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Community Plan Discussion Draft vII 05162011

Community Plan Discussion Draft vII 05162011

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Draft: May 16, 2011 City of Hampton Community Plan Update: 2011 Strategic Issues Introduction Each community in Virginia must formulate and adopt a plan to serve as a general guide for its growth and development. Compared to most Virginia communities, Hampton has a long tradition of community planning dating back to the 1950’s. Recent efforts have embraced the value of grassroots citizen participation in the formulation of these important policy documents. This value recognizes that local government alone cannot achieve the level of successes represented in Hampton’s vision of making our community the “most livable community in Virginia.” These plans give us an opportunity to engage in education, dialogue, and discussion to determine what our priorities should be going forward. Out of this discussion, broad community goals accompanied by specific strategies are identified which guide future actions and resource allocation. In this first phase of work, participants are being asked to help address the following questions: What are our relative strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats? What are the most strategic issues facing our community in the next 5 years and beyond? What should be the vision for success for each of these strategic issues? What broad community goals should we establish for each issue area? How do we measure success? How are these strategic issues related to each other? In February of 2006, the City of Hampton adopted a new comprehensive plan entitled the Hampton Community Plan. Approximately every five years, the adopted plan is reviewed to ensure that it remains relevant and current with respect to community aspirations and challenges. In September 2010, Hampton City Council authorized the City Manager to begin a process to review the Hampton Community Plan (2006, as amended). As was the case in 2006, the City of Hampton has collaborated with Hampton City Schools and numerous community partners to review and update this important document that helps to shape our community’s future. The Hampton Community Plan (2006, as amended) was the first merger of both the
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“strategic plan” and the “comprehensive plan” into one integrated document; we are continuing that approach with this update. As a result, the first step in the process is to review the vision, strategic issues, and broad community goals. This document represents the key results emanating from this community discussion. Process On October 7, 2010, the City hosted a community kick-off meeting in which approximately 240 citizens attended. This meeting outlined the purpose and anticipated schedule for this effort. The bulk of the session allowed citizens to participate in one, or more, small group discussions aimed at identifying the most pressing issues and challenges facing our community. As a result of the discussion held on October 7, 2010, ten (10) strategic topic areas were identified: Economic Base, Regionalism, Transportation, & Infrastructure Education and Lifelong Learning Community Appearance, Pride & Image Waterways (this strategic issue had been identified prior to 10/7/10) Good Government Housing & Neighborhoods Community Health & Healthy Families Public Safety Environment, Sustainability, & Quality of Life Diverse Population, Youth, & Seniors These topics were endorsed by City Council as the starting point for the update process. As a result, community focus groups were formed for each of the ten strategic topic areas. Each focus group was comprised of between 10-20 community members (although some groups were larger) supported by a staff convener, a facilitation team, and technical experts from City staff and other organizations and entities. Most focus groups met approximately twice each month between January and April 2011, although a few focus groups began meeting earlier than January 2011. On March 8, 2011 a “mid-point” community checkpoint meeting was held. Each focus group presented its work which included a draft vision and goals proposed for their specific
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strategic topic area. Citizens were then given the opportunity to discuss the draft work and offer comments and/or suggestions. On March 10, 2011, two representatives of each of the ten focus groups came together to process what they heard from the public two nights earlier and what “course corrections” they would suggest. These representatives generally felt that the ten (10) focus group topics were on target based upon public feedback. They also discussed common issues and themes shared by more than one focus group. Thirteen common issues or themes were identified as being worthy of note and further exploration. These common issues or themes were topics identified by two or more focus groups through the course of their respective work. The thirteen common issues or themes identified at the mid-point of the process were as follows: History/Historic Jobs/Business Attraction Education (broadly defined) Neighborhood Quality & Diversity Broader Community Involvement/Bringing People Together Water Resources/Waterfront As An Asset Communication To All/Public Awareness Improved Access to Services Need for Partnerships/Shared Responsibility People as Resources More & Better Choices for Getting Around/Mobility for All More “Green” & Sustainable Policies, Practices, and Development Achieve Excellence in What We Do (Public & Private Sector) Each focus group completed its initial work by April 15, 2011. Based upon this work a draft document was compiled and distributed for review around the first of May 2011. A final community checkpoint meeting was held on May 24, 2011 in order to receive comments and feedback prior to making final changes that were then forwarded to the Planning Commission and City Council. (Fill in results from this meeting). On June 8, 2011, the Planning Commission and City Council received the proposed update to the Community Plan at a joint work session. (Fill in results from this work session). The Planning Commission held its first public hearing to receive public comment on July 7, 2011. (Fill in any results, changes from the Planning Commission)
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The City Council held public hearings to receive public comment on the proposed update to the Community Plan/Strategic Plan on (list dates and results).

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Community Appearance, Pride, and Image

Vision: Contemporary coastal living in a proud, historic, and vibrant community. Goal 1: Aesthetic improvement of all major corridors and gateways, including interstate entrances and exits. Strategies: 1. Quality appearance of all gateways, for example: Pembroke – Powhatan, Mercury – I64, Woodland – I64, LaSalle/Armistead – I64, and Mercury – King. 2. Improve attractiveness of landscaping through increased use of a. low maintenance landscaping using natural and native plants and designs in new installations and problem areas b. underground watering. 3. Increase signage attractiveness: a. Improve standards to eventually eliminate billboards and nonconforming signs b. Increase the number of neighborhood entrance signs c. Use ‘Welcome’ and ‘Thank You' signs that support City branding d. Work with Hampton Convention and Visitor’s Bureau (HCVB) to coordinate signage with the branding of the City. 4. Enlist the help of City partners (master gardeners, VDOT, Sheriff’s Office, neighborhood associations, and others) to tend entrances and exits. a. Establish a modest budget ($600-1200 annually) for partners to purchase new bulbs and/or annuals. b. Establish “ownership” of gateways and corridors with a boasting rights trophy awarded each month or quarter, to be passed down to the next winner. c. Ensure excellent communication between involved parties to achieve stated goals. “Key” Measurable: 1. Hampton’s gateways and corridors reflect pride and a high standard of maintenance as measured by a. Resident satisfaction regarding the appearance of gateways and major corridors b. Improved score on litter index.
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Goal 2:

Optimize appearance, pride, and image in our water assets. Strategies: 1. Educate homeowners on the importance of waterfront landscaping, buffers, and historic creeks 2. Better communication of City successes and future plans for improving water asset appearance (e.g., New Market Creek, Fort Monroe, Robinson Creek, Indian River Creeks) 3. Annually hold a waterways cleanup celebration and issue T-shirts to increase participation and promote the pride in Hampton ethic. “Key” Measurables: 1. Increase the number of shoreline cleanups and the number of citizens participating. 2. Resident satisfaction with appearance and quality of waterways.

