving.

The Tourism industry contributes significantly to Lagunas economy because of the abundance of natural and man-made scenic spots and hot / cool water springs. The Provincial Government is encouraging more investments in tourism with emphasis on eco- tourism and cultural heritage.

Various natural and man-made attractions and facilities spread all over the province making it a favourite destination to local and foreign excursionists and tourist. World-class golf courses, theme parks, resorts, and historical sites draw thousands of visitors to the province. Local entrepreneurs have also prospered in cottage industries and small and medium scale enterprises. The arts and crafts shops double as tourists attractions that give Laguna a distinct character. These small and medium sized manufacturing and service firms such as financial institutions, insurance firms, real estate companies,

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business and community service firms, social and personal service firms have set up businesses in Laguna.

DRRM Provincial Situationer / Hazard Profile


Hazard Maps of the Province
Flood Hazard Map

Source : Provincial Planning & Development Coordinators Office & PHIVOLCS-REDAS

Figure 3. Flood Hazard Map

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Rain-Induce to Landslide Hazard Map

Source : Provincial Planning & Development Coordinators Office & PHIVOLCS-REDAS

Figure 4. Rain-Induced to Landslide Hazard Map

Earthquake-Induced to Landslide Hazard

Source : Provincial Planning & Development Coordinators Office & PHIVOLCS-REDAS

Figure 5. Earthquake-Induced to Landslide Hazard


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Liquefaction Hazard Map

Source : Provincial Planning & Development Coordinators Office & PHIVOLCS-REDAS

Figure 6. Liquefaction Hazard Map

Ground Rupture Hazard Map

Source : Provincial Planning & Development Coordinators Office & PHIVOLCS-REDAS

Figure 7. Ground Rupture Hazard Map

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Figure 8. Flooded Area due to Typhoon Ondoy

Water Resources of Laguna

Figure 9. Water Resources of Laguna


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Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council


The Honorable Governor Jeorge E.R Ejercito Estregan, through an executive order, has reorganized the Laguna Provincial Disaster Coordinating Council (LPDCC) into the Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (LDRRMC). The LDRRMC is composed of the following members: Hon. Jeorge E.R Ejercito Estregan Governor Mr. Valentin P. Guidote, Jr. Provincial Planning and Development Coordinator Captain Jonas P. Javier (OS) PAR Head Disaster Prevention Action Office Mr. Ernesto M. Montecillo Provincial Social Welfare and Development Officer Dr. Alsaneo F. Lagos Head Provincial Health Office Mr. Juanito Samson OIC Provincial Agriculture Office Engr. Gilberto R. Mondez Head Provincial Engineering Office Dr. Mary Grace Bustamante Head Provincial Veterinary Office Ms. Marieta Jara Head, Provincial Budget Office Mr. Ricardo Trios Head Environment and Natural Resources Office Dr. Ester C. Lozada Schools Division Superintendent Department of Education Laguna Mr. Lionel L. Dalope OIC DILG Laguna Ps/Supt. Gilberto DC. Cruz Provincial Director Laguna Provincial Police Office

- Chairperson

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member

- Member
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FSr/Supt. Lorenzo S. De Guia Provincial Fire Marshall, BFP Ms. Rudelly C. Cabutin Laguna Chapter Administrator Philippine Red Cross Four (4) Accredited Civil Society Organizations One (1) Private Sector Representative

- Member

- Member

- Member - Member

This organization visualizes the establishment/strengthening of Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council that will provide the vehicle for a concerted and coordinated disaster council efforts as well as exercise direction and control over all emergency operations from the provincial down to the municipal level. The council shall coordinate the executive provincial offices support/assistance in disaster stabilization operations.

A total commitment and application of resources of the government and other volunteer and relief agencies, national as well as local, to ensure maximum assistance during any emergency in the province. The functional relationship between the PDRRMC and M/CDRRMC shall be such that the different executive provincial agencies and offices extend support/assistance to the Council. This relationship shall be maintained down to the barangay level. Disaster Coordinating Council at the Municipal and Barangay level has been established to complement the Regional and Provincial DRRMCs. Each council shall have centers during disaster operations to be composed of the following:

a. Medical Service b. Evacuation Service c. Supply Service d. Emergency Service e. Rescue and Recovery Service f. Fire Service g. Communication and Warning Service h. Relief and Rehabilitation Service i. Damage Control and Engineering Service j. Police / Security Service

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The council shall oversee the status of the provincial preparedness programs, disaster operations and rehabilitation activities by the government and private sector. It shall advice the RDRRMC on the status of preparedness programs and the situation in the province and recommends the appropriate measures.

TASKS OF THE MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL

The Governor as the Chairman of the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council shall:

1. Coordinate on the provincial level, the activities of the various agencies and instrumentalities of the national and local government, private institutions and vivid organizations to implement the policies set by the National and Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council relative to disaster management.

2. Convene the Council as often as necessary to effectively coordinate provincial efforts on disaster preparedness and response, emergency operations, relief and rehabilitation activities.

3. Call on heads of office of the government and private sector assigned in the province for assistance in preparing for, reacting to and recovering from the effects of civil contingencies.

4. Prepare and disseminate disaster control manuals and other publication related to measures on disaster control, prevention and mitigation.

STAFF ELEMENTS

INTELLIGENCE AND DISASTER UNIT MEMBERS Dept. of Interior and Local Government Office of the Provl. Planning and Devt Coordinator Provl. Engineering Office Provincial Budget Office Philippine National Police
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This unit evaluates disaster situations, determine courses of an action to follow in time of emergency and formulate guidelines in evaluating disaster situations:

o Evaluates warning information and advises the members of the Provincial Disaster Coordinating Councils on impending disaster

o Makes recommendations on how to prevent disaster, if possible and / or suggest precautionary measures to minimize the effects of disaster.

o Submits recommendations for allocations of needed resources.

o Prepares appropriate recommendations to proper authorities for possible declarations of the existence of state of calamity in affected areas. These recommendations shall serve as basis for request in the release of Calamity Funds to ameliorate the sufferings of disaster victims.

PLANS AND OPERATIONS UNIT MEMBERS Provl. Social Welfare and Devt. Office Office of the Provincial Veterinarian Department of Education Office of the Provincial Agriculture

a. Determines the courses of action to be taken on the recommendations of the Intelligence and Disaster Unit b. Determines the type of number operating teams to be utilized in the disaster area c. Recommends implementation of the existing plans d. Maintains and/or supervises the programs of operations and the necessity of utilizing additional teams e. Prepares appropriate reports upon termination of Disaster Operations

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RESOURCE UNIT MEMBERS Provincial Health Office Provincial Engineering Office Office of the Provincial Agriculture Office of the Provincial Veterinarian

a. Undertakes a survey of urgent items needed in helping the victims/sufferers of disaster/calamities as well as gather the necessary statistics on resources such as:

1. Foods rice, corn, meat, vegetables, fish, softdrinks, and other grocery items 2. Clothing clothing materials and footwear 3. Construction Materials cement, lumber, roofing materials and hardware 4. Medical supplies medicines 5. Transportation government and private vehicles available 6. Other rehabilitation items seeds, planting materials, pesticides, fertilizers, livestock and fingerlings.

Resource survey will include the names and addresses of dealers, agencies or persons who may donate, contribute or make available such resources which may be needed to ameliorate natural disaster or calamity victims/sufferers and to release data for immediate reference to those who are called upon to render assistance and relief to the victims/sufferers.

b. It shall have the continuing task of updating its data and shall furnish it to all concern for ready reference and guidance

TASKS OF EACH MEMBER COMMITTEE/OFFICES OF THE PROVINCIAL DISASTER AND COORDINATING COUNCIL

A. THE PROVINCIAL SOCIAL WELFARE AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

a.1.) On pre disaster period, the OPSWD;

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a 1.1 Continuous identification, assessment of disaster prone areas within the coverage of the whole province in coordination with the MDCCs and BDCCs;

a 1.2 Continuous provision of training to different technical persons of P/C/M/BDCCs;

a 1.3 Maintenance of necessary food stockpile at the Disaster Operation Center;

a 1.4 Providing necessary advanced forecast to different P/C/M/BDCC members

a.2.) On the onslaught of Disasters, the OPWSD;

a.2.1 Will make available the service of the Provincial Disaster Operation Center on twenty-four (24) hours services;

a.2.2. Will coordinate with the twenty six (27) MDRRMCs and four (4) CDRRMCs of the province collating all advanced and available disaster monitored reports for proper utilization of the Office of the Governor and the Sangguniang Panlalawigan;

a.2.3. Will provide necessary relief assistance to affected populace in the whole Province of Laguna;

a.2.4. Will continue monitoring the different disaster prone areas of the province, coordinate these with the Communication, Rescue and Recovery Committee;

a.3. After the Perils of disaster, the OPSWD;

a.3.1. Will submit the final reports to the Office of the Governor such as the final disaster affected population and properties;

a.3.2. Will make proper assessment report for preparation of Project Proposals for the Rehabilitation of affected population and properties.

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B. THE DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

b.1.) On Pre-Disaster Phase, the DILG thru its different Municipal Local Government Operation Officers (MLGOOS) shall;

b. 1.1 Assist the establishment and operation of the disaster operation centers;

b.1.2. Assist in the conduct of training especially those of LDRRMCs;

b.2.) During disasters, the DILG will;

b.2.1. Oversee the disaster councils activities thru situationer/ monitoring reports from the LGUs;

b.2.2 Assist in the mobilization of officials thru communication, networking and linkages;

b.2.3. Assist in the survey of disaster areas and in the distribution of relief goods.

b.3.) After the Disaster, the DILGs;

b.3.1 Make a post disaster report coming from different LGUs incorporated with possible recommendations and immediate action;

b.3.2. Coordinate with the other government agencies/ non-government organizations to help the victims by providing them self-helped projects on livelihood projects.

C. THE OFFICE OF THE PROVINCIAL VETERINARIAN

c.1.) Before Disaster strikes, the OPV; c.1.1. Coordinate with the counterpart and local officials of disaster prone areas regarding c.1.1.1. Information campaign c.1.1.2. Preventive measures c.1.1.3. Contingency plans
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c.2.) During the strike of Disaster;

c.2.1. Fielding of OPV personnel to initially assess the damage incurred in the affected areas. c.2.2. Report incurred damages to the PDCC for proper information. c.2.3. If necessity permits, emergency purchase of drugs and biological to prevent the spread of animal diseases and treatment affected animals. c.2.4 If needs warrants, placing a particular affected area under quarantine to prevent the transfer of infectious diseases from one place to another, thus, includes the restriction of movement of criminals and to some extent of people to control the spread of diseases. c.2.5. Monitor the prices of animal products and by products in the market to prevent unscrupulous businessmen from taking advantage of the situation

c.3.) After the Disaster;

c.3.1. Assist in the sourcing of funds for the rehabilitation of the livestock industry in the affected areas.

D. THE ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCES OFFICE

d.1.) Before disaster strikes, the ENRO;

d.1.1. Under Mitigation Activities such as; d.1.1.1. Identification of communities for possible occurrence of different types of disaster; d.1.1.2. Formulation and receives contingency plan d.1.1.3. Reconnaissance and violation of flood prone areas for clearing debris. d.1.2. Step up preparedness thru: d.1.2.1. Creation of ENROs Emergency Action Team (EAT); d.1.2.2. Coordination and networking with other members of PDRRMCs; d.1.2.3. Information, Education Campaign to would-be-affected communities; d.1.2.4. EAT for emergency response to disaster and calamities distress call.

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d.2.) During Disaster Phase;

d.2.1. Activation of response mechanism such as: d.2.1.1. Establishment of ENRO-EAT for emergency response and immediate preparation for distress call d.2.1.2. Assign and identify staff elements for disaster for the following services; d.2.1.2.1. Evacuation Services d.2.1.2.2. Rescue and Recovery Services d.2.1.2.3. Relief and Rehabilitation d.2.1.2.4. Emergency Services d.2.1.2.5. Communication and Warning Services

d.3.) On Post Disaster Activities

d.3.1. Mobilization of staff to validate and report disaster related damages d.3.2. Provision of ENROs available and capable assistance

E. THE PROVINCIAL AGRICULTURIST OFFICE

e.1.) On Pre-Disaster, among activities are:

e.1.1. Information campaign regarding crop diversification, installation of STW; repairs of irrigation canals, desalting of irrigation canals, provision of vegetable seeds.

e.2.) During Disaster Period

e.2.1. Damaged assessment and monitoring e.2.2. Mobile water, Tank Irrigation

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e.3.) After the Disaster

e.3.1. Rehabilitation of damaged plantation thru seeds and seedling distribution or thru financial assistance e.3.2. Rehabilitation of damaged fields thru fingerlings dispersal

F. THE PROVINCIAL ENGINEERING OFFICE

f.1.) Before the coming of Disaster, the PEO is in urge of:

f.1.1. Preparation of heavy equipment like dump trucks, pay loaders, road graders, trailer trucks, power saw and other equipment needed; f.1.2. Assess and monitor possibilities of occurrence of road breaks; f..1.3. Stand by vehicles for possible rescue operations in case of disasters; f.1.4. Preposition all personnel for immediate dispatch to needed disaster areas;

f.2.) During disasters, PEO staff and personnel,

f.2.1. Dispatch all communication systems to identify possibilities of landslides, roadblocks; f.2.2. Dispatch all vehicles and equipment necessary for disaster related activities such as road clearing and transfer of possible evacuees for safer grounds.

f.3.) After the Disaster,

f.3.1. The presence of operation clearing of still uncleared road blocks; landslides and fallen tree cuttings for road clearing; f.3.2. Prepare project/program proposal for rehabilitation of damaged properties, roads, and other government-owned infrastructures.

