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Specimens of Bushman Folklore (1911) - The Late Bleek Ph.D. & L.C.Lloyd

Specimens of Bushman Folklore (1911) - The Late Bleek Ph.D. & L.C.Lloyd

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The book records eighty-seven Xam Bushman legends, myths and other traditional stories. Specimens of Bushman Folklore has been considered the cornerstone of study of the Bushmen and their religious beliefs. This book, as well as the situation of the bushmen during their disappearance in south-africa and the lives of Bleek has been covered in a Dutch documentary series called 'Het uur van de Wolf' ('The Hour of the Wolf').

The book records eighty-seven Xam Bushman legends, myths and other traditional stories. Specimens of Bushman Folklore has been considered the cornerstone of study of the Bushmen and their religious beliefs. This book, as well as the situation of the bushmen during their disappearance in south-africa and the lives of Bleek has been covered in a Dutch documentary series called 'Het uur van de Wolf' ('The Hour of the Wolf').

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BUSHMAN FOLKLORE

BY THE LATE W. H I BLEEK
. .

AND L.C.LLOYD
-r*-r..

,

PH

.

D.

E
'frt-

>i
—V-

4

^f.

|iil''^li4iuninlri,i"IJr''l4

6^

BOUGHT WITH THE INCOME FROM THE

SAGE

ENDOWMENT FUND
THE GIFT OF
1S91

A:%^MD'i

I.J.x"l.."TM

Cornell University Library

GR360.B9 B64
Specimens of Bushman
folklore,

collected

3
olin

1924 029 904 830

Cornell University Library

The
tine

original of

tiiis

book

is in

Cornell University Library.

There are no known copyright

restrictions in
text.

the United States on the use of the

http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924029904830

Wipo;ai(U.

FlempelX Pyrev

'TiT^j-lj,-

II

SPECIMENS
OF

BUSHMAN FOLKLORE
COLLECTED BY

The late W. H.

I.

BLEEK,

Ph.D.

AND

L.

C.

LLOYD

EDITED BY THE LATTER

WITH AN INTBODUCTION BY

GEOEGE McCALL THEAL,

D.Lit., LL.D., etc.
;

TEANSLATION INTO ENGLISH^; ILLUSTRATIONS

AND APPENDIX.

LONDON
GEORGE ALLEN & COMPANY,
RusKiN House, 44
Ltd.
'

&

45
1911.

Rathbone Place, W.

HERTFORD: PRINTED BY LTD. STEPHEN AUSTIN AND SONS,

TO ALL FAITHFUL WORKERS.

PREFACE.
With
all its

shortcomings, after

difficulties,

this

folk-lore is laid

many and great volume of specimens of Bushman before the public. As will be seen

from the
of

lists

Bushman

given in Dr. Bleek's "Brief Account Folk-lore and other Texts", Cape
in

"Short Account of Further Material collected", London, 1889, the selections which have been made for it form but a very small portion of the Bushman native literature collected. "Whether future days will see the remainder of the manuscripts, as well as the fine

Town, 1875, and

my

Bushman

collection of

copies of

Bushman

pictures
is

made by
a question

the late Mr. G.

W.

Stow, also published

that only time can answer.

In the spelling

of the native text in the

volume

now completed,

various irregularities will be observed. These have their source chiefly ia two causes. One of these was the endeavour always to write down, as nearly as possible, the sounds heard at the time; the other, that Dr. Bleek's orthography was of a more scientific kind than that of the other collector, whose ear had been mainly accustomed to English sounds. In a few instances, the "new lines" in the native text and translation do not correspond; as the Bushman and English proofs had often to be sent

over separately to

Germany

for correction.

The corresponding marginal numbers, by the side of the native texts and the translation (which refer
to the pages in
is

the

original manuscripts),

will,

it

hoped, be of material assistance to those wishing

to

study the

Bushman language from

this volume.

Till

PREFACE.

With regard to the extra signs used in printing the Bushman texts, it should be explained that
Dr. Bleek,
four
in.

order to avoid

still

further confusion

in the signs used to represent

clicks,

adopted the

marks for these which had already been employed by some of the missionaries in printing Hottentot. He added a horizontal line at the top of the mark used for the dental click, for the
I,

sake of additional clearness in writing
of

(see

the table

signs

on page

438
;

of

the

Appendix).

This

addition he intended to discontinue
for printing should

when

the time

in the table of in 1874.
table,

come and it no longer appears signs he prepared for the printer
clicks,

The sequence of the has also somewhat substituted the mark ^ instead
he
used
1

in this last
;

altered
of

and

has

the previously

I

for the

" gentle croaking sound in the throat ".
,,

indicates the dental click.
,,
,, ,,

I

cerebral click.
lateral click.

II

,,

+

,,
,,

palatal click.
labial click.

O
X y ^

,,


,,


,,

an aspirated guttural, like German ch. a strong croaking sound in the throat. a gentle croaking sound in the throat.
the nasal pronunciation of a syllable.

~

=

under vowels, indicates a rough,
nunciation of them.
indicates the raised tone.*

deep

pro-

^ =
'

indicates

that

the

syllable

under

which

it

stands has a musical intonation.
indicates

an arrest of breath

(as in tfnara).

* The tone is occasionally the only distinguishing feature in words spelt otherwise alike, but having a different meaning.

PREFACE.

IX

o

placed under a

letter,

indicates a very short

pronunciation of

it.

- xmder a vowel, indicates a more or pronunciation of it.

less

open

h

indicates a ringing pronunciation of tlie n, as

in " song " in English.,
r placed over
is

n indicates that the pronunciation between that of the two consonants. There is also occasionally a consonantal sound met with in Bushman between r, n, and 1.

A

description of
list,

how
of

to

make

the

first

four clicks,

in this

follows; taken from Dr. Bleek's

"Com-

South African Languages", Part I, Phonology, pp. 12 and 13. The dental click is sounded by pressing the "tip " of the tongue against the front teeth of the upper " jaw, and then suddenly and forcibly withdrawing "it". (Tindall.) It resembles our interjection of annoyance.
parative
1

Grammar

The

cerebral

click

!

is

"sounded by curling up

" the tip of the tongue against the roof of the " palate, and withdrawing it suddenly and forcibly".
(Tindall.)

The
"

lateral click

II

is,

" according

to

Tindall,

in

Nama

Hottentot generally articulated

by covering

" with the tongue the whole of the palate, and " producing the sound as far back as possible, " either at what Lepsius calls the faucal or the
" guttural point of the palate. European learners, " however, imitate the sound by placing the tongue

" against the side teeth and then withdrawing it." * * * similar sound is often made use of " in urging forward a horse."

"A

X

PREFACE.

The palatal click + is "soiinded by pressing the " tip of the tongue with as flat a surface as possible " against the termination of the palate at the gums, " and removing it in the same manner as during the
" articulation of the other clicks ".

The

labial click,

marked by Dr. Bleek O, sounds
of these

like a kiss.

In the arrangement
folk-lore,

specimens of
has

Bushman

Dr.

Bleek's

division

been followed.

The figures at the head of each piece refer to its number in one or other of the two Bushman Eeports mentioned above. The letter B. or L. has been added, to show in which report it was originally included. " The Eesurrection of the Ostrich," and the
parsing of a portion of
for
it,

were not

finally

prepared
it

the printer

when

Dr. Bleek died; and

was,

here and there, very

difficult to be sure of what had been his exact intention, especially in the parsing; but the papers were too important to be omitted.

The givers of the native literature in the "Specimens" are as follows: \a\Imnta (who contributes two pieces) was a youth who came from a part of the country in or near the Strontbergen (lat. 30° S., long. 22° E.). He was with Dr. Bleek at Mowbray from August 29th, 1870,
to

October 15th, 1873.

WMbho or "Dream" (who furnishes fifteen pieces) was from the same neighbourhood as Mkunta. He was an excellent narrator, and patiently watched until a sentence had been written down, before proceeding with what he was telling. He much
enjoyed the thought that the Bushman stories would become known by means of books. He was with Dr. Bleek from February 16th, 1871, to October 15th,

PREFACE,

XI

1873.

He

intended to return,
but, died before

later,

to
so.

help us at

Mowbray,

be could do
Jantje "

\han^kass'6

or

" Klein

(son-in-law

to

Mdbbo) contributes thirty-four pieces to this volume. He also was an excellent narrator; and remained with us from January 10th, 1878, to December, 1879. Dla.\kwmn gives fifteen pieces, which are in the Katkop dialect, which Dr. Bleek found to vary slightly from that spoken by Wkdbho and \a\kunta. He came from the Katkop Mountains, north of Calvinia (about 200 miles to the west of the homes of \a\kuhta and Wkdhbo). He was at Mowbray from
before

Christmas,
7th,

1873,

to

March

18th,

1874,

returning on June 13th, 1874, and remaining until

March

1876.

\kweiten ta Wken (a sister of Did\kwain'' s) contributes

She three pieces, also in the Katkop dialect. remained at Mowbray from June 13th, 1874, to January 13th, 1875. \j(dken-an, an old Bushman woman (fifth in a group of Bushman men and women, taken, at Salt River, in She was with 1884), contributes one short fragment.
us, for a little while, in

1884;

but, could not

make

herself

She longed to return she might be buried to her own country, so that with her forefathers.

happy

at

Mowbray.

To the
Wkdbbo,

pieces

of

native

literature

dictated
prefixed.

no giver's

name

has

been

by To

those supplied by the other native informants, their respective names have been added.
Portraits of Wkdbbo, Did\kwmn, his sister, \kweiten ta
Wken, Ihanfkass^o,

the illustrations;
oversight, that of

and \j(dken-aii, will be seen among from which, by an unfortunate \a\kuhta has been omitted.

XU
The few

PEEFACE.
texts in the language of the "

Bushmen ",

met with beyond Damaraland, which are given in the Appendix, are accompanied by as adequate an English translation as can at present be supplied. These texts were furnished by two lads, whose portraits will also be found among the illustrations. The extract given below, from the Bushman Eeport of 1889, sent in to the Cape Government, will explain a little more about them. The additional signs required for the printing of the \kun texts are almost similar to those employed in printing the Specimens of Bushman Folk-lore, but fewer in number. " It had been greatly desired by Dr. Bleek to gaiu information regarding the language spoken by the Bushmen met with beyond Damaraland; and, through the most kind assistance of Mr. W. Coates Palgrave (to whom this wish was known), two boys of this race (called by itself !kun), from the country to the north-east of Damaraland, were, on the
calling themselves \kun,

1st of September, 1879, placed with us, for a time, at

Mowbray.

They were

finally,

according

to

promise, sent back to Damaraland, on their
to

way

their own country, under the kind care of Mr. Eriksson, on the 28th of March, 1882. From

these lads,

much
were,

named respectively jnanni and Tamme, valuable information was obtained. They while with us, joined, for a time, by

of the authorities, on the 25th of March, 1880, by two younger boys from the same region, named luma and Da. The latter was very young at the time of his arrival and was believed by the elder boys to belong to a different tribe of jkun. luma left us, for an employer found for him
;

permission

PREFACE.
"

XUl

by Mr. George Stevens, on the 12th of December, " 1881, and Da was replaced in Mr. Stevens' kind " care on the 29th of March, 1884. The language
" spoken by these lads (the two elder of whom, " coming from a distance of fifty miles or so apart, " differed slightly, dialectically, from each other) " proved unintelligible to UiaMkass'o, as was his to " them. They looked upon the Bushmen of the " Cape Colony as being another kind of [kuii; and " IhaMkass^o, before he left us, remarked upon the " existence of a partial resemblance between the '' language of the Grass Bushmen, and that spoken
" by the
jkuh.

As
;

far

as

I

could

observe,

the

" language spoken by these lads appears to contain " four clicks only the labial click, in use among " the Bushmen of the Cape Colony, etc., being the
" one absent ; and the lateral click being pronounced " in a slightly different manner.[*] The degree of " relationship between the language spoken by the " !kun and that of the Bushmen of the Cape Colony

" (in -which the main portion of our collections had " been made) has still to be determined. The two " elder lads were fortunately also able to furnish

"some specimens

of their native traditionary lore;

" the chief figure in which appears to be a small " personage, possessed of magic power, and able to " assume almost any form who, although differently " named, bears a good deal -of resemblance to the The " Mantis, in the mythology of the Bushmen.
;

the earlier[*] It will be observed that, in some instances, in colleoted [kuh texts, given in the Appendix, the mark jl has been used to denote the lateral click, in words where this differed
slightly in its pronunciation

Later, this attempt to distinguish

from the ordinary lateral click, II. these two sounds apart was

discontinued.

XIV

PREFACE.

" power of imitating sounds, both familiar and " unfamiliar to them, as well as the actions of " animals, possessed by these boys, was astonishing. " They also showed a certain power of representation,

by brush and pencil. The arrows made by them " were differently feathered, and more elaborately " so than those in common use among the Bushmen " of the Cape Colony." *
"

As
of
of

the

suggestion has been advanced that the
following facts will be
at

painters and sculptors were from different divisions

the

Bushman race, the interest. One evening,
if

Mowbray,

in 1875,

he could make pictures. smiled and looked pleased; but what he The latter The following morning, said has been forgotten. early, as Dr. Bleek passed through the back porch of his house on his way to Cape Town, he perceived
Dr. Bleek asked DidXkwain

a small drawing, representing a family of ostriches, pinned to the porch wall, as DidXkwain's reply to
his question.

(See illustration thirty-three.)
also told me,

The

same Bushman

on a later occasion, that

his father, yad-ttin,

had himself chipped pictures of

gemsbok, quaggas, ostriches, etc., at a place named \kami^ where these animals used to drink before the coming of the Boers. Some other drawings

made by Did\kwain^
and the
trations.
\Tiun

as well as a

few by

lAan+^ass'o,
illus-

boys, will be found

among the
it

has not been easy to place them appropriately as regards
* Taken from "A Short Account of further Bushman Material " collected. By L. C. Lloyd. Third Report concerning Bushman

In the arrangement of these,

" Eesearches, presented to both Houses of the Parliament of the

"Cape
1889.

of

Good Hope ".—London

:

David Nutt, 270, Strand.—

pp. 4

&

5.

