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Lafcadio, by Shel Silverstein: A Listen and Respond Packet

Lafcadio, by Shel Silverstein: A Listen and Respond Packet

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Published by mookymira
Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back, by Shel Silverstein, must certainly have been written with the intent of being read out loud! It is one of my VERY FAVORITE classroom read-alouds! Full of smart, laugh-out-loud humor, it appeals to the boys as well as the girls. If you haven’t tried reading this to your class, do yourself and your students a big favor and read it! It has always been a hit with my 4th and 5th graders, though it’s bound to be equally loved by older and younger students alike. This packet contains a ready-to-use, 15 page student booklet created for teachers to use with students in grades 3-6 who are currently listening to Lafcadio,The Lion Who Shot Back, by Shel Silverstein. An answer key is also included. The booklet has chapter-by-chapter questions and activities for students to do during and after listening to the book. The activities go along with the story and give students the opportunity to use and understand writing crafts that have been appeared in the book. The student activities are designed to be both fun and instructive. Reading and writing skills/crafts that are practiced in this packet include using idioms, writing summaries, visualizing/sketching, recognizing genre, working with homophones, understanding puns, explaining/describing/clarifying, demonstrating comprehension, recognizing hyperbole, and understanding the author’s purpose. The student booklet is aligned with National Standards. You will find in this packet a copy of Common Core Standards in Reading and Writing for Grades 3-5; those standards which are addressed in the student booklet have been highlighted. Hence, the teacher will have at his or her fingertips that essential information. I recommend that students not work on the student booklet while the teacher (or parent or aide) is reading it aloud (with the exception of those few places where they are instructed to do so) because good listening requires the opportunity to “get lost” in the story. Many activities in the booklet provide the students with essential quotations from the text since it is expected that they will not have the actual book in front of them as a reference. The teacher should plan to allow about 20 minutes following the oral reading for students to complete that day’s activities. Occasional mini-lessons and class discussions on some of the writing crafts and techniques introduced may be necessary depending on the skills of the students. I hope you and your students enjoy this book as much as my students and I have!!  LAFCADIO, The Lion Who Shot Back…in a Nutshell: Shel Silverstein is known for his appeal to young and old. This book is a fable and is somewhat of a departure from his famous poetry books, but it is full of the same humor and wisdom that speaks to old and young alike. Lafcadio began life as a jungle lion but with his out-of-the-box thinking and his willingness to practice till perfect, he eventually finds himself to be rich and famous and living in a big city. But is this what he needs to be happy? Appropriate for all levels; reading level is 4th-5th grade.
Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back, by Shel Silverstein, must certainly have been written with the intent of being read out loud! It is one of my VERY FAVORITE classroom read-alouds! Full of smart, laugh-out-loud humor, it appeals to the boys as well as the girls. If you haven’t tried reading this to your class, do yourself and your students a big favor and read it! It has always been a hit with my 4th and 5th graders, though it’s bound to be equally loved by older and younger students alike. This packet contains a ready-to-use, 15 page student booklet created for teachers to use with students in grades 3-6 who are currently listening to Lafcadio,The Lion Who Shot Back, by Shel Silverstein. An answer key is also included. The booklet has chapter-by-chapter questions and activities for students to do during and after listening to the book. The activities go along with the story and give students the opportunity to use and understand writing crafts that have been appeared in the book. The student activities are designed to be both fun and instructive. Reading and writing skills/crafts that are practiced in this packet include using idioms, writing summaries, visualizing/sketching, recognizing genre, working with homophones, understanding puns, explaining/describing/clarifying, demonstrating comprehension, recognizing hyperbole, and understanding the author’s purpose. The student booklet is aligned with National Standards. You will find in this packet a copy of Common Core Standards in Reading and Writing for Grades 3-5; those standards which are addressed in the student booklet have been highlighted. Hence, the teacher will have at his or her fingertips that essential information. I recommend that students not work on the student booklet while the teacher (or parent or aide) is reading it aloud (with the exception of those few places where they are instructed to do so) because good listening requires the opportunity to “get lost” in the story. Many activities in the booklet provide the students with essential quotations from the text since it is expected that they will not have the actual book in front of them as a reference. The teacher should plan to allow about 20 minutes following the oral reading for students to complete that day’s activities. Occasional mini-lessons and class discussions on some of the writing crafts and techniques introduced may be necessary depending on the skills of the students. I hope you and your students enjoy this book as much as my students and I have!!  LAFCADIO, The Lion Who Shot Back…in a Nutshell: Shel Silverstein is known for his appeal to young and old. This book is a fable and is somewhat of a departure from his famous poetry books, but it is full of the same humor and wisdom that speaks to old and young alike. Lafcadio began life as a jungle lion but with his out-of-the-box thinking and his willingness to practice till perfect, he eventually finds himself to be rich and famous and living in a big city. But is this what he needs to be happy? Appropriate for all levels; reading level is 4th-5th grade.