Goal 3:

Maintain and enhance neighborhood quality, appearance, and pride. Strategies: 1. Increase beautification efforts, including a. Adopt-A-Spots b. Neighborhood cleanups led by HCCC c. Increase maintenance of schools and neighborhood recreation facilities such as pools, parks, bike paths. 2. Enforce or improve existing laws to address: a. Preservation of historic easements in older neighborhoods when redoing streetscapes b. Blighted, vacant structures c. Dog excrement d. Litter on street fronts and parking lots e. Parking on lawns f. Size of concrete driveways g. Insufficient neighborhood parking h. Dilapidated fencing. 3. Improve neighborhood lighting with increases in lighting and/or upgraded architectural street lighting where appropriate. 4. Create or re-establish an inter-civic league council to aid in communication and coordination of stated goals. “Key” Measurables:
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1. 2. Goal 4:

Increase in code enforcement related to home appearance and litter. Resident satisfaction with the attractiveness of their neighborhood.

Support and communicate Hampton’s excellence. Strategies: 1. Implement an internally-focused branding campaign that targets people who live, work, and play in Hampton and is coordinated with the HCVB website relaunch so that the imagery and signage work together rather than compete. a. Utilize all media to communicate Hampton successes b. Increased use of TV coverage c. Education using special/local personalities d. Channel 47 interviews that showcase accomplishments e. Host events to increase awareness of successes and/or areas needing support for improvement 2. Partner with Hampton City Schools to inspire pride in students and enlist their help in building pride throughout the community. 3. Implement an award program promoting citizen contributions to Hampton appearance, pride, and image. “Key” Measurables: 1. Number of positive news articles regarding Hampton appearance, pride, and image. 2. Resident pride in Hampton as measured on the Resident Satisfaction Survey. 3. Number of nominations and donors for the CAPI award and honor event.

Goal 5:

Capitalize on Hampton’s history as a source of pride. Strategies: 1. Capitalize on and emphasize Hampton’s 400 year history by developing a program to biannually focus on a significant period of Hampton’s History. “Key” Measurables: 1. Resident pride in Hampton’s history as measured on the Resident Satisfaction Survey. 2. Attendance at Hampton history-related museums and events.

Note to staff: The group was unable to agree on whether Goal 5 should stand alone or be incorporated into Goal 4. The group did agree to let City staff make the final decision. Standalone argument: History is in the CAPI vision and should be separate so that it is more
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prominent and less likely to get lost in other initiatives. Argument for making #5 a part of Goal 4: Pride in history is so integral to Hampton’s overall excellence that it should be included in #4. The CAPI group requested that the following strategies and measures be passed on to other more appropriate focus groups: 1. To be passed on to the Transportation Focus Group: o Improve pedestrian crossings throughout the City (e.g., Mercury – Coliseum). To be passed on to the Waterways Focus Group: o Improve/increase public access to waterways. o Increase/protect public access to water assets: boardwalks, boat ramps, beaches. o Reclaim and restore historic creeks to help improve access, drainage, and flood prevention through dredging, ditch maintenance, and erosion control). o Encourage compliance with Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act; use buffers, increase citizen responsibility for keeping waterways clean and beautiful. o Reclaim/restore historic waterways. o Improve water quality at beaches and on rivers by better maintaining stormwater BMPs (Best Management Practices) and other impacting factors. Key measure: Water quality using HRSD water quality standards and testing to measure progress. To be passed on to the Neighborhood Focus Group: o Increase home sales and stabilize home assessments. o Increase home ownership investments with new home owners. To be passed on to the Diverse Populations Focus Group: o Increase handicap ramps/access.

2.

3.

4.

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270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 Goals: 1. Hampton will create a coordinated system that provides information about health and about access to health-related services. (See Economic Base, Regionalism, Transportation & Infrastructure; Diverse Population, Youth & Seniors; Good Government) Strategy 1: The Hampton City web site will include a section titled Health Information and Health Care Services with links to health information web sites, as well as information about health care organizations and home- and community-based health services available to Hampton residents. Strategy 2: Hampton will publicize to physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners seeking to relocate, that federally designated medically underserved areas exist within the city. (Health care professionals working in these areas may be eligible for reduction or elimination of their medical training loan obligations.) Measurement 1: The number of patient visits to the CarePlex Emergency Department which do not require emergency medical services will be reduced by 5 percent annually. Measurement 2: The number of ambulance trips for medical problems which do not actually require the presence of Emergency Medical Service staff in the ambulance will be reduced by 10 percent. Measurement 3: All federally designated medically underserved areas in Hampton will be eliminated by increased numbers of health care professionals working in these areas. 2. Hampton will implement a regular community health planning and improvement process. Strategy 1: Hampton will create a health and wellness advisory body, supported by appropriate staff, which will identify pertinent health and wellness indicators which can be used to describe and track increases and decreases in the health of Hampton 9

Community Health/Healthy Families
The collective health of our citizens and the environment which influences our collective wellbeing are of strategic importance for the future of our community. We often say that ”we will only be as successful as our people allow us to be,” so the relative health of our community will influence many aspects of our future. Performance in school, performance in the workplace, the cost of public services and the attractiveness of a community as a place to live and work can all be influenced by how well we succeed at being a healthy community. Vision: Hampton will be the healthiest community in Virginia.

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residents and to develop recommendations for ameliorating adverse health indicators. These indicators should be broadly applicable to Hampton, and incorporate Hampton specific data and appropriate comparators.

Measurement 1: The advisory body will issue at least two reports and recommendations each calendar year.

