STEPS FOR STARTING AND BUILDING

A NEW TUTOR/MENTOR PROGRAM
Building an effective tutor/mentor program is simple. Making
it work is a bit more difficult. It takes 12 years to help a first
grader finish high school. It could take another 5-10 years
until he/she is launched in a career.
--Daniel F. Bassill, President of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC and the Tutor/Mentor Connection
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

"Mentoring draws our attention to important issues for
social policy: how to provide young people with the
relationships they so badly need, and how to engage
the people who don’t live in poverty in addressing
problems of neighborhoods dominated by poverty.
A great many disadvantaged youth are in need of
support that is developmental, nurturing, protective
and extensive in nature--in other words, something
resembling supplemental parenting. They need this
caring not only to make the basic transition to
adulthood, but to survive under conditions of great
stress.” from The Kindness of Strangers", by Mark Friedman
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

At this time, the biggest obstacle
to involving more children and
caring adults in tutor/mentor
programs is the need for more of
the programs themselves, as
well as the need for a more
consistent flow of resources
(dollars, volunteers, training,
technology, etc.) to existing
programs.
Visit the Links Library at
http://www.tutormentorconnection.org to learn
more about poverty mapping.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Chicago Area Program Locator http://www.tutormentorprogramlocator.net

You can search
for programs in
Chicago area,
based on zip
code, age
served, type of
program. You
can also add
your own
program.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

In The Kindness of Strangers, Freedman writes about the
potential and the difficulties of mentoring and suggests that
without infrastructure and support for mentors and mentoring
programs, the movement will never reach its potential.
Freedman listed a number of ways mentoring was falling short
of its potential:
- missing infrastructure
- poor program models
- missing follow-up
- emphasis on marketing and recruitment instead of program
support
- poor or no coordination
- matches made and then abandoned by program
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Ways mentoring programs fall short of its potential:
- conducted in isolation
- few programs with resources to serve mentors as well as
mentees
- missing operational expenses
- missing knowledge regarding effective practices
- little appreciation of how hard it is to put mentoring into
action

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

As leaders organize a new tutor/mentor
program, this message should serve as a
reminder of what it takes to succeed.
If you do not address each of these issues in the
structure of your program, in the on-going
activities, policies and commitments, your
program will fall short of meeting its potential.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

In the initial stages of organizing a program, or network of programs, these
steps are in sequential order. The more you know about tutor/mentor
programs and how other programs operate, for instance, should help you
with every other stage of developing your own program. The more people
you have to help you, the more you can accomplish.
However, once you have launched your program, these steps begin to run
concurrently. You don’t stop doing research, learning, or team-building
once you have started your program. Continuous process improvement
means that you are always looking for ways to get better*, etc. Programs
which are able to incorporate these steps into their operating philosophy
stand a greater chance of long-term success.
*Read the Jim Collins book titled, “Good to Great and the Social Sector” for ideas on process
improvement.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Every successful business follows
some of the same steps to make it a
success
Think of your tutor/mentor program as a
business. The fundamentals are the same.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Fundamentals
for Success

Research
Don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Get to know
other tutor/mentor programs and borrow
strategies and materials that you feel would fit
the type of program you want to build. Use the
T/MC web site links to research mentoring
programs in Chicago and around the country.
As you begin to consider building a formal nonprofit structure (which you must have to raise
money), use the links in the fund raising section
of the T/MC resource library to do much of your
research.

Research

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Use resources on
Tutor/Mentor
Connection web
site to support your
learning.

Where to Learn
http://cmapspublic.ihmc.us/servlet/SBReadResourceServlet?rid=1180119458133_1566509717_34175&partName=htmltext

Each section leads to information
that you can use in planning,
finding partners, raising money,
recruiting volunteers.
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Tutor/Mentor Institute: www.tutormentorexchange.net

PDF essays
share concepts
to use in
planning and
operating a
program

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

The T/MC seeks to connect everyone in the Chicago
region who wants to help kids in poverty move to careers.
T/MC incorporates concepts of adult-to-youth mentoring into our core
strategy because providing greater adult support to youth is a proven way
to help kids be more successful in school and life
After many years of leading a tutor/mentor program (since 1975), we
understand mentoring as a form of service learning, in which the volunteer
has to be transformed, not just the youth. Because some of the volunteers
need to become leaders and capacity builders to constantly expand the
resources available to the tutor/mentor program, and the youth, as the
youth grows older.
This strategy can work in other cities, not just Chicago. Email
tutormentor2@earthlink.net to explore ways Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC
can help you create your own Tutor/Mentor Connection type strategy.