Ostriches (male, females, and

young

one).

Kw|-kkw^ra gwai.
Male.
Otii afra, Lin.

Kw|-kkw|ra
Female.

laityi.

Dialkw^in, March, 187S.

PREFACE.
the text,
translation
as

XV

-would

anything standing between text and materially hinder the usefulness

of the latter; and, for this reason, the

main portion

of the illustrations will be placed at the end of the

volume.

To show the

living activity of

the following instances

may be

time after Dr. Bleek's death, a a small room by herself, had been startled by an owl making a sound, like breathing, outside her

Bushman beliefs, Some little child, who slept in
given.

window
of

in

the

night.

Did\kwmn, who
countenance,
to

said,

This was mentioned to with a much-pleased expression
I

did
see

not

think
little

that

Dr.

would come
getting on
?

how

his

children

Bleek were

Later, I brought a splendid red fungus
a

wood

in the neighbourhood of the

home from Camp Ground,
After several

in order to ascertain its native name.

days, fearing lest

it

should decay, I asked \haMkass''o^
us, to

who was then with
and rain
occurred.

throw

it

away.

Shortly

afterwards, some unusually violent storms of wind

Something was said to him and \han^kass'd asked me if telling him to throw the fungus I did not remember away. He said, he had not done so, but had "put He explained that the fungus it gently down". was "a rain's thing"; and evidently ascribed the very bad weather, we were then having, to my
about the weather;

having told him

to

"throw

it

away".

To Dr. Theal, for his most kind interest in this work, and for his untiring help with regard to its publication, to Professor von Luschan, for his kind
efforts

to

promote the publication
pictures

of the

copies of

Bushman

made by

the late Mr. Q.

W.

Stow,

XVI
to

PREFACE.

for the copies of
so

Herrn Regierimgshaumeister a.d., H. Werdelmann, Bushman implements that he was good as to make for us, to my niece, Doris Bleek,
her invaluable help in copying
to

for

many

of

the

manuscripts and making the Index to this volume,

my niece, assistance, my most
and

Edith

Bleek,

for

much kind

grateful thanks are due.

L. C.
Chaelottenbtjbg, Geemakt. May, 1911.

LLOYD.

CONTENTS.
List op Illustrations
InIEODTTCTION

.......
I.

PAGE

xxi

XXV

A.

MYTHOLOGY, FABLES, LEGENDS, AND POETRY.
The Mantis.
of a Hartebeest

The Mantis assumes the form
Mantis

...

2

\ga%tnu-tsaxdu (the son of the Mantis), the Baboons, and the

.16
Leopard Tortoise
II.

The Story

of the

36

Sun and Moon.
44
56
66

The Children are sent to throw the sleeping Sun into the Sky The Origin of Death preceded by a Prayer addressed to the Toung Moon The Moon is not to be looked at when Game has been shot
;
.

III.

Stars.

The Girl of the Early Pace, who made Stars The Great Star, \gS^nu, which, singing, named

the Stars

What

the Stars say, and a Prayer to a Star

... ...
.

72 78

80 84

\h6-g\nuin-tdra, wife of the

Dawn's-Heart

Star, Jupiter

.

Ilia.

Other Myths.

The Son

of the

Wind
.

100 112

^kdgdra and \hmnii, who fought each other with Lightning
IV.

Animal

Fables.

The Hyena's Kevenge {First Version^ The Hyena's Revenge {Second Version) The Lion jealous of the Voice of the Ostrich The Resurrection of the Ostrich Part of the preceding Tale parsed by Dr. Bleek The Vultures, their elder Sister, and her Husband

122

124
126

....
.

136 144 154 162 170

Ddi-xirreten, the Lioness, and the Children

The Mason Wasp and

his

Wife

....

XVIU

CONTENTS.
V.
Legends.

PAOE

The Young Man
a Lion,

of the

Ancient Kace,

who was
.

carried off

by
174 192
198

when
;

asleep in the Field

A "Woman of the Early Eace and the Eain Bull The Girl's Story the Frogs' Story The Man who ordered his "Wife to cut off his Ears
. .

The ^nkrru and her Husband The Death of the Lizard
VI.

.

.

.

204 206 214

Poetry.

220 The Cat's Song 222 Song of the Caama Fox The 224 The Songs of the Blue Crane .228 The Old "Woman's Song {First Version) A Song sung by the Star \gSunM, and especially by Bushman 230 "Women
. . .

Sirius and

Canopus

230
232

The Song of the Bustard The Song of the Springbok Mothers WTcabld's Song on the Loss of his Tobacco Pouch The Broken String The Song of \nic\num.ma-\Ictviien

234
. .

.

......
— Adventures
. . .

234 236 238

B.
VII.

HISTOEY (NATURAL AND PEESONAL).
Animals and
their

Salits

with them


244

and Hunting.

The Leopard and the Jackal Doings of the Springbok

.

.

.244
246 264

Habits of the Bat and the Porcupine

The Saxicola Castor and the "Wild Cat The Baboons and WxdhiitenWxdliiten

A Lion's

Story

....
Hunting

The Man who found a Lion in a Cave Certain Hunting Observances, called \n&nna-ssi
\nd,nna-ssS.

264 258 260 270
particularly

Second Part.

Further information
of

with regard to the Treatment
Tactics in Springbok

Bones

.

274 284

.

CONTENTS.

XIX
PAGE

VIII.

Personal History.

\kd.Uo\ Capture and Journey to Cape
Wlablo's Capture and Journey to Cape

Town {First Account) Town ( S^co?!*? Account)

290

Whalloh Journey in the Eailway Train Wkabho^ Intended Eeturn Home

....
.

294 298 298
320

How

l^«»+^a«s'o's Pet Leveret

The Thunderstorm
IX.
Cutting
off

........
was
killed
. .

.316

Customs and Superstitions.
of the Little Finger,

the

Top
.

and Piercing Ears
328 330 330 338 342
348 348

and Nose
Cutting
off

the

Top

of the Little Pinger {Second Account)

Bushman Presentiments Doings and Prayers when Canopus and Sirius come out The Making of Clay Pots The Bushman Soup Spoon The Shaped Eib Bone The Bushman Drum and Dancing Battles The use of the \ffo'ih\goin, followed by an Account Bushman Dance
The Marking of Arrows The Adhesive Substance used by Bushmen

Preparation of the Feather Brushes used in Springbok Hunting

....... ....... .... ....... .......
in

350
352

of a

358

360 362 364
364 372 374
378

Mode
The

of getting rid of the evil Influence of

Making Arrows Bad Dreams

Concerning

Two

Apparitions

Jackal's Heart not to be eaten

Whdra and

TM

How
Signs

Ttd

is

obtained

made by Bushmen
air

have gone

Earth thrown into the

Death

.....
of

.... ....
.

to

show in which

direction they

380 384
388

Appendix

A

few \Jcun texts with translation The Doings of \xue are many
\j(U^ as

Various Transformations of lx?e,

|»Sx«m«

Further Changes

form
.

Ix^^ as a Wgui Tree and as a Fly

404 404 404 404 406

XX
Water and
and dies

CONTENTS.

\xy.e as

as other things.

fire

........
.
. . .

In his own form he rubs
40fi

Prayer to the Young Moon

.414
416 424 428

The Treatment of Thieves The |x?i (Four pieces of Wood used Beating the Ground with a stone
Certain animals,

for Divining Purposes)

.....
.

.

when

seen near graves, to be respected
. .
.

A

Snake which announces Death
Report,
etc.,

.

428 430
434 439 439

Dr. Bleek's

regarding

Photographs sent to
. .

England by Government, December 23, 1871 Undated Fragment, found among Dr. Bleek's Papers, apparently written between 1870 and 1873 Letter from Dr. Bleek to the Secretary for Native Affairs Report concerning Bushman Researches, by W. H. I. Bleek, Ph.D. Printed by order of the House of Assembly
. . .

in 1873

Index

to

Specimens

of

Bushman Folklore

....

441

449

.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
1.

Coloured Portrait of Ukabbo, Dr. Bleek's old

Bushman Teacher From a Painting hy W.
2.

....
Schroder.
Schroder.

Frontispiece.

Coloured Portrait of lhaii4:kass'5

To precede page
To face page „

1

From
3.

a Painting hy
of

W.

Photograph
Photograph

DiajkwaJn

....
sister to

42
70

4.

of Ikweiten ta liken,

5.

Photograph

Diajkwpn of Bushman Men and Women, including Ixaken-an, who is fifth in
the group

..... .....
c
.


98

'

Taken at Salt Eiver in 1884.
of a

6.

Photograph

Bushman,

120

From
7.

the BreaJcwater.

Pencil Drawing hy \han^kass'd, showing the
ravines
in

and homes of the children
story
of

the

Ddixerreten,
Children.

the
{See

Lioness,

and

the

page 163.)
belongs

The

pencil sketch above
to

properly

the
.

drawings
172
l.d. 2.d.

made by the jkun boys
8.

Photograph

of

and

3.d.

....
Hunting

Three Bushmen,

172 218

From
9.

the

Breakwater.

Photograph of a Grass Bushman
Taken at Cape Town in 1880.

10.

Photograph

of a

Bushman Family
.

242 288 288
with

Taken at Salt River in 1884.
1 1

Tactics in Springbok

Drawn
12.

hy \han^ha8S^d.

Photograph of Bushman Children Taken at Salt River in 1884. Photograph
of

13.

Bushman

Digging-stick

.....
"Woman

326

Taken at Salt River in 1884.

xxu
14.

LIST OF ILLUSTE,A.TIONS. Four jkuii Boys, Tamme, luma, and Da
of
.

Photograph

Inanni,
. •

To face pac/e 402

15.

Group

of

Bushmen
Group
a.

a.

{See Appendix, page 437.)

Photographed at the Breakwater Convict Station about 1871.
15».

Key

to

(1) Ihankum, "Marcus." (2) Khauru, "Soopie."

(20) Kietfontein. (26) Strontbergen. (72)

" (3) jherri-i,

Oud

Toontje."

N.W.

of Strontbergen.

(4) ixaitatin, "Lellerbay." (5) Tshorru, " Cornells." (6) Kusi, "

(28) Dr. Hahn. (34) Strontbergen.

Koos Pleitje."
"Klaas."
Fix."

(22)

Among

Boers.

(7) Ixwariitten, "Jacob Nel."
(8) Gautarru,

(52) Witteklip.
(28)
]Sr."W. of

Strontbergen.

" Coos Toontje." (9) jgubbu,
(10)
16.
ilioe,

(52)

N.W.

of Strontbergen.

"Adam

(67) Haarfontein.

17.

Group of Bushman b. Same men as the preceding, Photograph of Ukabbo. {Full face.)
Taken at
the

Breakwater, 1871.
{Side face.)

18.

Photograph
Taken at
jgoi'n-jgoin.

of llkabbo.
the

Breakwater in 1871.

19.

{See page ^5^.)

Brawn by Herr H. Werdelmann. 20 Bushman Dancing Eattles. {Half si%e. See page Z53.) Brawn by JSerr H. Werdelmann. 21 (1) Plaything made by jkun. (2) The Bushman Soup Spoon. {Nearly half si%e. See page Brawn by Merr H. Werdelmann. 22. Instruments similar to jgdin-jgdin, made by the Ikun. Brawn by Serr S. Werdelmann.
23.

3i9.)

A

shaped rib bone, used for eating certain food.
of actual
site.

{Two-thirds

See page 349.)

24. (1)

Brawn by Serr H. Werdelmann. Arrow made by the jkun. {3alfsi%e.) {One-sixth actual size.) (2) Bushman Arrow.
{a) Section

showing red marks by which the

aiTows

are

recognized by Bushmen.

Brawn
Brawn

by Herr

H. Werdelmann.
Gemsbok, and Springbok.

25. Hartebeest, Steinbok,

by \han^kass'6.

.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
26. Porcupines

XXUl
to

and Mierkats.

A Jackal supposed

be chasing the

latter.

Brawn

by [han^kass'o.
Anteater,

27. Porcupines,

and

Birds

called

+nerru.

{See

page 207.)

Brawn
28«.

hy \hah^lcass'6.

28. Footprints of Porcupine at one of the entrances to its hole,

The Mountains into which the genus Agama) was changed. Brawn hy \hak^kass'6.
and Ostrich.

jkhaii

(a

lizard

of the

{See page 215.)

29. Blue Cranes

{See page 225.)

30.

Brawn hy \hah^kass'o. Bushman Huts. Brawn hy \han^hass' 6

31.

A

"Water-bull".

Brawn
32.

hy BialJcwam.

Male and Female Gemsbok.

Brawn
33.

hy BicAJcwain.
{See Preface, page xiv.)

Family

of Ostriches.

Brawn hy
33». Bustards

B'laXIcwain.

Male and Female.
hy BiaXkwmn.

{See page 233.)

Brawn
Brawn
35.

34. Lizards of the

Genus ^yama.

{See page 215.)

by BidVkwain.

Male and Female Mantis.

Brawn
36. Ixue.

hy BidUcwain.

{Seepage 405.)
hy \nanni.
{See page 405.)

Brawn Brawn Brawn
39.

37. Ixue as the plant Inaxane.

hy \nanni.

38. Ix'ie as a tree

by day and himself by
{See page iOT .)

night.

hy \nanni.

Ixue as a llgui-tree. Brawn hy \nahni.

40. Ixye as a Ikui-tree.

Brawn hy

\nanni.

41. Ix'ie as a jkan-a.

Brawn Brawn

hy \nanni.
hy Tamme.

42. Ixue as an Elephant.

XXIV
43.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
with
hollow in

The

llgue-tree,

a

which rain-water has

collected.

