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InJust10Pages Quarterly Newsletter - Gluten Intolerance - Jan 2012

InJust10Pages Quarterly Newsletter - Gluten Intolerance - Jan 2012

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Published by Brandon Schmid
Get the latest gluten intolerance, gluten free articles, tips resources and recipes. Get access to bonus materials and tips not available on our site. Like out Microbooks, each newsletter is 10 pages in length and contains only useful, actionable information.
Get the latest gluten intolerance, gluten free articles, tips resources and recipes. Get access to bonus materials and tips not available on our site. Like out Microbooks, each newsletter is 10 pages in length and contains only useful, actionable information.

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Published by: Brandon Schmid on Jan 24, 2012
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www.injust10pages.com GLUTEN INTOLERANCE | GLUTEN SENSITIVITY | CELIAC DISEASE

NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

In Just 10 Pages

Releases our Inaugural Quarterly Newsletter!

“This newsletter shows that our primary goal is to provide solutions for every day questions about gluten intolerance and to promote products that will be incredibly useful for our members.” - Brandon Schmid CEO of In Just 10 Pages
It is with great pride that we announce the release of our inaugural, quarterly newsletter. The goal of In Just 10 Pages is to always provide the best and most useful information to all of our valued members! We trust you will find this to be an incredibly valuable resource and will always provide incredible content. Our mission with this newsletter is to provide our members with delicious recipies, tips, resources and the latest, most up-to-date research about gluten intolerance and Celiac Disease. “I am thrilled about this new and exciting resource for our members!” President and CEO of In Just 10 Pages, Brandon Schmid said from his office in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. “A lot of websites out there simply don’t provide enough content for their members. This newsletter shows that our primary goal is to provide solutions for every day questions about gluten intolerance and to promote products that will be incredibly useful for our members.” “I am very excited about our decision to create more content for our readers.” says the In Just 10 Pages Creative Director, Conrad Dekker. “My background in journalism allows me to dig deep and

IN THE WINTER

Issue

1 Inaugural Quarterly Newsletter First Edition 2 Can a Gluten-Free Diet Reduce the Risk of Osteoporosis? 3 The Hidden Link Between Gluten Intolerance Infertility and Miscarriage 4 Top 5 Gluten-Free Travel Tips 5 Are Oats Actually GlutenFree: The debate continues 6 FEATURED ARTICLE: Gluten Intolerance Linked to Skin Diseases 7 Gluten-Free Dinner Recipe: Sheperd’s Pie 8 Gluten-Free Lunch Recipe: Citrus Chicken Salad 9 Gluten-Free Breakfast Recipe: Incredible Crêpes

find the content that our readers really want and need.” Guy Gagnon is the Business Relations Manager of In Just 10 Pages and says; “This is something that we have discussed creating for some time. We felt a newsletter was the best way for people to get fantastic information, for free and could view it from home, work, on their smart phones or e-readers. It is a no brainer to give more to our members.” We would like to thank you for your continued support and if you have any questions, concerns or ideas about new products you hope to see in the future, please contact us at support@ injust10pages.com q 1

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

Can a Gluten-Free Diet
Tip of The Season
There are a number of ways you can prevent or reduce the risk of Osteoporosis while maintaining a gluten-free diet. One of the most important tips is to get plenty of calcium. Most dairy products are high in calcium and gluten-free. If you are also lactose intolerant there are many supplements you can take - just be certain they are gluten-free. Eliminating gluten from your diet and increasing your intake of calcium will help increase your bone density.
It is well known that Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance have many secondary complications. A recent study attempted to determine if a gluten-free diet could help correct bone disorders such as osteopenia and osteoporosis - one of the most common and debilitating conditions related to the disease that mostly affects women. Researchers in Argentina conducted a clinical trial with Celiac patients to determine if a gluten-free diet would reduce the risk of minor and frequent fractures (The results of the study were published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology in July 2011).

