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Psallite Sapienter: A Musician's Guide to the Extraordinary Form

Psallite Sapienter: A Musician's Guide to the Extraordinary Form

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Psallite Sapienter: A Musician's Guide to the 1962 Missal, by B. Andrew Mills, addresses a critical need in today's Catholic Church. In one volume, the author provides a comprehensive, authoritative, and easy-to-understand guide to providing music for the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

It covers the types of sung Masses and and what is required of the organist and choir, and the expectations and needs of the full liturgical year, plus weddings, funerals, and Benediction.

It combines an explanation of the rubrics with the author's own extensive experience with the 1962 Missal, which is particularly useful since the author understands the ordinary form as well and the differences. This one book does the work of a full library on the topic of the extraordinary form, telling musicians just what they need to know.

The author is the organist and choirmaster at the Church of St. Agnes in New York, New York.
Psallite Sapienter: A Musician's Guide to the 1962 Missal, by B. Andrew Mills, addresses a critical need in today's Catholic Church. In one volume, the author provides a comprehensive, authoritative, and easy-to-understand guide to providing music for the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

It covers the types of sung Masses and and what is required of the organist and choir, and the expectations and needs of the full liturgical year, plus weddings, funerals, and Benediction.

It combines an explanation of the rubrics with the author's own extensive experience with the 1962 Missal, which is particularly useful since the author understands the ordinary form as well and the differences. This one book does the work of a full library on the topic of the extraordinary form, telling musicians just what they need to know.

The author is the organist and choirmaster at the Church of St. Agnes in New York, New York.

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Published by: Church Music Association of America on Nov 10, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/08/2015

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42The rubrics concerning the inclusion or omission of the Gloria
may be conveniently summarized thus:
~ If the vestments are white or red, the Gloriais sung.

~ If the vestments are violet, rose, or black, the Gloria
is omitted.
~ If the vestments are green and it is Sunday, the
Gloriais sung.

~ If the vestments are green and it is a weekday, the
Gloriais omitted.

20

Psallite Sapienter: A Musician’s Practical Guide to the 1962 Roman Missal

43The Gloriamust be intoned by the celebrant of the Mass. He and
the choirmaster will have determined beforehand which intona-
tion is to be used. Each of the chant Glorias has its own intonation,
which should be sung if at all possible. If the Gloriais to be sung to a
polyphonic setting, it will be found that the intonation from Mass VIII
fits most major-mode settings, while that from Mass XI fits most minor-
mode settings. These are by no means the only possibilities.

44During the singing of the Introit and Kyrie, the celebrant will
have recited the preparatory prayers, incensed the altar, and read
the Introit and Kyrieat the Epistle side (his right) of the altar. When he
has finished all this, he will go to the center of the altar. Only then should
the organist give the pitches necessary for him to intone the Gloria.
[Some priests, when celebrating Missa Cantata, follow the rubrics of
Missa Privataand say the Kyrieat the center. It is earnestly to be desired
that the Missa Solemniscustom of going to the center only for the Gloria
be universally adopted, as this is the most reliable clue for the organist to
give the intonation pitches.]

45Once the celebrant has sung Gloria in excelsis Deo, the choir may
not repeat these words, but must continue with Et in terra pax. If
the Gloria is sung to chant, alternation may be employed: the first group
will sing the verse Et in terra pax, etc., the second will sing Laudamus te,
and so on. The double bars indicate the points of alternation. Amen
should be sung by both groups together. (The wise choirmaster will num-
ber the verses for ease of reference; thus the first group will sing all the
odd-numbered verses, and the second the even.)

46It is a venerable custom to make a slight ritenutoat each iteration
of the Holy Name Jesu Christe. Care should be taken that the
proper tempo be resumed immediately afterwards.

Psallite Sapienter: A Musician’s Practical Guide to the 1962 Roman Missal 21

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