3. Hampton will create a culture of disease prevention and health promotion. Strategy 1: Hampton city schools will require that each student participates each day in 30 minutes of physical exercise appropriate to that student’s health and physical abilities. Measurement 1: The average percentage of students at each grade level with a Body Mass Index (BMI) greater than 30% will decrease 10% annually. Strategy 2: Hampton city schools will devote, on average, 3% of each school day to age and culturally appropriate health education programs, at all grade levels. This effort will be in addition to physical education programs. Strategy 3: The City of Hampton will identify itself as striving to become a smoke-free city, and all city publicity materials will reflect this. Measurement 1: The percentage of adult tobacco users will decrease 5% each year. Measurement 2: The percentage of teens that use tobacco products will decrease 10% each year. Strategy 4: Hampton will increase its opportunities for walking, hiking, and jogging. Measurement 1: Hampton will add 10 additional miles each year to its system of uninterrupted sidewalks, paths, and hiking trails. Strategy 5: The Hampton Health Department, Hampton City Schools, and other organizations will create and publicize information on preventing sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies. Measurement 1: The rate of pregnancies among Hampton teen girls will decrease 10% each year. 10

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Measurement 2: The rates of gonorrhea and chlamydia infections in Hampton citizens will decrease 10% each year. Strategy 6: The Health Department, in partnership with Hampton City Schools and other organizations, will increase immunization rates among Hampton residents. Measurement 1: All children under the age of 18 years will complete all recommended immunizations. Measurement 2: At least 45% of Hampton residents will receive an influenza immunization each year. Strategy 7: Hampton will ensure year-round daily access to basic personal hygiene and community referral services for the homeless population. 4. Hampton will maximize awareness of health education resources. (See Education and Lifelong Learning) Strategy 1: The Hampton City web site will include a section titled Health Information and Health Care Services with links to health information web sites, as well as information about health care organizations and home and community-based health services available to Hampton residents. Strategy 2: Hampton will publicize the existence of this web site each quarter. Measurement 1: The number of “hits” on the web site will increase 10% each year over the previous year. Measurement 2: Periodic customer satisfaction surveys on the web site will demonstrate high and steadily increasing measures of satisfaction and usefulness. 5. Hampton will create a community-wide understanding and acceptance of the concept that “community health” is the responsibility of all segments of the community - public and private, individuals and organizations. Strategy 1: Hampton will systematically examine all aspects of homelessness within the city with a goal of identifying new opportunities and new partners to reduce the number of homeless persons. Strategy 2: In collaboration with community partners, Hampton will develop a single room only (SRO) facility for long-term affordable housing for currently homeless single adults.

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Measurement 1: Hampton will reduce its homeless population by an estimated 10% annually. Measurement 2: The number of non-religious organizations which support homeless assistance programs will increase 10% each year. Strategy 4: Hampton will create a tobacco-users buddy program for individuals who are trying to stop smoking. This would pair former smokers with smokers trying to quit, with the former providing an anchor to call upon when tempted to smoke. Measurement 1: The percentage of adult tobacco users will decrease 5 percent each year. Measurement 2: The percentage of teens that use tobacco products will decrease 10% each year. Strategy 5: Increase support of the Peninsula Food Bank and other food banks. Measurement 1: The number of individuals and organizations who have never previously contributed to community organizations such as the Food Bank will increase 8 percent each year.

Focus Group Members: Paul Babcock Debra Flores Art Greene Elizabeth Lewis Evelyn Olenick Maureen Savage Valda Branch Angela Futrell Linell Hunter Bill Massey Wanda Rogers Christine Woods Carlton Campbell Jeanie Goldberg Thea Lawton David Murray Debbie Russell Nick Wooten

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Diverse Population, Youth, and Seniors Focus Group

This grouping of issues recognizes the importance of Hampton’s changing demographics and the related challenges and opportunities associated with these changing demographics. Recognizing that Hampton has become an increasingly diverse community with respect to race, ethnicity, culture, religion, lifestyle, age, and background, the Diverse Population, Youth, and Seniors Focus Group reviewed data and information from various perspectives, focusing on the assets and needs that these very different groups bring to our community.

Vision Statement:

Hampton is a city that is welcoming, supportive, and inclusive of all citizens. Goals:

1.

All people will be viewed as a rich resource to their community where their needs are accommodated and their contributions welcomed. Easy accessibility of all resources and services for all citizens. City of Hampton policies and procedures and implementation of those policies and procedures are inclusive of the diversity in Hampton. All people will have an opportunity to experience world-class cultural and leisure activities in Hampton.

2. 3.

4.

Measurements of Success: Goal 1 Measurements: a. Population change, both in total number and diversity

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b. Level of customer/citizen satisfaction/delight with regards to their needs being met and contributions to the community being welcomed Goal 2 Measurements: a. Usage of communication tools (311 calls, website hits, emails, neighborhoods group notices, etc.) b. Use of resources within the city

Goal 3 Measurements: a. b. Number of complaints registered Diversity of representation on appointed boards and commissions

Goal 4 Measurements: a. Number and variety of restaurants, entertainment venues, and cultural concerts and events in Hampton b. Number of people using cultural and leisure activities in Hampton

Focus Group Members:

Pete Bacote Veronica A. Davis Linda Hansen Olive Johnston Michael B. Hamar Carole A. Perenzin Ellen Shackleford Troy Elliott

Karen L. Baker Charlotte Dillow Jasmine Sanders Katherine Tyler-Northern David Murray Willie Press Eric Stone Angela Leary

Barbara Stewart Donald Fennell John Gately Letitia Lee Teresa Ottofaro-Davries Jason Samuels Sharmae Stringfield Will Moffett
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Economic Base, Regionalism, Transportation and Infrastructure This grouping of issues recognizes the important and fundamental linkage that exists between how well we address regional challenges and the overall well-being of individual communities like Hampton. Hampton’s overall success will rise and fall based upon how well the region addresses significant issues that cross jurisdictional boundaries. The economy, our transportation network, many aspects of our infrastructure system, many environmental issues, as well as other challenges must all be addressed on a regional level in order for Hampton to become the community it aspires to be. This “regional” perspective has been identified in Hampton’s community plan as an important perspective since the mid 1990’s. Over the last 15 years, the Hampton Roads region has made significant strides toward “acting like a region.” Through the efforts of organizations like the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission, the Hampton Roads Transportation Planning Organization, the Hampton Roads Partnership, and the Hampton Roads Economic Development Alliance (to name only a few), long range regional vision and action plans are in place to help define our regional vision. There is a fine balance in distinguishing what are truly regional issues versus purely local issues. Often this line appears as “shades of grey” rather than a distinct line. We must understand the impact local decisions will have regionally and vice versa. Hampton’s challenge is to be able to pursue its own interests while also respecting the regional goals and perspective. Within the region, Hampton is a community with a vast array of assets that are often overlooked and may not have reached their full potential. Although progress has been made in recent years as a result of the implementation of the Master Plans and through participation in key regional initiatives, the core cities of Hampton Roads (Hampton, Newport News, Portsmouth, and Norfolk) still represent cities on the margin. Hampton’s challenge is to be proactive and strategic in addressing these issues effectively at both the local level and at the regional level through initiatives outlined in this plan. Vision Statement: Hampton will be an innovative and economically vibrant city, central to the success of the region by advancing its economic opportunities with an educated workforce, modern infrastructure, sustainable development, and cutting-edge technology, while embracing its heritage and natural resources.