Reduce the Risk of Osteoporosis?

Image courtesy of Spanishale from the website www.sxc.hu

The test involved 256 people suffering from Celiac Disease. The participants were asked to disclose a history of their bone health. Those answers were then compared to 530 control subject without gastrointestinal disorders of the same age and sex. Other individuals who had poor bone health due to conditions other than Celiac Disease were excluded from the study. The results revealed that individuals with Celiac Disease were at a higher risk of suffering from fractures; however the study also determined that the risk of fractures was significantly reduced when

patients were kept on a gluten-free diet for a five year period. Researchers pointed out that eliminating gluten from the diet does not necessarily increase bone mass and mineral density; it determined that the bone mass of Celiac patients improved which in turn leads to a lower risk in the occurrence of fractures. Although the results are not entirely conclusive, this is yet another study that indicates a gluten-free diet in Celiac patients will improve the digestive system as well as bone health and overall health. q

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

The Hidden Link Between Gluten

Intolerance Infertility and Miscarriage.

. “The link between adrenal stress and gluten intolerance is common, but rarely diagnosed”. - Dr. Vikki Peterson
Gluten intolerance doesn’t attack the digestive system alone, but it also attacks the various systems of our body and brings along secondary complications. Gluten intolerance has been linked to more than 300 diseases. The most common ones has been the excess production of female hormones which results in imbalances of the female reproductive system. It has to be understood that correct and timely diagnosis of gluten intolerance can prevent individuals from facing the wrath of the complications that accompany this autoimmune disorder. Understanding the link between gluten intolerance and hormones? Dr. Vikki Peterson, co-founder of HealthNOW Medical Center and a certified Nutritionist in her book “The Gluten Effect” said that “Gluten intolerance has many secondary effects, including adrenal fatigue”. Adrenal glands of our body are responsible for striking a balance between DHEA, estrogen, testosterone and progesterone. These hormones are in turn responsible for providing the female system a ‘shield’ against issues such as PMS and infertility. In addition to this, these hormones also play a vital role in many basic functions such as regulating blood pressure, blood glucose levels and preventing dehydration. Due to gluten intolerance, when the adrenal glands become fatigued, they fail to function optimally. They then either produce sex hormones or just help to keep the basic functions of the body going. As a result of this, regulating the basic functions of the body becomes the priority and this production of sex hormones takes a back seat. Continued on page 4

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

“When the adrenal glands become fatigued, they fail to function optimally. They then either produce sex hormones or just help to keep the basic functions of the body going.”
Continued from page 3 Dr. Peterson has also outlined various conditions resulting from the low or no production of sex hormones in the female body. These include: -lower abdominal cramps -heavy bleeding during menstruation -irregular menstrual cycle -endometriosis -fibrocystic breasts -polycystic ovaries -infertility -frequent miscarriages -migraines Dr. Peterson concluded that “the link between adrenal stress and gluten intolerance is common, but rarely diagnosed”. As a result of this, millions of women continue to suffer from these debilitating conditions and gradually this affects their quality of life. q

Top 5 Gluten-Free Travel Tips
Each issue we want to have some fun! Because winter is one of the most common seasons for travelling, we have compiled a list of the “Top 5 Gluten-Free Travel Tips.” 1. Research, Research, Research: Understand the culture, know where you will be staying and research the most common dishes is the best way to prepare yourself for eating gluten-free while away. Please visit this website: www.celiacrestaurantguide.com/gftravel 2. Pre-plan Your Meals: This may take some time and effort, but simply google typical ‘ethnic’ dishes for the country you will be visiting. Then pick out some of the ones you hope to try that are glutenfree. Plan out your entire meal-plan, print it off. and bring it with you. 3. Pack Your Own Snacks: Bringing your own snack food may be a ‘lifesaver’. You will be travelling on a plane, or on a tour and having your own food that you know is gluten-free will prevent accidentally eating something you can’t tolerate. 4. Do Your Own Cooking: This may seem tedious, but this is the best way to be sure you are eating gluten-free. Perhaps you can stay at a hotel or house with a kitchen or stay with relatives who understand your condition. 5. Have Fun!: This may sound like a cliche, but it’s important to have fun while on vacation. If you ‘do your homework’ avoiding gluten should be a lot more easy than you think. Good luck! Have a safe and gluten-free holiday! q

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Gluten-Free?