(See pages 432 and 433.)

Drawn
44.

hy \nanni.

A

little

child asleep in the shade of a tree.

Brawn

hy \nanni.

45. jganjgahni or jganjgannishe.

Brawn
46.

hy \nanni.
is

A

Grave (the body

placed in a hole at the side).

Brawn
47. Pieces
of

hy \nanni.

Wood
hy Herr

shaped by
{Full she.)

the

jkun, used

by them

for

Divining.

Brawn
Brawn
48.

S. Werdelmann.
fire).

iTa. riresticks (used for rubbing

hy \nanni.

Igonllna (an edible root).

Brawn
49. Ilhuru.

hy Tainme.

A

ground-plant.

Apparently drawn hy Tamme.
50. Beast of Prey, Fish,

and Tree.

Brawn

hy Tamme.

mTRODUCTION.
The Bushmen were members
hiiman species that in
the
all

of a

division of the

probability once occupied

whole,

or
It

nearly the

whole,
that
partly

of

the

African

continent.
totally

would seem
or

exterminated

they were either exterminated and

partly absorbed

by more robust races pressing down

from the north, except in a few secluded localities where they could manage to hold their own, and that as a distinct people they had disappeared from nearly the whole of Northern and Central Africa before white men made their first appearance theie. Schweinfurth, Junker, Stanley, Von "Wissmann,*

and other explorers and residents

in the equatorial
:

* The following volumes ma}^ be referred to Schweinfurth, Dr. Georg: The Heart of Africa, Tliree Years' Travels and, Adventures in the Unexplored Regions of Central Africa, from 1868 to 1871. Two crown octavo volumes, published in

London (date not given). Junker, Dr. Wilhelm
:

Travels in Africa during the Tears

1875-

1886.

Translated from the

Three demy octavo
Stanley,

German by A. H. Keane, P.R.G.S. volumes, published in London in 1890-2.
:

Henry M.

In Bwrhest Africa or

the Quest, Rescue,

and

Retreat of Emin, Governor of Eqiiatoria. published in London in 1 890.

Two demy octavo

volumes,

von Wissmann, Hermann
Africa from the Congo
Translated from the
to

:

My Second Journey
Zambesi in
the
J.
.

through Equatorial

the

Years 1886 and 1887.

German by Minna
:

A Bergmann.

A demy

octavo volume, published in London in 1891. Ten Years in Equatoria and the Return Casati, Major Gaetano

with

Emin

Pasha.

Translated from the original Italian Manuscript

by the Hon. Mrs. J. Eandolph Clay assisted by Mr. I. Walter Savage Landor. Two royal octavo volumes, published at London and New York in 1891. Burrows, Captain Guy The Land of the Pigmies. A demy octavo
:

volume, published in London in 1898.

XXVI
regions,
still

INTRODUCTION.

who have had

intercourse with the pygmies

existing in the depths of the dark forest west

given descriptions of these people which show almost beyond a doubt that they and the Bushmen of South Africa are
of

the Albert Nyauza, have

one in race.
same,
if

northern

we allow for the pygmy being due
and
the

All the physical characteristics are the full open eye of the
to

his

living in forest

gloom,
southern

sunken
to

half-closed
life

Bushman

his

eye of the being passed in the

glare of an unclouded sun.

The average height

of adult

male Bushmen, as

given by Fritseh and other observers from careful measurement, is 144'4 centimetres or 56*85 inches.

Yon Wissmann

gives the height of some pygmies
centimetres,

that he measured as from 140 to 145
or about the same.

Schweinfurth's description not only of the bodily

but

of

the

mental

characteristics

of

his

pygmy

would hold good
Junker's
the

taken on and no one acquainted with Bushmen can read the charming account of the imp Blasiyo, given by Mrs. E. B. Fisher in lier book On the Borders of Pygmy Land, without recognising the aborigine of South Africa. Whether he is blowing a great horn and capering under the dining-room window, or caning the big Bantu men in the class wliich he is teaching to read in

for one of the photographs might have

southern stock.

been

Orange

river

;

the mission school at Kabarole, in order to make them respect him, the portrait in words which Mrs. Fisher has given of that exceedingly interesting

pygmy
this

is

true to the
deals.

life of

one of those with

whom

volume

INTRODUCTION.

XXVll

remnants of a race that there is every reason to believe was once widely spread do not oflfer to ethnologists such an excellent subject for study as might at first thought be supposed, for it would appear from the observations of travellers that they have lost their original language, though
isolated

But those

altogether certain. Savages, though having the passions and the bodily strength of men, are children in mind and children in the facility with which they acquire other forms of speech than those of their parents. The rapidity with which a Bushman learned to speak Dutch or English, when he was brought into contact with white people in South Africa, was regarded as almost marvellous in the early days of the Cape Colony. And so the Bushmen or pygmies of the north, hemmed in by Bantu, although not on friendly terms with them, learned to speak Bantu dialects and may have lost their own ancient tongue. This is to be gathered from what travellers have related, but no one has yet lived long enough with them to be able to say definitely that among themselves they do not speak a distinct language, and use a corrupt Bantu dialect when conversing with strangers. But whether this be so or not, they must have lost much of their original lore, or it must at least have changed its form. South of the Zambesi and Kunene rivers, in addition to the Bushmen, two races had penetrated before our own. One of those was composed of the people termed by us Hottentots, who at a very remote time probably had Bushmen as one of its
this
is

not

ancestral

stocks,

and certainly

in

recent

centuries
girls.

had incorporated great numbers

of

Bushman

XXVlll

INTRODUCTION.

But these people never went far from the coast, though they continued their migrations along the border of the ocean all the way round from the Kunene to a little beyond the Umziravubu, where their further progress was stopped by the Bantu
advancing on that side. resided cannot be stated
strong reason
for

Where they
positively,

originally

but

there

is

believing

that

in

ancient

times

they occupied the territory

now

called

Somaliland.
history,

The

references

to

Punt

in early

Egyptian

and the
tioned
belief.
is

portrait

of the queen
different

of that country so

often described
as

by
of

writers,

may

be mento
this

one

the

indications

leading

Another,

and perhaps

stronger,

indication

the large

number

of drilled stones of the exact

and pattern of those used by the Hottentots different in form from those in South Africa that have been found manufactured by Bushmen in Somaliland, an excellent collection of which can
size

be

seen

in

the

ethnological

The Hottentots, according to came from some far distant country
east,

museum their own
in

in

Berlin.

traditions,

the north-

and they cannot have crossed the Kunene many centuries before Europeans made their first
appearance at the extremity of the continent. This is conclusively proved by the fact that the dialects

spoken by the tribes in Namaqualand and beyond Algoa Bay on the south-eastern coast differed so
slightly

that

the
of

people
other

of

one

could

understand
difiiculty,

the

people

the

without

much

which would certainly not have been the case if they had been many centuries separated. They had no intercourse with each other, and yet towards
the close of the seventeenth century an interpreter

INTRODUCTION.

XXIX
of the

belonging to a tribe in the neighbourbood

Cape peninsula, when accompanying Dutch trading parties, conversed with ease with them all. In our present state of knowledge it is impossible to say when the Bantu first crossed the Zambesi, because it is altogether uncertain whether there were, or were not, tribes of black men in the
territory
of

now termed Ehodesia
present

before the ancestors

the
;

occupants

moved

down from

the

north

but those at present in the country cannot claim a possession of more than seven or eight hundred years. When the Europeans formed their
settlements, the area occupied by the Bantu was small compared with what it is to-day, and a vast region inland from the Kathlamba mountains nearly to the Atlantic shore was inhabited exclusively by Bushmen. That region included the whole of the present Cape province except the coast belt, the whole of Basutoland and the Orange Free State,
first

the greater part,

if

not the whole, of the Transvaal
of

province, and

much

Betshuanaland, the Kalahari,
in

and Hereroland.
of a

The paintings on rocks found

Southern Ehodesia at the present
not very
territory,

day afford proof

that

remote occupation by Bushmen of but they give evidence also that

the
as

big
well.

dark-coloured

Bantu

were

akeady there

By

were though young

the Hottentots and the Bantu the Bushmen regarded simply as noxious animals, and
girls

were usually spared and incor-

porated in the tribes of their captors to lead a life of drudgery and shame, all others who could be

little

entrapped or hunted down were destroyed with as mercy as if they had been hyenas. On the

^•x-x

INTRODUCTION.

immediate

border

of

the

Hottentot

and

Bantu

was thus away from that frontier line the Bushmen pursued their game and drank the waters that their fathers had drunk from time immemorial, without even the knowledge that men differing from
settlements there

constant strife

with the

ancient race, but

themselves existed in the world.

This was the condition of things when in the year 1652 the Dutch East India Company formed a station for refreshing the crews of its fleets on the shore of Table Bay, a station that has

South Africa, The had established themselves at Sofala a hundred and forty-seven years earlier, but they had never penetrated the country beyond the Bantu belt, and consequently never made the acquaintance From 1652 onward there was an of Bushmen, opportunity for a thorough study of the mode of living, the power of thought, the form of speech, the religious ideas, and all else that can be known of one of the most interesting savage races of the earth, a race that there is good reason to believe once extended not only over Africa, but over a

grown

into the present British

Portuguese

large

part

of

Europe,

over

South-Eastern Asia,

where many scientists maintain it is now represented by the Semang in the Malay peninsula, the Andamanese, and some of the natives of the Philippine islands, and possibly over a much greater portion of the world's surface, a race that had made little, if any, advance since the far distant days when

members

of

it

shot

their

flint-headed

arrows at

reindeer in France, and carved the figures of mammoths and other now extinct animals on tusks of
ivory
in

the

same

fair

land.

It

was truly

an

INTRODUCTION.

XXXI

ancient race, one of the most primitive that time

had left on the face of the earth. But there were no ethnologists among the earlywhite settlers, whose sole object was to earn their bread and make homes for themselves in the new country where their lot was cast. They too soon came to regard the wild Bushmen as the Hottentots and the Bantu regarded them, as beings without a right to the soil over which they roamed, as untamable robbers whom it was not only their interest but their duty to destroy. They took
wherever they chose, shot the game that the pygmies depended upon for food, and when these retaliated by driving off oxen and sheep, made open war upon the so-called marauders. It was impossible for pastoral white men and savage Bushmen who neither cultivated the ground nor owned domestic cattle of any kind And so, to live side by side in amity and peace. slowly but surely, the Europeans, whether Dutch or English, extended their possessions inland, the Hottentots Koranas and Griquas, abandoning the coast, made their way also into the interior, and the Bantu spread themselves ever farther and farther, until to-day there is not an acre of land Every in all South Africa left to the ancient race. man's hand was against them, and so they passed out of sight, but perished fighting stubbornly, disdaining compromise the very or quarter to the globe for last. There is no longer room on palaeolithic man. When I say every man's hand was against them, I do not mean to imply that no efforts at all were
possession
of

the

fountains

ever

made by white men

to save

them from absolute

XXXU

INTRODUCTION.

extinction, or that no European cast an eye of pity upon the unfortunate wanderers. On more than

one occasion about the beginning of the nineteenth
cattle,

century benevolent frontier farmers collected horned ebeep, and goats, and endeavoured to induce
of

adopt a pastoral life, but They could not change always without success. their babits suddenly, and so the stock presented to
parties
to

Bushmen

them was soon consumed.

The London Missionary

Society stationed teachers at different points

among

them, but could not prevail upon them to remain at any one place longer tban they were supplied In tbe middle of tbe same century with food. the government of the Orange River Sovereignty

bands of them, but by some blunder located a Korana clan between them, and that effort failed. Then many frontier farmers engaged families of Bushmen to tend their flocks and herds, which they did as a rule with the greatest fidelity until they became weary of such a monotonous life, and then they wandered away again. Other instances might be added, but they all ended in the same manner. The advance of the white man, as well as of the Hottentots and the Bantu, was unavoidably accompanied with the disappearance of the wild people. On the farms where a number of Bushman families lived white children often learned to speak their language, with all its clicks, and smacking of the lips, and guttural sounds, but this knowledge was of no use to anyone but themselves, and it died with them. They were incompetent to reduce it to writing, and too ill-educated to realise the
set

apart

reserves

for

two

little

value of the information theyjpossessed.

Here and

INTRODUCTION.
there a traveller

XXXlll

of scientific attainments, such as Dr. H. Lichtenstein, or a missionary of talent, such as

the reverend T. Arbousset, tried to form a vocabulary
of

Bushman

"words,

but as they did not understand
their lists

the language themselves, and there were no recognised

symbols
So

to represent the various sounds,

are almost worthless to philologists.
in 1857, when the late Bleek (Ph.D.), who was born at Berlin in 1827, and educated at the universities

matters

stood
I.

Dr.

Wilhelm H.

of

Bonn and
for

Berlin,

commenced

his

researches in

connection with the Bushmen.
qualified

He was

eminently

the task, as his natural bent was in

of philology, and his training had been of the very best kind, in that he had learned from it not to cease study upon obtaining his

the

direction

degree,

but

to

continue

educating

himself.

For

many

years after 1857, however, he did not devote

himself entirely, or

even mainly, to investigations

Bushmen, because of the difficulty of obtaining material, and also because he was intently engaged upon the work with which his reputation as a philologist must ever be connected,
regarding the

Comparative Grammar of South African Languages. In this book he deals with the Hottentot language and with the Bantu, the last divided into a large

A

In 1862 the first part of his valuable work appeared, in 1864 a small volume followed entitled Reynard the Fox in South Africa, or Hottentot Fables and Tales, and in 1869 the first

number

of

dialects.

section

of

the

second

part

of

his

Comparative

Grammar was

published.

everyone since its issue as of the highest value,

That work, regarded by and

which must always remain the standard authority

XXXIV
on
its

INTRODUCTION.

subject,

was never completed, for
of

in

1870

a favourable opportunity of studying the

Bushman

which Dr. Bleek at once availed himself, knowing that in the few wild people left he had before him the fast dying remnant of a primitive race, and that if any reliable record of that race was to be preserved, not a day must
language occurred,

be

lost in securing

it.