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Goals: 1. Hampton will be aggressive in its efforts to enhance the region’s worldwide economic competitiveness through a shared vision and collaborative actions among the region’s communities. Hampton will strengthen its economic base through its workforce development efforts and by facilitating development of small businesses, enhancing relationships with major institutions in the City, and capitalizing on its natural and physical assets. Hampton will maintain and enhance its existing infrastructure to ensure it exceeds the expected useful life and will expand its infrastructure to meet future challenges and changes regarding advanced communication systems, building for sustainability, as well as the management of coastal and storm water flooding. Hampton will create and enhance local and regional transportation options for residents and visitors by supporting urban development patterns and implementing master plans for strategic investment areas.

2.

3.

4.

Measurements of Success: Goal 1 Measurements: a. Endorsement by all communities of a vision for Hampton Roads and a strategic plan which addresses key issues b. The number of Hampton’s collaborative planning and operational activities with one or more Hampton Roads communities Goal 2 Measurements: a. b. High school graduation rates Number of new businesses on annual basis

Goal 3 Measurements: a. Residential and commercial penetration of broadband wireless and fiber optic services b. Expenditures for infrastructure replacement prior to expected useful life
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Goal 4 Measurements: a. b. New transportation options Commute times within the region and City of Hampton

Focus Group Members: Steve Adams Nat Battar Art Collins Adanna Davis Ernest Green Rodney Harris Curtis Knight Donna Lawson Donna Morris Tony Reyes L’Allegro Smith Sherry Spring George Wallace Jennifer Askey Lewis Bellinger Craig Cope Doug Dwoyer Greg Grootendorst Ted Henifin Mike Kuhns Calvin Lowe Jerry Palmer Judy Rogers Charles Smith Jean Thacker Fred Whitley Hugh Bassette Bill Benson Clay Culbreath Phyllis Flanders Larry Gwaltney Joseph King Gay La Rue Sam Martin Amy Parkhurst Jason Samuels Tommy Southall Jim Turner Stan Winarski

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Environment & Quality of Life Vision Statement: Hampton exemplifies sustainable environmental stewardship in a waterfront community for all to enjoy. Goal #1: Hampton proactively practices environmental stewardship of its natural resources and assets. Measurements of Success Mixed energy usage patterns Environmental component of SOL – Youth Litter Index Increased percentage of redeveloped green or open space Mowed land (acreage) or Naturalized cover areas Tree Cover (Tree City or City Green) Strategies Education on environmental stewardship Increase conservation of green spaces Exceed federal and state guidelines in all environmental areas Litter court Mandatory recycling Contiguous green space City should encourage residents and businesses to utilize alternative energy and the City should develop standards for requiring new residential developments to utilize alternative energy Unified streetscape improvements Public awareness signage program Goal #2: Hampton provides multi-modal connectivity within and between strategic investment areas and surrounding neighborhoods Measurements of Success Miles of walkways/bike paths/trails Connectivity index between strategic areas Shuttle/bus availability and ridership (between strategic areas) Strategies
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Increase the number of bike paths Bring back the trolley system or start shuttle bus/tour bus routes Review streets for ease of “cross-over” at major intersections and connections between neighborhoods Increase pedestrian signalized paths Goal #3: Hampton has improved public access to coastal and other natural environments Measurement of Success Miles of public coastline/beach (property/easement/right of way) Strategy Education around pollution & Chesapeake Bay preservation Goal #4: Hampton provides high quality environmental infrastructure (See Economic Base, Regionalism, Transportation, and Infrastructure) Possible Measurements of Success Miles of underground cable/conduit Tons of trash converted to steam Tons of recycled materials Megawatt per capita Permits for alternative energy sources

Focus Group Members: Cris Ausink George Burbank Kendyl Crawford Gaynell Drummond Donald Fennell Richard Marshall Pat Parker Chris Stuart Jim Williams

Shirley Boyd Jeff Cerro Woody Dorsey Greg Enterline Doris Hamill Sam Martin Ken Ricklin Donnie Tuck Ken Wright

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Good Government Insuring that the local governance infrastructure is effective, efficient, innovative, open and ethical has always been important to the success and future of Hampton. The community’s relationship and involvement in local government are quite unique and have been recognized nationally on many occasions for excellence and for using “best practice” methods. Unlike many other communities in which large profit and/or not-for-profit companies play key leadership roles, Hampton has generally looked to local government to play a prominent leadership role in charting the course for future success. Despite Hampton’s previous successes and recognition, we cannot afford to rest on past achievement. Draft Vision: Good government is one that is responsive, open, and ethical in and out of public view, and provides services which improve the quality of life for all. Draft Goals: 1. Seek and provide more opportunities to engage and respond and inform citizens on issues pertinent to the community by the use of multiple means of communication. 2. A competent city workforce will educate citizens on and provide for accessible, efficient, and fairly distributed services. 3. Hampton will identify, plan, and adopt innovative opportunities for citizen involvement, work, education, and recreation. 4. Hampton will strive to be open and ethical by providing financial accountability, communication, and transparency. Measurements of Success: Measures for Goal #1 % of citizens report being involved in city-sponsored activities % of citizens that reply to city surveys % of responses based on media (i.e.: how many people attended a particular meeting because they heard about it on Facebook, Ch. 47, etc.)