Are Oats Actually

NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

The debate goes on and on. Some experts feel that oats are completely safe for consumptions for patients with Celiac Disease or gluten intolerance - and others feel that oats should be avoided. The most recent research claims that, it appears ‘pure oats’ are safe for most - but not everyone - suffering from the disease. I’m glad this is finally clear... Since oats can easily be contaminated with wheat during harvest, storage, or other stages of processing, it has been stressed that the oats should be certified as pure. Although the classic 33-amino acid long oligopeptide that acts as the immunogenic stimulus in gliadin had not yet been found in oats, other peptides isolated from oats do activate T-cells isolated from celiac patients. A new study performed in Spain by Isabel Comino et al. suggests that it is not that some celiac patients can’t tolerate all oats, but rather that all celiac patients can’t tolerate some oats. Their results are reported in the January 2011 issue of GUT: An International Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. to recognize the toxic 33-mer from gliadin, and also measured if each of the oat varieties could elicit an immune response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from celiac patients. They wanted to see if they could correlate recognition by the monoclonal antibody to induction of a T-cell response, and found that they certainly could. The nine varieties of oats segregated neatly into three groups of three varieties each: those for which the antibody had high affinity, low affinity, and no affinity. This affinity was validated by two different experimental methods, so was not an artifact of the technique chosen. When T cells from patients with celiac were exposed to extracts of the oat variety the antibody bound to strongest, they proliferated the most and released interferon-gamma, an immunostimulatory cytokine whose aberrant expression is associated with autoinflammatory disease. In contrast, the oats that didn’t react with the antibody did not elicit these immune responses. The authors note that the avenin – the storage protein in oats – from even the most immunogenic oats they saw bound to this antibody with 40400 fold less affinity than gliadin (from gluten – the storage protein in wheat). This study thus leaves us with two valuable conclusions. One is that some oats are more toxic than others, regardless of their purity. And the other is that reactivity with this antibody can be correlated to toxicity, making it a potential tool for evaluating the toxic gluten content of other food. q

“Many people with gluten intolerance can safely consume oats, depending on the severity of their intolerance to gluten.”
Dr. Comina and her colleagues examined nine different cultivars of oats. They exposed each of them to a sensitive monoclonal antibody generated

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012
Dr. Magdalene A. Gohil, from the University of California, San Diego, proposed that the clinicians should test for the presence of antibodies against gliadins, endomysium and transglutaminase. These antibodies get deposited beneath the first or primary layer of the skin causing uncomfortable and itchy skin rashes. Dermatitis herpetiformis commonly appears near the regions of elbow, knees, buttocks, face, scalp and shoulders. Dr. Dohil also said that, about 74% of the people with Celiac Disease will suffer from some or the other type of skin disease. Other common skin problems that occur in Celiac patients are xerosis, which may also lead to pruritus. Patients having a long term history of Celiac Disease suffer from mucosal manifestations. Dr. Dohil added that there is a strong connection between epithelial defects (that often manifests as skin diseases) and disorders of the gut and digestive tract. Most of the disorders related to the gastrointestinal tract often may lead to skin problems. About 60 – 82% of the people with asymptomatic inflammatory bowel disease often experience skin tags, fistuals, fissures and or abscesses in the

Linked to Skin Diseases

Gluten Intolerance
Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disorder affecting millions across the globe. Statistics have revealed that 1 in 133 people in America suffer from Celiac Disease. To add to that number, one in four of those affected, develop dermatitis herpetiformis as a result of this digestive disease. Dermatitis herpetiformis (duhring’s disease) is most commonly found in adult population aged above 40; whereas only 5% of the children (under 7 years of age) are found to suffer from it. Appropriate clinical diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis is necessary in order to avoid further complications. Skin biopsy and direct immunofluorescence can be used as diagnostic tools for determining the presence of the skin disease.