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G. PROVINCIAL HEALTH OFFICE

g.1.) Before the Disaster Strikes

g.1.1. Establish a planning team g.1.2. Review and develop Provincial Health Office Disaster Plan g.1.3 Identify and estimate available medical resources g.1.4. Test plans, identify deficiencies and corrective actions g.1.5. Set up emergency management center

g.2.) During Occurrence of Disaster

g.2.1. Make initial response g.2.2. Make personnel notification g.2.3. Reception of patients g.2.4. Treat Victims g.2.5. Provision of Assistance Center

g.3.) After the Disaster

g.3.1. Incident Report g.3.2. Restocking of Supplies g.3.3. If needs arises, decontamination of immunization of exposed personnel g.3.4. Cleaning up of affected community g.3.5. Monitoring of sites for sentinel events g.3.6 Recovery

29

Proposed Organizational Chart for the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office

PDRRMOProposed OrganizationalChart

ProvincialGovernor

ProvincialDeputizedDisaster Coordinator PDRRMO Dept.Head PDRRMOAssistantDept.Head

AdministrativeSupport DivisionCoordinator

ResearchandStatistical EvaluationDivision Coordinator

PlansandOperations DivisionCoordinator

TrainingandInformation DivisionCoordinator

EmergencyandMedical DivisionCoordinator

Risk Assistant

4Researchers

OneStoreKeeper TwoLightVehicle Drivers


FiveHeavyEquipment Operators

HighAngleRescue WASAR/CCA/Fire fighter

*BLS/FirstAid *Two(2)EMR *Three(3)RN

4 Admin Staff 2Computer Operators Two(2)Utility Workers

FiveSenior Trainors FiveJunior Trainors

* WASH TEAM Will coordinate with the DSWD

TwoJobOrdersforSpecial Operations

15

Figure 1 Proposed PDRRMO Organizational Chart

30

PDRRMO Functions
Section 4, Rule 6 of IRR of R.A. 10121 states that the provincial, city, and municipal DRRMOs or BDRRMCs, in coordination with concerned national agencies and instrumentalities, shall perform the following functions with impartiality, given the emerging challenges brought by disasters of our times: (1) Set the direction, development, implementation and coordination of disaster risk management programs within their territorial jurisdiction (2) Design, program, and coordinate disaster risk reduction and management activities consistent with the National Councils standards and guidelines (3) Facilitate and support risk assessments and contingency planning activities at the local level (4) Consolidate local disaster risk information which includes natural hazards, vulnerabilities, and climate change risk, and maintain a local risk map (5) Organize and conduct training, orientation, and knowledge management activities on disaster risk reduction and management at the local level (6) Operate a multi-hazard early warning system, link to disaster risk reduction to provide accurate and timely advice to national or local emergency response organizations and to the general public through diverse mass media, particularly radio, landline communication, and technologies for Communication within rural communities (7) Formulate and implement a comprehensive and integrated LDRRMP in accordance with the national, regional and provincial framework, and policies on disaster risk reduction in close coordination with the local developments council (LDCs) (8) Prepare and submit to the local Sanggunian through the LDRRMC and the LDC the annual LDRRMO plan and budget, the proposed programming of the LDRRMF, other dedicated disaster risk reduction and management resources, and other regular funding source/s and budgetary support of the LDRRMO/BDRRMC (9) Conduct continuous disaster monitoring and mobilize instrumentalities and entities or the LGUs, CSOs, private groups and organize volunteers, to utilize their facilities and resources for the protection and preservation of life and properties during emergencies in accordance with existing policies and procedures (10) Identify, assess and manage the hazards vulnerabilities and risk that may occur in their locality (11) Disseminate information and raise public awareness about those hazards, vulnerabilities and risks, their nature, effects, early warning signs and counter-measures (12) Identify and implement cost effective risk reduction measures/strategies

31

(13) Maintain a database of human resource, equipment, directories, and location of critical infrastructures and their capacities such as hospitals and evacuation centers (14) Develop, strengthen and operationalize mechanisms for partnership or networking with the private sector, CS0s, and volunteer groups; (15) Take all necessary steps on a continuing basis to maintain, provide or arrange the provision of or to otherwise make available, suitably-trained and competent personnel for effective civil defense and disaster risk reduction and management in its area; (16) Organize, train, equip and supervise the local emergency response team and the ACDVs, ensuring that humanitarian aide workers are equipped with basic skills to assist mothers to breastfeed; (17) Response to and manage the adverse effects of emergencies and carry out recovery activities in the affected area, ensuring that there is an efficient mechanism for immediate delivery of food, shelter and medical supplies for women and children, endeavor to create a special place where internally-displaced mothers and children can find help with breastfeeding, feed and care for their babies and give support to each other; (18) Within its area, promote and raise public awareness of and compliance with the Act and legislative provisions relevant to the purpose of the Act; (19) Serve as the secretariat and executive arm of the LDRRMC; (20) Coordinate other disaster risk reduction and management activities; (21) Establish linkage/network with other LGUs for disaster risk reduction and emergency response purposes; (22) Recommend through the LDRRMC the enactment of local ordinances consistent with the requirements of this Act; (23) Implement policies, approved plans and programs of the LDRRMC consistent with the requirements of this Act; (24) Establish a Provincial / City / Municipal / Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Operations Center; (25) Prepare and submit, through the LDRRMC and the LDC, the report on the utilization of the LDRRMF and other dedicated disaster risk reduction and management resources to the local Commission on Audit (COA); for provincial / city level and internal audit for municipal and component city level, copy furnished the regional director of the OCD and the Local Government Operation Officer of the DILG; and (26) Act on mothers that maybe authorized by the LDRRMC.
32

DRR - PMT Committees


1. Advocacy, Research, Planning, and IEC Committee - Responsible for gathering and analyzing data in order to come up with viable DRRM Plans 2. Institutional Strengthening Committee - Responsible for the coordination and scheduling of DRRM Programs 3. Capacity Building Committee - Tasked to design and implement capacity programs for DRRM organizations through trainings, seminars, workshops, etc. 4. Documentation and Knowledge Management Committee - Responsible for the consolidation and dissemination of local disaster information - Tasked to raise public awareness about hazards, vulnerabilities and risks including their nature, effects, early warning signs and counter measures - Tasked to maintain a database of human resource, equipment, directories and location of critical infrastructures i.e. hospitals and evacuation centers. Project Proposal of Documentation and Knowledge Management Committee Project Title: Barangay Risk Reduction Management Map Project Description: Setting up of billboards/distribution of brochures about local risk and contingency plans of the community that builds awareness and preparedness among people in times of disaster Data Information:

Brgy. Base Map (includes Purok / Sitio) Infrastructure / Social Services Facilities Socio Economic Profile Number of POs / NGOs / COs Area Prone to Hazards (ex. Flooding, Landslides, etc.) Level of Hazards Evacuation Centers (includes flow / directions in time of emergencies) Early Warning Device (location)
33

BARANGAY DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT MAP


Socio-Economic Profile Land Area : No. of Sitio/Purok : Population : Male Female No. of HH Agricultural Land: Rice HVC etc..

Evacuation Center Flow of Direction

Figure 2. Sample Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction Management Map

34

DRRM Supplies and Equipment Inventory

Figure10.AvailableDRRMEquipmentintheProvinceofLaguna

Figure11.DRRMEquipmentinthe1stCongressionalDistrict

35

Figure12.DRRMEquipmentinthe2ndCongressionalDistrict

Figure13.DRRMEquipmentinthe3rdCongressionalDistrict

36

Figure14.DRRMEquipmentinthe4thCongressionalDistrict

Equipment : Bolt Cutter 2 Sit Harness 6 Hard Hat 50 Flashlight 10 Ropes 2 Life Vests 80 Base Radio 20 Repeater System 1 Life Ring 10

back

Figure15.DRRMEquipmentinBianCity,Laguna

37

Equipment : Hard Hat 21 Megaphone 2 Rubber Boots 1 Raincoat 1 Flashlight 51 Life Vests 28 First Aid Kit 4 Handheld Radio 4

back

Figure16.DRRMEquipmentinCabuyao,Laguna

Equipment : Power saw 2 Stretcher 9 Ropes 2 Life Vests 12

Dump Truck(1)

back

Figure17.DRRMEquipmentinCalambaCity,Laguna

38

10 Wheeler Dump Truck (2)

Equipment : Generator 2 Base Radio 5 Handheld Radio 52

back

Figure18.DRRMEquipmentinCalauan,Laguna

Equipment : Alarm System 1 Megaphone 2 Chainsaw 1 Life Vests 15 Handheld Radio 4

back

Figure19.DRRMEquipmentinCavinti,Laguna

39

No inventory of Equipment

back

Figure20.DRRMEquipmentinKalayaan,Laguna

Equipment : Mobile Phone 12 Power saw 1 Ladder 2 Raincoat 6 Flashlight 2 Ropes 1 Spine Board 1 Handheld radio - 1

10 Wheeler Dump Truck(1)

back

Figure21.DRRMEquipmentinLiliw,Laguna

40

Equipment : Power saw 2 Flashlight 16 Ropes 6 Life Vests 8 Handheld Radio 25 Chain Block Cable with Clamp 1 C-Colar 2

back

Figure22.DRRMEquipmentinLosBaos,Laguna

Equipment : Generator 2 Chainsaw 3

back

Figure23.DRRMEquipmentinLuisiana,Laguna

41

Equipment : Alarm System 1 Power saw 1 Megaphone 1 Ladder - 2

back

Figure24.DRRMEquipmentinLumban,Laguna

Equipment :

(3)

Generator 1 Ladder 1 Ropes 1 Chainsaw 2 Spine Board 1

back

Figure25.DRRMEquipmentinMagdalena,Laguna

42

Equipment : Power saw 1 Rubber Boots 10 Raincoat 10 Flashlight 10 Ropes - 4

10 Wheeler Dump Truck (5)

back

Figure26.DRRMEquipmentinNagcarlan,Laguna

back

Equipment : Hard Hat 30 Generator 1 Raincoat 30 Flashlight 30 Ropes 3 Life Vests 2 Life Ring 6 Handheld Radio 3

Figure27.DRRMEquipmentinPaete,Laguna

43

Equipment : Raincoat 10 Flashlight 10 Ropes 1 Life Ring 10

back

Figure28.DRRMEquipmentinPangil,Laguna

Man lift (1)

Equipment : Power saw 2

back

Figure29.DRRMEquipmentinPila,Laguna

44

Equipment : Bolt Cutter 1 Hard Hat 30 Generator 3 Power saw 4 Rubber Boots 30 Raincoat 30 Flashlight 30 Base Radio 2 Handheld Radio 20

back

Figure30.DRRMEquipmentinSanPabloCity,Laguna

Man lift (1)

back

Equipment : Hard Hat 10 Tent 10 Rubber Boots 8 Raincoat 20 Flashlight 14 Ropes 2 Chainsaw 1 Life Vests - 11

Figure31.DRRMEquipmentinSanPedro,Laguna

45

No inventory of Equipment

back

Figure32.DRRMEquipmentinSantaRosaCity,Laguna

Equipment : Generator 2 Power saw 2 Ladder 2 Rubber Boots 50 Raincoat 29 Flashlight 10 Life Vests 26

back

Figure33.DRRMEquipmentinSantaCruz,Laguna

46

Equipment : Power saw 1

back

Figure34.DRRMEquipmentinVictoria,Laguna

No inventory of Equipment

back

Figure35.DRRMEquipmentinFamy,Laguna

47

No inventory of Equipment

back

Figure36.DRRMEquipmentinSta.Maria,Laguna

Equipment : Hard Hat 10 Generator 2 Megaphone 2 Rubber Boots 10 Stretcher 1 Ropes 3 Life Vests 10 First Aide Kit 2 Life Ring 10

Tent 5 Power Saw 2 Ladder 1 Raincoat 10 Flashlight 5

back

Figure37.DRRMEquipmentinSiniloan,Laguna

48

Equipment : Generator 1 Life Vests 20 Base Radio 2 Handheld Radio 13

back

Figure38.DRRMEquipmentinPakil,Laguna

Equipment : Generator 1 Power saw 1 Ropes 1 Life Vests 1 Life Ring 1

back

Figure39.DRRMEquipmentinMabitac,Laguna

49

Equipment : Flashlight 4 Handheld Radio - 4

No inventory of Vehicle

back

Figure40.DRRMEquipmentinRizal,Laguna

No inventory submitted to the PPDCO

back

Figure41.DRRMEquipmentinMajayjay,Laguna

50

Vehicle: 1 Dump Truck 1 Mini Dump Truck

back

Figure42.DRRMEquipmentinPagsanjan,Laguna

No inventory submitted to the PPDCO

back

Figure43.DRRMEquipmentinAlaminos,Laguna

51

No inventory submitted to the PPDCO

back

Figure44.DRRMEquipmentinBay,Laguna

52

DRRM MANPOWER
NameofOrganization
1.KabalikatCivicom (Laguna4thDistrict Chapter)

NumberofMembers

ContactPerson

Designation

Contact#

Specialization

Recommended Training

51

FelicianoP. Bagabagon

Chapter President

09085366062

Radio Communication

Settingupof Communication systems

2.1stLagunaRRBn 3.PigeonPatrolSta.Rosa City 4.BantayBayan FoundationINC.

500 30

JonasJavier

Batallion Commander 09103476599

Security&Rescue

Advancedsearch andrescue trainingand refresher course

RustyAramBulo

President 09219715080

Security&Rescue

Search&Rescue

Security&Rescue OICMunicipal Chairman

Search&Rescue

Sta.Cruz Lumban

19 25 12 3 24

ManuelA.Hiwatig

09395462428

Search&Rescue Search&Rescue

RickyB.Magano un.Director M 09168509043

Paete

TeodoroP.Baguio Mun.Chairman 09204726972

Search&Rescue

Sta.Maria Bay

DanteV.Clarete ManuelA.Hiwatig

Mun.Organizer

09394688712 09395462428

Search&Rescue Search&Rescue

Pangil 20 AntonioC.Bautista

OIC Vice Chairman ForOperation

09084335644

Search&Rescue

53

5.BFPRegion Mayapa station,Calamba City

FO1Quiawan

09294341772

Fire Protection

Refresher courses Search&Res cue Refresher courses Search&Res cue

6.BFP Sta.CruzStation

FaridaB. Ymball a

FSr/ Insp.

09175018937

Fire Protection

7.4thR CDG ARESCOM, P.A LosBaos

14

Col.Isip CDCCommander Batalli on LTC.Baccaro commander

09056778274

Securi ty& Rescue Securi ty& Rescue

Search&Res cue Advanced trai ni ngonS&R

8.1stInf.Bat'n P.ACavinti,Laguna

80

09175069622

9.PhilippineRedCross LagunaChapter Sta.Ros a Sta.Cruz 20 35 Rudell yC. Cabutin Rudell yC. Cabutin Rudell yC. Cabutin Admini strator Adminis trator 09175046694 Admini strator 09175046694 09175046694

TrainingFA, BLS,VA,

Medical Response

Pangi l 10. Filipino ChineseYoungMen'sAthletic Association(VolunteerFireBrigade) Sta.Cruz,Laguna

20

13

HenryFung

TeamLeader (049)8081414

Securi ty& Rescue

Search&Res cue

54

11. Sta.Cruz EmergencyResponseTeam (SERT)

50

ErwinMarbide

09053420188

Security& Rescue Security& Rescue Security& Rescue Security& Rescue

Search&Rescue

12. AlphaPhi Omega(APO)

10

JayJavier

09084946702

Search&Rescue

13. Sta.Cruz BDC

30

Mi lagrosNg

09093730074

Search&Rescue

14. BantayKrimen Nagcarlan,Laguna

10

GermanTubiera

09084047954

Search&Rescue Search&Res cue andBLSand FirstAi d PreDi saster Acti viti es

15.PNP Province

1,417

Col .Bamba ManuelY. Alejo,Jr. Dr.Darwi n S. Talambayan

Deputyfor Operation 09278405551

Security& Rescue

16. DPWH Province

V. DRRM TRAINING PROGRAMS


27

Di strictEngr. 09175660388 09189858156

Cleari ng

A. First Aid and Basic Life Support


17. DepEd

B. Search and Rescue Training C. Fire Rescue D. Vehicular Extrication

WASH

Dr.AlsaneoF. 18. ProvincialHealthOffice E. 19. BHW 20. LTM O 80 Lagos Evacuation Center Management 1350 PHOII 09179665876

Traini ng FA, BLS,VA, WASH n i DRR WASH n i DRR

AdvancedMedi cal Response Medical Respons eand BLS

F. Setting-up and Monitoring of Rain Gauges RachelDaoa,RN

PHNIII

09198380902

WASHi nDRR VA, FirstAid&BLS

G. Protective Measures against Natural and Man Made Calamities 135 Kal ahi abago R LTMOConsultant 5011123

55

DRRM Training Programs


First Aid and Basic Life Support Training Programs
Schedule of Activities Day 1 Morning Session Opening Prayer National Anthem Introduction of Participants Welcome Remarks Pre-Test Break Lecture Proper Module 1 Basic Life Support for Non-Health Care Provider Principles of Emergency Care Getting Started Precaution to Prevent Disease Transmission Module 2 Introduction to Basic Life Support Chain of Survival Human Body/Anatomy Module 3 Respiratory Arrest and Rescue Breathing Causes and Techniques of Rescue Breathing Module 4 Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation When to start CPR Module 5 Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Indication and Importance Module 6 FBAO Lunch Break Afternoon Session 1:00 pm-5:00 pm Practice/Return Demonstration

Day 2 Practical Exam Written Exam WASH Day 3 First Aid for Bleeding and for Burns Break Poison Emergencies First Aid for Musculo - Skeletal Injuries Splinting Lunch Break Demonstration 1:00 5:00pm Day 4 Morning Session Simulation/Drill Break/Lunch Afternoon Session Graduation Response from the Participants Word from the Trainor Closing Remarks - PHO Giving of Certificates Picture Taking

56

Search and Rescue Training Program (Schedule of Activities)