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A LISTEN-AND-RESPOND PACKET for
LAFCADIO, The Lion Who Shot Back,
by Shel Silverstein
Created by Jean Martin
http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Jean-Martin-18


Table of Contents
Packet Overview ................................................................... ii
Lafcadio in a Nutshell ............................................................ iii
Common Core Standards ...................................................... iv-x
Student Booklet ............................................................... 1-15
Answer Key .................................................................... 16-22



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A LISTEN-AND-RESPOND PACKET for
LAFCADIO, The Lion Who Shot Back,
by Shel Silverstein
Created by Jean Martin
http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Jean-Martin-18
OVERVIEW

Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back, by Shel Silverstein, must certainly have been written with
the intent of being read out loud! It is one of my VERY FAVORITE classroom read-alouds! Full
of smart, laugh-out-loud humor, it appeals to the boys as well as the girls. If you haven’t
tried reading this to your class, do yourself and your students a big favor and read it! It has
always been a hit with my 4
th
and 5
th
graders, though it’s bound to be equally loved by older
and younger students alike.

This packet contains a ready-to-use, 15 page student booklet created for teachers to use with
students in grades 3-6 who are currently listening to Lafcadio,The Lion Who Shot Back, by
Shel Silverstein. An answer key is also included. The booklet has chapter-by-chapter
questions and activities for students to do during and after listening to the book. The
activities go along with the story and give students the opportunity to use and understand
writing crafts that have been appeared in the book. The student activities are designed to be
both fun and instructive. Reading and writing skills/crafts that are practiced in this packet
include using idioms, writing summaries, visualizing/sketching, recognizing genre, working
with homophones, understanding puns, explaining/describing/clarifying, demonstrating
comprehension, recognizing hyperbole, and understanding the author’s purpose.
The student booklet is aligned with National Standards. You will find in this packet a copy of
Common Core Standards in Reading and Writing for Grades 3-5; those standards which are
addressed in the student booklet have been highlighted. Hence, the teacher will have at his
or her fingertips that essential information.
I recommend that students not work on the student booklet while the teacher (or parent or
aide) is reading it aloud (with the exception of those few places where they are instructed to
do so) because good listening requires the opportunity to “get lost” in the story. Many
activities in the booklet provide the students with essential quotations from the text since it
is expected that they will not have the actual book in front of them as a reference. The
teacher should plan to allow about 20 minutes following the oral reading for students to
complete that day’s activities. Occasional mini-lessons and class discussions on some of the
writing crafts and techniques introduced may be necessary depending on the skills of the
students.

I hope you and your students enjoy this book as much as my students and I have!!



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 LAFCADIO, The Lion Who Shot Back…in a Nutshell:

Shel Silverstein is known for his appeal to young and old. This book is a
fable and is somewhat of a departure from his famous poetry books, but
it is full of the same humor and wisdom that speaks to old and young
alike. Lafcadio began life as a jungle lion but with his out-of-the-box
thinking and his willingness to practice till perfect, he eventually finds
himself to be rich and famous and living in a big city. But is this what he
needs to be happy?

Appropriate for all levels; reading level is 4
th
-5
th
grade.





 Additional Information for the Teacher:

Have you visited the Shel Silverstein website? Take your students to
www.shelsilverstein.com and see the characters from many of his books.
They will be animated and will even have voices! A fun way to follow-up
this Lafcadio read-aloud might be to go to the website and click on books;
then, find Lafcadio and click on it. Your students will be simply delighted
to listen to the reading of a selection from the first chapter! In addition,
there are games and other activities that students can access which go
with some of the other books by Shel Silverstein.

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Reading and Writing Common Core Standards for Grades 3-5
That Are Addressed in this Lafcadio Packet
(Highlighted Standards Reinforced in this Packet)

English Language Arts Standards >> Reading: Literature >> Grade 3
Key Ideas and Details
1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly
to the text as the basis for the answers.
2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine
the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key
details in the text.
3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain
how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing
literal from nonliteral language.
5. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text,
using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part
builds on earlier sections.
6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by
the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).
8. (Not applicable to literature)
9. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same
author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).
Range of Reading and Complexity of Text
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and
poetry, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and
proficiently.


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English Language Arts Standards >> Reading: Literature >> Grade 4
Key Ideas and Details
1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly
and when drawing inferences from the text.
2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize
the text.
3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the
structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of
characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or
speaking about a text.
6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated,
including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions
and directions in the text.
8. (Not applicable to literature)
9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of
good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and
traditional literature from different cultures.
Range of Reading and Complexity of Text
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas,
and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as
needed at the high end of the range.