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OUR GOAL: SUPPORT THE
GROWTH OF TOTAL QUALITY
MENTORING PROGRAMS THAT
HELP INNER CITY YOUTH
REACH CAREERS

To SUCCEED
We must recruit business
leaders who will use their
resources in PULLING
Youth to Careers

School-Time Programs
Pre-K

K - 5th

5th - 6th

3-5 PM Non-School Programs

6th - 8th

High
School

Career
Track

After 5 PM and Weekend Programs

To SUCCEED
We must help tutor/mentor
program leaders, volunteers,
schools and parents be more
effective in PUSHING
Youth to Careers
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SHARING RESPONSIBILITY
To finish school and
enter a career…
…youth who participate in
great K-8 programs still need
support to finish high school,
college and to enter careers.

Programs serving youth in one age level,
or one time frame, can do better work if
the child comes to them better prepared.

School-Time Programs
Pre-K

K - 5th

5th - 6th

3-5 PM Non-School Programs

These are feeder programs. If
kids have access to good K-5
programs they will perform better
in 5th and 6th grade and high
school programs.

6th - 8th

High
School

Career
Track

After 5 PM and Weekend Programs

EXAMPLE
A program serving 5th and 6th grade kids
is able to do more if programs serving
the SAME kids in K-5 have laid a
reading/math learning/motivation
foundation.

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THE GOAL IS NOT TO FINISH 6TH GRADE. IT’S TO REACH A
CAREER.
Every program serving youth on this
time line needs volunteers, dollars,
technology, etc.

School-Time Programs
Pre-K

K - 5th

5th - 6th

3-5 PM Non-School Programs

6th - 8th

High
School

Career
Track

After 5 PM and Weekend Programs

Agencies that help each other do
more to help kids stay in school
and reach careers.
Instead of competing for resources, the T/MC
seeks to help programs work together to increase
the availability of resources for all tutor/mentor
programs.
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Copywrite 2011, Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Prepare youth for jobs in all Industries
Technology
Communications

Arts, Culture.
Religion

Insurance
Healthcare

Government
Education

Science,
Math
Engineering

Hospitality
Recreation

Natural Resources
Agriculture

Finance, Personal &
Business Services

Recruit volunteers, and donors,
from all industries.

Built environment
Engineering

Manufacturing
Transportation

Retailing
Wholesaling
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Copywrite 2011, Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Discussion
forum includes
links to
recommended
reading

STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Develop a Team
Look for Partners to help you- from
local business, schools, park
districts, churches, and community
groups.

Develop a Team
Database

Don’t forget to include people from
business groups that you will go to
as you begin to recruit volunteers
and donors. Think of volunteers for
their talent (technology, accounting)
and not just as tutors/mentors.
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Fundamentals
For Success

Define Mission and Goals
Borrow ideas from programs you visit and
read about to build your own vision of the
type of program that would work best in
your area, and with the resources you have.
At this stage you should begin drafting a
written program design and action plan.

Define Mission and Goals
Build Team

Look at the charts on the T/MC site to see
how we visualize our aim of helping kids to
careers. It shows a variety of people and
activities that could be part of any
tutor/mentor program.

Research

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Look for a Host/Sponsor(s)

Find Host/Sponsor
Define Mission & Goals

Build Team
Research

You will need a place to meet and
some financial support to get
started. If you can find donated
space, you’ll be much better off than
if you need to rent. Business sites,
churches, banks, insurance sales
agencies, health care sites, etc. are
ideal because they also provide a
source for volunteer recruitment and
in-kind donations.
Schools that offer space to operate
in non-school hours and evening
hours can also be potential hosts.
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Determine Program Structure

Program Structure: Actions
that motivate youth and
adults to participate.
Find Host/Sponsor

What days, times will the program meet; where
will they meet? Begin to establish a vision for
the length of months/years that your program
intends to operate, along with the length of
service you intend to provide to individual
children.
Develop a format for tutor/mentor sessions
(group activity, one-on-one, or both) that
encourages workplace volunteers to participate.