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Strategies o Look at the number of different ways the city uses to communicate such as surveys, meetings, forums, phone calls, etc. o Use community forums, voting, internet communications, newspaper, and other means to communicate with the public Measures for Goal #2 Measure change in survey numbers to determine success % of citizens successfully accessing city services # of complaints received & resolved from citizens on a daily basis % of citizens report having an understanding of city services provided by the city Strategies o Monthly communiqués to advertise city services, events, and information to the public o Find and develop other means to distribute the citizen satisfaction survey to get more responses Measures for Goal #3 % of citizens participating in the community plan process % increase in the number of communications distributed by the city # of community plan checkpoint meetings held annually diversity of participation in discussions % of citizens completing the citizen satisfaction survey that report being satisfied with city services Increase in the number of citizens to receive the citizen satisfaction survey Strategies o Survey citizens to determine if city services and the information is: easy to find, easy to read, offered at multiple locations, and answers the 5 W’s o The means of communication should be diversified Measures for Goal #4 # of city staff, including directors and managers, trained in open government principles % increase in the number of open meetings # of open meetings compared to closed meetings (to include City Council meetings)
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# of citizens reporting increased understanding of the budget process # of neighborhoods represented and participate in the city’s dialogue about the budget Strategies o Perform audits to ensure financial accountability o Financial disclosures available to the public o Greater effort to make the budget process open and understood by citizens o After action report produced in relation to the budget Focus Group Members: Alice Callahan Ellen Carpenter Pete Fairchild Carole Garrison Wanda Hewlin Ross Kearney Tracy Martin Charles Smith Jim Williams Staff: Tami Back Karl Daughtrey Leslie Fuentes Katherine Glass Montique McClary Liz Nisley Cindy Woolwine

Carlton Campbell Daphne Costley Ernest Ferguson Claude Hewlin, Jr. Charlene Johnson Sam Martin Jackie Roundtree George Wallace

Sabrina Carr John Eagle Diane Gardner Valencia Jowers Janice Moore Gloria Washington

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Housing and Neighborhoods Much of Hampton’s character and charm comes from the unique tapestry of diverse neighborhoods that collectively make up our community. Neighborhoods are one of the basic foundations of social and civic life. If we are to reach our goals, our neighborhoods must provide the kind of places our current residents and future residents can proudly call home. While the physical elements of a neighborhood are important and most visible, the overall quality of life and effectiveness of all neighborhoods also depends on effective social and civic infrastructure. Draft Vision: Hampton will be a community of choice that preserves and builds for future generations. Draft Goals: Goal #1: Hampton neighborhoods will offer a mix of housing that is attractive, affordable, and accessible to accommodate all citizens. Goal #2: Neighborhoods and schools will have a strong partnership. Goal #3: Hampton neighborhoods will offer accessible pedestrian and cycle friendly choices to promote mobility of citizens and to offer accessibility to neighborhood services and amenities. Goal #4: Hampton will reinvest in neighborhoods by enforcing state blight regulations, city property maintenance codes, and beautification and incentive programs. Goal #5: Hampton will preserve, maintain, and perpetuate the history, culture, and architecture of its neighborhoods. Note: The group had several discussions regarding the need to address homeless populations as part of the Housing and Neighborhoods Focus Group. In the end, they concluded that since the issues facing homeless persons are multi-faceted (housing, social services, mental health, employment, etc.), a separate group should be established to develop a vision, goals, and strategies to assist the Hampton homeless population.

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Measurements of Success: Goal #1: Survey of realtors, homeowners, and renter perceptions on the attractiveness of Hampton neighborhoods. Survey of new homebuyers who chose not to live in Hampton to better understand what influenced their decision. o Information on local Property Transfers can be found in the Daily Press on Saturdays Goal #2: Identify and track joint school and community programs. Track neighborhood participation in and support for school programs and activities Track neighborhood resources devoted to school programs/improvement Goal #3: Survey residents in areas with new bike and/or walking paths regarding usage, likes, dislikes, etc. o Example - New bike/walking paths are proposed in the N. King Street and Newmarket Creek areas. Increase in the growth of connectivity of bike/walking paths over time Goal #4: Change in the number of property maintenance violations Change in housing conditions (minor/major deterioration) o Exterior Housing Conditions Survey Survey residents of specific areas regarding their perceptions of housing conditions in their neighborhood. Goal #5: Track the number of educational events and/or publications promoting neighborhood history, culture, and architecture. Track the number of historic tax credit projects in Hampton Track the number of times the City is recognized in publications regarding history, culture, and architecture Draft Strategies: Increased marketing of the Curb Appeal Grant Programs Evaluate new developments to ensure there is a mix of housing types
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819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838 839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849

Partner with the Mayor’s Committee for People with Disabilities to help address accessible housing Recruit neighborhood associations and volunteers to help schools Empower neighborhoods to enforce blight regulations. Promote neighborhood organizing to build pride and make neighborhoods better Educate the public on property maintenance/codes compliance issues, processes, etc. Provide pro bono legal support for civic associations Simplify the process for Special Tax Districts so more groups can take advantage of it as a tool to improve their neighborhood Increased marketing of beautification activities such as Clean the Bay Day, etc. Market historic events/places to people outside of Hampton. Promote and take advantage of the history that is here. Promote the vision to the citizens of Hampton and to City Council. This effort needs citizen support and Council funding to be successful. o Be proactive to the vision, not reactive to individuals Conduct an anonymous survey of teachers to assess teacher opinions of schools, etc. – link the survey to SOL /SAT scores. Focus Group Members: Karen Duncan Donald Fennell Ernest Ferguson Angela Leary Caroline McCord Tonya Mosley Sister David Ann Niski Philip Page Willie Press Carmina Sanchez

L’Allegro Smith Kevin Spence Barbara Stewart Peggy Todd Donnie Tuck Catherine Tyler-Northan Gregory Williams Stan Winarski Catherine Winston

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Lifelong Learning & Education Vision Statement: Partnering with community resources to ensure innovative, quality, and affordable education and lifelong learning for every citizen, every day. Goals: The group decided on the following goals and measurements: 1. GOAL 1 - By 2030 every citizen in Hampton will be educated and trained to compete in the global workforce. Measurement 1 – Ensure children are reading on grade level or above by third grade Measurement 2 – All Hampton children will graduate on time Measurement 3 – Increase number of students who attend college Measurement 4 – Ensure Hampton children have education preparation that supports “Ready By 21” philosophy Measurement 5 – Create an Oversight Committee with schools, City, and citizens (Education, Lifelong Learning Focus Group member should have a seat) 2. GOAL 2 - Develop multiple education paths that lead to working levels/occupations. Measurement 1 – Explore charter schools 3. GOAL 3 - Ensure all students/citizens are aware of resources available throughout Hampton. Measurement 1 – More informational brochures Measurement 2 – More presentations/Job Fairs Measurement 3 – PEG-TB (Channel 47) Measurement 4 – General website Measurement 5 – Benchmark and follow up surveys 4. GOAL 4 – Market education and lifelong learning success stories/statistics. Measurement 1 – Increase awareness via website Measurement 2 – Sold on Hampton Measurement 3 – Economic development