To abandon which offered
tion,

a

work

iu

which fame had been gained,
its

still

further celebrity in

prosecuobject,

and

to devote himself entirely to a

new

simply because the one could be completed by somebody else at a future time, and the other, if neglected
then, could never be done at
all,

shows such utter
self,

devotion to science, such entire forgetfulness of
that the

name of Dr. Bleek should be uttered not only with the deepest respect, but with a feeliag akin to
reverence.

How many men

of

science

are

there

in the world to-day

who would

follow so noble an

example ?

The task now before him was by no means a simple or an easy one. The few pure Bushmen that remained alive were scattered in the wildest and most inaccessible parts of the country, and it would have been useless to search for them there. A traveller indeed, who was prepared to live in a very rough manner himself, might have found a few of them, but his intercourse with them would necessarily have been so short that he could not study them
thoroughly.
nately for

But, fortunately for
the

science, unfortu-

wretched creatures themselves, the majesty of Eiiropean law had brought several of them within reach. That law, by a proclamation of the earl of Caledon, governor of the Cape Colony,

liN

JL

ItUJJ U

(J

XlUiN

.

issued on the 1st of

November 1809, had confounded them with the Hottentots, and made all of them
within the recognised boundaries British subjects,

but had placed them under certain restraints, which were intended to prevent them from roaming about at will. It had very little effect upon the wild people, however, who were almost as difficult to arrest on the thinly occupied border as if they had been baboons. Then, in April 1812, by a proclamation of Governor Sir John Cradock, their children, when eight years of age, if they had lived on a farm since their birth, were apprenticed by the local magistrate for ten years longer. In this proclamation also they were confounded with Hottentots, and it really had a considerable effect upon them, because it was no

uncommon
service,

circumstance for

Bushman

parents to leave

their infant children on farms

where they had been in
for a couple of years.

and not return perhaps

By

a colonial ordinance of the 17th of July 1828

all restraints

people,

of every kind were removed from these and they had thereafter exactly the same amount of freedom and of political rights as Europeans. It seems absurd to speak of Bushmen having political rights, for their ideas of government were so crude that their chiefs were merely leaders in war and the chase, and had no judicial powers, each individual but so liaving the right to avenge his own wrongs the law determined. It determined also that the ground upon which their ancestors for ages had hunted should be parcelled out ih farms and allotted to European settlers, and that if they went there afterwards and killed or drove away an ox or a score of sheep, they could be sentenced to penal servitude for several years. It seems hard on the face of it,
;

XXXvi

INTRODUCTION.

other but progress is remorseless, and there was no way of extending civilisation inland. The pygmy not hunter with his bow and poisoned arrows could

be permitted to block the way. But he, though he could not argue the matter, and regarded it as the most natural thing in the world for the strong to despoil the weak, being the

He was feeble one himself resented this treatment. the means of sustehungry too, terribly hungry, for
nance in the arid wastes where he was making his last stand were of the scantiest, and he longed for meat, such meat as his fathers had eaten before the Hottentots and the big black men and the white
farmers came into the country and slaughtered all And so he the game and nearly all of his kin.
tightened his hunger belt,

and crept stealthily to he could make observations without a hill-top, where anyone noticing him, and when night fell he stole down to the farmer's fold and before day dawned again he and his companions were gorged with flesh.

When
was

the farmer arose and discovered his loss there

hunt as a matter of course. Man and horse and dog were pressed into the chase, and yet so wily was the little imp, so expert in taking cover, and it must be added so feared were his poisoned ari'ows, that it was a rare thing for him to be captured. Once in a while, however, he was made a prisonei', and then if it could be proved that he had killed a shepherd he was hanged, but if he could be convicted of nothing more than slaughtering other men's oxen and sheep he was sent to a convict station for a few years. So it came about that Dr. Bleek found at the
a big

convict station close to

Capetown

several of the

men

INTRODUCTION.

XXXVll

he wanted. There were two in particular, whose terms of imprisonment had nearly expired, and who were physically unfit for hard labour. The govern-

ment permitted him

to take these

men

to his

own

residence, on condition of locking

them up

at night

until the remainder of their sentences expired. After they had returned to the place of their birth, two

obtained, who ere long were induced to proceed to their old haunts and prevail

other

Bushmen were

of their relatives to accompany them back again, so that at one time a whole family could be seen on Dr. Bleek's grounds. The material was thus obtained to work with, but first the language of the primitive people had to be learned, a language containing so many clicks and other strange sounds that at first it seemed almost impossible for an adult European tongue to master it. To this task Dr. Bleek and his sister-in-law^ Miss

upon some

Lucy
zeal,

C. Lloyd,

who had

boundless patience, untiring

and a particularly acute ear, devoted themselves, and persevered until their efforts were crowned with success. Symbols were adopted to represent the different sounds that are foreign to the European ear, and then it became possible to take down the exact words used by the Bushman narrators and to have the manuscript checked by repetition. Before the results of such prolonged labour were ready for publication, but not until a very large quantity of valuable matter had been collected, to the great loss of students of man everywhere Dr. Bleek died, 17th of August 1875. Miss Lloyd then continued during some years to collect further material from various individuals of the Bushman race, and after adding greatly to the stock on hand at her

XXXVlll
brother-in-law's

INTRODUCTION.
death,
in

proceeded to Europe with a view to arranging it properly and publishing it. Tor nine years she endeavoured, but in vain, to carry out this design, the subject not

1887 she

being considered by publishers one that would attract readers in sufficient number to repay the cost of
printing, as

that cost

owing

to the style

would necessarily be large, In 1896 of the Bushman text.
Co. undertook to get

Messrs.

Swan SouDenschein &

out a volume, but then, unfortunately. Miss Lloyd fell ill, and her impaired strength has since that
It has time delayed the completion of the work. only been at long intervals and by dint of much

what is here presented to the reader, with much more that may perhaps follow, has been This is a brief account of the manner got ready. in which the material was collected, and of the causes which have delayed its publication for so many years. It would be quite impossible to
exertion that

gather such information now.

As
stated,

to

the
of

value
this

for

scientific

purposes
deal
to

of

the

contents

volume,

a great
for
as

might be
say

but
as the

it

here,
of

cannot be book speaks
is

necessary
itself.

much

The

religion

the

Bushmen
as

made

clear

from their own
be,

recitals

such

a

subject

can
of

when

it

is

remembered that the minds
nected with their immediate

the narrators were
con-

like those of little children in all matters not

bodily wants.
stars
five

Their

views concerning the
utterly

sun,

absurd, but
if

years of age,

no better their unreasoning

six not informed, would probably give explanation. Their faith too, that is,
belief in

a

moon, and European child

seem
or

many

things that to an

lINTKUiJUUTlOJN.

XXXIX
is

adult European seem ridiculous,
of

seen to be that

Every reader of this book has mere infants. gone through the same stage of thought and mental power him or herself, and our own far remote ancestors must have had beliefs similar to those The civilised European at different of Bushmen.
stages
of

his

existence

is
its

a representative

of

the

whole human species in
the lowest
savagery.

progress

upward from
pity the
in
justified

We
we

may
are

therefore

ignorant

pygmy,
of

but

not

despising him.

On many
thrown in
one here.

their

customs a flood of light

is

this

volume, but I shall only refer to

In the early Dutch records of the Cape Colony there is an account of some Bushmen eating almost the whole of an animal, the intestines included, rejecting only two little pieces of flesh
containing

the

sinews

of
this,

the

thighs.

When
replied

questioned
that
it

concerning

they

merely

was their custom not to eat those parts, beyond which no information is given. Who could have imagined the cause of such a custom ? They had devoured parts tougher to masticate, so it That is all certainly was not to spare their teeth. that could be said of it, but here in this volume the reason is given, and how well it fits in with the belief of the wild people that certain men and animals could exchange their forms, that some animals in former times were men, and some men in former times were animals. Probably, however, the value of this volume
will be greatest to the philologist, as

the

original
to

Bushman

text,

which will be unintelligible
is

the

general reader,

printed

side

by

side

with the

Xl

INTRODUCTION,
translation.

Englisli

Students

of

the

growth,

of

ideas
in

language have thus the means of ascertaining how were expressed by a race of people so low
culture
as

the Bushmen.

Their vocabulary,

it

"What be seen, was ample for their needs. is that, though they had no word for a numeral higher than three, and though the plurals of many of their nouns were formed in
will
is

surprising

such a simple

manner

as

by

reduplication,

their

verbs were almost, if not quite, as complete and expressive as our own. The myths indicate a people in the condition of early childhood, but from the language it is evident that in the great chain of human life on this earth the pygmy savages represented a link

much

closer to the

end than

to that of the first beings

modern European worthy of the

name

of

men.

GEO. McCALL THEAL.
London, 1911.

\li

anA-kas's'o

Finm

a painting by

W. Schroder.

A.

MYTHOLOGY, FABLES, LEGENDS,

AND
1.

POETRY.

The Mantis.

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

I.— 13.

IKAGGEN DI jK'WA.
(2281)

iMggen

Iku a lk<5rruwa

Ikauken,

han di

jk'wa,

hail llkeillkei jk'wa

a Ikuka.

Han

Ikiiken
lla
;

ddauddau

luhitin Ikauken,

au Ikaukaken Iwkwa

au han ka,

(2282) Ikauken
Iki

(

) se

la

ha au

llkiirru,

au jkaukaken yauki

Igwatten.
Ini
i

Ikauka Ine

ha, au

han jgoujgduwa

tta ha, au
( )

ha

(2283)

llkeillkgfyan

u.

.Ikaukaken
ta,

+kakka hi

Ikagen
:

"Ik'wa kail Ike
"
i, sita

ha Ikuka."
ha a
.Ik^rri."

Ikaukaken Ikwe-i

jk'wa

;

si

se

Hiti Ikw^lkw^ hho
)ttiiwaii

(2284) llkiittenllkutten,*hin!>'aolkaggen. Ikaggen(
Ikdrrokenlkdrroken
li:!kali^ka.

siitten

I'hiti

hi

au

Ikauken
llwiyaki
ttu

Hin +kakka hi Ikagen: " jkann
«

au jk'wa ttu."
Inon
ii."

[kwakogen +kakken

:

<'

jkVa

kan

(2285)

(

)

Ha
Iki

llkap^aiten

+kakken
je

:

"He
;

ti,

hi tan

e,

jk'wa

yauki

ttwi

!,

au

e

l;^a

ha

ta jk'wa llkhoa 11^,

ha Ikuken,
(2286)
(

Ta

jk'wa llkwaii

lliiwa,

jk'wagen yduki

) Iki

l;^aixaga ttwi."
llka;^aiten llgda

Ha

hhd jk'wa

llgai,

han

llkd

Ha hi.

* Hin Ikwe au Ikaukko.

THE MANTIS IN FORM OF A HAETEBEEST.

L— 13.
B,

THE MANTIS ASSUMES THE

FORM OF

A HAETEBEEST.
The Mantis is one who cheated the children, by (2281) becoming a hartebeest, by resembling a dead hartebeest.

He

feigning death lay in front of the children,

when
sort of

the children went to seek gambroo {\kui, a

cucumber) ; because he thought (wished) that
( )

the children

should cut him up with a stone knife, (2282)

as these children did not possess metal knives.

The

children perceived him,

when he had

laid

himself stretched out, while his horns were turned backwards. The children then said to each ( ) other (2283)
:

"It is a hartebeest that yonder lies; it is dead." " Our harteThe children jumped for joy (saying) beest we shall eat great meat." They broke oflf stone knives by striking (one stone against another),* they skinned the Mantis. ( ) The skin of the Mantis (2284)
:

!

snatched

itself

quickly out of the children's hands.

They say
for

to

each other:

"Hold thou
!

strongly fast
:

Another child said me the hartebeest skin " The hartebeest skin pulled at me." Her elder sister said: "It does seem that the (2285) ( ) hartebeest has not a wound from the people who shot it; for, the hartebeest appears to have died of itself. Although the hartebeest is fat, (yet) the hartebeest has ( ) no shooting wound." (2286)

"

Her
beest,

elder sister cut o£E a shoulder of the harte-

and put

it

shoulder arose
* They break

down (on a by itself, it
by

bush).
sat

The hartebeest's down nicely (on the

off,

striking with one stone against another.

4

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ik'wa llgliten

lie, liiii

m

;

lim ss'9en akken, au

bin.
llko

(2287) (ku akken
lla

hi.
ui,

Han

Ikaii lilid

jkVa
Ilk6

tte, (

)

han

hi

;

hin

hin Ikonn akken
llgdiko,

M au Ohd.
au Ohd.
tatti,

Han
Hih
(

Ikau hho

jkVa
ss'oiii

ban

llkau llko hi
;

(2288)

fii,

hih

Oho a

tt'ain

au hih

Ohd

)

llken-1 hi.

Ha

llkap^aikogen
ti

Ika^
a,

Ikam

jk'wa

tteko.

Hin

tkakken,

e

:

" Ik'wa a
e,

ha

en-6ii

dda

Ine ddarra-

ken*: he yoa
(2289)

hi +kd-i, i."
;

Hih

di

Ikdmmeh

jkiikogen

(

)

+kakka

jkiiko

" Ikao Ikvra Ik'wa jkhdu, llj^aOua se Ikdmmeh jk'wa
Ina
;

td, llkap^ai Ike ssho,

ha se p^waia
i Ikii

tti

jk'wa llwkde,
jj^wdffi;

(2290) ha a jkuila
ta
i Ikii

(

)

jk^rri.

Ta

ss'e

Ikdmmeh

sah

la

hho Ik'wa a
i

a.