Define Mission & Goals

Build Team
Research

If volunteers cannot leave work to get to a
school, or a 3-5pm program site on a regular
basis, design 5-8pm meeting times that
encourage volunteers to stop at a program on
their way home from work.
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Determine Structure
Look for ways volunteers can build student motivation, study skills,
reading, writing, vocabulary and speaking skills, etc. These are habits
students can take with them into the classroom, or workplace.
Use the T/MC Links Library, and conferences, to see how other programs
provide tutoring, mentoring and learning supports to students. Try to build
your programs from “best practices” of other programs.
Use the T/MC Program Locator on-line directory to find contact
information for other programs in Chicago. Use search engines like
http://www.volunteermatch.org to find youth organizations in other cities.
Participate in the November and May T/MC Conferences
(http://www.tutormentorconference.org) to network and learn from other
program leaders.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Determine Recruiting Strategies
and Sources of Volunteers
Determine Recruiting
Strategies
Program Structure: Actions
that motivate youth and
adults to participate.
Find Host/Sponsor
Define Mission & Goals

TMC web sites, newsletters and
leadership conferences are a source
of information, as are interviews
with other tutor/mentor programs.
Participate in the Citywide
Chicagoland Tutor/Mentor
Volunteer Recruitment Campaign
organized by the T/MC.

Build Team
Research

Information on the recruitment campaign can be
found at http://www.tutormentorexchange.net

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Determine Recruiting Strategies
and Sources of Students
Determine Recruiting
Strategies
Program Structure: Actions
that motivate youth and
adults to participate.
Find Host/Sponsor
Define Mission & Goals

Will students be recruited by schools, referred by juvenile
justice organizations, or recruited from the community. Are
you at a school, or a non-school location?
At the tutor/mentor programs which Dan Bassill led from
1975-2011, (http://www.cabriniconnections.net) our youth
were volunteers. They come because they, or their parents,
want them to attend. They are not the “problem kids” referred
by schools or juvenile authorities. Thus, our activities have to
motivate them to attend regularly.
How will you keep kids attending from one grade level to the
next? How will you keep them connected with you and the
volunteers over the summer.

Build Team
Research

These are some of the questions you need to address before
you launch your program. Discussing these issues with leaders
of existing programs can help you determine your own
strategies.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Set a Start-Up Schedule and
Develop an Action Plan
Schedule and Action Plan
Determine Recruiting
Strategies
Determine Structure
Find Host/Sponsor
Define Mission & Goals

Build a Team
Research

Keep in mind, you are simply
bringing adults and youth together.
You must answer the “what do I do”
question volunteers will have when
they come to your session each
week. Plan your activities around
the calendar. Halloween,
Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc. offer
themes for research, writing,
performing and building bonds
between students, volunteers and
your program.
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Recruit and Train
Volunteers and Youth.
Schedule and Action Plan
Determine Recruiting
Strategies
Determine Structure
Find Host/Sponsor
Define Mission & Goals

Build a Team
Research

Recruit and Train Volunteers and
Youth.
You need to be recruiting both at the same time,
aiming for a start date when you bring them together
and launch your program.
Volunteer training is an on-going process. A start-up
orientation introduces your organization, its goals,
rules, vision and calendar of events. You must be
prepared to provide on-going information through
one-on-one contact, handouts, email, and training
workshops.
Try to share the responsibility for recruiting and
volunteer training workshops with other programs in
your area. Use the May and November T/MC
conferences as supplemental training for staff,
volunteers and board members.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Begin Operations
Begin Operations
Recruit & Train Volunteers and Youth.
Schedule and Action Plan
Determine Recruiting
Strategies
Determine Structure
Find Host/Sponsor
Define Mission & Goals

Build a Team
Research

Remember to track student and volunteer
participation at every session. Create
reports so you can see patterns of
attendance and adjust your activities based
on positive or negative trends.
This information provides evaluation and
planning information. It is also essential in
preparing grant requests to donors who
want to see quantifiable information.
Use the Internet (web sites, blogs, etc.) to
tell your story, and show others what you
are doing. Consider this an essential part
of recruitment, training and fund raising.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Continuous Process Improvement
and Annual Planning

Continuous Process Improvement
and Annual Planning

Begin Operations
Recruit & Train Volunteers and Youth.
Schedule and Action Plan
Determine Recruiting
Strategies
Determine Structure
Find Host/Sponsor
Define Mission & Goals