Day 1 Disaster Situationer Hazard Review and Hazard Mapping Lunch Continuation of Hazard Review Snacks Emergency Services and Response Day 2 Morning Rituals Emergency Services and Response Snacks Continuation of Emergency Services and Response Lunch Public Awareness DM Planning Snacks DM Planning Day 3 Environmental Protection Training DENR Mandate, Mission & Vision The Agenda 21 Snacks DENR Laws, Rules & Regulation Lunch Continuation of DENR Laws Snacks Environmental Awareness Day 4 Fire Crew Organization Fire Fighting Tools & Equipment Lunch Initial Attack Planning Fire Safety & First Aid Day 5 Rescue Operation Lunch Management of Rescue Team Day 6 Rescue Equipment Ropemanship and Knot Tying Rappelling (Lecture)
57

Day 7 Rappelling (Actual)

Day 8 Basic Swimming Day 9 Basic Water Search and Rescue Day 10 Fire Rescue Day 11 and 12 Vehicular Extrication

Training Program for Management of Evacuation Centers


Schedule of Activities Day 1 Morning Session Opening Prayer National Anthem Introduction to Participants Welcome Remarks Break Lecture Proper Module 1 The Sphere Project Guidelines for Management of Evacuation Center Basis/Foundation Objectives Module 2 Pre-Evacuation Process Planning Organization Staffing Day 2 Module 3 Evacuation Process Standards in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion Standards in Shelter, Settlement and Non-Food Items Solid Waste Management Standards in Health Service Module 4 Post Evacuation Process Assessment Documentation of Post-Evacuation Assessment Discussion with the Evacuees about Their Return to Their Homes General Cleaning of Deactivated Evacuation Centers Inventory of Supplies and Equipment Break Response from the Participants Graduation Closing Remarks Giving of Certificates

58

EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES NEEDED IN DRRM


Inventory Needs of Training Programs
TRAINING MATERIALS FOR BASIC LIFE SUPPORT DESCRIPTION Durable Blood pressure monitor aneroid BLS/CPR mannequin (adult, junior and infant) Triangular bandage Lap top LCD projector Folding spine board Pole stretcher Consumable Participants name tag Pointer (laser) Blankets Permanent marker Pencil yellow pad Cotton ball (300 pcs.) Alcohol (500 ml) Total for Basic Life Support 500 pcs 3 pcs 30 pcs 1 box 100 pcs 36 pads 20 bags 20 pcs 20,000.00 1,200.00 15,000.00 480.00 720.00 1,300.00 1,326.00 1,500.00 Php 510,066.00 4 units 1pc each 80 pcs 1 unit 1 unit 3 pcs 3 pcs Php 7,080.00 226,800.00 7,800.00 42,750.00 52,350.00 77,760.00 54,000.00 QTY. ESTIMATED PRICE

59

TRAINING MATERIALS FOR FIRST AID

DESCRIPTION Durable Blood pressure monitor aneroid Triangular bandages C Collar (adult) C Collar (pedia) Splint Elastic Bandage 4-6 Lap top LCD projector Penlight Forceps Cold compress bag Cord clamp Standard first aid scissor Elastic roller bandage Tissue forceps and thumb forceps Hot compress bag Digital thermometer Sub Total (1)

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

4 pcs 80 pcs 5 pcs 5 pcs 6 sets 6 pcs 1 unit 1 unit 4 pcs 1 pc 2 pcs 2 pcs 1 pc 2 pcs 1 pc. 2 pcs 4 pcs

Php 7,080.00 7,800.00 12,000.00 12,000.00 14,400.00 5,760.00 35,625.00 52,350.00 576.00 2,292.00 600.00 132.00 2,352.00 327.00 2,280.00 600.00 1,128.00 Php 157,302.00

60

TRAINING MATERIALS FOR FIRST AID (CONTINUATION)

DESCRIPTION Consumable Participants name tag Gauze pads Alcohol (250 ml) Plaster (surgical tape) Band aid Cotton roll Sterile glove (L) Sterile glove (M) Povidine iodine (120 ml) Tongue depressor Sub total (2) Sub total (1) Total for First Aid

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

500 pcs 1 box 6 bottles 4 pcs 1 box 1 pc 1 box 1 box 1 pc 4 pcs

Php 20,000.00 250.00 533.00 216.00 180.00 186.00 480.00 480.00 186.00 288.00 Php 22,799.00 157,302.00 Php 180,101.00

Total for First Aid Total for Basic Life Support Total Amount Required for First Aid and BLS

Php 180,101.00 Php 510,066.00 Php 690, 167.00

61

TRAINING MATERIALS FOR SEARCH AND RESCUE

VEHICULAR ACCIDENT (EXTRICATION)

DESCRIPTION HYDRAULIC SPREADER AMK 30 CX spreader and (accessories) standard chain package HYDRAULIC CUTTER AMK 21 cutter BOLT CUTTER C COLLAR (adult) C COLLAR (pedia) AIRLIFTING BAGS ( PARATECH ) 136 ton crash crew air lifting bags set (includes 8 bags) Total for Vehicular Accident (Extrication)

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

1 unit

Php 452,000.00

1 unit 1 unit 5 pcs 5 pcs

528,000.00 5,400.00 12,000.00 12,000.00

1 set

860,000.00

Php 1,869,400.00

62

TRAINING MATERIALS FOR HIGH ANGLE RESCUE AND CONFINED SPACE RESCUE

DESCRIPTION USAR task force kit Confined space rescue team kit rigging Falcon rescue harness Vertex vent helmet CMC rescue 8 steel Large d carabiner Petzl rappel gloves Petzl duo head lamp AM'D aluminum locking D carabiner screw lock Petzl fixe pulley

QTY 2 sets 1 set 2 pcs 5 pcs 2 pcs 2 pcs 5 pcs 5 pcs 7 pcs 2 pcs

ESTIMATED PRICE Php 1,142,000.00 885,000.00 22,000.00 30,000.00 16,000.00 6,600.00 15,000.00 38,500.00 11,900.00 3,200.00 Php 2,170,200.00

Sub Total (1) for High Angle Rescue and Confined Space Rescue

63

TRAINING MATERIALS FOR HIGH ANGLE RESCUE AND CONFINED SPACE RESCUE (CONTINUATION)

DESCRIPTION Petzl tandem pulley Petzl rescuecender Petzl double pulley 7mm prusik cord 5 ft. Kermantle rope 12.5mm 300 Ft. with bag Pick off strap Load release strap 1 inch tubular webbing 18 feet length Anchoring strap Sub Total (2) Sub Total (1)

QTY 2 pcs 2 pcs 2 pcs 4 rolls 1 roll 2 pcs 2 pcs 10 pcs 2 pcs

ESTIMATED PRICE Php 6,600.00 15,800.00 4,690.00 1,120.00 46,000.00 8,800.00 10,200.00 8,000.00 8,600.00 Php 109,810.00 2,170,200.00 Php 2,280,010.00

Total for High Angle and Confined Space Rescue

64

TRAINING MATERIALS FOR WATER SEARCH AND RESCUE

DESCRIPTION BCD BC5XX SPARTAN III BCD jacket with padded neck collar; back padding & both sides REGULATOR QR3YOKE QR3 1st stage yoke standard piston QSS1 Standard second stage unbalance no adjustment with hose GAUGE: GD316DR Combo depth/pressure gauge small size double reading BAR/PSI OCTOPUS OT102 basic octopus no adjustment yellow cover with yellow 40" hose MASK MK151 FINS OF4XX BOOTIES 3B2XX Sub Total (1)

QTY

ESTIMATED PRICE

2 units

Php 18,760.00

2 units 2 units

7,080.00 4,040.00

2 units

9,280.00

2 units

4,288.00

Seeflex mask black seal black no box

2 units

1,160.00

Sea Runner Open Heel Fins

2 units

4,000.00

3MM Low Cut Booties Black

2 units

1,016.00 Php 49,624.00

65

TRAINING MATERIALS FOR WATER SEARCH AND RESCUE (CONTINUATION)

DESCRIPTION SNORKELS SK5XX Claro Snorkel (Black)

QTY

ESTIMATED PRICE

2 units

Php 731.00

WEIGHT BELT WB511 Weight belt w/ stainless steel buckle black 2 units 731.00

WETSUIT M3MZ1-XXX 3MM Wetsuit All Black With Wrist & Ankle Zipper Slanted Back Zipper & Embossed Logo 2 units 6,384.00

LEAD WEIGHTS LW2LBS 2 LBS Lead weights LW3LBS 3 LBS Lead weights LW4LBS 4 LBS Lead weights 2 units 2 units 2 units 540.00 810.00 1,080.00

TANKS CTS80TV Catalina 80 cubic feet tank 5 units 38,400.00

with DIN/YOKE convertible tank valve 3000 PSI

Sub Total (2) Sub Total (1) Total For Water Search and Rescue

Php 48,676.00 49,624.00 Php 98,300.00

66

WATER RESCUE EQUIPMENT FOR FLASH FLOOD

DESCRIPTION Water rescue helmet Swift water fury Water rescue rope (polypropylene) Rescue SRT, throw line bag, CMC Rescue fins Rescue buoy Portable water search light (water resistant) Water rescue mask Aluminum locking D carabineer Utility rope 9mm/20m Air Compressor MCH6 Single Phase Elec. 2.8 CFM MCH6 Gasoline Engine 3.5 CFM

QTY 8 pcs 8 pcs 1 roll 2 pcs 8 pairs 1 unit 8 pcs 8 pcs 8 pcs 1 roll

ESTIMATED PRICE Php 16,000.00 40,000.00 46,000.00 2,000.00 16,000.00 20,000.00 16,000.00 4,640.00 13,600.00 35,000.00

1 unit 1 unit

151, 200.00 151, 200.00 Php 511,640.00

Total for Flood Rescue Equipment

67

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES SEARCH AND RESCUE TRAINING MATERIALS

VEHICULAR ACCIDENT (EXTRICATION) HIGH ANGLE RESCUE AND CONFINED SPACE RESCUE WATER SEARCH AND RESCUE WATER RESCUE EQUIPMENT FOR FLASH FLOOD TOTAL

Php 1,869,400.00 2,280,010.00 98,300.00 511,640.00 Php 4,759,350.00

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES TRAINING MATERIALS

Basic Life Support and First Aid training tools Training Materials for Search and Rescue GRAND TOTAL

Php 690,167.00 4,759,350.00 Php 5,449,517.00

68

Actual Operation Inventory Needs (OPERATIONS/WAREHOUSING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES)

ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR BASIC LIFE SUPPORT

DESCRIPTION Durable Blood pressure monitor aneroid BLS/CPR mannequin (adult, junior and infant) Triangular bandage Lap top LCD projector Folding spine board Pole stretcher Consumable Participants name tag Pointer (laser) Blankets Permanent marker Pencil yellow pad Cotton ball (300 pcs.) Alcohol (500 ml) Total for Basic Life Support

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

4 units 1pc each 80 pcs 1 unit 1 unit 3 pcs 3 pcs

Php 7,080.00 226,800.00 7,800.00 42,750.00 52,350.00 77,760.00 54,000.00

500 pcs 3 pcs 30 pcs 1 box 100 pcs 36 pads 20 bags 20 pcs

20,000.00 1,200.00 15,000.00 480.00 720.00 1,300.00 1,326.00 1,500.00 Php 510,066.00

69

ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR FIRST AID

DESCRIPTION Durable Blood pressure monitor aneroid Triangular bandages C Collar (adult) C Collar (pedia) Splint Elastic Bandage 4-6 Lap top LCD projector Penlight Forceps Cold compress bag Cord clamp Standard first aid scissor Elastic roller bandage Tissue forceps and thumb forceps Hot compress bag Digital thermometer Sub Total (1)

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

4 pcs 80 pcs 5 pcs 5 pcs 6 sets 6 pcs 1 unit 1 unit 4 pcs 1 pc 2 pcs 2 pcs 1 pc 2 pcs 1 pc. 2 pcs 4 pcs

Php 7,080.00 7,800.00 12,000.00 12,000.00 14,400.00 5,760.00 35,625.00 52,350.00 576.00 2,292.00 600.00 132.00 2,352.00 327.00 2,280.00 600.00 1,128.00 Php 157,302.00

70

ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR FIRST AID (CONTINUATION)

DESCRIPTION Consumable Participants name tag Gauze pads Alcohol (250 ml) Plaster (surgical tape) Band aid Cotton roll Sterile glove (L) Sterile glove (M) Povidine iodine (120 ml) Tongue depressor Sub total (2) Sub total (1) Total for First Aid

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

500 pcs 1 box 6 bottles 4 pcs 1 box 1 pc 1 box 1 box 1 pc 4 pcs

Php 20,000.00 250.00 533.00 216.00 180.00 186.00 480.00 480.00 186.00 288.00 Php 22,799.00 157,302.00 Php 180,101.00

Total for First Aid Total for Basic Life Support Total Amount Required for First Aid and BLS

Php 180,101.00 Php 510,066.00 Php 690, 167.00

71

ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR SEARCH AND RESCUE

VEHICULAR ACCIDENT (EXTRICATION)

DESCRIPTION HYDRAULIC SPREADER AMK 30 CX spreader and (accessories) standard chain package HYDRAULIC CUTTER AMK 21 cutter BOLT CUTTER C COLLAR (adult) C COLLAR (pedia) AIRLIFTING BAGS ( PARATECH ) 136 ton crash crew air lifting bags set (includes 8 bags) Total for Vehicular Accident (Extrication)

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

1 unit

Php 452,000.00

1 unit 1 unit 5 pcs 5 pcs

528,000.00 5,400.00 12,000.00 12,000.00

1 set

860,000.00

Php 1,869,400.00

72

ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR HIGH ANGLE RESCUE AND CONFINED SPACE RESCUE

DESCRIPTION USAR task force kit Confined space rescue team kit rigging Falcon rescue harness Vertex vent helmet CMC rescue 8 steel Large d carabiner Petzl rappel gloves Petzl duo head lamp AM'D aluminum locking D carabiner screw lock Petzl fixe pulley

QTY 2 sets 1 set 2 pcs 5 pcs 2 pcs 2 pcs 5 pcs 5 pcs 7 pcs 2 pcs

ESTIMATED PRICE Php 1,142,000.00 885,000.00 22,000.00 30,000.00 16,000.00 6,600.00 15,000.00 38,500.00 11,900.00 3,200.00 Php 2,170,200.00

Sub Total (1) for High Angle Rescue and Confined Space Rescue

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ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR HIGH ANGLE RESCUE AND CONFINED SPACE RESCUE (CONTINUATION)

DESCRIPTION Petzl tandem pulley Petzl rescuecender Petzl double pulley 7mm prusik cord 5 ft. Kermantle rope 12.5mm 300 Ft. with bag Pick off strap Load release strap 1 inch tubular webbing 18 feet length Anchoring strap Sub Total (2) Sub Total (1)

QTY 2 pcs 2 pcs 2 pcs 4 rolls 1 roll 2 pcs 2 pcs 10 pcs 2 pcs

ESTIMATED PRICE Php 6,600.00 15,800.00 4,690.00 1,120.00 46,000.00 8,800.00 10,200.00 8,000.00 8,600.00 Php 109,810.00 2,170,200.00 Php 2,280,010.00

Total for High Angle and Confined Space Rescue

74

ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR WATER SEARCH AND RESCUE

DESCRIPTION BCD BC5XX SPARTAN III BCD jacket with padded neck collar; back padding & both sides REGULATOR QR3YOKE QR3 1st stage yoke standard piston QSS1 Standard second stage unbalance no adjustment with hose GAUGE: GD316DR Combo depth/pressure gauge small size double reading BAR/PSI OCTOPUS OT102 basic octopus no adjustment yellow cover with yellow 40" hose MASK MK151 FINS OF4XX BOOTIES 3B2XX Sub Total (1)

QTY

ESTIMATED PRICE

2 units

Php 18,760.00

2 units 2 units

7,080.00 4,040.00

2 units

9,280.00

2 units

4,288.00

Seeflex mask black seal black no box

2 units

1,160.00

Sea Runner Open Heel Fins

2 units

4,000.00

3MM Low Cut Booties Black

2 units

1,016.00 Php 49,624.00

75

ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR WATER SEARCH AND RESCUE (CONTINUATION)

