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Fruits and Vegetables Marketing-final

Fruits and Vegetables Marketing-final

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Published by ABID H
Its about marketing of Fresh fruits and vegetables in India- a fact report
Its about marketing of Fresh fruits and vegetables in India- a fact report

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Published by: ABID H on Nov 05, 2008
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05/09/2014

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Horticultural development had not been a priority until recent years in India. It was later in
the post 1993 period that focused attention was given to horticulture development through an
enhancement of plan allocation and knowledge-based technology. Despite of this decade being a
period of “golden revolution” productivity of the horticultural crops has increased only marginally
from 7.5 tonnes per hectare in 1991-92 to 8.4 tonnes per hectare in 2004-05 (NHB, 2005 In 2005
total area under fruits and vegetables had been 11.72 million hectares and total production had
been 150.73 million tones (NHB, 2005). Of the 456 million tons of vegetable produced in the
world, India’s share is 59 million tons. All taken together, India’s share of the world’s vegetable
market is 17 per cent. Presently, the horticultural crops cover 13.6 million hectares, i.e. roughly 7
per cent of the gross cropped area and contributes 18-20 per cent of the gross value of India’s
agricultural output. India is the second largest producer of fruits and vegetables in the world next
only to China and accounts for about 16% of the world’s production of vegetables and 10% of
world’s fruits production. Annual area and production growth under fruits and vegetables in the
period 1991-2005 was 2.6 per cent and 3.6 per cent respectively in India. Share of fruits and
vegetables in total value of agricultural exports has increased over years from 9.5 per cent in 1980-
81 to 16.5 per cent in 2002-03. But we are still lagging behind in actual exports of these produce.
For example, India produces 65 per cent and 11 per cent of world’s mango and banana,
respectively, ranking first in the production of both the crops. Yet our exports of the two crops are
nearly negligible of the total agricultural exports from India. It is a known fact that horticulture
sector in India is constrained by low crop productivity, limited irrigation facilities and
underdeveloped infrastructure support like cold storages, markets, roads, transportation facilities
etc. There are heavy post-harvest and handling losses, resulting in low productivity per unit area
and high cost of production. However, on the other hand India’s long growing-season, diverse soil
and climatic conditions comprising several agro-ecological regions provide ample opportunity to
grow a variety of horticulture crops. Thus, efforts are needed in the direction to capitalize on our
strengths and remove constrains to meet the goal of moving towards a horticulture lead agricultural
growth in India. The foreign trade policy 2004-09 emphasized that to boost agricultural exports,

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growth and promotion of exports of horticultural products is important. Horticulture contributes
nearly 28 per cent of the GDP in agriculture and 54 per cent of export share in agriculture.

ACREAGE UNDER HORTICULTURE: Includes fruits, vegetables, spices, floriculture, and
plantations-is expected to be 20 million hectares in 2006-07. With production of 53 MT and 108
MT, respectively, in 2005-06, India was the second largest producer of both fruits and vegetables
in the world. India occupies first position in the production of cauliflower, second in onion and
third in cabbage. The National Horticulture Mission (NHM) was launched in May 2005 as a major
initiative to bring about diversification in agriculture and augment income of farmers through
cultivation of high value horticultural crops. The National Horticulture Mission (NHM) aims at
doubling horticulture production by 2012.

Area and Production of Major Horticulture Crops (Area-Million ha,Production-Million tonnes)

Crops

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05*

2005-06*

AreaProduction

AreaProduction

AreaProduction

AreaProduction

Fruits

4.8

49.2

5.1

49.8

5.3

52.8

5.9

54.4

Vegetables

5.9

84. 8

6.7

101.4

7.1

108.2

7.2

113.5

Spices

2.4

3.8

5.2

4.0

3.2

4.9

3.2

5.9

Plantation
Crops

3.1

13.1

3.3

9.4

3.1

10.4

3.2

9.8

Flowers

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.6

0.1

0.7

0.1

0.8

Others

0.09

0.9

0.1

0.3

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.5

Total

16.4

152.0

20.6

165.5

19.2

177.4

20.0

184.9

Source: National Horticulture Board * Estimated

PRODUCTION AREA:

Vegetables are typically grown in India in field conditions; the concept is opposed to the
cultivation of vegetables in green houses as practiced in developed countries for high yields. The
fruits and vegetables considered important by the horticulture board are mostly grown in the areas
of Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, hilly regions of North Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Tamil Nadu,
Maharashtra, Karnataka, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Punjab,
Tripura, West Bengal and Orissa.

GROWTH PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES:

Ongoing liberalization and the emergence of and integrated global market have opened new
vistas for Indian horticulture. In fact, till very recently, India’s main policy focus that until recently
was only on grains and cereals, has been changed in a timely manner, with the launch of National
Horticulture Mission in 2005-06 by Government of India with a mandate to promote integrated

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development in horticulture, to help in coordinating, stimulating and sustaining the production and
processing of fruits and vegetables and to establish a sound infrastructure in the field of
production, processing and marketing with a focus on post harvest management to reduce losses. It
envisages to double the production of horticulture produce by the end of 1912. This enabled India
to exploit its true potential. Since liberalization and withdrawal of excise duty on fruit and
vegetable products there has been significant rise in the growth rate of the industry. No industrial
license is required for setting up Fruits & Vegetables Processing industries; setting-up 100% EOUs
require specific Govt. approvals. Many subsidies, irrigation plans, loans, pre and post harvesting
schemes led to the following figures of production.

FRUIT & VEGETABLE

INDIA'S PRODUCTION STATUS

Mango, Guava, Banana & Peas

World's largest producer

Lemon, Onion, Brinjal, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Pumpkins &
Gourds, Total Vegetables and Total Fruits

World's 2nd

largest producer

Coconut

World's 3rd

largest producer

Oranges

World's 4th

largest producer

Papaya, Lettuce & Pineapple

World's 5th

largest producer

Tomato

World's 6th

largest producer

Citrus Fruits/ Mosambi & Cassava

World's 7th

largest producer

Sweet Potato

World's 9th

largest producer

Apple

World's 10th

largest producer

Grapes

World's 16th

largest producer & World

record in productivity

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