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892 893 894 895 896 897 898 899 900 901 902 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 912 913 914 915 916 917 918

5. GOAL 5 – Ensure all children enter school ready to learn. Measurement 1 – All children meet Hampton City Schools’ “Kindergarten Readiness Checklist 6. GOAL 6 – Provide ongoing education resources that support citizens, post secondary. Measurement 1 – Provide financial literacy learning opportunities for all citizens 7. GOAL 7 – Attract, develop, and retain highly qualified teachers for children and adults Measurement 1 – Increase number of national certified teachers Measurement 2 – Increase number of highly qualified teachers

Focus Group Members: Roxanne Aaron David Duxbury Allyson Graul Letitia Lee Betty Peters Keisha Samuels Lydia Williams Nellie Jo Yannarella Andrea Berndt Denis Gallop Olive Johnson Tracy Martin Jason Samuels Bobby Whitehouse Carol Winarski Tony Yannarella

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Public Safety Vision Statement The City of Hampton fosters a safe environment that promotes proactive public safety responsiveness and community interaction. Goals: 1. Hampton will enhance communication activities to improve perception so that the public has a greater awareness of public safety programs. o Measurements: Public Safety citizen survey will be conducted to obtain baseline data (separate from the general citizen survey). Quarterly meetings between citizens and representatives from Public Safety, Public Works, Codes, and others to address citizen comments. Post successes/failures/information results on Channel 47, Hampton Page, etc. 2. Hampton will work with community organizations and national and regional authorities to improve and widely communicate emergency preparedness plans for catastrophic events. o Measurements: Publicize general emergency preparedness plans on Channel 47, Website, radio, and via other communication mechanisms. Frequency of emergency preparedness, drill and special programs will increase annually. There will be an increase in the variety and frequency of communication resources utilized to publicize public safety-related programs. 3. Hampton will improve its record of public safety success in providing services as reflected in appropriate public safety standards. o Measurements: Produce charts and graphs of safety events and issues to establish a baseline indicating status of current public safety indicators. Performance will be measured annually and benchmarked against industry standards. An external review process with citizen input will be established.
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Hampton public safety programs will be implemented utilizing state-of-theart equipment. 4. Hampton public safety personnel will receive ongoing comprehensive training in best practices. o Measurements: Training hours will be monitored for public safety personnel with total hours dedicated exceeding industry standards. Intensive training will be provided for areas identified as requiring specialized training. 5. Hampton will provide strong codes enforcement and crime and fire prevention programs. o Measurements: Citizen participation in Neighborhood Watch and other citizen safety programs will increase each year. Building code enforcement will increase. Public Safety representatives will work with community organizations and city departments to increase activities to improve areas of the city where there is a significant need for blight removal. Focus Group Members: Steve Brown Woody Dorsey Larry Gwaltney Ross Kearney Michael McHenry George Wallace Eddie Deerfield Richard Gagne Cindy Hayth Karen Leckemby Gregory Siegel

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Hampton Comprehensive Waterway Management Plan Steering Committee One of Hampton’s key strategic assets is its waterways and access to the Hampton Roads and the Chesapeake Bay. Our very history is intrinsically linked to these very waterways. As we plan for our future, our waterway assets will play an important role in almost all facets of community life including economic development, recreation, quality of life, neighborhoods, community health, and environmental quality. The myriad of ways in which waterways affects our lives are influenced by local, regional, national, and global influences. In November 2010, Hampton City Council established the Hampton Comprehensive Waterway Management Plan Steering Committee. This committee has been charged with a somewhat different set of tasks than the other focus groups. Their work will encompass development of a comprehensive set of goals, recommendations, and criteria to guide future City policies and investments regarding waterways management. As a result, their work schedule and product may not always coincide with that of the other groups. To expedite their work and to enable greater focus on key issues, this Committee has formed four subcommittees to focus on the following broad waterway issues: Shoreline Protection Tidal Flooding Dredging (Waterway Management and Maintenance) Storm water Management These four subcommittees are currently in the process of assessing current conditions and identifying key issues related to their respective topics. These groups have also begun to have preliminary discussions to identify broad community goals and evaluation criteria to help guide public policy choices. Each of the four subcommittees has provided a short summary of their current status. Shoreline Protection Subcommittee The Shoreline Protection Subcommittee has begun discussion regarding a vision for Hampton’s shoreline and began to identify focus areas and outline potential community goals. The proposed vision statement is “A beautiful sand public beach and healthy tidal marshes that enhance the Chesapeake Bay’s shoreline and tributaries can be the keystone attribute in creating a vision that inspires citizens, business, and industry to live, support, and invest in the City of Hampton, Virginia.” The subcommittee has begun to look at strategic areas such as:
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Bay-fronting beaches and tidal shoreline protection Funding and maintenance needs. Two community goals have been identified as this point: Develop a shoreline management plan Develop education programs to educate citizens about preventive measures, recommendations, etc. Tidal Flooding Subcommittee The Subcommittee has been meeting since mid-March 2011. Through discussion, we have identified a vision statement and five (5) focus areas in relation to the topic of tidal flooding. The vision statement and focus areas are listed below in priority order are: Vision Hampton will provide an enhanced quality of life throughout the city through proactive measures and comprehensive management of the tidal flooding issues for current and future generations. Focus Areas: 1. Conduct a comprehensive study of current and probable future tidal flooding impacts. 2. Development regulations to reduce future tidal flood property damage. 3. Public education. 4. Emergency management/public notification 5. Funding of public/private improvements to mitigate tidal flooding impacts. The Subcommittee has begun to identify strategies to address the focus areas. In future conversations, we will determine goals and strategies for each of these topic areas. We are also looking at other localities’ best practices to determine how Hampton can use them to mitigate the negative impacts of tidal flooding. Stormwater Management Subcommittee Vision Hampton improves the quality of storm water so that Mother Nature can take care of herself; Hampton achieves maximum efficiency of drainage within the City – both natural and manmade. Goals To increase the quality of storm water by identifying cost effective solutions to comply with storm water and environmental regulations.
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To minimize the impact of storm water flooding through identifying cost effective solutions that maximize effective drainage. Evaluation of Policy Choices/Best Practices/Options currently being reviewed: 1) Review of New Storm Water Regulations 2) Review of City of Hampton Maintenance Plan 3) Pursuit of Dedicated Easements 4) Creation of green space to promote drainage – this topic includes down-zoning; consideration of purchasing of flood prone property to create green space; re-zoning of properties in non-flood prone areas that will also increase drainage. 5) Public Education 6) Funding Models Identify Criteria for Evaluating Policy and Investment Choices o What constitutes a policy/strategy/recommendation as “cost effective”  Cost effectiveness could facilitate people and businesses staying in the city and/or coming to the city to live, work, or conduct business  Cost effectiveness would encourage a “smaller environmental footprint” by citizens and businesses  Cost effectiveness would require a cost/benefit analysis that includes weighing the recommendation against the goals and issues as well as within the larger context of community needs and interests  Cost effectiveness would balance preservation of natural habitats, investment in infrastructure, and new/re-development