DESCRIPTION SNORKELS SK5XX Claro Snorkel (Black) WEIGHT BELT WB511 Weight belt w/ stainless steel buckle black WETSUIT M3MZ1-XXX 3MM Wetsuit All Black With Wrist & Ankle Zipper Slanted Back Zipper & Embossed Logo LEAD WEIGHTS LW2LBS 2 LBS Lead weights LW3LBS 3 LBS Lead weights LW4LBS 4 LBS Lead weights

QTY

ESTIMATED PRICE

2 units

Php 731.00

2 units

731.00

2 units

6,384.00

2 units 2 units 2 units

540.00 810.00 1,080.00

TANKS CTS80TV Catalina 80 cubic feet tank 5 units with DIN/YOKE convertible tank valve 3000 PSI Sub Total (2) Sub Total (1) Total For Water Search and Rescue

38,400.00

Php 48,676.00 49,624.00 Php 98,300.00

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WATER RESCUE EQUIPMENT FOR FLASH FLOOD

DESCRIPTION Water rescue helmet Swift water fury Water rescue rope (polypropylene) Rescue SRT, throw line bag, CMC Rescue fins Rescue buoy Portable water search light (water resistant) Water rescue mask Aluminum locking D carabineer Utility rope 9mm/20m Air Compressor MCH6 Single Phase Elec. 2.8 CFM MCH6 Gasoline Engine 3.5 CFM

QTY 8 pcs 8 pcs 1 roll 2 pcs 8 pairs 1 unit 8 pcs 8 pcs 8 pcs 1 roll

ESTIMATED PRICE Php 16,000.00 40,000.00 46,000.00 2,000.00 16,000.00 20,000.00 16,000.00 4,640.00 13,600.00 35,000.00

1 unit 1 unit

151, 200.00 151, 200.00 Php 511,640.00

Total for Flood Rescue Equipment

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SUMMARY OF EXPENSES ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS FOR SEARCH AND RESCUE

VEHICULAR ACCIDENT (EXTRICATION) HIGH ANGLE RESCUE AND CONFINED SPACE RESCUE WATER SEARCH AND RESCUE WATER RESCUE EQUIPMENT FOR FLASH FLOOD TOTAL

Php 1,869,400.00 2,280,010.00 98,300.00 511,640.00 Php 4,759,350.00

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES ACTUAL OPERATION MATERIALS

Basic Life Support and First Aid training tools Actual Operation Materials for Search and Rescue GRAND TOTAL

Php 690,167.00 4,759,350.00 Php 5,449,517.00

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Inventory Needs of 24/7 Operations Center


OFFICE EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES

DESCRIPTION Durable Office table Ergonomical chair Bookshelf Filing cabinet Whiteboard Whiteboard eraser Cork board Ten seater conference table with chairs Coat rack/hangers Closets/lockers Air-conditioning unit (2HP) Industrial fan Hi-specs desktop computers 3-in-1 printer Copying machine Calculator Clock Poster boards for signs Stapler Staple remover Scissors Sharpener Push pin Flashlight Scotch tape dispenser Sub Total (1)

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

20 units 20 units 5 units 5 units 2 unit 2 pcs 1 unit 2 sets 2 units 1 unit 6 units 4 units 4 units 4 units 1 unit 4 units 3 units 2 units 5 pcs 5 pcs 5 pcs 3 pcs 2 boxes 10 pcs 5 pcs

Php 200,000.00 100,000.00 29,990.00 29,990.00 2,000.00 100.00 1,000.00 30,000.00 5,280.00 10,200.00 216,000.00 8,000.00 144,000.00 25,000.00 20,000.00 1,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 1,200.00 200.00 600.00 600.00 200.00 2,500.00 1,500.00 Php 835,360.00
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OFFICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES (CONTINUATION)

DESCRIPTION Consumable Message forms & other EOC forms Function log sheets Record books Flash disk / compact disk( 8 gb) Cartridges Bond paper (long) Bond paper (short) Scotch tape & masking tape Ball pen Pencil Whiteboard marker Yellow pad (90 lvs) Folder (long) Folder (short) Envelope (long) Envelope (short) Expanding envelope (long) Expanding envelope (short) Spare batteries Battery for all equipments Stamps (for action, completed, approved) Staple Sub total (2) Sub total (1) Total for Office Equipment and Supplies

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

2 sets 2 sets 10 pcs 6 pcs 10 boxes 100 rims 100 rims 20 pcs 200 pcs 200 pcs 3 boxes 50 pads 200 pcs 200 pcs 100 pcs 100 pcs 200 pcs 200 pcs 20 pcs 10 pcs 50 pcs

Php 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 6,000.00 10,500.00 15,000.00 14,000.00 1,000.00 1,440.00 1,380.00 1,000.00 1,800.00 1,200.00 1,100.00 240.00 225.00 3,600.00 3,120.00 3,000.00 30,000.00 2,000.00 Php 102,605.00 835,360.00 Php 937,965.00

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FOOD SERVICE AREA

DESCRIPTION Durable Container cup Bowls Plate Spoon& fork Hot/cold water dispenser Kitchen-cooking utensils Coffee maker Refrigerator Gas Range (2 burner)

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

20 pcs 20 pcs 20 pcs 20 sets 1 unit 5 sets 2 unit 1 unit 1 unit 1 unit 2 units

Php.2,500.00 2,500.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 5,000.00 2,500.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 3,900.00 2,500.00 3,700.00

Portable mini gas stove w/ burner (2.7 kg.) LPG tank (11 kg.) Consumables Dishwashing supplies LPG Tank Refill Total for Food Service

4 sets 8 times

1,200.00 6,400.00 Php 51,200.00

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COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT

DESCRIPTION Telephone Mobile phones Digital camera Video camera 32 LCD / LED TV / VCR / DVD AM/FM radio Fax machines LCD projector Emergency power generator minimum 5-15 KVA Extension cords Standby batteries for base radio (field use) Still / moving camera Total for Communication Equipment

QTY. 2 units 4 units 2 units 2 units 2 units 2 units 1 unit 3 units 1 unit 3 sets 1 unit 1 unit

ESTIMATED PRICE Php.4,000.00 20,000.00 20,000.00 20,000.00 26,000.00 3,000.00 6,900.00 90,000.00 30,000.00 1,500.00 3,000.00 4,000.00 Php 228,400.00

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RADIO COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION Repeater Controller (set w/ antenna) variloop Base radio Portable radio Power supply, 20 watts Inverter Coaxial cable US Belden, solid PL259 connector Booster 200 watts antenna (CP22 diamond) Maglite/Lantern lamp Mobile antenna (Larsen) -gutter mount -magnetic mount Generator set, 5kva w/ 12v DC Antenna mast w/ steps guy wires, turn buckles & labor 68m wet cell battery Battery terminal Total for Radio Communcation Equipment 7 pcs 12 pcs QTY. 1 unit 4 units 10 units 5 units 1 unit RG-8/roll 8 pcs. 4 units 5 units 4 units 2 units 2 units 1 unit 18,000.00 35,000.00 42,000.00 600.00 Php 701,584.00 ESTIMATED PRICE 92,000.00 116,000.00 165,000.00 59,000.00 15,400.00 85,000.00 1,584.00 48,000.00 10,000.00 14,000.00

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SANITARY AND LODGING SUPPLIES

DESCRIPTION Durable Bed sheet Blanket Pillows Pillow case Towel Cot bed Personal protective equipments for the workers Emergency utility tent Command tent Sleeping bag Consumable Toiletry supplies Waterless hand sanitizer TOTAL

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

10 pcs 30 pcs 30 pcs 30 pcs 20 pcs 30 pcs 25 pcs 2 units 1 unit 4 units

Php 10,000.00 7,000.00 5,000.00 2,500.00 10,000.00 180,000.00 25,000.00 30,000.00 15,000.00 10,000.00

2 sets 3 bottles

5,000.00 1,500.00 Php 301,000.00

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REFERENCE MATERIALS DESCRIPTION Checklist / flowcharts (protocols / guidelines) Local area and regional maps, aerial photos, hazard maps, including dead spots GIS Update contact / supplier / media lists Current telephone books Emergency OpCen plan (possibly an OpCen contingency plan as well) Emergency plans (at least 3 copies) DOH contingency plans (at least 3 copies)

85

SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT NEEDED TO SET UP PDRRMO OPERATION CENTER

OFFICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES FOOD SERVICE AREA COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT RADIO COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT SANITARY AND LODGING SUPPLIES GRAND TOTAL

Php 937,965.00 51,200.00 228,400.00 701,584.00 301,000.00 Php 2,220,149.00

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VEHICLES/HEAVY DUTY EQUIPMENT

DESCRIPTION Durable Service vehicle, 4x4 all terrain Rescue truck Ambulance Fire truck Pay loader and back hoe combo M-35 type truck jet ski Amphibian vehicle Fiber glass boat Consumable Fuel, gasoline Fuel, diesel TOTAL

QTY.

ESTIMATED PRICE

2 units 1 unit 1 unit 1 unit 1 unit 1 unit 4 units 1 unit 10 units

Php 3,000,000.00 1,500,000.00 1,000,000.00 1,500,000.00 12,000,000.00 2,500,000.00 2,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,688,000.00

10, 000 ltrs 20, 000 ltrs

452,500.00 710,000.00 Php 35,350,500.00

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CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDING & WAREHOUSE/OFFICE OFFICE BUILDING DESCRIPTION Durable 2 storey bldg. (at least 300 sq. mtrs. per floor) 1st FLOOR Garage (at least 300 sq. mtrs.) 2nd FLOOR One barracks with toilet and bathroom that can accommodate a minimum of 30 pax. (at least 120 sq mtrs.) Command/conference center and office area with toilets ( at least 100 sq mtrs.) Training area with mess hall and kitchen( at least 80 sq mtrs) TOTAL 1,600,000.00 Php 12,000,000.00 2,000,000.00 2,400,000.00 Php 6,000,000.00 ESTIMATED PRICE

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SUMMARY OF EXPENSES

TRAINING PROGRAMS OPERATIONS/WAREHOUSING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES PDRRMO OPERATION CENTER SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT NEEDED VEHICLES/HEAVY DUTY EQUIPMENT CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDING & WAREHOUSE/OFFICE GRAND TOTAL

Php 5,449,517.00 5,449,517.00

2,220,149.00

35,350,500.00 12,000,000.00

Php 60,469,683.00

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DRRM Early Warning and Feedback Framework


NDRRMC RDRRMC PDRRMC M/CDRRMC BDRRMC LOCALITY

Release of severe weather advisory and activation of Regional Disaster Operations Center

Dissemination of

severe weather advisory and activation of Provincial Disaster Operations Center

Dissemination of severe weather advisory and activation of City / Municipal Disaster Operations Center

Dissemination of severe weather advisory and activation of Barangay Disaster Operations Center

Dissemination of severe weather advisory to local residents

Dissemination of severe weather advisory to local residents and conduct of precautionary measures

Formulation on National Disaster Situation Report

Provision of feeback on Regional situation

Provision of feeback on Provincial situation

Provision of feeback on M/C situation

Provision of feeback on Brgy. Situation

Provision of feeback on local situation

Figure45.
Early Warning and Feedback Framework
141

Rescuers Deployment Flowchart


NDRRMC
START
Activates Regional Disaster Operations Center Activates Provincial Disaster Operations Center Conducts Emergency Meeting Deployment of AFP, PNP, 1st LRRBn, Kabalikat Civicom, PRC, NGOs in Strategic Places

RDRRMC

PDRRMC

PDRRMO

NO
Is there a high probability that the hazard will directly affect the province?

YES

Has the threat ceased to exist?

NO

Places AFP, PNP, BFP, 1st LRRBn, Kabalikat Civicom, PRC,NGOs on Standby Alert

YES
Demobilizes AFP, PNP, BFP, 1st LRRBn, Kabalikat Civicom, PRC,NGOs

END

YES

Are there sudden changes that warrant the attention of the Council?

NO
143

Figure46. Rescuers and Responders Deployment Flowchart

90

S&RTeamDistrictAssignments
DISTRICT ORGANIZATION RADIOCOMMUNICATIONSGROUP

CharlieCompany 1ST and2ND 1st LagunaReady ReserveBattalion 4th RCDGARESCOM 3RD 4TH AlphaCompany 1st InfantryBattalion

KABALIKATCIVICOM

Figure47.S&RDistrictAssignments
144

WASH DRR Program of Public Health Office (PHO)

WASH DRRProgram
BarangayHealthWorkers(BHW)inthe ProvinceofLagunaweretrainedonWASH PDRRMOalsoadvocatesfortheincorporation ofWASHinDepEdcurriculum

146

91

Organizational Chart of DRRM DepEd Laguna


DEPEDDRRM OrganizationalChart DR.ESTERC.LOZADA CHIEF (049)5014163

DR.NORAE.BAMBO DEPUTYCHIEF (049)5010565

MR.HEREBERTOJOSED.MIRANDA DEPUTYCHIEF (049)5010565

DR.DARWINS.TALAMBAYAN 09189858156 MR.EMMANUELE.ICALINA (049)5014218 DR.ORLANDOT.VALVERDE DARIODELIMA (049)5010501 INTELLIGENCEDISASTERANALYSISOFFICERS

MRS.SUSANORIBIANA MS.JUDITHCLEMENTE MRS.ARLENEBONGGON PLANSANDOPERATIONSOFFICERS (049)5010501

MR.FREDERICKB.ZAIDE MRS.SUSANASUTAREZ COMMUNICATIONANDWARNINGOFFICERS (049)5010501

MR.ROGELIOOPULENCIA MRS.RODERICACAMACHO RESCUEENGINEERINGANDEVALUATIONOFFICERS (049)5010501

MR.EDGARDOMILITANTE MR.MARIONTOBIAS PHYSICALSECURITYOFFICERS (049)5010501

DR.ZENAIDAYERRO MS.LIGAYAURRIZA COLLECTIONANDINVESTIGATIONOFFICERS (049)5010501

MR.ARIELCABANTOG MR.VICENTEABRANTES FIREFIGHTINGOFFICERS (049)5011405

DR.CELERINABARBA ANDMEDICALTEAM FIRSTAIDANDMEDICALASSISTANCE (049)5010501

MRS.ESTRELLADELOSSANTOSAND TEAM SUPPLY,RELIEFAND TRANSPORTATIONMOTORPOOL(049) 5011971

148

MR.MARTYR.VALERO,MR.RAULJARAPLASANANDDISTRICTSUPERVISORS ACTIONGROUP/VOLUNTEERGROUP09278018867/09178816622

Figure48.OrganizationalChartofDRRMDepEdLaguna

DEPEDDRRPMT
NUMBEROFELEMENTARYANDSECONDARY SCHOOLSINTHEPROVINCEOFLAGUNA ELEMENTARYSCHOOLS 326 SECONDARYSCHOOLS 85 NO.OFSCHOOLDISTRICTS 22
149

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Assessment
Synthesis of the Participatory Capacity and Vulnerability Assessment Integrated Analysis

DEMOGRAPHIC, GEOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS In the Province of Laguna, the demographic, geographic, and socio-economic information prevalent was that the populace lacked the proper understanding of the inter-connectedness of the different issues. First and foremost, they did not understand what kind of calamity happened to the province. For both typhoons, Ondoy and Santi, the magnitude of the devastation and destruction it caused was something unparalleled and unheard of. Many did not understand what hit the province especially the prolonged flooding that lasted almost four months while in the past it lasted only for a couple of days. They did not know where all the water was coming from and why it did not immediately dissipate. What they failed to realized was the fact that because there was so much rainfall in the last couple of months before Ondoy and Santi came, the soil could no long absorb rainwater because it has already reached its saturation point. Aside from this, what the people could not understand was why the floodwaters would not dissipate. Laguna de Bay had only one outlet and it was heavily silted, clogged, and the opening was covered by more than 16,000 families of informal settlers. Because of this calamity, the landscape and geographical features of the province changed. Many residential areas were completely submerged under water and a lot of people were temporarily relocated to higher, safer, and dry grounds. Those who refused to vacate their houses had to build makeshift rooms and shelters on top of their roofs just to be able to guard and secure their dwellings and belongings. Even the agricultural and livestock areas were affected by flash floods, erosion, and flooding. Many of the agricultural produce including rice fields were destroyed by the calamity. Because of this the lives of our farmers and fisher folks were affected. An agricultural rehabilitation program was launched by the provincial government together with the affected local government units in order to avert the lack of produce and augment the income of the agricultural sector.