IJa eji-6n

ddarraken

^2288')

* Ikauken ddoa

+x°^i

ti

^

'

" Ik'waka en Ine ddarraken."
ta,

Ik'waka dnyan Ine Ijkejlkeya Ik'wa yauki e;
||k6||keya jkuita en, hin dd|rrak§n.
r

Ik'waka 6n |ne

jkuita an ||Dau !kuk5 1;^! ha, jgaokaken |^

ha en-6n,

jeten Ine
!6ten
(
)

Ikau !kwa haka

fi,

an hin Ikau Ihin ui !ga6ken-ka ttwi

ttu.

(2289')

^^^ "^"^ "^ Ikuita &; hin ssho-ko ddarraken,

au S-ka ttikdkgn
16 Jkaii

dd|rraken |eta ha en-6n,

— he, ha
li,

|kf-ssho,

1,— he,

!kwa

hi.
ti
i.

Hin
hin

e,
e,

Ine

dddrraken leta ttwi

ttu,

au Sn
e,

tatti e, a tta
e,
If,

If.

H6
if,

a Iku ddarraken, au an tatti
tatti,

a l.anwa; he
tta

ha

tta

Au
(2290')**^^
ti

!kuit§n

ha kkiin
e,

ha en-en- ta-)iugen
1,

au hin

tatti,

hi |ku lauwa.
'S^'^e,

Ti

ha jkuken kwokwon-a,
^^

hin

g,

ha en-^i

|n6

^^

^^^

t^tti-

y^'
i.

(

) Jia

en-6n-yan |ne jkwa.

H6

hin

ha en-en

Ine Ikdkgn,


;

THE MANTIS IN PORM OF A HAETEBEEST.
other side of the bush), while
it

6

placed

itself nicely.
(

She (then) cut
put
it

off a thigh of the hartebeest,
;

)

down

(on a bush)

it

placed

itself nicely

and (2287) on

the bush.
beest,

She cut off another shoulder of the harteand put it upon (another) bush. It arose, and sat upon a soft (portion of the) bush ; as it felt that the bush (upon which the child had laid it) ( ) (2288)
pricked
it.

Another elder
hartebeest.
flesh

sister cut off the other tliigh of the
:

They spoke thus " This hartebeest's does move * that must be why it shrinks
;

away."

They arrange
other
:

their burdens; one ( ) says to the (2289) " Cut and break off the hartebeest's neck, so

that (thy) younger sister

may

carry the hartebeest's
sister,
is

head, for, (thy) yonder sitting elder
carry the hartebeest's back, she
(

she shall

who

a big girl.

) For, we must carrying return (home); for, we (2290) came (and) cut up this hartebeest. Its flesh moves

* The children truly thought that the hartebeest's flesh moved. (2288') hartebeest's flesh seemed as if it was not hartebeest for, the hartebeest's flesh was like a man's flesh, it moved. (As regards) a man's flesh, when another man shoots him, the

The

;

poison enters the body.

The people

cutting break

away

his flesh,

while they cutting take away the mouth of the poisonous wound. The people set aside the man's flesh; it remains quivering, while

moves (quivers) in his body, that (2289') ( ) which he sits in (literally " which he possesses sitting "), This it is which moves ia that which the people cutting broke. the (cut out) wound's mouth, while the flesh feels that the flesh is warm. Therefore, the flesh moves, as (while) the flesh (feels that the flesh) is alive hence it is warm. As (while) the man (feels that he) warms himself at the fire, all bis flesh is warm, while it (feels that it) lives. The thing (reason) on account of which he While it feels that it is really dies is that his flesh feels cool. This is the reason why his (2290') cold, ( ) his flesh becomes very cold.
the other part of the flesh
(flesh)
;

flesh dies.

6

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

"

haka aka Ikarroken ssutten I'Mn
hi Ine
lie,

M au
4n

i

IWka.

latta

hin Ikann akki."
)

(2291)

Hin
\kwk
hi."
:

(

Ikammen

hlid Ikaggen-ka
ina, Ina,

;

hin +kakka
Ilka Ihda

" Ikammeiiya jk'wa

6a sse Ma

hu
:

jkwan ^hwain jk'wa

han l«ke ha

llka;^uken

(2292) "

Ikarin

hhui n

;

ddd

(

)

IkVa

Ina Vauki ywi."

Ha

llkd;^ukaken jkann

hhd

ha.

Hin

tai Ikii

lla,

hin Ikuiten. hi jkhe
jau.

IkVa. Indn
(
)

llkoe,

au
hi,

(2293) Ikdggen InAn
jk'wa
lnd.n

jge,

jkwdn hhdn

Ikdm
'

lii

\hm. au jk'wa ts'^du.

jk'wa Indn
.

kw^itenkw^iten, han +kdkken kw^itenkwdita Ikwa: " o o o o
(2294')"*^^'^"^^'^®' +hali kan +dun +khe
da-ki

n

ts'a^du.

Ikd,m

+hau

;

+hau kan +khe +hdn-a n ts'a^du." *
ts'iinn jkwa.

(2294)

(

)

Ikwdn ddditen; Ikdkkaken
ha
:

jkwdn

Ikdrfuii,

llkdp^aiten
(

ddditen ha.
i

Ha

llkd;^aiten

(2295) ^^^^ ta

" Tai
:

)

ss'du jktiss'a;
a,

Ikuiten."

Ikwah kkui

" Ik'wa
li^ke

ha

Ina

kan d6a +kdkken."
Ikuss'a;
Ina ? "

Ha
(2296)
i tfi-

llka;^aiten

ha:

" llkhweillkhwdita
(
:

A-^au dddindddinya
llkd;^ai

) ss'a

au jk'wa

jkwdn +kdkka ha

"

jkVa kan n Ikdm
li

ts'unn

n au

jkVa ts'a^du
/noq i
\
-'

;

jkVagen

sin kA,

jh^ au ha
:

>

* Mantis speech, translated into

common Bushman thus
Ik|m 6a-ki IhSu
;

" jkhwS-

wwe! !h^ kan

jauii

jkhe

n

ts'axau.

!h^ kan

jkh^ !hafi-a n ta'ax^u."

:

infi

ju.A.i>xio

ux

xAjusa.

ujc

a.

cLa.niJir>i!iJ!ioi.

its flesh

snatches itself out of our hand,

\dtta

!

*

it

of itself places itself nicely."

They
father

(

)

take
:

to the child

up the flesh of the Mantis they say (2291) " Carry the hartebeest's head, that
;

may put

it

to roast for you."

The

child slung

on the hartebeest's head, she called to her sisters " Taking hold help me up f this hartebeest's (2292) ( ) head is not light." Her sisters taking hold of her help her up. They go away, they return (home). The hartebeest's head slips downwards, because the Mantis's head wishes to stand on the ground. ( ) The child (2293)
;

lifts

it

up (with her

shoulders),

the

hartebeest's

removes the thong from The hartebeest's head was the hartebeest's eye. " whispering, it whispering said to the child

head (by turning a

little)

:

child

!

the thong
for
(
)

is

standing in front of
;

my

eye.

Take away

me

the thong
child
child.

the thong

is

shutting
the (2294)
;

my

eye."

The

looked behind her;

Mantis winked at the
called to her

The

child

whimpered
;

her elder sister looked back at her.
:

Her

elder sister

"Come(

)

forward quickly
*'

we

return (2295)

(home)."

The

child exclaimed

able to speak."

Her

This hartebeest's head is elder sister scolded her: " Lying
:

Art thou not ( ) coming (2296) " deceiving (us) about the hartebeest's head ?

come forward; we

go.

" The hartebeest at me with the hartebeest's eye ; the hartebeest desired that I should take away the thong

The child has winked

said to her elder sister

:

* This seems
yet
f

to be an exclamation, the

meaning

of

which

is

not

known
The

to the editor.

child lay

upon her back npon the

hartebeest's head.

8

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(2297)

ts'aj^du.

H^

(

)

y6a

e,

jk'wa taa ll«kognll«kogiiya

llnunta

n

ts'e^u."
Ina,

Ikwdn ddditen jk'wa
(2298) +kdkka ha llkd^ai
:

Ik'wagen dddbba-i.
(

jkwan

" [k'wa Ina

)

kan yda d6a jduwa

td hi Iku Ine dddbba-i."

jkwan
(2299) jkVa
Ina.

ttaittdiya-tti

kuerre

jh^; jkwan jku
(

ti

Ikakkaken l«ke jkwa, han
!kwa: "
lilt

) lilin

ha

Ina.

Han l«ke

n

Inaj

* Inn +kuiOuawwe,t

lala-ki

au n InaL"

Ha
(2300) ka
(

llkajfukaken jkulkuti Ikaggen en-en.
)

Ikaggen-

enyan +hau+hau

ll»ke,

hin kkiii +ua+ua au

Ikaggen ll^kde.

Ikaggen Indh kkui +udku !aun jkhe
Ikdggen
\j(a,.

(2301) Ikdggen Ikhdu.
jdnn

(

)

jkhdugen kkiii tudku

jkh^ Ikdggen
lliikde.

Ikdggen !;^dn kkui +udku
Tis8'a,t

Ikhd Ikdggen

Ikdggen tten +hdu

hin

(2302) kkiii tuakussfn
Ikilp^e liss'a
;

(

)

Ikdggen liakde.
kkiii

Ha

ttekogen

au hin bbai, hin

tudkussln Ikdggen
(
) liss'a,

(2303) llwkde ka tikko.

Ikdggen !ka;;fuken !ku;^e
j^a
!ka;^u.

hin kkiii +udkussfn Ikdggen
llgaiyaken jkup^e
viss'a,

Ikdggen

hin kkiii tudkussln Ikdggen

(2299')

*

Ha

jku f llMi au ha Inl
|nti

t Mantis's pronunciation of "

!k]Uii0ua-ww^."

Ssw4-ka

llii^jkaoJIiikaS.
e,

Au

Sswif-ka-!kni

lywainya jkuko, hin

ha ka " |n6

!k])l"

(llkellkeya Inussa !e)

hah ka " |keh "

;

au jkuko Ike. Han ||nau ha kkoka jkuko, han ka " ||kan-o," au hi kk6ka hi Ikdgen.

(2301')

t Ikaggen tteh

+h£u

uss'a llkellkeya jgd.

THE

MAMTliS

IJS

i'UKM. OJ?

A

ilAKTiilJJKJiST.

from his eye. Thus it was that ( ) the hartebeest's (2297) head lay looking behind my back." The child looked back at the hartebeest's head, the The child said hartebeest opened and shut its eyes. " The hartebeest's head must (2298J to her elder sister ( ) and shutting its eyes." be alive, for it is opening The child, walking on, unloosened the thong the The Mantis child let fall the hartebeest's head. scolded the child, he ( ) complained about his head. (2299) He scolded the child " Oh oh my head * Oh bad
:

;

:

!

!

!

!

little

person

!

f hurting

me
)

in

my

head."

Her

sisters let fall the flesh of the

flesh of the

joined itself

Mantis. The sprang together, it quickly (2300) ( to the lower part of the Mantis's back.

Mantis

The head
Mantis
(

of the Mantis quickly joined (itself)

the top of the neck of the Mantis.
)

quickly joined

(itself)

upon The neck of the upon the upper part (2301)
part of the Mantis's

of the Mantis's spine.

The upper
it

spine joined itself to the Mantis's back.

The thigh

of the Mantis sprang forward,J
(

joined itself to the

)

Mantis's back.
it

His other thigh ran forward, (2302)
(

racing
back.

joined itself to the other side of the Mantis's
of the Mantis ran
)

The chest

forward,

it

(2303)

joined itself to the front side of the upper part of the Mantis's spine. The shoulder blade of the Mantis ran
forward,
*
it

joined itself on to the ribs of the Mantis.
r

He was merely complaining about his head. Mantis pronunciation of \nA \kuiQua wwi. The cursing of f the Flat Bushmen. When a Flat Bushman is angry with another,
it is that he is wont to say l«fl \hui, resembling \nAs8a \e name by which the Flat Bushmen call the Grass Bushmen), (the

2299')

then

for the other one's name.

When
wont

wont
X

to say

'

mate

'

;

he

is

to say

he loves another person he is brother when they love
'
'

each other.

The Mantis's thigh sprang forward

like a frog.

10

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

(2304)

lino fiitu.

Ikdggen llgaikogen

(

)

\k^x^ uss'a, au

hm

tdtti e,

Ikdggen jaunlaun Iku koa +ud+ud, au hin bbai.
(
)

(2305)

Ikdukaken jndunko iku^e Na; han Iku
[y&tten

jydtten-

m, au han bbai jkauken,—au han
Inan Ine kuorrekudrre,— au
) \ka.i.

Iku Ine
tatti,

+urru,

—au ha
(

han

(2306) ha iku Ine e
Ikdnn au

H^

ti

hin

e,

ha Iku

Ine Ikdnnllgai.

jkulkii,

au han Iku

ine biitten

x^ au ha
lla

Han
(2307)
( )

lliiikoen, ti e,

jkauken Iku jk^i

lln^in

;

han

wwi

!khe,

han biittenbutten

km

Igwdi au

!ku(i)rri.

Han
llan

iian

jkammilkammi kk^rre jkhe
ttin.

!ku(i)rri;

han

kkan jkhwain
;

Han

i

jkuiten I'hin llneih
!h<5

(2308)

(

)ll^a;^u e l;^arra

han jkuiten
ti

jko

ss'a llnein.

Ikdukaken tkdkken,
(2309) jk'wa a
Ikiika.
;

e

:

"Si tdn
hah
a,

llan
si
la

dda
( )

Ini tte

Ha

jk'wa,

ha au

llkiittenlikiitten

hdka eh dddrraken.

Ik'wa-ka ehydn
sf

Iku Ikdrrokenlkarroken ssiitten I'hfn hi au

Idkaiakd.