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

Gluten-Free Dinner Recipe
Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour Total Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Serves: 6 Ingredients:

Sheperd’s Pie

* 1 lb regular or lean ground beef * 3 tbsp buckwheat, quinoa or bean flour * 1 1/4 cup gluten-free beef broth or stock * 1 tsp salt * 1/2 tsp black pepper * 2 tbsp ketchup * 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce * 4 cups fresh or frozen mixed vegetables (carrots, peas, corn etc.), thawed and drained well * 1 1/2 lb gold or red potatoes, cut into quarters. * 3 cloves garlic, peeled, halved * 1/4 cup milk * 1/2 cup sour cream * 2/3 cup shredded cheddar cheese Preparation: 1. Brown ground beef in large sauté pan over medium heat, breaking the meat into very small pieces as it cooks. You may add some olive oil to prevent sticking. 2. Stir in gluten-free flour and cook for 3 minutes. 3. Stir in the gluten-free broth, then add the salt, pepper to taste, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, and vegetables. 4. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 4-5 minutes. Transfer into a 3-quart baking dish.

5. In a large sauce pan, add the potatoes and garlic. Cover with cold water and add salt if desired. Bring to boil. 6. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 25 minutes. 7. Drain well, and put back into the saucepan. Add the milk and sour cream; mash the potatoes until

smooth and lump-free. Stir in the cheddar cheese. 8. Cover the meat mixture with the mashed potatoes, and spread evenly with a fork. Bake in a preheated 400 degrees F. oven for 25 minutes, or until golden. 9. Allow to sit for 10 minutes before serving.

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

Gluten-Free Lunch Recipe
Citrus Chicken Salad
Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour Total Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes Serves: 4 Ingredients: * 1/2 cup orange juice * 1/4 cup lime juice * 2 shallots, minced * 2 cloves garlic, minced * 1 teaspoon chili powder * 1 teaspoon ground cumin * 1 teaspoon white sugar * 4 (4 ounce) skinless, boneless chicken breast halves * 8 cups torn romaine lettuce * 2 oranges - peeled, segmented, and chopped * 2 stalks celery, sliced * 4 green onions, chopped Preparation: 1. In a mixing bowl, whisk together orange juice, lime juice, shallots, garlic, chili powder, cumin, and sugar. 2. Pour 1/2 of this mixture into a large, resealable plastic bag, and add the chicken breasts. Seal, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. This will allow the chicken some time to absorb most of the delicious citrus juices before you cook it. 3. Refrigerate the remaining dressing. 4. If you are expecially advernturous, preheat an outdoor grill on medium-high heat. But if the weather is a bit too much to handle, preheat a large, slightly oiled sauté pan on medium heat.

5. In a large salad bowl, toss romaine lettuce with celery, oranges and green onions. Set aside. 6. As mentioned before, lightly oil grate or sauté pan, and place chicken in center. Cook for 6 to 8 minutes each side, or until juices run clear when pierced with a fork. 7. Discard the marinade from the chicken.

8. Remove chicken from heat, let cool for several minutes and slice into thin strips. 9. Toss salad with reserved dressing, and top with sliced chicken. 10. Server and enjoy. Refridgerate unused portions.