EXPERIENCES IN DISASTERS AND HAZARDS The experiences of the people during disasters and hazards are basically the same for the entire province. Two major disasters hit the province namely; strong typhoons and prolonged flooding in most of the coastal areas. Because of this prolonged flooding there were a lot of documented cases of water-borne diseases. The most common diseases during this time were skin diseases like fungal infection, athletes foot, other diseases like leptospirosis, diarrhea and flu. Most, if not all, have
93

something to do with dirty water. But if the disaster brought a lot of negative effects on the people, it also brought a lot of good opportunities and ideas. Because of the prolonged floods, innovative means of transportation were invented and used. First, there were a lot of improvised materials used like Styrofoam, banana trunks, old refrigerators, karo or coaches for images of saints. This innovation meant steady income for some of our enterprising constituents. Another major innovation in the province of Laguna was the use of floating toilets. This innovation won recognition for its new approach and design. The province also experienced the change in land use and commercial features. Since many of the areas for commerce and trade were also flooded you will see the emergence of new business in the areas which were not flooded. Many of the consumer stores had to relocate from their current place to another which was not affected by the flooding in order for their businesses to survive. Because of this, one glaring feature stood out, and that is the ability to cope vis-a-vis the adaptation process involved. Because of their demise people have learned to find alternative ways to survive and adjust to their situation. The ability to cope and the adaptability skills have become symbiotic in the process. From the experience, there was also the recognition of the things that were needed to be improved. One aspect is the relief operations being conducted. For lack of trust and confidence in the local government units leaders, donor agencies and organizations went to the relief distribution themselves. This caused a lot of problems because while others had so much relief items in their possession enough for them to put up their own sari-sari store, some of the evacuees in other camp sites had barely anything to eat. Learning from the experience there should be a validation process for the list of recipients to to avoid conflicts, abuses, and favoritism. But we are also cognizant that this is one of the more difficult tasks. The second aspect is the lack of protection and security inside the evacuation centers and temporary relocation centers especially for women against being raped, molested or abused and the prevalence of robbery and theft. These two things must be looked at as areas of immediate concern.

SOCIAL SERVICES AND PUBLIC FACILITIES Most of the social services and public facilities that were inadequately provided during the disaster were those that were inside the evacuation centers and temporary relocation centers. These camp sites (mostly schools) lacked proper drainage system that would prevent the prevalence of foul odors and unhygienic and unsanitary practices. Toilet facilities were inadequate because the classrooms were not designed for use by a large number of people. There is also a lack of proper waste disposal. You would see garbage and waste scattered around the place. People staying at the evacuation centers do not even care to clean and dispose of their garbage properly. Water resources are either scarce, inadequate or inaccessible. Lack of potable water is prevalent thereby increasing
94

chances of diseases and epidemics. Also as a result of lack of water, unsanitary and unhygienic practices occur. To resolve these issues, it has been recommended by most members of the different disaster coordinating teams from the barangay to the provincial level that schools should no longer be allowed to be used as evacuation centers. Because as most people would put it, after the evacuation centers are vacated, one would find that it has ravaged and destroyed far worse than the devastation of the typhoon. Classrooms are destroyed. Toilet facilities are clogged, Chairs and blackboards used as firewood, Schoolbooks used as drawing materials. Electrical facilities and supplies are stolen. After being used as evacuation centers, the provincial and municipal governments end up spending a considerable amount for repairs and maintenance. In order to prevent these things from happening, a proper housing and relocation program must be done alongside the identification and development of evacuation sites. Proper housing and relocation sites should be provided for those who are staying in the identified hazards zones and 12.5 easement of the lake while the evacuation centers will be for victims of any disaster whether man-made or natural. The relocation of people in the hazard prone areas will prevent the recurrence of damage to property.

LIVELIHOOD Although the flooding may have had a lot of devastating effects on the lives of the people, it has also presented a lot of new livelihood opportunities. Many people who did not have work took the opportunity of transporting people in the flooded areas. As mentioned earlier, many enterprising individuals made makeshift boats out of Styrofoam, banana trunks, old refrigerator, and others. While others who did not have any makeshift boats became couriers and baggage carriers especially in the flooded marketplaces. However, despite the livelihood opportunities that presented themselves there were also unscrupulous people who took advantage of the situation by charging exorbitant boat fees. In a lot of the flooded residential areas, exorbitant fees were being charged to the passengers much more than the regular fare rates. The reason why they charge higher fees according to the boatmen is because its much harder work to maneuver the boats on the narrow streets and that they normally get wet almost all of the time. Based on the discussions, it has been recommended that there should be barangay ordinances that must be passed to regulate the rates and protect the victims from paying much higher rates.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND AGENCIES One of the most common problems that presented itself in the community is the lack of communication and proper relationship that should have been established between the NGOs and the barangay council. It would have been better if both parties had a harmonious working relationship based
95

on trust and confidence. The issue of mistrust occurred because of two opposing views. The barangay council wanted that all relief goods would have to pass through the council to ensure that everyone in the community who were affected by the typhoon would benefit from the donations. However many of the donor agencies and organizations did not want to course the relief goods because they do not want the relief operations politicized. This caused rift between the two groups. Another effect of this rift is the unexplored linkages with other potential partner agencies. Many of the barangay councils did not utilize the available resources within their community for fear that they would experience the same mistrust that was accorded to them by some donor agencies. These would have been resolved if proper dialogues were done. Another experience that had negative effects on the communities is the overlapping of services and interventions among donor agencies and organizations. This resulted to a lot of envy among the barangays because while other barangays had plenty and were in abundance of relief goods other barangays had barely received anything. This could have been easily avoided if proper coordination was made with the PDCC. This should be standard operating procedure that before donations are made to any barangay or municipality it should register its donation to the PDCC to ensure that there is no overlapping and duplication of services and interventions from the donor agencies.

GOVERNANCE On the governance aspect there is also prevalence on the lack of communications and relationship buildings between the NGOs and barangay council. The lack of communication being mentioned on this aspect is specifically because of the identification of the beneficiaries. The barangay council is insistent that the list of beneficiaries should come from the barangay council because they can identify better the victims of a calamity, donor agencies on the other hand would rely on the listing that they would get from their coordinators, The problem arises specifically when the list of beneficiaries differ from each other therefore a proper validation system should be created by the DSWD to identify accurately list of beneficiaries. More importantly the BDCCs should become pro-active instead of being reactive. It had been observed in the past that the BDCCs only convene when a calamity has already struck. It is important that BDCCs regularly discuss measures and ways to better respond to the calamity. BDCCs should also need to have a better understanding of DRR policies and framework. They should also be able to draw up the DRR plan for their respective barangays and create an advocacy program that will educate their constituents. Finally the BDCC should also have ordinances or resolutions that will address the lack of mechanism to regulate irregular practices during calamities. This will include regulation of rates, identification of victims, proper assessment of damage and proper rehabilitation programs.

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Issues and Concerns


Strengthening Institution for DRR
No permanent PDRRMO/HEMS (Structure/Building) No policies, guidelines and plan for DRRM Inadequate trained and skilled personnel Inactive barangay in strengthening DRR No contingency plan for all types of hazards and disasters Inadequate knowledge of mainstreaming DRRM into sectoral plans and programs Inadequate WASH facilities, equipment and supplies No permanent structure for provincial water testing laboratory Inadequate trainings of implementors on WASH Inadequate water laboratory equipment, reagents and supplies Different appreciation on DRR by various agencies Too much requirements of national government agencies in the preparation of PDRRM plan

Risk Assessment and Early Warning


The need to institutionalize the Risk Assessment Tool

Lack of logistic support for risk assessment (e.g. digital camera, communication and transport equipment) Difficulty in Risk Group Identification Absence of focal person Communication problem between people in the community and LGU Inadequate early warning devices Need to synchronize the warning system from national down to provincial and local level

97

Knowledge Management
Undedicated, uncommitted and incapable personnel attending trainings and seminars.

Insufficient training seminars, workshops, drills and simulation exercises for Disaster Risk Reduction Management Lack of trainings, equipment, and reference materials for Disaster Risk Reduction Absence of Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction Resource Center

Uncooperative / unresponsive community during Disaster Risk Reduction information dissemination. Lack of study grants in Disaster Risk Reduction

Reducing Risk to Disaster


Hazardous land conversion Land use zoning not strictly followed No regular inspection of buildings and other structures No proper evaluation of new building construction as to adaption to Climate Change No identified resettlement areas for families in hazard-prone areas Lack of structural protection against soil erosion and floods Inadequate facilities in evacuation centers Need for siphoning of septic tanks in evacuation centers Lenient implementation of waste management programs; lack of landfills Deforestation Need for stricter implementation of local ordinances, laws and policies on disaster management Lack of awareness programs on biological and chemical hazards

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Responding to Disaster
Lack of supplies, equipment and skilled personnel

Provision of emergency assistance to communities impacted and overwhelmed by disaster and emergencies Resistance of people to leave danger area during disaster Lack of coordination among service providers (LGUs, NGO's, Church, etc.) Lack of specific areas for evacuation Lack of alternative response team Improper camp management (evacuation center) Lack of emergency procedure plan : (Contigency Plan ex. Flood) Lack of coordination and protocol

Goals and Objectives


Achieve Zero casualties during disasters Institutionalization of the disaster risk reduction program in the province by systematic use of resources and mainstream the DRR plan in the CDP, AIP, ELA, LAND USE plan and PDPFP Make Laguna less vulnerable to disasters & can respond adequately to the needs of victims by increasing capability and resiliency of the community to be able to respond better to any disaster that may occur and lessen the risk of loss of lives and properties Provide an adequate & pleasant facility to Lagunenses in times of crisis or disasters by establishing permanent evacuation centers and relocation sites Prevent & control outbreaks of disaster-related diseases

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Recommendations
Strengthening Institution for DRR
Establishment of PDDRMO/HEMS with complete human resources, required equipment and supplies Formulation of policies and guidelines and preparation of DRRM Plan Capability building of personnel Organize/orient barangay level on DRR Prepare contingency plans for all types of hazards and disasters Conduct trainings on how to mainstream DRRM into sectoral plans and programs Provision/construction of WASH facilities Establishment of provincial water testing laboratory Capacity building for implementors Provision of water laboratory, equipment, reagents and supplies Synchronize activities and programs for all agencies Simplify government requirements with regards to DRRM Programs

Risk Assessment and Early Warning


Institutionalize the Risk Assessment Tool such as Participatory, Capacity, Climate Change Adaptation and Vulnerability Assessment in municipalities in the province. Intensify logistic support for risk assessment Pre-identification of risk group before disaster Designation of a focal person/s in certain area Strengthening communication between people in the community and LGU through proper information communication Provision of additional early warning devices such as rain gauges, bells and others
100

Synchronization of multi-hazard warning system

Knowledge Management
Dedicated, committed and capable personnel to attend trainings. Additional trainings, seminars and workshops, drills and simulation exercises for Disaster Risk Reduction. Establishment of Laguna Disaster Risk Resource Center. Knowledgeable trainors / personnel to educate the community during disaster. Inquire additional study grants, scholarship international and local for Disaster Risk Reduction.

Reducing Risk to Disaster


Review current zoning areas to identify land conversions as to its conformity with the law Seek help from municipal agencies on the supervision of the implementation of zoning laws Conduct regular quarterly inspection of buildings to determine strength and safety Integration of adaptation to climate change as one requirement during building constructions Search and identify resettlement sites for families in hazard prone areas Work on the construction of dikes, dams and other structural protections for rivers and mountain areas which are prone to disasters Identify evacuation centers and check on all water, lighting and other facilities for proper accommodation Formulate stricter laws on waste management Formulate stricter laws on waste management Coordinate with the PENRO on identification of potential landfills Coordinate with local government agencies on the apprehension of illegal loggers; enhance reforestation programs Instruct municipal offices to implement stricter laws on disaster imposition of fines and imprisonment Include biological and chemical hazards awareness in DRRM Programs
101

management including

Responding to Disaster
Proper and complete training, emergency kits & tools, proper personnel protective equipment for efficiency & safety of rescuers Have the rescue vehicle, equipment, tools, relief goods and other indigenous tools ready for dispersal / deployment during and after disaster. To be able to instigate forced evacuation of residents at high risk areas Proper coordination to service provider and consolidate all action plan regarding emergency response Identify and establish permanent evacuation camps / centers to areas at high risk. Coordinate with civic action group and private organization (PO's) regarding their readiness during and after disaster. Train camp managers who will supervise all evacuation camps/centers Establishment of articulate operation procedure and guidelines for every type of disaster Improving communication / protocol regarding disaster response Establishment of Emergency Response (ER) command center that will handle all emergency situation

102

Workplans
PDRRMO Plan

193

103

194

104

195

105

196

106

WASH IN DRR

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MATLS COST SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPONSI BLEPERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

PRE DISASTER

A.ORGANI ZATION/ PLANNING 1.Institu tionalization ofWASH Cluster/ Teamswith approvedE.O. 2.Planningbased oncapacity/ needs assessment (ProvincialWASH Cluster&Provincial Mun/Brgy.WASH Teams) Draft Executive Order LGU PHO Availabilityof organized WASHTeams forDisaster/ Emergency Response Streng thened WASH Program implemen tation

DisasterRiskAreas Office supplies

LGU

Provincial WASH Cluster/ Team

107

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPON SIBLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

MATLS

COST

PRE DISASTER

B.CAPACITY BUILDING

Provincial WASHCluster (20) Provincial WASHTeam (15) City/Mun WASHTeams (200) Brgy.WASH Teams(400)

TrainingMaterials Meals,Snacks& Accomodation Training Equipments: Laptopw/OS& Antivirus LCDProjector Printer

1,500/ pax/dayx3x 635days(Live in) P2,857,500

PLGU/ Other funding agencies

PHOWASH Team

do do P45,000.00 P35,000.00 P10,000.00 do do

Enhanced capacityof personnelon WASHinDRR &Emergen cyPrepared ness Availabilityof trainedand organized WASH Cluster/ Teamsready forDisaster Response

do do

108

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MATLS PREDISASTER C.ESTAB./ UPGRADINGOF WASH Facilities: Provincial Water Testing Laboratory 1.Requestforthe provisionoflot andconstructionof Laboratorybuilding 2.Purchaseoflab equipments, reagents& supplies Refertolistof equipment, reagents& supplies ESTIMATED COST Improved WaterQuality Surveillance 1Provincial Lab. Availabilityof safewater supplysources SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPONSIBLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

LotC/oPLGU 20,000/sq.m.bldg. construction =P5,000.000 1set L.S. =P5,000,000

PLGU

PHOWASH Team

PLGU

PHOWASH Team

109

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MAN POWER MATL ESTIMATED COST SOURCE OF FUNDS RESPON SIBLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

PRE DISASTER

C.ESTAB./ UPGRADINGOF WASH Facilities: 3.Hiringof Laboratory Personnel

6Lab. Personnel

1Chemist 1Medtech/ Microbio logist 4LabAides

SG13 P202,042/ Annum SG9 P157,725/ Annum SG2 P98,289/ Annumx4 =P393,156

PLGU

PHOWASH Team

Regular water analysis conducted

110

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MATLS ESTIMATED COST SOURCE OF FUNDS RESPON SIBLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

PRE DISASTER

D.ADVOCACY/IEC ONWASHinDRR thru: a.Meetings b.Community assemblies c.WASH Class D.TriMedia Campaign

LCEs Community Womens Organizations

WASHModules IECMaterials (Posters, Leaflets,Flyers, etc. Meals&Snacks

P10,000

LGUs

P50,000

Provl/ City/Mun WASH Team

Enhanced awarenessof the communityo nWASHin DRRand prepared nessduring disaster/ emergency

Radioand newspaper announce ments

P20,000

PLGU

Provl/ City/Mun WASH Team

111

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MATLS Watersupply sourcesfor ECs/TRSs Officesupplies Forms ESTIMATED COST P5,000 SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPONSIBLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

DURING DISASTER

I.RAPIDASSESS MENTOFWASH FACILITIES:

LGUs

Provl/ City/Mun. WASH Team do

Affectedareas properly evaluated

A.WATER 1.Sanitarysurvey/ Inspectionofwater supplysources 2.Watersampling& analysis

Possiblesources ofwaterinthe area

Officesupplies GasAllowance Portabletestkits Samplingbottles Cooler Labequipments, reagents& supplies

P100,000

LGUs

Availabilityof safewater supplysources

Possiblesources ofwaterinthe area

P500,000

PLGU

Sanitation Inspectors/BH Ws Lab.Personnel

112

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MATLS ESTIMATED COST SOURCE OF FUNDS RESPONSI BLEPERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

DURING DISASTER

3.WaterTreatment /Disinfection

a.Water supplysources inaffected areas& ECs/TRSs b.Water Containersin ECs/TRSs

Chlorine Disinfectants Water treatmenttools

P200,000

PLGU

Chlorine Water disinfectants (hyposol, aquatabs,etc.)