(2310) Hin Iku

Mi,

hih

(

)

Ikdnnlkdnn dkken

llko

hi au

Ohdken
sse

e aken;

au jkVagen

tdtti e, jk'-wa Ina

y6a

ddAuko kwditenkw^iten.
hi,
( )

Au

Ikwa a

ssho,

hah

(2311) Ikdmmenya

hih +kd,kken+kdkka llnuh jkhe

ikwa ts'in^u."

jkwah +kd,kka ha da:
ka,

"Ibbo-wwe!

A

kah

ss'd

Ik'wa Ina
)

yAu

Iku +kdkka-ke?

Au
h

jk'wa InAn

(2312)

tdtti e, (

hi yds. Iku Ine ll«koSn Ikl

llkdrru,

au h


THE MANTIS IN FORM OF A HAKTEBEBST.

H

The

(

)

other shoulder bladaof the Mantis ran forward, (2304)
felt

while

it

that the ribs of the Mantis

had joined

themselves on,

when they

raced.
;

The children still ran on he (the Mantis, arose from the ground and) ( ) ran, while he chased the (2305) children, he being whole, his head being round, while he felt that he was ( ) a man.* Therefore, he (2306) was stepping along with (his) shoes, while he jogged

with his shoulder blade, f

He

saw that the children had reached home

;

he

quickly turned about, he, jogging with his shoulder (2307) ( ) He went along the blade, descended to the river.
river bed,

making

a noise as he stepped in the soft

he yonder went quickly out of the river "bed. He returned, coming out at ( ) a different side of the (2308) house (i.e. his own house) he returned, passing in
sand
;
;

front of the house.

The

children said

:

" "We have been (and) seen
dead.

a hartebeest which was

That hartebeest,

it
;

was the one which we cut up ( ) with stone knives (2309) The hartebeest's flesh quickly its flesh quivered. It by itself was ( ) (2310) snatched itseK out of our hands. placing itself nicely upon bushes which were comfortwhile the hartebeest felt that the hartebeest's head would go along whispering. While the child who sits (there) carried it, ( ) it talking stood behind (2311)
able
;

the child's back."

papa! Dost thou seem to think that the hartebeest's head did not Eor the hartebeest's head felt that ( ) (2312) talk to me ? it would be looking at my hole above the nape of the

The

child said

to

her father:

"0

*

He

became a man while he was putting himself together
his left shoulder blade,

again,

t

With

he being a left-handed man.

12

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

t4i lla;

U
lia

e,

jkVa

Ina Ine +kdkka-ke,

n Ik^m 6a ha
sin ss'e

!li^ au

ts'a^du.

Ta,

\hm \Mu

tta lia ts'a^du."

(2313)

(
lla,

)

Ha

daken +kakka-lii:

"TJ-bba,

Iku

la

hho Ikom Ikaggen, an ban Ikuken ddauddafu

.luMttaii?"

(2314)

ikaukaken +kakken
IlkS llkudii Una,

:

"Si(

)

tan tatti

e,

Ik'wa

llkei-

[kVagen
;

llkuan Iki Ikuki.

jk'wagen

a yauki
(2315) y^a
(

Iki

Inwa-ka ttwi

au jk'wagen
ti

tatti e, jk'wa

)
si,

sse

+kakken.

H^

bin

e,

jk'wa Ine ssan
Ik'wa en(
)

!ku;^e

au siten ka

llko-u Ik'wa en-dn.

(2316) dnyan Iku Ine +bau+bau-i, au bin +bau+bau
W^e, bi se Igui, hi
ll^kde.

jkdnn

se Igui Iguilkann
lk(5tten. —

ll!:^e

au jk'wa

Ik'wa ll«k(5eten llvam O Am
ti

O

(2317)

"

Hd

bin
Ine

e,

jk'wa Iku Ine !ku;^e

(

)

uss'a,
Iki

au ba

en-enyan
(Ikuken
e,

jkiya,

au ban yauki
i),

Ine

Ikuken

ba

sin Iki tta

au ban

Ine jkatten jhwi

kkui ywan
(2318)
"

jkui.

He

ti

bin

(

)

e,

ba

Ine lliikogn ti e, si Iku Ine

jkdiss'a lln^in,

ban Iku
\h.6
lla,

Ine

wwf

jkb^.
Ine
Ikei

Han

Iku Ine

Ikwdrrelkwdrre

Ikujkii,

au ba
Ine

[kattenlkatten lublssbo

(2319)

(

)

llkda

jkb^

au

lloin

ba

!n(5a!n6an^u,
llkd'i-d,

au ban Ikattenjkatten bbaya

!ku(i)rri

ba

se iinun
(

bhd
)

Ikdo Iketa,

ba

tsl."
:

(2320)

Ha okenguken
Han
la

+kdkka Ikduken

"TJkaiilkue,
i

Ikllki

jkoin llkdndoro.
ti i e."
( )

Han
:

a sin Ikwa-

Ikwdrra I'bin ss'a

(2321)

jkdukaken +kdkka bi
kk(5koa, bari l^i-a.

dkengu

"

Ha

llkwan sin
i

Han

Ikw^iten >'wan, ba se Ine

THE MANTIS IN FORM OF A HARTEBEEST.
neck, as I went along
hartebeest's head told
for
;

13

and then
his eye.

it

me

that I should take

waa that the away

him the thong from

For, the thong lay

in front of his eye."
(

the Mantis, while he lay pretending to be dead in front of you ? "
cut
hartebeest's horns

Her father said up the old man,
)

to

them

:

"

Have you been and (2313)

We ( ) thought that the (2314) were there, the hartebeest had hair. The hartebeest was one which had not an arrow's
The
children
said
:

"

wound
( )

;

while the hartebeest
talk.

felt that the

hartebeest

would

Therefore, the hartebeest came and (2315)

chased us,
flesh.
it

when we had put down
hartebeest's flesh
( )

the hartebeest's
together, while
it

The

jumped

springing

gathered
it

(itself)

together, that

(2316)

might mend, that
joined on.

the hartebeest's back.

might mending hold together to The hartebeest's back also
(2317)

" Therefore, the hartebeest ran ) forward, while his ( body was red, when he had no hair (that coat of hair in which he had been lying down), as he ran, swinging his arm like a man. "And when ( ) he saw that we reached the house, he whisked round, He ran, kicking up his heels (showing the white soles of his shoes), while he running ( ) went before the wind, while the sun shone upon his feet's face (soles), while he ran with all his might into the little river (bed), that he might pass behind the back of the hill lying yonder." " You are Their parents ) said to the children
(
:

(2318)

(2319)

(2320)

those

who went and

cut

up the

old

man

'

Tinderbox-

Owner.'

He, there behind,

was one who gently
:

came The children

out from the place there behind."
said to their ( ) fathers

"

He

has (2321)

14

SPECIMENS OE BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
I'hin ss'd Ika^ka tf Iketa;

(2322) jkhdi
e, si

au han ll«koSn

(

) ti

Iku Ine Ik^ tau jk^i ss'a llnein.
a,

<*Au Od^aiOpud
(2323) +kdkka-ha
si
;

ha doa

a,

!kVa

Ina
)

dauko
hin
e,

lie e,

ha

Ine +kdkka-8i.
;

He

ti (

Iku Ine jkulku te jk'wa eh-6h
InTiitaiiii, si

siten iku Ine +gd,mmi-

+gdnimi te
(2324)
"
(
)

se jkuxe-ss'i likdkkenllkakken.
Ine Ikulkd;^® l^^'^^ ikajka.
(
)

Au

ha en-^nyan
hin Iku

"^^^ ^^

ha
(2325)

il»k<5e,

Igiii kiiii

Han
ssi.

Iku jkuxe

li-ss'a,

han Iku

Ine jgeilg^iten

llk(5

He

ti

hin
si

e, si a,

Ikwe

Ika, siten ll'ilwa i

au jkux©

a,

ha jkuxeya

ha,

(2326)

ha Iku Ine i " He ti hin e, (

Ig^ijg^iten.
)

ha Iku

Ine kkiii jgwai

au

!kii(i)rri,

—au han ka,
He
(2327)
ti

ha ha

se Igeijg^iten k^rrf jkh^ !kTi(i)rri.
Ine

hin
)

e, si

Ikwe

Ika,

han
;

lliikoka jk^i I'hin

ss'a, (

au

Ine tta ss'o

au

ll'u

au han

tatti e,

ha

Ine jkhwilkhwlsiten.

Au
;

han

tatti, jditakii Ine

ll«koen

(2328) ha, au siten sin Ikanunen Han Ikuken luhften
ssi

ss'a

ha

ttette,
si

(

)

au han
ll'u

au han ka,

se tta-a

e

a,

au jkwa a
(2329) +na jhda.
d4bba-i
;

a,

han

sin

Ikammenya ha
ha
( )

Ina,

—han llwkoen
han
Ine

Han
han

llkeillkdiya,

Ikuka;

Ine

kan

+kakken+kakka-ta.
;

Han

+kakken, au han Igui ha en-^n (2330) han Igui ha en-^n.
llwkoe
;

ha Inan +kakken, au

(

)

Ha

Inan +kakka jkei ss'a ha

hin ss'an Iguann !(k)aun jkhd, hin jkotten.
li-ss'a
;

" Haix jkuxe
ssho,

han
Iki

Ike, ss'an

Ikhwijkh-wisiten
llkiittenllkiitten.

au siten

sin

la

ha

au

(2331)

(

) latta,

ha Iku Han Ikuken ddauddau
Iku^e.

juhltin-ssi, si

se ikwe

Ikl, si


THE MANTIS IN FOEM OF A HARTEBEEST.
gone round, he ran
fast.

;

15

He

always seems as
lying yonder

if lie

would come over
sees
*'

th.e little hill

when he
(2322)

(

)

that

we

are just reaching home.

While

this little daughter,

she was the one to
;

whom

the hartebeest's head, going along, talked

and

then she told us.
beest's flesh
;

There(

)fore,

we

let fall

the harte- (2323)

we

laid our karosses
fast.

on our shoulders,

that "

we might run very
( )

back,

running came together on its (2324) mending itself. He arose and ran forward, he, quickly moying his arms, ( ) chased us. (2325) Therefore, we did thus, we became tired from it, on account of the running with which he had chased us, while he did verily move his arms fast.

While

its flesh

it

finished

he descended into the small river, while (2326) he thought that he would, moving his arms fast, run Then he thus did, he, picking along the small river.
)

"Then(

up wood, came out;
fatigue
felt
;

(

)

while

we

sat,

feeling the (2327)

While he because he had been deceiving. that all the people saw him, when we came
;

carrying his thighs,
front of us

when he went to die while he wished that we should
( )

lying in (2328)
feel this

fatigue, while this child here, it carried his head,

he looked up with fixed eyes. He was as if he ( ) (2329) was dead he was (afterwards) opening and shutting his eyes he afar lay talking (while the children were running off). He talked while he mended his body ( ) His (2330) his head talked, while he mended his body. head talking reached his back; it came to join upon
; ;

the top (of his neck).

"He

ran forward;

he yonder will
did cut
!

sit

deceiving

(at home), while

we

knives (splinters).
lie

\a-Ua

him up with ( ) stone (2331) he went feigning death to
do
so,

in front of us, that

we might

we

run.

16

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMA.N FOLKLORE.

"He
(2332)
1.

ll'u,

bin Iku
ti

e, si ta-1 si

hi

;

he, si lili ssosoken,
;

(

)

He

hin

e,

yauki san l«kua

ta, si

Iku

llkdaken Una

llneiii."

I.— 5.
!GAIJNU-TSA;^AIJ,
{Related,, in 1878,

IHUiHU,
Ixabbi-an.)

he

IKAGGEN.
mother,

ly Ihan+kass'o, who heard

it from his

(6978)

jgaunu-tsa^au* llkuan ha
Ikhwalten
;

(5a

+j(^arnma ha 6a a jkhwaIk'd e Ikalilkau

ha 6a sse llkharro-a

luhfluM

(6979) !khe Ikukenjkiiken.
hi,
ll;^i

au hin ha-a

lla.

Han ha Ine +^anima ( ) H^ tfken e, Ihiilhii a, kan
ban
e,

M
a,

lla

ha-a,

h(5a, hail e ll^^ttea llua,

a, !ga1iiiu-tsa-(;aii Ine

!k^ ssa ha.

H^
)

tlken

ha ha

Ine tiitu jgaunu-tsa^ati,
tf

(6980)

i.

He

(

!gaunu-tsa;^au Iku-g Ine tkakka ha
(5a

e,

ha ddoa +^amma ha
jk'e e

k !kliwa!k]iwm.ten

;

ha da

sse llkharro-a
Ikiiken.

jkaiijkau luhljuhf jkhd

jk&enIne ssd

Hd

t£ken

e,

ha ha

Ine kiiit

:

"Hal,

(6981)

(

)

tuinma jku a a."

He

jkiikko ha Ine kiii:

" jhamm Heten-lleten ^Kafi ttumm,
!kii a ki Ihamm lleten-iletgn Kan ttumm, !kli

k

kk"

(6978')
(6981')

* Ikaggen Opuon
t
•'^

||kuaii e jgaunu-tsaxSu.
n-ii

^^™ ^^^ tkakken

ka 4=kakken4=kakkeD, au kaken

t^tti e,

Ihillhu

ka +kakkeu+kakken. ^auki ^wi.

THE SON OF THE MANTIS.

17

" This fatigue, it is that which we are feeling; and our hearts burnt on account of it. ( ) Therefore, we (2332) shall not hunt (for food), for we shall altogether remain at home."

I.— 5.
L.