Dredging Subcommittee (Waterway Management and Maintenance) Sub-committee vision: To improve Hampton’s economic viability and citizen satisfaction by strategically improving the availability and usability of its waterways while maximizing the return on investment. Key Strategic Issues: (not prioritized) There is no local long-term plan for waterway maintenance or a City department tasked with its development and implementation.
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The on-going need for waterway maintenance is driven by other features of an interrelated system, e.g. silt and debris from storm water, sand migration, marsh run-off. The connections between waterway maintenance, economic activity, and property values are not clear or recognized. Questions of usage, benefits, ownership, easements, and legal restrictions complicate funding and maintenance responsibilities. Identify best practices/policy choices/options which address key issues: Assign one department to develop an integrated Waterway Management Plan to include: o Systematically collected data o Policies related to funding responsibilities o Implementation schedule connected to community generated criteria o Built-in evaluation and reassessment Draft Vision: Overall vision has not yet been developed. subcommittee Draft Goals: See Subcommittee reports Measurements of Success: (not yet developed) Focus Group Members: (core members) Vince Behm Andy Bigelow Frank Blake Robin Carpenter Bob Croft Carole Garrison Ernest Hale Steve Mallon Ben Williams Woody Woodcock Edith Newkirk Hugh Bassette Thomas Pantelides Polly Siemann Joe Stellutte Kevin Van Sloten Selvin Walker Arne Hasselquist See draft visions for each

Perry Pilgim* Floyd Gibbs* Claude Vann* *Appointed but decided they can no longer participate.
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Things We Have Learned and Next Steps Through the course of the focus group discussions, it has become evident that many issues and ideas are shared by multiple groups. These “themes” represent important findings for moving forward. Additional thought and discussion will be required to fully flush out these concepts. How we do this will be one of the questions asked during the Joint Focus Group Work Session on June 6, 2011. This work session will provide an opportunity for representatives of each focus group to process and discuss the public feedback received on May 24, 2011. A number of these “cross cutting themes” were identified during the mid-point review. Prioritizing and combining these key themes will occur prior to finalizing the document. One of the other common directions which surfaced during the process was the need to monitor our progress. Many participants voiced enthusiasm about the ideas and directions identified, but expressed some reservation regarding the lack of on-going reporting and updates so the general public could better understand what actions and accomplishments emanate from the adopted plan. The central theme was to place an emphasis on carrying through with implementation and monitoring our progress toward key outcomes. A third important observation came forward that expressed a desire to have some way to continue to have citizen input and involvement after the plan is adopted. The actual details are yet to be worked out, but it was expressed repeatedly that the community members who participated on the focus groups represented a very valuable asset that could in some way assist in moving forward the ideas and concepts expressed in the plan. Some important topics are not specifically addressed in this phase of the Community Plan Update. Many important community programs and their associated strategies and actions may not be discussed in this broad document. The review of these public policies, programs, and directions should be reviewed as part of the process of aligning our resources and programs to support the community priorities identified in this update process. This type of assessment and alignment should involve both public and private partners who have a role in making our community the kind of place envisioned by all of those who’ve contributed to this plan. The tentative schedule moving forward from the May 24, 2011 Community Checkpoint meeting is as follows:

1176 1177 1178 1179 1180 1181 1182 1183 1184 1185 1186

May 24, 2011 June 6, 2011 June 8, 2011 July 7, 2011 August 10, 2011

Community Checkpoint Meeting Focus Group Representatives work session Joint Planning Commission & City Council briefing on the work of the focus groups Planning Commission public hearing City Council public hearing

For further information, you may review this document on the City of Hampton’s website or you may contact the Community Development Department at 727-6140.

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Comments Received So Far (as of May 16, 2011):
Community Appearance, Pride, and Image: Strategy 3 – Improve standards to eventually eliminate billboards and nonconforming signs. o Comment: I think it is good but I know other City staff disagree. Whatever happens, I just want all City departments to acknowledge this when (if) Council approves it. Community Health/Healthy Families: Hampton will create a community-wide understanding and acceptance of the concept that “community health” is the responsibility of all segments of the community - public and private, individuals and organizations. o Comment: Hampton can’t “create” understanding, especially not with the entire community. Economic Base, Regionalism, Transportation, and Infrastructure: Goal 2 Measurement – Number of new businesses on an annual basis. o Comment: If we track new businesses then it doesn’t consider the number that we lose to Newport News or failure. Can we use retail revenue or total number of businesses? Environment & Quality of Life: Goal 1 Strategies – Mandatory recycling o Comment: This doesn’t acknowledge that the City doesn’t recycle in all of its buildings. Lifelong Learning & Education: Goal 2 – Measurement - Explore charter schools o Comment: Are charter schools really the only measurement here? It’s not even measureable. How about the Waldorf or Montessori schools or trade schools? There is no mention of partnering with private schools (faith-based or secular) to leverage their resources. Public Safety: o Goal 1: Hampton will enhance communication activities to improve perception so that the public has a greater awareness of public safety programs.  Comment: It is surprising that the word “gang” is not mentioned. Is it implied in Goal #1? o Goal 5: Hampton will provide strong codes enforcement, and crime and fire prevention programs. o Goal 5: Measurements – Public Safety representatives will work with community organizations and city departments to increase activities to improve areas of the city where there is a significant need for blight removal.
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Comment: It’s hard to measure “will work with.” Can we track 311 calls or Code enforcement? This also ties directly with the Housing and Neighborhood goals. Comment: Thanks for the review. I’m satisfied with the result. Comment: I have read the document and everything looks good. I would like to hear more on the plans to create/expand bike trails. I think this is a good idea. I have reviewed the material you sent along and I believe it is consistent with what our committee (Economic Base, Regionalism, Transportation & Infrastructure) agreed to at our last meeting. The material generated by the other committees seems reasonable and well thought out and I certainly am pleased to endorse. I have attached one page that includes a few comments about the May 2 version of the Community Plan Discussion Draft (grammatical comments incorporated into the draft). I made a few editorial suggestions and corrected a few typos. All in all it looks pretty good considering the number of people you had to coordinate, numerous task forces and a tight schedule in which to develop the plan. I did not comment on this specifically in the attachment, but measures can be a challenge. In looking through the work of each group, the measures seem to vary (some I read were not what I consider measures, but more a way to determine a measurement). Anyway, thanks for the opportunity to be involved. I really enjoyed meeting the small business owners present. You had a strong sense that most who participated really love their community.