Sanitary Engineer/ Sanitation Inspectors/ BHWs Lab. Personnel do

Reduced waterborne diseases

P1,000,000

PLGU

II.SANITATION 1.Construction/ Improvementof toiletfacilities Allaffected areas/ECs/ TRSs Ceramics/ PlasticToilet Bowls

2,000pcsx P850/pc.= P1,700,000

LGUs

Provl/City/ Mun.WASH Team

Reduced sanitation related diseases

113

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MATLS ESTIMATED COST SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPONSI BLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

DURING DISASTER

II.SANITATION 2.Improvementof drainagesystem 3.Properwaste management

Allaffected areas/ECs/ TRSs Allaffected areas/ECs/ TRSs

Declogging Tools

P500,000

LGUs

WASH Teams

Absenceof vectorborne diseases

Refuse receptacles

III.HYGIENE 1.Development& reproductionofIEC Materials 2.IEConWASH, proper handwashing& personalhygiene

2,000units XP150/pc. =P300,000

LGUs

WASH Teams

Allaffected areas/ECs/ TRs do

IECMaterials (Posters, Leaflets, Flyers,etc.) Hygienekits

P500,000

LGUs Other funding agencies/ Donors

WASH Teams

Safe,healthy &resilient community

114

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS MATLS COST SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPONSI BLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

DURING DISASTER

IV.NETWORKING

Other GOs/NGOs/I NGOs

Office supplies

P5,000

LGUs

WASH Cluster/ Teams

IV.MONITORING& EVALUATION 1.Regularinspections Allaffected areas/ECs/ TRSs Forms Service Vehicle (4X4) Gas Allowance Office Supplies Digicam Desktop computer Copier P5,000 P1,500,000 PLGU WASH Teams

Responseon WASH properly coordinated

V.DOCUMENTATION& REPORTING

Allaffected areas/ECs/T RSs

Improved status& proper operation& maintenance ofWASH facilities Documenta tions&reports madeavailable atalltimes

P5,000 PLGU P10,000 P30,000 P5,000

WASH Teams

115

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH ProvinceofLaguna Year2011


PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPONSI BLEPERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT MATLS POSTDISASTER I.ASSESSMENT a.Inspectiontoverifystatus ofWASHfacilities b.Continuous implementationofWASH Programtoprevent& controloutbreakof WATSANrelateddiseases c.Cleanupcampaign Tools d.Recommenddeclogging ofdrainagecanals& desludgingofseptictanks e.ContinuousIEConWASH IECMaterials P10,000 Declogging& desludgingTools P500,000 LGUs LGUs Allaffected areas/ ECs/TRSs Officesupplies ESTIMATEDCOST P5,000 LGUs WASH Cluster/ Teams Properoperation &maintenanceof WASHfacilities Noreported outbreaksof WATSANrelated diseases

Forms GasAllowance

P5,000 P50,000

LGUs

WASH Teams

WASH Teams WASH Teams

P10,000

LGUs

WASH Teams

116

OPERATIONALPLANonWASH
ProvinceofLaguna Year2011
PHASE STRATEGY/ ACTIVITY TARGET RESOURCEREQUIREMENTS SOURCEOF FUNDS RESPON SIBLE PERSON EXPECTED OUTPUT

MATLS POSTDISASTER II.NETWORKING Other GOs/NGOs/ INGOs Officesupplies

ESTIMATED COST P5,000 LGUs WASH Cluster/ Team Responseon WASHproperly coordinated

III.MONITORING& EVALUATION 1.Followupinspections Allaffected areas/ECs/ TRSs Forms Service Vehicle GasAllowance P5,000 P20,000 OfficeSupplies Digicam Desktop computer Copier PLGU PHOWASH Team Improvedstatus& properoperation& maintenanceof WASHfacilities

PLGU

IV.DOCUMENTATION& REPORTING

Allaffected areas/ECs/ TRSs

P10,000

PLGU

PHOWASH Team

117

MEDICAL RESPONSE Plan

118

119

120

Nutrition and Infant Feeding During Disasters


NUTRITION/INFANTINDISASTER
ACTIVITIES TARGETAREA/ PARTICIPANTS TARGET DATE RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS/ SOURCE MealsandSnacksfor25 persons=P5,100.00 MealsandSnacksfor40 persons=P6,800.00 Mealsandsnacksc/o Mun.LGUs PERSON RESPONSIBLE PHO EXPECTEDOUTPUT

1.OrganizationofProvincialIFE /NutritioninDisasterTeam 2.Feedbackingonoutput/on goingactivitiesonIFEintargeted areas 3.Organization/activationof NutritioninDisasterTeamatthe municipal/barangaylevels 4.Followuptraining/ assessmentofcompetenciesof BreastfeedingSupportGroup (BSG) 5.Mobilizationofcommunity/ BFpeercounselors

PHONDs,PNAO,PNC Jan.2011, members=30persons 2ndweek IYCFcoordinatorsper mun.,MNAOs,NDs=40 27Mun./3Cities 2ndweek Feb.2011 Feb. Mar. 2011

ProvincialIFE/Nutritionin Disasterteamorganized Updatesondifferentprojects/ ongoingactivitiesgiven Municipal/barangayteams organized/activated

PHO

PHO

IYCFcoordinatorsper councilors/mother leaders/NDs5batches (30each) 27Mun./3Cities

1stweekFeb. 2011

Mealsandsnacks P5,100.00/batchx5 batches=P25,500.00 Source;\:PLGU/NGOs IECmaterials/posters leaflets

PHO

CompetenciesonIYCF assessedandimproved

Feb. Dec. 2011

NDs

BFpeercouncilorsmobilized. Improvedexclusive breastfeedingpracticesinall barangays/communities Humanmilkbanksavailablein strategicareasforstorageof donatedexpressedbrestmilk

6.EstablishmentofHumanmilk banking/lactationmanagement facilitiesinstrategicareas/ hospitals/offices/other workplaces 7.AdvocacyonEXPANDED BREASTFEEDINGPROMOTION ACTOF2009,(RA10028)toall LCEs/health/nutritionworkers 8.Regularmonitoringand

4Govt.hospitals(LPH/ JPRMDH/PPL/SPC/ SRCMWorkplaces/ offices/etc. 27Mun./3Cities

2ndquarter 2011

P250,000.00for Lactationmanagement facilitiesimprovement= PLGU/MLGU Mealsandsnacksc/o Mun.LGUs/PLGU= P10,000.00 RegularTEVs

IYCF/MBFHI coordinators

2ndquarter 2011

Provl.IYCF Coordinators

LGUsupportgainedthru issuanceofordinances/ resolutions LGUsupportgainedthru issuanceofordinances/ resolutions

27Mun./3Cities

Jan. Dec. 2011

NDs/DNPCs

121

DSWD Plan

DisasterReliefAssistanceFlowChart
Disaster Strikes

BDC

Submit report of affected families Assess report of BDC Consolidate & submit report to PSWDO No. of Household affected. No. of injured person. No. of Population affected. No. of Missing person. No. of Houses destroyed. No. of Dead person. (2 hours after onslaught of disaster) Validation of Reports (the day after the receipt of report) Relief Assistance is extended on different evacuation centers based on validated reports. ( after validation of report) Extended to victims whose houses are partially and totally destroyed.

MSWDO

Collation of Report

Data Analysis

Distribution of) Relief Assistance (food)

Extension of Emergency Shelter Assistance

The office of the Provincial Social Welfare and Development under the leadership of its PSWDO Mr. Ernesto M. Montecillo and his staff has adopted three shifting policy in management of activities when there is a monitored weather disturbance: First Batch - Will monitor prompting weather disturbance 2 days before the strike weather disturbance. Second Batch Upon the strike of weather disturbance, validate reports coming from the 26 Municipalities and 4 Cities. Third Batch Monitor different activities in disaster management. Prior to monitored weather disturbances, there are schedule mitigation activities in different municipalities and barangays such as: Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Seminar Workshop Technical Assistance in preparation of Local Risk Reduction and Management Plan.

122

Implementation of Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Activities at the Municipal and City levels are done in coordination with the Municipal Social Welfare and Development Officer and the Day Care Worker.

Guidelines for the Management of Evacuation Centers


Department Order No.36, Series of 1994

Rationale: In view of the implementation of Republic Act 7160 otherwise known as the Local Government Code of 1991, the LGU is mandated to undertake the function of providing immediate basic assistance such as food, clothing emotional support and temporary shelter as well as rehabilitation needs of disaster victims Evacuation usually takes place because of threats or the actual occurrence of flooding, volcanic eruption, fire and the other calamities causing serious damage to or destruction of lives and properties. In line with the new mandate of the DSWD to provide technical assistance to the LGUs in the provision of immediate assistance to disaster victims, not only after immediate impact of disaster but even before the occurrence of the threat, the following standards, rules and guidelines are formulated for direction and guidance of LGUs and ensure system and order in the management of evacuation center.

Objectives:

General Objective: To save lives and properties, minimize suffering, and deal with the immediate damage caused by disaster.

Specific Objectives: 1.To handle with reasonable effectiveness the pre, during and post evacuation processes; 2. To provide temporary refuge to individual families who are potentially at risk or in actual danger because the hazard; 3. To ensure that displaced disaster victims are immediately attended to and provide temporary shelter, food, clothing, domestic item and comport giving;

123

4. To provide opportunities, in case prolonged evacuation, for recovery, rehabilitation and development activities through work group/team/room organizing activities, skills development engaging income generating projects which facilitate recovery of the evacuees to normal family life.

Pre-Evacuation Process:

Planning Prior to disaster months, preparatory activities should be planned out such as:

Identification of hazards those are likely to pose threats to the community and the families who are potentially at risk.

Inventory of resources in the community which includes among other human, physical, and infrastructure resources.

Inventory of needs and requirements.

Ensure availability of viable communication/information facilities for accurate, timely and clear dissemination and waning.

Set up system for immediate dissemination of warning which special consideration on type, method, warning and procedures of dissemination.

Determine system of control and coordination of evacuation movement considering: number of people involved types of transport used number of vehicles available designation of routes and alternative routes designation of pick-up points identification of staff and coordinating movements flow of communication/decisions and feedback

124

Identification of evacuation centers considering the following: Number of families/persons who are in actual danger needing immediate movement or transfer to safer areas. Number of families/persons who are potentially at risk in the neighboring areas likewise needing evacuation. Transport facilities to be pre positioned to ferry the families/evacuees. Viable communication facilities. Preposition stockpile of foodstuff, clothing, domestic items and medicines to be able to immediately meet the needs of disaster victims to include reporting forms. Set-up latrines (one latrine for every 20 people) in areas accessible from any part of the camp to encourage its use. Conduct drills and exercises in evacuation centers to ensure order in the movement of disaster victims. Preparation of spot maps indicating the danger zones to ensure order and avoid panic and chaos during the actual evacuation. Installation/posting of directional signs in conspicuous places to direct people to the location of the evacuation centers. Conduct training/orientation of worker including volunteer involved in the management of evacuation centers.

Carefully plan out reception requirements at evacuation centers which shall cover the following: general care, welfare and accommodation registration inquiries feeding medical and health arrangements communication with the evacuation authority assurance of security for evacuees homes and property evacuees self-help Center coordination SWO I - to assist in direct relief service delivery
125

SWO I to handle NGOs desk and volunteers activities Welfare Assistance to act as Public Relation Officer and take charge of reporting and records.

Welfare Assistance to take charge of the food distribution, releases and receipt of relief goods/supplies

Evacuation Process:

Conduct inspection of available facilities and amenities required and evacuation centers. Water pumps or artesian wells or water tanks. Water container. Potable water for drinking. Lightning facility or installation of electricity. If not possible, gas lamps, flashlights, candles, matches and other indigenous lighting system in the area should be made available. Adequate comfort rooms or toilets. Latrines shall be put up, at least one (1) toilet for every 20 families. Space/material/supplies for sleeping purposes: Mats or cartons for sleeping areas. Blankets and mosquito nets. Stockpile for one week of relief supplies and other domestic items and materials. Storage space for stockpile commodities. Space for working which can accommodate at least a table, few chairs and sleeping space for use of workers assisting the evacuees. Compost pits, empty bag cans/drums and large plastic bag for garbage disposal. Activate the evacuation center. Conduct a short briefing of all the staff to be involved in the operation, stressing that round the clock service will be provided for the victims. Briefly make a run-down of agreements along: Standard Operating Procedures Visibility thru use to identification cards/name plates blazers, jackets, shirts, with marking for easy identification Decision-making flow of information and feedback

126

Activities the Disaster Welfare inquiry Desk and Non Government Organization (NGO) Desk. Designate the person in-charge and review its main function and responsibilities: An NGO Desk shall: o serve as advisory/source of advise/information for NGOs as the areas/ center needing assistance, the type and volume of assistance man-power needed and the number of person/families needing such assistance. o Organize and systemize distribution of relief assistance by NGOs, G Os and POs to disaster victims in order to maximize use of resources by avoiding duplication and assistance thus covering more areas and reaching more beneficiaries/effected population. o Enhancement the complementation and supplementation of the services between G Os and NGOs during disaster operation and the implementation of developmental activities that may be pursued after the disaster operation as part of rehabilitation A Disaster Welfare Inquiry Desk shall: o Responds to inquiries of people residing within the country or abroad on the status and/or condition of their relatives, friend, acquaintances who are victims of disaster especially those in evacuation centers or those in communities adversely affected by disaster. o Serve as the source of advise/information for media and other concerned units/individuals. o Responds to inquiries of people residing within the country or abroad on the status and/or condition of their relatives, friend, acquaintances who are victims of disaster especially those in evacuation centers or those in communities adversely affected by disaster. o Serve as the source of advise/information for media and other concerned units/individuals.

Streamers and signboards shall be displayed at evacuation centers for identification and visibility, designate and appropriately level specific location of Disaster Operation Center, emergency clinics/health station, police and security warehouse, Disaster Welfare Inquiry Desk, NGO Desk and rooms for occupancy by victims classified by place of origin.

127

Registered names and place of origin of incoming evacuees and assigned to their designated rooms. Special attention is given to unaccompanied children, sick, elderly, disable and pregnant woman.

Provide

evacuees

with

basic

requirements

of

food

and

non-food

items.