Build a Team
Research

It takes months, even years, to build an
effective tutor/mentor program. It takes 12
years for a first grade student to be a high
school graduate.
Programs need to build trust and
participation of children, parents and
volunteers, which is not given easily. As
you build participation, you must build
motivation, which often comes as you build
tradition, and a core staff of leaders and
veteran volunteers.
You must be patient, yet aggressive in
doing everything you can to make your
program as good as it can be.
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Process Improvement
Once your program is started, your job is to sustain and nurture it from
year to year, so that it is able to serve children on a continuous basis, for
the number of years it takes for students to grow to be productive adults.
This involves continuous critical review of your process, your results and
your programs, with on-going incremental additions, revisions and
deletions, based on your own results, and what you are learning from
other tutor/mentor programs throughout the country (and the world).
Each year your review should lead to your plan for the next year’s growth.
If you do this you will surprise yourself in a few years as you look back
from where you and a small group of people began your program and see
the great progress you have accomplished – and the many lives you have
affected.
Use the http://www.tutormentorconnection.org web site as a regular
resource in this process.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

More youth stay in school, are
safe in non-school hours,
graduate, and move to careers
Continuous Process
Improvement
Recruit & Train, Begin
operations
Set Schedule and action plan
Determine Recruitment
strategies
Find host
Define Mission
Building a Team
Research

THE RESULT
According to Mark Cohen, a
professor at Vanderbilt University’s
Owen Graduate School of
Management, “High risk youths
who are kept out of trouble through
intervention programs could save
society as much as $2 million a
youth per lifetime”.
Review similar research and articles in the No
Child Left Behind section of the LINKS
LIBRARY at
http://www.tutormentorconnection.org
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Summary
Every child who is helped by a volunteer-based tutor/mentor program to become a
tax-paying adult represents a savings and an investment. We are offered with the
choice of a 12 to 16-year investment as a child becomes and adult and becomes a
taxpayer, vs the potential lifetime costs of public services associated with children
who live adult lives that are a drain on social resources, and who raise future
children who re-enter the cycle of poverty.
Volunteer-based tutoring/mentoring programs can not-only help individual innercity children have a wider range of possibilities for long-term personal fulfillment,
but they can also engage adults who don’t live in poverty, and educate them to
become more personally involved as they build their bonds with the kids they
connect with in tutor/mentor programs.
These programs enrich the lives of the volunteers, as much as they support the
growth of youth skills and aspirations.

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Summary
Children can’t realize personal goals without the necessary skills. They cannot
secure rewarding jobs and personal happiness without self-esteem, a good
education and good learning habits. They can’t reach there full potential without a
network of positive role models who demonstrate these skills, and who expand the
experiences and learning opportunities for kids living in areas of highly
concentrated poverty.
Tutoring/mentoring programs are infused with these types of role models and
learning opportunities. It is up to each of us to provide the leadership and
resources needed to build and sustain such programs.
Daniel F. Bassill, President, CEO, Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

More youth stay in school, are
safe in non-school hours,
graduate, and move to careers
Continuous Process
Improvement
Recruit & Train, Begin
operations
Set Schedule and action plan
Determine Recruitment
strategies

This type of organization is not
achieved in one or two years.
It will never be achieved without the
work done at the base of this
pyramid each year.

Find host/sponsor
Define Mission
Building a Team
Research

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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Learn more about Starting and
Sustaining a Tutor/Mentor Program
Visit the Tutor/Mentor Institute at:
http://www.tutormentorexchange.net
Participate in Tutor/Mentor Conferences
http://www.tutormentorconference.org
Read the Tutor/Mentor Blog
http://tutormentor.blogspot.com
email tutormentor2@earthlink.net
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

This presentation is property of

Tutor/Mentor Connection
Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC
You may use this for planning and training. If you find
the material valuable to you, please consider sending a
donation or a letter of appreciation.
If you would like to have Dan Bassill come speak at your
organization, be part of a conference, or explain the
purpose of this and other ideas of the Tutor/Mentor
Institute, LLC email tutormentor2@earthlink.net to
discuss fees.
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STEPS TO START A PROGRAM: A mentoring-to-career strategy of the Tutor/Mentor Connection

Tutor/Mentor Connection
Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC
Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654
www.tutormentorconnection.org
www.tutormentorexchange.net
Email tutormentor2@earthlink.net