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Community Plan Update: 2011
Appendix A: Summary Table of Goals

Goal #1 Goal #2 Goal #3 Goal #4 Goal #5 Goal #1 Goal #2 Goal #3 Goal #4 Goal #5

Community Appearance, Pride, and Image Aesthetic improvement of all major corridors and gateways, including interstate entrances and exits. Optimize appearance, pride, and image in our water assets Maintain and enhance neighborhood quality, appearance, and pride Support and communicate Hampton’s excellence Capitalize on Hampton’s history as a source of pride Community Health/Healthy Families Hampton will create a coordinated system that provides information about health and about access to health-related services Hampton will implement a regular community health planning and improvement process Hampton will create a culture of disease prevention and health promotion Hampton will maximize awareness of health education resources Hampton will create a community-wide understanding and acceptance of the concept that “community health” is the responsibility of all segments of the community – public and private, individuals and organizations Diverse Population, Youth, and Seniors

Goal #1 Goal #2 Goal #3 Goal #4

All people will be viewed as a rich resource to their community where their needs are accommodated and their contributions welcomed.
Easy accessibility of all resources and services for all citizens. City of Hampton policies and procedures and implementation of those policies and procedures are inclusive of the diversity in Hampton. All people will have an opportunity to experience world-class cultural and leisure activities in Hampton. Economic Base, Regionalism, Transportation, and Infrastructure Hampton will be aggressive in its efforts to enhance the region’s worldwide economic competitiveness through a shared vision and collaborative actions among the region’s communities Hampton will strengthen its economic base through its workforce development efforts and by facilitating development of small businesses, enhancing relationships with major institutions in the city, and capitalizing on its natural and physical assets Hampton will maintain and enhance its existing infrastructure to ensure it exceeds the expected useful life and will expand its infrastructures to meet future challenges and changes regarding advanced communication systems, building for sustainability, as well as the management of coastal and storm water flooding Hampton will create and enhance local and regional transportation options for residents and visitors by supporting urban development patterns and implementing master plans for strategic investment areas 38

Goal #1

Goal #2

Goal #3

Goal #4

Goal #1 Goal #2 Goal #3 Goal #4 Goal #1 Goal #2 Goal #3 Goal #4

Goal #1 Goal #2 Goal #3

Goal #4 Goal #5

Goal #1 Goal #2 Goal #3 Goal #4 Goal #5 Goal #6 Goal #7 Goal #1 Goal #2

Goal #3 Goal #4

Environment & Quality of Life Hampton proactively practices environmental stewardship of its natural resources and assets Hampton provides multi-modal connectivity within and between strategic investment areas and surrounding neighborhoods Hampton has improved public access to coastal and other natural environments Hampton provides high quality environmental infrastructure Good Government Seek and provide more opportunities to engage and respond and inform citizens on issues pertinent to the community by the use of multiple means of communication A competent city workforce will educate citizens on and provide for accessible, efficient, and fairly distributed services Hampton will identify, plan, and adopt innovative opportunities for citizen involvement, work, education, and recreation Hampton will strive to be open and ethical by providing financial accountability, communication, and transparency Housing and Neighborhoods Hampton neighborhoods will offer a mix of housing that is attractive, affordable, and accessible to accommodate all citizens Neighborhoods and schools will have a strong partnership Hampton neighborhoods will offer accessible pedestrian and cycle friendly choices to promote mobility of citizens and to offer accessibility to neighborhood services and amenities Hampton will reinvest in neighborhoods by enforcing state blight regulations, city property maintenance codes, and beautification and incentive programs Hampton will preserve, maintain, and perpetuate the history, culture, and architecture of its neighborhoods Lifelong Learning & Education By 2030, every citizen in Hampton will be educated and trained to compete in the global workforce Develop multiple education paths that lead to working levels/occupations Ensure all students/citizens are aware of resources available throughout Hampton Market education and lifelong learning success stories/statistics Ensure all children enter school ready to learn Provide ongoing education resources that support citizens, post secondary Attract, develop, and retain highly qualified teachers for children and adults Public Safety Hampton will enhance communication activities to improve perception so that the public has a greater awareness of public safety programs Hampton will work with community organizations and national and regional authorities to improve and widely communicate emergency preparedness plans for catastrophic events Hampton will improve its record of public safety success in providing services as reflected in appropriate public safety standards Hampton public safety personnel will receive ongoing comprehensive training in best practices 39

Goal #5

Hampton will provide strong codes enforcement and crime and fire prevention programs

Hampton Comprehensive Waterway Management Plan Steering Committee (Note: The charge given to this Committee is somewhat more extensive than other focus groups. The work presented represents a snapshot of the “work in progress” and not a final recommendation of the Committee) Shoreline Protection Subcommittee Goal #1 Develop a shoreline management plan Goal #2 Develop education programs to educate citizens about preventive measures, recommendations, etc. Tidal Flooding Subcommittee Focus Area #1 Conduct a comprehensive study of current and probable future tidal flooding impacts Focus Area #2 Development of regulations to reduce future tidal flooding property damage Focus Area #3 Public Education Focus Area #4 Funding of public/private improvements to mitigate tidal flooding impacts Storm water Management Subcommittee Goal #1 Increase the quality of storm water by identifying cost effective solutions to comply with storm water and environmental regulations Goal #2 To minimize the impact of storm water flooding through identifying cost effective solutions that maximize effective drainage Dredging (Waterway Management and Maintenance) Subcommittee Goal #1 Assign one department to develop an integrated Waterway Management Plan

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