\GAUNJI-TSAXAtj{TR-R SON OF

THE MANTIS),

THE BABOONS, AND THE MANTIS.
* formerly went to fetch for his (6978) father sticks, that his father might take aim at the people who sit upon (their) heels. Fetching, he ( ) (6979) went up to them (the baboons) as they were going Therefore, a baboon who feeding along feeding. him, he who was an older baboon, he went past was the one to whom \gaunu-tsaj(au came. Then he
\ga'unu-tsaj(au

questioned
told

Iffounu-tsaj^au.
it,

And

(

)

\gaunu-tsaj(au (6980)

him about
sit

that he must

fetch for his father

sticks, that his father

who

upon
:

(their) heels.
!

might take aim at the people Therefore, he (the baboon)
( )

exclaimed f " Hie Come And the other one said
:

to listen to this child."

(6981)

" First going
I
listen,

To the
I

child yonder.

First going
listen,

To the

child yonder."

* !^«^MM-#««x»«< 'W^as a son of the Mantis. f "I must (the narrator here explained) speak in
language,

(6978')

my ^''^n/ggg^n
'

hecause

I

feel

that

the

speech of the baboons

is ^

not easy."

18

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

Han ha Ine kui " jkhu He, ha ha Ine jkhe ssa i. "' te'da ? He ( ) jkhwa ha Ine kiii " F kan (6982) i ha ±& ddoa +^amma ibo k jkhwalkhwaiten, Ibo sse llkhdrro-a
: :

Ik'l,

e

Ikaujkau

luhijuhi Ikh^ Ikukenlkiiken."

H^

(6983) tfken e linilhd ha ine kui: ( ) " Ine l^kdya Ikoih, Ikd He tlken e Ihiilhii ha ke, ha Ine ssa ttd jkhwa a." " HS, Ine ssa ttu Iku a a," H^ tiken e Ine kui
:

jkukko ha

Ine kiii

:

" jharam lleten-lleten
"

Kail ttumm,

\\hw& a ke."

(6984)

He, ha h| Ine jkhe sea, haii ha Ine kui: " jkhwa He jkilkko ha Ine kiii " jkhwa a, ha a ;Ca te da ? " kan ka, hari Ivi/ke, ha jkatta ha da a jkhwajkhwaiten,
(

)

:

(6985) ha

(5a

sse llkharro-a jke e jkaujkdu

(

)

juhiluhl jldie

Ikdkenlkiiken."
jkoiii Ike
Ihiilhii

He Ihiilhii a a, ha Ine kiii:
:

"Inelwkeya

ha Ine ssa ttu jkhwa a." H^ tfken e, " jku-wwd juhd, Ine ssa ha Ine kui (6986) ttumm-a jkhwi S." H^ tiken e, jkiiko (° ) ha Ine kiii
ke,
a,

a

" Ihamm Heten-lleten * Kan ttumm, jkhwa a ke."

ha ha Ine Ikhe ssa. Han hd Ine kiii: " Ikhwa ha ;^a te da ? " f He jkiikko ha Ine kui jkhwa (6987) a kan ka haii Iwke, ha jkdtta ha da ( ) a jkhwaIkhwaiten, ha 6a sse Ikharro-a Ik'd e Ikdulkdu luhlluhi Hd tiken e, Ihiilhii a, ha Ine jkhd, jkiikenjkilken. %

He
a,

:

(6986')

* According to the narrator, the above should be, in Baboons'

manner

of speaking, as follows

:

" jihamm jleten-jleten

'Kan ttumm,
!lkhfil,k^."
t

"jlkhttahixat^da?""

\ " jlkhu a, ha kan. ka, ban jike, ha jlkatta ha 6a a MkhwaIjkhwalten, ha 6a sae Ilkbarro-S jlkg e jlkaullkau lluhillijhi Ilkh6,

ilkdkenllkuken."

°
*

"

:

:

THE SON OF THE MANTIS.

19

And he
for

readied them.

He

said

:

"
:

What

child say ? »

And

(

)

the child said
?),

does this " I must fetch (6982)
father

my

father sticks (bushes

that

my

may

take aim at the people

who

sit

upon

(their) heels."

Then the bahoon said: ( ) '< Tell the old man (6983) yonder that he must come to hear this child." Then the baboon called out: "Hie! Come to hear this child." Then the other one said
" First going
I
listen,

To
(

tte child yonder."

)

And he came up

(to

them)

;

he exclaimed

:

"

What (6984)
:

does this child say ? " And the other one answered " This child, he wishes, he says, to fetch sticks for his
father, that his father

may

take aim at the people

who
said

baboon (6985) come Then this (other) baboon called to hear this child." out: "O person passing across in front! come to
sit
(
)

upon

(their) heels."

And

this

:

" Tell the old

man yonder

that he must

listen to this child."

Therefore, the other one

(

)(6986)

said:
" First going I listen,

To the

child yonder."

"What does one answered " This child wants, he says, to fetch * for his (6987) ) sticks ( father, that his father may take aim at the people
And he came up
this
(to them).

He

said:

child

say

?

"

And

the

other

who

sit

upon

(their) heels."

Therefore, this baboon

* In a paper entitled " A GUmpse into the Mythology of the Maluti Bushmen," which appeared in the Cape Monthly Maga%im for July, 1874, written hy Mr. J. M. Orpen (at that time Chief Magistrate, St. John's Territory), we find, on p. 8, that the
Mantis sent one of his sons to cut sticks to make bows, and that he was caught and kUled by the baboons.

20
kd'i:

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
"I-i llkuan e; dken llkuan sse l»keya !kdm Ik^ ese ssa tumm jkliwa S."° '( ) He tlken e, llnilM " Iku-g Ine kii'i w^ Ine ssa ttumm-a jkliwa a."
:

(6988)

kfe,

ha

a a,

!

H^

tfken

e, Ikiikko hi, Ine kiii

" jhamm lleten-lleten

'Kan ttumm,
jkhwa a k^."

(6989)
.

Han

\ki

lla

(

)

jk'e

kkditen,

i.

Han ha

Ine kiii
kiii:
(5a
it

" jkhwa a ha j^a t^ da ? " ° He jkiikko a hd Ine " jkhwa a, ha kan ka, han Iwke, ha jkdtta * ha

Ikhwajkhwaiten, ha (5a sse llkharro-a jk'e e jkdujkau (6990) iuhijuhi jkhd °( ) !kuken!kuken.'\ H^ tfken e Ihdlhu
a
a,

ha

Ine

kdi

:

"0 h6,t
kiii:
(

amiko IWk^ya
(6991)

jkoin Ike ke,

L Aken llkuan sse ha sse ssa, tumma jkhwa a."
i

llkuan

He

Ikdkko ha' Ine
S.".

)

"

jkfi

wwg+
°

juha, Ine ssa

tumm-a Ikhwa

He

Ikiikko
°,

hi

Ine kd'i:

" Ihamm
5
.

lleten-lleten S

Kan ttumm,
Ikhwd a ke."

(6992) He, ha ha Ine jkg lla jk'e kkditen, han h| Ine ( ) kiii: '' jkhwa a ;;^a te da?" He jkiikko ha Ine kdi: " jkhwa a, ha kan ka, han Iwke, ha jkdtta ha 6a a, jkhwSjkhwaiten, ha (5a sse llkharro-a jk'e e jkaujkau,
juhfjuhi jkhe hi jkukenjkuken."

(6993)
(6989')

°

(

j

m
lla

tiken
\^^t8L
e,

e,

ha Ihdihd,—ha

tatti e,

ha ha a Ihdihd

* -^^ ^^9^

N llkuan
Opuon
(6990') (6991')

+i,

ha Opyon, ha Opuon sse lla, ddd ha & tchuen. jkhwajkhw^ten llku|n 6. Ha llka|.n ka ha dd^ ha & hi, ha sse ssa t§hha hf, ha see dda Ihulhti Id.
ti

1 1? Baboons' language as follows :— " Oho, ^£ jlkuan L Akfn |lku|n sse arruko jlkeya jlkdin ||k6 k^, ha s°se ssa, ttumm jlkhi a a."
J "
i'kfl

ww^,

iluhd, line ssa

ttumm-l llkhu
tturiim,

L"

% " llhaihm Il6ten-||eten

Kan

llkhii

k

U."

:

:

!

THE SON OF THE MANTIS.
:

21

" It is ourselves exclaimed Thou shalt tell the old man yonder that he shall come to listen to this
!

child."

(

)

Therefore, this other baboon called out
to listen to this child."

:

(6988)

"

Ho

!

come

Then the

other

one said
" First going
I listen,

To

the child yonder."

He came up to ( ) the other people on account of (6989) He said: "What does this child say?" And it.
the other one answered: "This child, he wants, he
says, to fetch* sticks for his father, that his father

may

take aim at the people

who

sit

upon

(their)

(

)

(6990)

heels."

Therefore, this baboon exclaimed (with a " Oho sneering kind of laugh) It is ourselves
:

!

Thou

shalt quickly go to tell the old

man

yonder,

that he

may come
!

to listen to this child."
)

And

the

other one caUed out:
ia front

person passing across (6991) ( And the come to listen to this child."
" First going
I listen,

"0

other said

To the

child yonder."
;

And he went up "What does this
answered: "This
the people
(

to the other people

he

(

)

said

:

(6992)

child
child,

say?"

And

the other one
says, to fetch

he wants, he

sticks for his father, that his father

may

take aim at
old (6993)

)

who sit upon their heels." Then that baboon,—he felt that he was an

* Note by the narrator. He had sent his son, that his son should go to construct things for him. I think that they -were sticks (bushes ?). He -wished his son to go (and) make them for
him, that he might come (and) work them, in order that he might

(6989')

make war upon the

baboons.

22

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.
e,

au jkdkkdken ka lia kku: *< Ikhwa a kan ka, han l«ke, lia jkdtta ha <5a a, (6994) jkhwSlkhwditen," ( ) h6 tlken e, !ktikk& hd Ine kiii:
Ik^rri,—li6 tfken

ba ha

Ine kiii,

"Tsa

ra, i-1

Ihamin e;

i

llkuan

g.

liken

llkuaiv sse

Igwda jkhwa."

H^

tlken
ssi,

e,

(6995) Ine !gwd

hi hd Ine Igwa'i !gaunu-tsa;;^au, i ; hi He jkukko Ine jgwa jnajndka Ina. ( )
tsapj^sTri
;

kiii Ikfiiyu Ihin Igatmu-tsa^afii
h|l,

he jkhwa tsa;^aii

Ine Ikuei

lid,
:

(6996)

IM a, ha Ine kiii N H4 tfken e, hi hd Iku-g
Ine kiii

hin Ikdbbuken lia. H^ tlken e, Ihii" ka Ikhumm! n ka ( ) jkhumm!
Ine llkhd

Ikhumm,* au jkhwan
ta.

Iku-g Ine Ikuka, jkhwan Iku-g Ine

Hin ha

Iku-g

"He n +kabwa hi,
(6997)
(
)

Deken ta Ikhumm e. He n +ka5wa hi, Ddeken ta jkhumm e. He n +kabwa hi."

jk'6

kkuitaken Ine ta
"

N
N

Il«k6n ta
lltJken ta

Ikhumm
hi,

g,

He n +kabwa
(6998)

jkhumm

|,

au hi

hd,

He n +ka6wa hi," ( ) jkhumma Una, au jkhwa
Iki

tsa^ati.

Ikdkkaken ha Iku |ka

jkhwa.

Hd

tiken
e,

e,

Ikdggen

ha

Ine tt^n,

i,

au llkuanna.
,

H4

tiken

Ikaggen ha

/ggggn
^

* llkuan jkhuiim-i:

^

"

"

"Nka

jlkhuomm,^

N ka
He u

jlkhuomm

S,

jlkabwa hi.

N

jlken ta

jlkhuomm

S,

jlkabwa hi, 'N jlken ta jlkhuorum, He n jlkabwa h|."

He h

:

:

THE SON OF THE MANTIS.
baboon,
said,

23

^therefore,

he

said,

when

the other one had

"This

child wanted, he said, to fetch sticks for
(
)

his father,"

therefore the other one (the old baboon) (6994) exclaimed: "What? it is we ourselves; ourselves it
!

is

Te

shall strike the child

with your

fists."

Therefore, they were striking \gaUnu-tsqj(au
their fists on account of it
;

with
fists,

they hit with their

breaking (his) head.
his
fist,

(

)

And

another struck with (6995)

child's

knocking out \ga'unu-tsaj(m' s eye; and the eye in this manner sprang (or rolled) away.

Then
ball
!

this

"

baboon exclaimed: "My ball! my ( ) (6996) Therefore, they began to play a game at
;

baU,* while the child died
said (sang)
"

the child lay

still.

They

And I want it, "Whose ball is it?
And I want it, Whose ball is it? And I want it."
(6997)

(

)

The other people

said
companion's ball
I want
it,

"My
And

it is,

My
(
)

companion's ball
I want it,"

it is,

And

(6998)
ball

while they were playing
child's eye.

at

there with the

the Mantis lay

The Mantis was waiting for the child. Therefore, down at noon. Therefore, the Mantis
(6996')

* (They) were playing at ball. " My baU,

My
And

baU it is. I want it.
companion's ball
I want
it.

My
And

it is,

My

companion's baU,

Aiid I

want

it."

24

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
jkhwa,
i

(6999) Ine llkhabbo-i
hi Ine

(

)

;

ti e,

iMlM

e lkli4 jkhwa

ddf

Ikhunim au jkhwa

tsa;caii;

^^

'^e

Ha

iMlliu, au Ihullniken

jkliwumma Una, au jkhwa
Ine
lii, i.

tsajijau.

H^
(7000) Ine ho
hail
11^,

tiken
( )

e, lia

ha Iku-g

Han ha

Iku-g

llkhwdi,

han Iku-g
:

Ine juhdi jho ilkhwal;

ha Iku-g

Ine kiii

llndkka Ikhe IIS,* llndkka jkhe
ssih
i

au han
lie.

tdtti e,

ha hd ka
e,

ya,

ha hA ka
jkhai

llndkka

!khe

Hd

tiken

ha hd

llnau,

han

Ihifi ssa,

(7001)

(

)

han

Iku Ini Ihiilhti ka jk'^,
tsa;J^ah. Ihiilhii
e, e,

au Ihiilhuken Ikhumma
e,

llnd,

au !kh"wa

Hd

tiken

Ikaggen ha Ine
lloii,

yyra,, i,

au

ti e,

llkuan

yda

jkei
(

bin Ikhd

(7002) !khwa.
tsa^aU.