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

Gluten-Free Breakfast Recipe
Incredible Crêpes
Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes Total Time: 20 minutes Serves: 4 Ingredients: * 2 extra-large eggs * 1 cup of milk OR use dairy-free substitute * 1 tablespoon light olive oil * 1/4 teaspoon salt * 1/2 teaspoon dried, crumbled thyme (optional) * 1/2 cup light buckwheat or other gluten-free flour * Desired amount of topping such as Maple Syrup or fruit. * 8 oz (240 g) plain cream cheese * 1/3 cup confectioner’s/powdered sugar * 1 teaspoon lemon extract * 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract * ground nutmeg Preparation: 1. Combine gluten-free flour, salt and thyme in a medium-size mixing bowl and whisk together. 2. Add eggs, milk OR dairy substitute and olive oil and whisk until the mixture is a smooth batter, free of lumps. The consistensy should be slightly thinner than pancake batter. 3. In a small bowl, mix together confectioner’s/ powdered sugar with lemon extract, vanilla extract and ground nutmeg. Set aside. 4. Heat a small skillet or crêpe pan over medium high heat. Add 1/4 teaspoon oil to the skillet and

brush to coat the bottom of the skillet. (Do this before making each crêpe). 5. Pour 1/4 cup of batter into the preheated skillet. Swirl the skillet until the entire bottom of the pan is covered with the crêpe batter. 6. Cook the crêpe for about 1 minute. The crêpe should be slightly moist on top. Use a thin spatula to loosen the edges of the crêpe then slide the spatula under the crêpe and gently flip

it. Cook for one more minute, or until golden and transfer crêpe to a plate to allow it to cool. 7. Repeat with the remaining batter. 8. For extra richness, spread cream cheese mixture over each crêpe roll and top with fruit or Maple syrup. You should be able to get about eight 8 inch crêpes and can serve about four people.

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NEWSLETTER

Winter | 2012

Important Contact Information
For Technical or Customer Support: support@injust10pages.com Advertising Opportunities: advertise@injust10pages.com For Joint Venture: jv@injust10pages.com For Affiliate Inquiries: affiliate@injust10pages.com

Major Events From January - March 2011: Dates and times are subject to change. Please check our website for latest information on these events.
January 15, 2012 - “Food as Medicine for Celiac Disease: Nutrition Beyond the Gluten-Free Diet” Free Webinar January 15-17, 2012 - “NASFT Fancy Food Show - by National Association for the Specialty Food Trade” - San Francisco, CA January 17, 2012 - “Canadian Celiac Association - Luncheon” - London, Ontario, Canada January 24, 2012 - “Canadian Celiac Association - Special Meeting for New Celiacs” - London, Ontario, Canada January 28, 2012 - 2012 Celiac Awareness Tour - Monroeville, PA January 28, 2012 - “Gluten-Free Day at Weaver’s Co-opialty Food Trade” Weavers Way Co-op 8424 Germantown Ave. Chestnut Hill, PA February 4, 2012 - “The Gluten Sensitivity Spectrum” Houston, TX at the Hornberger Conference Center February 4, 2012 - “Houston Glutenology Expo - Sponsored by the Gluten Free Society“ - Houston, TX at the Hornberger Conference Center February 7, 2012 -”The Differences Between Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity” Free Webinar February 18, 2012 - “5th Annual Celiac Disease Foundation South Florida Chapter Gluten Free Food Expo” - West Palm Beach, FL February 23, 2012 - Canadian Celiac Association - Winter Social - London Ontario, Canada March 8, 2012 - “Natural Products Expo West” - Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, CA March 22, 2012 - “Canadian Celiac Association - Annual General Meeting” London, Ontario, Canada March 24, 2012 - “2012 Celiac Awareness Tour” - Indianapolis, IN March 24, 2012 - “Gluten Free For Life Expo” - The St. Pete Times Forum 535 Fourth Avene North, St. Petersburg, FL March 29-31, 2012 - “International Meeting on Celiac Disease” - Palazzo dei Congressi, Villa Vittoria - Florence, Italy

Please note that we strive to respond to all inquiries within 48 hours.

For More Information on these events, or any other events that haven’t been listed, please visting injust10pages.com

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