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English Language Arts Standards >> Reading: Literature >> Grade 5
Key Ideas and Details
1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when
drawing inferences from the text.
2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how
characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem
reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
3. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama,
drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
5. Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall
structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
6. Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are
described.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or
beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale,
myth, poem).
8. (Not applicable to literature)
9. Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure
stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
Range of Reading and Complexity of Text
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas,
and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and
proficiently.

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English Language Arts Standards >> Writing >> Grade 3
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
o Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an
organizational structure that lists reasons.
o Provide reasons that support the opinion.
o Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to
connect opinion and reasons.
o Provide a concluding statement or section.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
clearly.
o Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations
when useful to aiding comprehension.
o Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
o Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect
ideas within categories of information.
o Provide a concluding statement or section.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
o Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event
sequence that unfolds naturally.
o Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop
experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.
o Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
o Provide a sense of closure.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and
organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing
types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as
needed by planning, revising, and editing.
6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing
(using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. Research to
Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources;
take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
9. (Begins in grade 4) Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific
tasks, purposes, and audience
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English Language Arts Standards >> Writing >> Grade 4
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and
information.
o Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational
structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose.
o Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.
o Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to,
in addition).
o Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
clearly.
o Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and
sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when
useful to aiding comprehension.
o Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples related to the topic.
o Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g.,
another, for example, also, because).
o Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain
the topic.
o Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or
explanation presented.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
o Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or
characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
o Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the
responses of characters to situations.
o Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events.
o Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and
events precisely.
o Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types
are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as
needed by planning, revising, and editing.
6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to
produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others;
demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in
a single sitting.
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Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different
aspects of a topic.
8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print
and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.
o Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Describe in depth a
character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the
text [e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions].").
o Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an
author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text").
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
English Language Arts Standards >> Writing >> Grade 5
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and
information.
o Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational
structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer's purpose.
o Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
o Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently,
specifically).
o Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
clearly.
o Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group
related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and
multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
o Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples related to the topic.
o Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and
clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
o Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain
the topic.
o Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or
explanation presented.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
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o Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or
characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
o Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop
experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
o Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence
of events.
o Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and
events precisely.
o Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types
are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as
needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to
produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others;
demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages
in a single sitting.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through
investigation of different aspects of a topic
8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print
and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and
provide a list of sources.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.
o Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast two
or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific
details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]").
o Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an
author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying
which reasons and evidence support which point[s]").
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific
tasks, purposes, and audiences.


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Respond to Literature:

The Lion Who Shot Back








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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 1
DURING THE STORY
ridiculous
embarrassed
souvenir
_________________________________________________________________________________


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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 1, continued























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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapters 2 & 3
“Now take it out of here and throw it away!
It gives me goose bumps just to look at it!”

IDIOMS MEANINGS
I put my head in the lion’s mouth. My voice is hoarse.
Get your ducks in a row. He’s really an enemy not a friend.
You pulled the wool over my eyes. Get organized.
There’s a frog in my throat! I took a big risk.
He is a wolf in sheep’s clothing. You fooled me.







______________________________ ______________________________

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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapters 2 & 3, continued
he wrote in Chapter 1; in Chapter 2 he wrote,

Brrring BAM Bell Buzz Zing Rock Hmmm Oink
Screech Fall Bird Tweet Bonk Clipity-clop Hiss
Quack He-Haw Piano Voice Thwack Cock-a-doodle-do
6

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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 4







“Marshmallows Marshmallows
Marching Marshing Mellow
Malling Mallows Marshing Fellows
Marshy-Murshy..”


Busy bees were buzzing by the bear’s blinking eyes.
Wee Willy Woodchuck was winking weirdly at his wife.
Careful cats ___________________________________________
Daring dogs ___________________________________________
Tiny turtles ___________________________________________

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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 4, continued



First,
• What happened first?
Then,
• Then what happened?
Finally,
• How did the chapter end?
8

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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapters 5 & 6
DURING THE STORY

AFTER THE STORY


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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapters 5 & 6, continued
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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapters 7 & 8
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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapters 7 & 8, continued
EXAMPLE:
In Chapter 7, Uncle Shelby told the barber that the lion wanted a
haircut and might want his mustache trimmed too. The lion’s
response to that was, “I want a very good haircut. That is the main
thing!”
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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 9


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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 9, continued



First,
• What happened first?
Next,
• What happened after that?
Finally,
• How did the chapter end?
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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 10 & 11
“And so I dressed in a hurry and went out into the night
which was 65 below zero, and I remember I couldn’t get
a taxicab and so I had to walk twelve miles in the snow
and it took me fifteen minutes because
the snow was very deep and I forgot my galoshes.”