Identify and immediately extend comport living to victim manifesting anxiety, pain, fears and trauma. Ensure availability at all times of adequate supply of water for drinking, washing and laundry. Immediately provide mass feeding or RTEF during the first two (two) days of emergency operation. Given priority attention to 0-6years old children, sick person and the elderly evacuated at the center. Evacuees shall sign in the relief distribution sheets for any assistance received. Conduct a master listing of families evacuated, including their members-information to be gathered shall be limited only to the following: Name, age and sex of family head Name, ages and sex family members Post masterlist of occupants in their respective room. Assist the evacuees in the identification and selection of their respective room leaders. Consolidate masterlist and come up with profile evacuees. Organize evacuees into work brigades/committes/ sub-committes, to be organized shall include but not limited to the following: o Committee on cleanliness and sanitation o Committee on survey and masterlisting o Committee on relief (tasks to undertake food distribution and preparation of relief distribution sheets for ready use. o Committee on community kitchen/mass feeding and preparation o Committee on drills and exercises o Committee on sports and recreation Conduct orientation of committee members on their duties/responsibilities Assess other needs of evacuees and determine their eligibility for other social welfare services. However, such assessment should not interfere with immediate provision of food assistance during the first three (3) days of disaster operation.
128

Undertake/implement the following activities/services at Evacuation Center: Set up community kitchen and undertake mass feeding immediately or as necessary. Mobilize the working groups among evacuees. Undertake updating of masterlist opt evacuees as basic for allocation/distribution of relief goods and for preparation of rehabilitation activities for victims. Receive/allocate/distribution relief goods either purchased/donate. Set up rules and guidelines for the entities operating evacuation center. Maintain and update disaster bulletin board indicating number of evacuees by families/person, place of origin, service extended, NGOs and GOs including policies and procedure and allocation/distribution of relief goods to avoid confusion/complaint among evacuees and guidelines to entities operating in the center.

Post spot indicating location of families and danger zones. Plan out drills and exercise for evacuees to undertake while in the evacuation center to be prepared at all times for impending danger. Conduct periodic group and general assembly meeting to discuss policies, concern/problems and plans and option evacuees. Prepare updates and submit disaster monitoring reports regularly or as often needed. Reports/Documents to be prepared shall included but not limited to the following: masterlist/profile of evacuees form 200/Family intake sheet RIVs/acknowledgement letters/receipts of relief goods received whether purchase or donate. Weekly updates/consolidation of relief goods received and released Index cards of supplies/materials/equipment Stock cards to be past at bodega Relief Distribution Sheet NGOs/NGAs volunteers directory Minutes of meetings of staff, NGOs/NGAs and evacuees Narrative and statistical disaster monitoring reports Stock inventory and request for replenishment of stock

Install recording/filling system

129

Link the Disaster Coordinating Council, NGOs other NGAs volunteers operating in the evacuation center to ensure systematic and orderly operation and management of the evacuation center.

Ensure proper management of resources including donation received. The evacuees shall sign in the relief distribution sheets for any assistance received. All donation to centers received should be properly receipted/acknowledgement/recorded. Relief goods should be stored properly to ensure protection form rodents and other infection For easy accounting and monitoring, goods received, allocated, consumed and balances should be prepared daily and consolidated on a weekly basis. Special attention should be given to long terms problems caused by disaster. These are: Extended need for medical need Surveillance of communicable diseases Care for orphans or unaccompanied children

Conduct consultation sessions with evacuees to discuss among the other following areas: o update on disaster situation, relief efforts, existing and prospective rehabilitation efforts o needs and problems o plans and action o inventory of skill and identifying skills required

Assist families in preparing their rehabilitation plan. Initiate regular consultation with other service providers and NGOs, POs present to them the result consultation dialogue with evacuees and identify areas support.

V. Post-Evacuation Process

Conduct assessment to cover the following areas: Management of pre-evacuation and evacuation activities at the Evacuation Centers with other service providers and leaders of evacuees. Assessment to families served to determine who should be sent home and who needs further assistance. Assessment on the strengths and weaknesses of systems and strategies employed during the emergency operation.

130

Documentation of Post-Evacuation Assessment. This shall be a component of the terminal reports for submission to higher authorities. The narrative terminal reports shall contain among other the following information:

Situationer:

nature and date of disaster occurrence, areas and population of affected

including casualties and extend of damage to properties and livelihood activities, etc. Disaster Response Emergency services extended including CISD Strategies used/adapted stockpiling deployment of manpower pool, regular personnel and volunteers settings/capability building activities activation or Disaster Relief and Rehabilitation Service items GO & NGO linkages Learning Points Strengths/innovation Masterlist of dead, injured, and missing victims Action taken Recommendation of Further Action Highlights of Rehabilitation Action Summary and Budget Requirements Annexes and Statistical report Masterlist of dead, injured and missing victim Detail rehabilitation plan which contain specific activities/proposed project to be undertaken. Among the project/activities which could be considered are: emergency shelter assistance, cash for work, food for work, shelter assistance (core shelter or emergency shelter), day care service, supplementary feeding, disaster management, capability building activities, replenishment of stockpile, etc. Discuss with evacuees arrangement for their return to their homes or relocation to other areas. If evacuation center is already deactivated, conduct general cleaning and fumigation of all room. Undertake inventory of all its supplies and equipments and store these to safe room.
131

Emergency Indicator and Minimum Standards

Malnutrition Emergency Indicators >10% of <5 age group moderately malnourished w/ nutritional diseases Severe malnutrition for <5 age group MUAC<11.0cm WFH/WFL<70% Z-Score<-3

Moderate malnutrition for <5 age group MUAC<11.0 and <13.5cm WFH/WFL<70% and <80% Z-Score<-3 and <-2

Mortality Rate Emergency Indicators Crude Mortality Rare (CMR): Single most important indicator of serious stress in DPs CMR= death/10.00/day: emergency phase <1=Under Control 1=Serious condition >2=Out of control >4=Major catastrophe Mortality rate for <5 age group 1=Normal in a developing country <2=Emergency phase: under control >2=Emergency phase: in serious trouble >4=Emergency phase: out of control

Minimum Water Requirements Minimum maintenance = 15-20 liters/person/day Feeding center = 20-30 liters/person/day Health center = 40-60 liters /person/day 1 tap stand/200 people not/100m from users Large quality reasonably safe water is preferable to small amount of pure water

Minimum Food Requirements Minimum maintenance = 2,100 kcals/person/day

132

Minimum Shelter/Space Requirements Minimum shelter space = 3.5 m2/person Minimum total site area = 30 m2/person

Minimum Sanitation Requirements At least 1 toilet for every 20 person Maximum of 1min. walk from dwelling to toilet (>5m and <51m)

133

Provincial Engineering Office Workplan

134

Work Financial Plan


WORKFINANCIALPLANFORTHEYEAR2011
ProvinceofLaguna PROVINCIALDISASTERRISKREDUCTIONandMANAGEMENTOFFICE PARTICULARS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 A.PERSONNELSERVICES SalariesRegular SalariesandWagesCasual SalariesContractual PersonalEconReliefAllow(PERA) Add'lCompensation(ADCOM) RepresentationAllowance(RA) TransportationAllowance(TA) ClothingAllowance Subsistence&QuartersAllowance ProductivityIncentiveBenefits OtherBonusesandAllowances HazardPay CashGift YearendBonus Life&RetirementInsuranceCont. PAGIBIGContributions PHILHEALTHContributions ECCContributions TerminalLeave TOTALPERSONNELSERVICES
Account Code

Appropriations

Unprogrammed NetProgram Reserve

1stQuarter Releases

2ndQuarter Releases

3rdQuarter Releases

4thQuarter Releases

701 705 706 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 719 721 724 725 731 732 733 734 742 0.00
Account Code

0.00

0.00

0.00
1stQuarter Releases 250,000.00 375,000.00 30,000.00 2,000.00 0.00 100,000.00 100,000.00 4,500.00 800.00 1,000.00 65,000.00 15,000.00 1,750.00 10,000.00 75,000.00 1,762,653.00 2,792,703.00

0.00
2ndQuarter Releases 250,000.00 375,000.00 45,000.00 1,750.00 12,000.00 320,000.00 100,000.00 4,500.00 10,100.00 1,000.00 60,000.00 15,000.00 1,750.00 15,000.00 75,000.00 1,762,653.00 3,048,753.00

0.00
3rdQuarter Releases 250,000.00 375,000.00 35,000.00 1,750.00 12,000.00 350,000.00 100,000.00 4,500.00

0.00
4thQuarter Releases 250,000.00 375,000.00 35,699.00 2,000.00 12,101.00 350,000.00 100,000.00 4,500.00

PARTICULARS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Appropriations 1,040,000.00 1,500,000.00 145,699.00 7,500.00 13,017.00 1,162,500.00 435,544.00 20,000.00 13,300.00 4,000.00 250,000.00 60,000.00 7,200.00 50,000.00 310,000.00 7,050,612.00 12,069,372.00
Unprogrammed NetProgram Reserve

B.MAINTENANCE&OPERATINGEXPENSES TravellingExpensesLocal 751 TrainingandSeminar 753 OfficeSuppliesExpense 755 AccountableFormsExpense 756 FoodSuppliesExpense 758 MedicalSupplies 760 GasolineandOil 761 OtherSupplies 765 WaterExpense 766 ElectricityExpense 767 CookingGasExpense 768 PostageandDelivery 771 TelephoneExpenseLandline 772 TelephoneExpenseMobile 773 Internet 774 Cable,Satellite,Telegraph 775 Printing/Bindingofdocuments 781 Rentals 782 RepresentationExpense 783 OtherMOOE 969 TOTALMOOE

40,000.00 1,000,000.00 0.00 1,500,000.00 0.00 145,699.00 0.00 7,500.00 23,084.00 36,101.00 42,500.00 1,120,000.00 35,544.00 400,000.00 2,000.00 18,000.00 2,400.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 200.00 0.00 10,900.00 4,000.00 250,000.00 60,000.00 7,000.00 50,000.00

1,000.00 60,000.00 15,000.00 1,750.00 15,000.00 75,000.00 1,762,653.00 3,058,653.00

1,000.00 65,000.00 15,000.00 1,750.00 10,000.00 75,000.00 1,762,653.00 3,059,703.00

10,000.00 300,000.00 0.00 7,050,612.00 109,560.00 11,959,812.00

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PARTICULARS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C.CAPITALOUTLAY BuildingandInfrastructures OfficeEquipment FurnituresandFixtures ITEquipment CommunicationEquipment OtherEquipment PurchaseofMotorVehicle

Account Code

Appropriations 12,000,000.00 353,100.00 411,460.00 249,575.00 942,000.00 5,188,470.00 34,188,000.00

Unprogrammed NetProgram Reserve

1stQuarter Releases 12,000,000.00 150,000.00 100,000.00 100,000.00 342,000.00 5,188,470.00 7,000,000.00

2ndQuarter Releases 0.00 75,000.00 100,000.00 50,000.00 200,000.00 0.00 12,000,000.00

3rdQuarter Releases 0.00 75,000.00 100,000.00 50,000.00 200,000.00 0.00 10,688,000.00

4thQuarter Releases 0.00 53,100.00 111,460.00 49,575.00 200,000.00 0.00 4,500,000.00

215 221 222 223 229 240 241

0.00 12,000,000.00 0.00 353,100.00 0.00 411,460.00 0.00 249,575.00 0.00 942,000.00 0.00 5,188,470.00 0.00 34,188,000.00

TOTALCAPITALOUTLAY
DoubleChecking(Unprogrammed+NetProgram) PlusMOOE

53,332,605.00
53,332,605.00 12,069,372.00

0.00 53,332,605.00

24,880,470.00

12,425,000.00

11,113,000.00

4,914,135.00

65,401,977.00

StaffingComputation

Position CommunityAffairsOfficerV PublicServiceOfficerI SpecialOpsOfficerI RecordsOfficerI Info.SystemsResearcherI SeniorTrainor (2)PublicServicesAssistants (3)AssistantInfo.Officer ComputerOperator WarehouseManI HeavyEquipmentOperatorII DataController JuniorTrainor(PublicServicesForeman) Admin.ClerkII HeavyEquipmentOperatorI Admin.ClerkI LightVehicleDriverI UtilityWorkerI PublicHealthNurseI NurseI

SalaryGrade 22 11 11 10 10 8

MonthlySalary 32,973.00 15,649.00 15,649.00 14,641.00 14,641.00 12,735.00

AnnualSalary 395,676.00 187,788.00 187,788.00 175,692.00 175,692.00 152,820.00

No.ofPersonnel 5 1 2 1 1 5

Total 1,978,380.00 187,788.00 375,576.00 175,692.00 175,692.00 764,100.00

7 6 6 6 6 4 4 3 3 1 12 10

11,869.00 11,062.00 11,062.00 11,062.00 11,062.00 9,536.00 9,536.00 8,854.00 8,854.00 7,575.00 16,726.00 14,641.00

142,428.00 132,744.00 132,744.00 132,744.00 132,744.00 114,432.00 114,432.00 106,248.00 106,248.00 90,900.00 200,712.00 175,692.00

2 1 1 3 5 1 4 2 2 2 3 3 44

284,856.00 132,744.00 132,744.00 398,232.00 663,720.00 114,432.00 457,728.00 212,496.00 212,496.00 181,800.00 602,136.00 527,076.00 7,050,612.00

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Annexes
ANNEX A: Inventory of Vehicles and Equipment Used in DRRM
SUMMARYOFINVENTORYOFEQUIPMENTAVAILABLEFORDISASTERMANAGEMENT PROVINCEOFLAGUNA2010 EQUIPMENT MobilePhone BoltCutter SitHarness HardHat Tent AlarmSystem Generator Powersaw Megaphone Ladder RubberBoots RainCoat Stretcher Flashlight Ropes FoggingMachine ChainSaw LifeVests SpineBoard BaseRadio RepeaterSystem FirstAidKit LifeRing HandheldRadio TransistorRadio SearchLight ChainBlockCablewithclamp CColar TOTAL 209 257 1 2 198 271 414 58 2 10 29 2 2 77 100 29 5 20 1 4 2 27 20 7 1 91 48 1 7 6 74 1 2 2 24 4 8 20 1 1 9 67 8 39 4 2 3 1 4 2 2 40 46 5 7 2 6 60 10 20 30 40 5 2 10 8 5 6 60 79 1 55 9 NGO's/PO's/OtherOffices 1stDistrict 2ndDistrict 3rdDistrict 12 1 4thDistrict TOTAL 12 3 6 150 15 2 17 22 8 8 109 146 10 187 25 7 7 313 31 34 1 8 37 184 2 2 1 2 302 1349

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SUMMARYOFINVENTORYOFVEHICLESAVAILABLEFORDISASTERMANAGEMENT PROVINCEOFLAGUNA 2010 VEHICLES PatrolJeep Ambulance FiberglassBoat RubberBoat PumpBoat MiniDumpTruck 10WheelerDumpTruck MightyMite FireTruck Truck Compactor MultiCab Motorcycle Tricycle Pickup Van FX 4WheelerVehicleAnfra PayLoader Manlif Backhoe Elf MotorBanca Roller Grader Bulldozer TOTAL 4 2 56 47 18 1 1 58 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 10 3 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 10 2 4 2 3 4 3 4 7 7 1 6 6 2 24 2 2 4 10 2 14 5 1 9 3 22 1 1 0 164 2 1 5 12 5 1 8 29 3 4 3 4 NGO's/PO's/OtherOffices 1stDistrict 2ndDistrict 3rdDistrict 1 11 1 1 4thDistrict 10 11 2 6 3 8 10 TOTAL 11 60 7 22 3 15 29 2 19 22 2 35 2 4 6 11 3 25 10 2 11 7 25 1 6 3

303

343

138

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT PDRRMO organized and made functional

RESPONSIBLE PERSON Provincial disaster management program coordinator

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS OFFICE SUPPLIES - computer laptops with networking capability (field use) - pen & ink - meals / snacks

To establish PDRRMO

Organization of PDRRMO Identify members of PDRRMO Meeting regarding organization of PDRRMO Formulate the roles and responsibilities of PDRRMO Formulate function of PDRRMO Establishment of PDRRMO Identify location area - Acquire equipment - Maintain office - Upgrade identified PDRRMO members