15

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Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back: Chapter 10 & 11, continued

“Why are you crying—you have everything!”
“Everything isn’t everything.”


16

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DURING the STORY
ridiculous
embarrassed
souvenir

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IDIOMS MEANINGS
I put my head in the lion’s mouth.
My voice is hoarse.
Get your ducks in a row.
He’s really an enemy not a friend.
You pulled the wool over my eyes.
Get organized.
There’s a frog in my throat! I took a big risk.
He is a wolf in sheep’s clothing. You fooled me.

he wrote in Chapter 1; in Chapter 2 he wrote,

Brrring BAM Bell Buzz Zing Rock Hmmm Oink
Screech Fall Bird Tweet Bonk Clipity-clop Hiss
Quack He-Haw Piano Voice Thwack Cock-a-doodle-do
18

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“Marshmallows Marshmallows
Marching Marshing Mellow
Malling Mallows Marshing Fellows
Marshy-Murshy..”

Busy bees were buzzing by the bear’s blinking eyes.
Wee Willy Woodchuck was winking weirdly at his wife.
Careful cats
Daring dogs
Tiny turtles
Students should have ideas written in the plan.

First,
• What happened first?
Then,
• Then what happened?
Finally,
• How did the chapter end?

19

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Chapters 5 & 6
DURING THE STORY

AFTER THE STORY


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EXAMPLE:
In Chapter 7, Uncle Shelby told the barber that the lion wanted a haircut and
might want his mustache trimmed too. The lion’s response to that was, “I
want a very good haircut. That is the main thing!”
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First,
• What happened first?
Next,
• What happened after that?
Finally,
• How did the chapter end?

22

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“And so I dressed in a hurry and went out into the night
which was 65 below zero, and I remember I couldn’t get
a taxicab and so I had to walk twelve miles in the snow
and it took me fifteen minutes because
the snow was very deep and I forgot my galoshes.”

“Why are you crying—you have everything!”
“Everything isn’t everything.”

23

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Dear Purchaser:
I hope that you find this product to be just what you wanted!
After you’ve had a chance to take a look at it, please take a
minute or two to provide me with feedback and/or rating this
product.
Just follow these easy steps:

 Click on the “My Purchases” button at the top of the TPT
website (www.teacherspayteachers.com).

 Locate the title of this product (A Listen and Respond
Packet for: Lafcadio…) and then click on the flashing
“Provide Feedback” button. You will have the opportunity
to rate my work by clicking on the stars and also leave a
comment if you like.

Thanks so much for your support!
Jean Martin


ii

LAFCADIO, The Lion Who Shot Back,
by Shel Silverstein
Created by Jean Martin http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Jean-Martin-18

A LISTEN-AND-RESPOND PACKET for

OVERVIEW
Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back, by Shel Silverstein, must certainly have been written with the intent of being read out loud! It is one of my VERY FAVORITE classroom read-alouds! Full of smart, laugh-out-loud humor, it appeals to the boys as well as the girls. If you haven’t tried reading this to your class, do yourself and your students a big favor and read it! It has always been a hit with my 4th and 5th graders, though it’s bound to be equally loved by older and younger students alike. This packet contains a ready-to-use, 15 page student booklet created for teachers to use with students in grades 3-6 who are currently listening to Lafcadio,The Lion Who Shot Back, by Shel Silverstein. An answer key is also included. The booklet has chapter-by-chapter questions and activities for students to do during and after listening to the book. The activities go along with the story and give students the opportunity to use and understand writing crafts that have been appeared in the book. The student activities are designed to be both fun and instructive. Reading and writing skills/crafts that are practiced in this packet include using idioms, writing summaries, visualizing/sketching, recognizing genre, working with homophones, understanding puns, explaining/describing/clarifying, demonstrating comprehension, recognizing hyperbole, and understanding the author’s purpose. The student booklet is aligned with National Standards. You will find in this packet a copy of Common Core Standards in Reading and Writing for Grades 3-5; those standards which are addressed in the student booklet have been highlighted. Hence, the teacher will have at his or her fingertips that essential information. I recommend that students not work on the student booklet while the teacher (or parent or aide) is reading it aloud (with the exception of those few places where they are instructed to do so) because good listening requires the opportunity to “get lost” in the story. Many activities in the booklet provide the students with essential quotations from the text since it is expected that they will not have the actual book in front of them as a reference. The teacher should plan to allow about 20 minutes following the oral reading for students to complete that day’s activities. Occasional mini-lessons and class discussions on some of the writing crafts and techniques introduced may be necessary depending on the skills of the students. I hope you and your students enjoy this book as much as my students and I have!!

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