To establish disaster management office

PDRRMO identified, upgraded and made functional

Provincial disaster management program coordinator

OFFICE BUILDING -2 storey bldg. with minimum floor area of 40 sq.mtrs. per floor - 1st floor command/conference center with toilets - 2nd floor office area with toilets - one(1) barracks with mess hall; kitchen and bathroom that can accommodate a minimum of 30 pax. - garage FURNISHING - work station/office tables - ergonomic/office chairs - bookshelves - filing cabinets - whiteboard, marker & eraser - cork board - conference tables & chairs - coat rack / hangers - closets / lockers

139

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

RESPONSIBLE PERSON

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS OFFICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES - hi-specs desktop computers - 3-in-1 printers & cartridges -xerox machines - bond papers - calculator - clocks, all synchronized to the computer clock - envelopes of various sizes - poster boards for signs - identification tags - message forms & other EOC forms - function log sheets - record books - flash disk / compact disk - stamps (for action, completed, approved) - staplers, staples, staple remover - scissors - scotch tape & masking tape, scotch tape dispenser - pen, pencil & sharpener - push pins - flashlights with spare batteries - battery for all equipment

305

140

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

RESPONSIBLE PERSON

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS REFERENCE MATERIALS - checklist / flowcharts (protocols / guidelines) - local area and regional maps, aerial photos, hazard maps, including dead spots - GIS - update contact / supplier / media lists - current telephone books - emergency OpCen plan (possibly an OpCen contingency plan as well) - update EOC floor plan - emergency plans (at least 3 copies) - DOH contingency plans (at least 3 copies) FOOD SERVICE AREA - food supplies - food preparation / food equipment - hot beverages, container cups & - bowls, plates, spoon & fork - hot/cold water dispenser - kitchen-cooking utensils / - coffee makers / filter - gas range - stove (portable) - refrigerator - dishwashing supplies 306 - water source

141

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

RESPONSIBLE PERSON

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT - telephones / mobile phones - digital camera / video camera - 32 LCD / LED TV / VCR / DVD (monitor/TV news) - AM/FM radio - fax machines - LCD projector - photocopier - emergency power generator minimum 5-15 KVA - extension cords - standby batteries for base radio (field use) -Internet connection SANITARY AND LODGING SUPPLIES - male & female toiletry supplies - first aid kit for the number of people expected - waterless hand sanitizer - bed sheets, blankets, pillows, pillow case and towels - cot (s) bed - personal protective equipment for the workers - emergency utility tents - command tents and sleeping bags

307

142

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT Training conducted 80% of participants completed the training course

RESPONSIBLE PERSON Provincial disaster management program coordinator

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS TRAINING - allowance (if outside / live in) -Meals - honorarium TRAINING MATERIALS -Participants name tags - blankets - markers, yellow pad, pencil - certificate - cotton balls & alcohol - multimedia (if any) - triangular bandage - blood pressure monitor aneroid - dual head stethoscope - BLS / CPR mannequin (adult, junior, infant) SPILL KIT -1 plastic bag - 2 granules sachet - 1 swabs 75 x 75 (25s) - 4 pairs nitrile gloves - aluminum folding spine board - double fold pole stretcher - reusable ice pack - adjustable neck collar

To improve the capability of personnel (human resource development)

Planning for the training of personnel - training needs assessment - preparation of training design - development of instructional materials / methodology - conduct training

308

143

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT

RESPONSIBLE PERSON

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS Office regulation 7 first aid kits in a metal box with content as follows: - 1 burnshield 10cm x10cm burn dressing - 2 sterile gauge swabs 75 x 75 (5s) - 1 tweezers (forceps) - 10 plasters - 1 safety pin (12s) - 1 hypopore paper tape (24mm x 3m) - 2 first aid dressing no. 3 - 2 first aid dressing no. 5 - 1 wound cleaner (50ml) - 1 non-sterile gauze swab - 1 cotton wool (100g) - 1 standard first aid scissors - 2 triangular bandages N/woven - 2 proform bandages (75mm) - 2 proform bandages (100mm) - 1 profab fabric roll (25mm x 3mm) - 2 straight splints - 1 pair disposable latex gloves (L) - 1 pair disposable latex gloves (M)

309

144

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT Human and resource materials modulized and utilized

RESPONSIBLE PERSON Provincial disaster management program coordinator

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS - AUV service vehicle - medical equipment - drugs / meds supplies - TEV

To modulate human and material resources

Modulization and utilization of human and resource materials -emergency medical response team - human resource management - deployment of responder team - inventory of supplies, materials and equipment Coordination on the establishment of referral system - meeting on the establishment of referral system - MOA with different hospitals - develop policies and guidelines on referral -Implementation of referral - inventory of all available stocks in PDRRMO - prepare IR based and approved RIS from PDRRMO - arrange the delivery of goods to affected areas - furnish PDRRMO a copy of IR sent to the recipient

To install and maintain 2 way referral system

Referral system established and made functional

Provincial disaster management program coordinator

- meals - snacks - office referral forms - TEV - honorarium

To establish logistics management in the PDRRMO

Logistics management establish and made functional

Provincial disaster management program coordinator

- 4x4 service vehicles with mechanical winch - rescue truck - M35 type trucks - jetskies with carrier - amphibian vehicle - payloader / backhoe - fire truck - ambulance - powersaw - fiber glass boat and outboard motor with carrier - office supplies 310 - equipment

145

OBJECTIVES

STRATEGY/ACTIVITIES

EXPECTED OUTPUT Events properly documented and submitted to PDRRMC, RDRRMC and NDRRMC Activities well coordinated, problem given solution

RESPONSIBLE PERSON Provincial disaster management program coordinator

RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS ITEMS - still / moving camera - office supplies

To document all events happening in the province

Proper recording and documentation of events

To assess and evaluate the PDRRMO program


implementation

Regular conduct of meeting - evaluating regularly the events happening in the province / municipality

Provincial disaster management program coordinator

- snacks - TEV - honorarium

311

146

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. __ Series of 2010 REORGANIZING THE LAGUNA PROVINCIAL DISASTER COORDINATING COUNCIL INTO THE LAGUNA DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND MANAGEMENT COUNCIL (LDRRMC) WHEREAS, Republic Act 10121 [RA 10121] otherwise known, as the "Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010" provides for the implementation of national and local rescue and protection programs in time of natural and man-made disasters, calamities and accidents which aims primarily to protect and preserve life, property and environment; WHEREAS, Section 11 of the afore-said RA 10121 provides for the conversion of existing Provincial, City, and Municipal Disaster Coordinating Councils into Provincial, City and Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Councils; WHEREAS, there is need to develop, formulate, promote, and implement comprehensive Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan (PDRRMP) that aims to strengthen the capacity of Local Government Units (WUs), together with partner stakeholders, to ensure and guarantee resilience of communities; institutionalize arrangements and measures for reducing disaster risks, including, projected climate risks; and, enhance or encourage preparedness and response capabilities at all levels; WHEREAS, in order to carry out provincial-wide response to disaster risk reduction, there is an urgent need to ensure effective and efficient training of volunteer organizations and develop sound rescue and protection programs in times of natural and man-made disasters, calamities and accidents, thereby, encouraging volunteerism from civil society organizations in the entire Province of Laguna; NOW, THEREFORE, I, JEORGE "E.R. EJERClTO ESTREGAN, by virtue of powers vested in me by law as Provincial Governor of the Province of Laguna, do hereby reorganize the Laguna Provincial Disaster Coordinating Council (LPDCC) into the Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (LDRRMC) as follows, to wit: SECTION I. COMPOSITION. The Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (LDRRMC) shall be composed of the following members: Chairman HON. JEORGE "E.R." EJERCITO ESTREGAN Provincial Governor Members: MR. VALENTIN P. GUIDOTE, JR.-Provincial Planning Development Coordinator CAPTAIN JONAS P. JAVIER (OS) PARHead, Laguna Disaster Prevention Action Office MR. ERNESTO M. MONTECILLO - Provincial Social Welfare & Development Officer DR. ALSANEO F. LAGOS - Head, Provincial Health Office MR. JUANITO SAMSON OIC - Provincial Agriculture Office ENGR. GILBERTO R. MONDEZ - Head, Provincial Engineering Office DR. MARY GRACE BUSTAMANTE - Head, Provincial Veterinary Office MS. MARIETA V. JARA - Head, Provincial Budget Office MR. RICARDO TRINOS - Head-Environmental & Natural Resources Office DR. ESTER C. LOZADA - Schools Division Superintendent, Department of Education-Laguna MR. LIONELL.DALOPE - OIC-DILG PS/SUPT. GILBERTO DC. CRUZ - Provincial Director of PNP-Laguna FSr/ SUPT. QUIA - Provincial Fire Marshall, BFP MS. RUDELYN C. CABUTIN - Chapter Administrator-Phil. Red Cross-Laguna Four (4) Accredited Civil Society Organizations One (1) Private Sector Representative
147

SECTION II. FUNCTIONS: The Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (LDRRMC) shall have the following functions and duties: 1. Approve, monitor and evaluate the implementation of the LDRRMC programs specifically the PDRRMP, and regularly review the same to conform with national and other Local Government Units (LGUs) planning programs; 2. Ensure integration of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation programs to the Provincial development plans, programs, and budgetary allocations as strategy for sustainable development and poverty reduction; 3. Recommend proper implementation of forced or pre-emptive evacuation measures of local residents, should the same become necessary under relevant circumstances; 4. Convene the Municipal and/or City DRRMCs once a month or as may be necessary; and, provide monthly honoraria for the Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and members of the Council in such amount to be determined by :the Council members themselves. SECTION III. MEETING. The Council shall meet regularly once a month and may hold special meetings to consider urgent matters upon the call of the Chairman or any members of the Council. SECTION IV. SECRETARIAT. The Secretariat of the Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (LDRRMC) shall be responsible in providing technical support, documentation of proceedings, preparation of reports and such other assistance as may be required in the discharge of its functions. The Secretariat shall be headed by the Chief of Office/Department Head of the Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (LDRRMO). SECTION V. CREATION OF THE LAGUNA DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND MANAGEMENT OFFICE (LDRRMO). (a) There shall be established an LDRRMO in the Provincial Government of Laguna which shall be responsible for setting the direction, development, implementation and coordination of disaster risk reduction and management programs within the territorial limits of Laguna. (b)The LDRRMO shall be under the Office of the Governor to be initially composed of the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Officer (PDRRMO) assisted by at least three (3) personnel staff responsible for (1) administrative and training; (2) research and planning, and (3) operations and warning. The LDRRMO shall organize, train and directly supervise local emergency response teams (ERTs) and accredited community disaster volunteers (ACDVs). SECTION VI. THE PROVINCIAL DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND MANAGEMENT OFFICER (PDRRMO). The PDRRMO shall be an appointee of the Provincial Governor with a position equivalent to a Department Head of the Provincial Government of Laguna; who shall serve as an adviser to the Governor on all matters related to disaster risk: (1) Design, program and coordinate disaster risk reduction and management activities consistent with the National Council's standard and guidelines; (2) Facilitate and support risk assessments and contingency planning activities at the provincial level;
148

(3) Consolidate local disaster risk information which includes natural hazards, vulnerabilities and climate change risks and maintain a local risk map in 26 municipalities and 4 cities of Laguna; (4) Organize and conduct training, orientation and knowledge management activities on disaster risk reduction and management at the provincial level; (5) Operate a multi-hazard early warning system, linked to disaster risk reduction to provide accurate and timely advice to national or local emergency response organizations and to the .general public through diverse mass media, particularly radio, landline communications and other technologies for communication within rural communities; (6) Formulate and implement comprehensive and integrated LDRRMP in accordance with national, regional and provincial frameworks, and policies on disaster risk reduction and management in close coordination with the Local Development Councils (LDCs); (7) Prepare and submit to the Sangguniang Panlalawigan through the LDRRMC and the Local Development Council (LDC) the annual LDRRMO operating plan and budget; the proposed programming allocation of the Laguna Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF); other allocated risk reduction and management resources; and, other special and regular funding sources for budgetary support to the other City/Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (C/MDRRMC)/Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (BDRRMC) in Laguna that cannot allocate sufficient funds for herein declared purpose; (8) Conduct continuous disaster monitoring and mobilize instrumentalities and entities of the LGUs, Civil Society Organizations [CSOs), private sector groups and organized volunteers within the Province, to utilize their facilities and resources for the protection and preservation of life and properties during emergencies in accordance with existing policies and procedures; (9) Identify, assess and manage the hazards, vulnerabilities and risks that may occur in various parts of the Province; (10) Disseminate information and raise public awareness about identified hazards, vulnerabilities and risks; nature and effects thereof, as well as, early warning signs and counter-measures for the same; (11) Identify and implement cost-effective risk reduction measures/strategies; (12) Maintain a database of human resource, equipment, directories, and location of critical infrastructure and their capacities, such as, hospitals and evacuation centers; (13) Develop, strengthen and operationalize mechanisms for partnership or networking with private sector entities, CSOs, and volunteer groups; (14) Take all necessary steps, on a continuing basis, to maintain, provide or arrange provision of; and/or otherwise, make available, suitably-trained and competent personnel for effective civil defense and disaster risk reduction and management in its area;

149

(15) Organize, train, equip and supervise the local emergency response teams and the ACDVs, ensuring that said humanitarian aid workers are duly-equipped with basic skills to assist mothers to breastfeed and/or properly nourish their off-springs; (16) Respond and manage adverse effects of emergencies and carry out appropriate rescue and recovery activities in affected areas, ensuring that there shall be efficient mechanisms for immediate delivery of food, shelter and medical supplies to women and children; and, endeavor to create a special place where displaced mothers can find help with breastfeeding, nourishment and care for their babies and provide support to each other; (17) Within its territorial and/or geographical area, undertake to promote and raise public awareness and compliance with RA 10121 and other applicable and/or relevant, pertinent laws, rules and regulations; (20) Establish linkages/networks with other municipalities and cities for disaster risk reduction and emergency response purposes; (21) Recommend through the LDRRMC necessary enactment of Sangguniang Panlalawigan ordinances on risk reduction and management consistent with the requirements of RAI0121; (18) Serve as the Secretariat and Executive Arm of the LDRRMC; (19) Coordinate other disaster risk reduction and management activities; (20) Establish linkages/networks with other municipalities and cities for disaster risk reduction and emergency response purposes; (21) Recommend through the LDRRMC necessary enactment of Sangguniang Panlalawigan ordinances on risk reduction and management consistent with the requirements of RAI0121; (22) Implement policies, approved plans and programs of the LDRRMC consistent with the policies and guidelines laid down under RA 10121; (23) Establish Provincial and Barangay Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Operations Center; (24) Prepare and submit, through LDRRMC and the LDC, appropriate report on the utilization of dedicated risk reduction and management resources to the local Commission on Audit [COAl units, copy furnished the regional director of the Office of Civil Defense [OCD] and the Local Government Operations Officer of the DILG; and (25) Act on such other related matters that may be authorized by LDRRMC SECTION VII. FUNDING SOURCE. Pursuant to Section 21 of RA 10121 the budgetary allocation requirement for establishment of the Office, including its operational expenses, as well as, that of the operations centers; honoraria of officers and members; and other expenses related to disaster risk reduction and management shall be duly-appropriated and/or incurred from the LDRRMO funds.

150

SECTION VIII, REPEALING CLAUSE. All executives order and other issuances or parts thereof inconsistent with the provisions of this executive order are hereby repealed or modified accordingly. SECTION IX. SEPARABILITY/SAVING CLAUSE. If any part, section or provision. of this executive order shall now and heretofore be declared unconstitutional, other parts, sections or provisions hereof not affected thereby shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION X. EFFECTIVITY. This Executive Order shall have force and take effect immediately upon due execution and/or signing thereof. DONE at the Provincial Capitol Building, Sta. Cruz, Laguna this 8 day of November in the year of our Lord Two Thousand and Ten.
th

JEORGE "E.R." EJERCITO ESTREGAN Governor

151