Hd He

tiken
tiken

hi Ikhurhma

) llni,

au jkhwa

ha

hf, llnau,

han

Ikhai Ihin ssa,

han

Ini Ihiilhii

ka jk'^, au

Ihiilhiiken
e,

Ikhumma
Ine

llnd,
I.

au jkhwa
(7003) He, ha
kiii
(

tsa;f;au.

Hd

tiken
li'i

ha ha
;

)Va,

)

hd

Ine

antau Ikam

ha ttu

han

Ine luinm
haii

dkken
Ihiilhii

llwei,

ha

tsa;{;aiten
Ini (
)

au jkhwdten; au

ka
(7004)

ssan yauki

jkhweta Una ha
ssa,

t8a;^jditen;
lid

ti e,

ha

y&a, ssin
;

>Vda
ild,

tin

e,

ha tsa^aiten
Ihiilhu,

jkhwdten

ha

sse

jkhumma, hi

au ha

tsa;^dita ya'uki Iki jkhwdten.

Hd
Hd
(7000')

tiken

e,

ha ha Iku-g
lu

Ine jk'dtten, jk^ ssa
(

Ihiilhii,

(7006) au Ihiilhiiken Ine
tiken
e,

ha;

)

au bin

tdtti,
ssiii,

hi
hi

ja a.t
lii

ha hd llnM,
S,

Ihiilhiiken

kku

ha,

* jnwd llkuan
tatti e, hi

jnwa

e l^ta llkhwrfi; hin Iku lln|kken,

ddfrraken llkhoeta.
llg."

He

tfkgn

e,

ha

In6 ta

:

au hia " Indkka

+khillS; In^kka tkhl

(7006')

t

Hin

>'aiiki

|kw6iten Ine

Ini

ha; he

ti hiii e,

hi lu ha,

i.

THE SON OP THE MANTIS.

25

was dreaming about were those who had

(

)

killed the child

the cHld, that the baboons (6999) that they had ;

made a
baboons,

ball of the child's eye; that

he went to the
at
ball

while the baboons

played

there

with the child's eye.

,

he took up ( ) the quiver, he (7000) he said, " Rattling along,* ; rattling along," while he felt that he used formerly to do so, he used to say, " Rattling along." Then, when he came into sight, ( ) he perceived the baboons' (7001) dust, while the baboons were playing at ball there with the child's eye. Then the Mantis cried on account of it, because the baboons appeared really to have killed the child. Therefore, they were playing at ball ( ) there with the child's eye. (7002) Therefore, when he came into sight, he perceived the baboons' dust, while the baboons were playing Therefore he at ball there with the child's eye. cried about it. And he ( ) quickly shut his mouth; (7003) he thoroughly dried the tears from his eyes, while he desired that the baboons should not perceive tears in his eyes; that he appeared to have ( ) come crying, (7004) hence tears were in his eyes so that he might go to play at ball with the baboons, while his eyes had no
Therefore, he arose
;

slung on the quiver

;

tears in them.

Then

he, running,

came up
at

to the baboons, while

him, ( ) because they were (7005) Then, while the baboons were still startled at him.f staring at him, he came running to a place where he
the baboons
stared
* The arrows they were, the arrows which were in the quiver (7000') they made a rattling noise, because they stirred inside (it). Therefore, he said, "Battling along, rattling along." therefore they (7005*) t They were not in the habit of seeing him stared at him.
;

;

26
hail

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

ha Iku

Ik'atten SBk

an

ti

e,

ban

Iku tt§ llkhwai;

(7006) han Iku

Iki lliin
lh.in

Inpin,

han

Iku

llkho jnuiii,
le !li<5a

hah
ha,

(

)

Iku

jkann, llnop

jnabbe, a ha, ssin

au

Ilh6,

han Ikhumm.
(7007)
a,

Ikuttdrokenttdroken !nabbe,hanha Iku llkhudrriten

Han h&
ha
a.

iku l«k^ Ihdihd, tsa a
(
)

IhTilhii Id

ha

au Ihiilhdken yadki

llkhu^rriten

Ikhumm,

Ihiilhii

sse jk'aita

He

tiken

e, Ihulhii

h|

ine jkwelkwella hi Ikdgen,

au

bin tdtti, hi llkiya, tsa a, ha Ikueida a. Hd tiken e, (7008) ha bd ka Ikii Ikea jkhutnm, au jkhuinm ( ) wa Iku
i

llkhbdwa Ihdihu kko, au Ibulhd

a,

ha Iku

jk'^ta

jkdkko Ikhumm. Ikbwa tsa^adken
(7009)
(

H^

tiken

tdtti e,

|khwa tsa^au hd lln^, hi kdi +ka, au ha 6a Iv^kwai,
e,

)

bin h^ Iku-g Ine

ydwa

ttin

;

Ihdibdken hi Iku-g
IhdIbu a Ikwai, ha

Ine Ikilkfya ttdn hi.
Ikii

H^
)

tiken

e,

a Ine Ikei hi

;

ban
(

Ine Ik'aita Ikiikko hi.

H^

tfken

(7010)

e,

Ikaggen ha Iku-g

Ine

i

ssdken

Ibifi ti e,

Ikdkkaken
Ine

Iku-g Ine Ikei jkhwa

tsa;j;aAi,

Ikdkkaken ha iku-g

kui I^abbu Ikam |khwa
llhudbbaken jkhwa
tiken

tsajj;au.

H^

tiken

e,

Ikdggen

Iku-g Ine ttdrokenttdroken jkhwa

tsa;[;a:ti,

i;

hah

Ine

(7011)

(

)

tsa^M au ha

liiiJkaral^kdra-ttu.

13.6

e, ha ha Ikbwa tsa^adken h|

Ine |k'^ta Ibulhd

Ine Iku llkaiten,

(7012) hA Ine Iku

ydwa k

ttin
ja

jkhwa tsajj;^, jkhwa t8a;^adken jgwd^u; ( ) Ihdibdken ha
au
biii

Iku-g Ine lli^kodnya ki

ttin hi,

hk Iku-g

Ine

ydwa

ja

ttin jgwd;^^.

He

jkhwa
;

tsa;(;au h|, Ine Iku

llan kan jgw^ jkh4 llkhwai bin Ine Iku llkhoa hi (7013) ikbdbbuken ( ) jkhai Ibih llkhwai, au bin ife jkbi^,

llkbwiu ta Ilh6.*

(7013')
ha

*

Ha
InS

llkuan
S,

llhin, \k

Ilkh6a Ilhb-0pu4, au lllthwE;
;

lie

tfken

e,

llkh-wai ta

Mho

au han

tdtti e,

llho-Qpua a

llhin !4

;

THE SON OF THE MANTIS.
laid

27

skin cloak), he put

down the quiver he took o£f down the kaross,
;

(his) kaross

{i.e.

he,

(

)

grasping, (7006)

drew out the feather brush which he had put into the bag, he shook out the brush, he played with (?)

why was it were staring at him, while the baboons did not ( ) play with (?) the ball, that the (7007) baboons might throw it to him. Then the baboons looked at one another, because they suspected why he spoke thus. Then he caught
the
ball.

He

called out to the baboons,

that the baboons

hold of the

ball,

to another baboon,

thrown the ball because the child's eye felt that on account of his father's scent,
about ; the baboons trying to one baboon, he was the one

when the ball ( ) had merely flown (7008) when this (the first) baboon had to the other. Then the child's eye,
was startled (?), it went playing (7009) ( ) get it, missed it. Then
it

who caught hold

of

it,

he threw it towards another. Then the Mantis ( )(7010) merely sprang out from this place, the Mantis caught
hold of the child's eye, the Mantis, snatching, took the child's eye. Then the Mantis whirled around
the child's eye; he
(the perspiration
(
)

anointed the child's eye with (7011)

of)

his armpits.

Then he threw

the child's eye towards the baboons, the child's eye ascended, the child's eye went about in the sky
(

)

the baboons beheld

it

above, as

it

played about (7012)

above in the sky. And the child's eye went to stand yonder opposite to the quiver it appeared as if it sprang ( ) over the quiver, while it stood inside the (7013) quiver's bag.*
;

* He
which
is

tied,

placing a

little

bag at the

side of the quiver; there-

(7013')

fore it is the quiver's bag; -while it feels that it is a little

tied at the side of the quiver

;

he had laid

bag the bow upon

28

SPECIMENS OE BTJSHMAN FOLKLORE,
B.6 tlken
e, Ihiilhii

ha

Ine

llafi,

llgdue hi.

iMkkaken

Ine ll;tam ki llgdue hi,

au Ihulhiiken

Ine llgdue hi.

(7014)

H^

tfken

e,

Ihiilhu

ka

Ikhwa Ikhuinm." *
llgdue

t8a;^£iti.

Ihulhti a

laua ke

(7065) yh,

n

kail

jkhumm." f ^auki ddda
"Ine
e,

h| Iku-g Ine ( ) llkdaken Hin ha ka " Ine IMa n liy^n ka jkhumm e, han ha ka " Ine Ikdkkaken hd ka " Ine ilii^ko^n
kti,
:
:

:

iki

Ikhuinm."

(

)

Ihiilhiiken

hd ka:

lalla

n

ll^^n
:

Ikhumm."
" Ine
kui,
lalia
( )

Ikhumm
(7066)

H^
Ilh6

tflten e,
;

han hd ka Ihulhti ha Ine
ss'o
le

ihtilhu & ka ke jkhumm."
;;t^tten

Ikdggen

ta,
:

Ikhumm
"Ine
le

\kht

Ilh6.

He
;

ikdggen ha

Ine

kui

llvi/koen

yu, Ine

llii/koen

yu, jkhuinm
haii

kail yaiiki

|kh4

llh6.
(
:

Ine llwkoen

yu " au

h|

(7067) jken-na, au |khwa
Ilh6.

)

tsa^ati, haii ;^iitten, |kdro Ihoa
yii,

Hail hd ka
kaii

" Ine IliJkoen
l4

Ine lli^koen yu,

Ikhumm
(7068)

^auki ddda
e,

Ikh^ Ilh6."
Ine Ine

H^ H^ ti H4
Iki

t£ken

Ihulhu
(

a,
)

ha
ha

kui

:

hill e, Ikiikko
;

kui

:

"Ine jgwa jkoiii." " Ine laua ii liy^n
Ina.

Ikhumm " au
tiken
e,

haii

ha kui |nupp, au Ikaggen

Ikdggen ha Ine kui:
haii

"N

kaii

yauki ddda
Ina.

Ikhumm," au
tiken
;

ha kui |nupp, au Ihulhu

(7069)

Hd

e,

(

)

hi ta

kii,

ha Iku-g
Igwai

Ine llkdaken Igwai
hi.

Ikdggen

Ikakkaken ha
Ine
!

H4
lla,

tiken
Ine
(

e,

lkd,kkaken

ta

Ikhwi,

Ikakkaken ha
!

kiii:

(7070) "

Auuuuu Ikwa ka |kduken-gg6 u koa

)

|kdu-

llkhoa au llkhww, ha e; ha

ssiii

Ine llx^raken ta |hou 5;

han

a,

(7014') ta Ine tsaxM

llhin \k

(

)

llkhoa ha, au llkhwai.

Ha

llhb,

han

a,

jkhwa

Ine 1^ Ikhi ya. Ha llho, han A, ha Ine tnabbe ta * " Mne llsniwa n |len jlkhwumm." t " Mne llsiuwa kg llkhvumm."

IhbTi, a.

"

:

THE SON OF THE MANTIS.

29

Then the baboons went
also

sought for
all

Then

to seek for it. The Mantis while the baboons sought for it. the baboons were ( ) altogether seeking for (7014)
it,
:

the child's eye. They said '' Give my companion the ball." * The baboon whose ball it was, he said

" Give me the ball." f The Mantis said "Behold ye I have not got the ball." ( ) The baboons said " Give my companion the ball." The baboon whose " Give me the ball." Then ball it was, he said the baboons J said that ( ) the Mantis must shake the bag, for the ball seemed to be inside the bag. And the Mantis exclaimed *' Behold ye Behold ye the ball is not inside the bag. Behold ye whUe he grasped the child's ( ) eye, he shook, turning the bag inside out. He said " Behold ye Behold ye the ball cannot be inside the bag." Then this baboon exclaimed: "Hit the old man with (your) fists." Then the other one ( ) exclaimed: "Give my companion the ball!" while he struck the head of the Mantis. Then the Mantis exclaimed: "I have not got the ball," while he struck the baboon's head. Therefore, ( ) they were all striking the Mantis with their fists; the Mantis was striking them with his fist. Then the Mantis got the worst of it; the Mantis exclaimed: " Ow
:

!

:

(7065)

:

(7066)

:

!

!

!

(7067)

:

!

!

(7068)

(7069)

!

Hartebeest's Children

!

§ ye must go

!

(

)

\Mu

vy^rri-

(7070)

was the one that he tied, ( ) placing it by the side of the (7014) That bag, it was the one that the child's eye was in. That bag, it was the one that he laid the bow upon. * " Give my companion the ball."
it
;

it

quiver.

Give me the baU." t j It is uncertain whether this should be singular or plural here. § " Hartebeest's Children," here, may refer to a bag made from
the skin of young hartebeests, which the Mantis had with him.

"

30

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

lyferri-ggti!

u koa
;

lla,"

au iMlhuken ha

Ine ll«ko^nya,

ki llkaiten ha

au

haii

ha

Ine llkhcTii llkaiten,
e,

au han
ydp-pu
tt^n
e,

Ine llkhouwa jkhoa.

H^ tlken
au han h|
i

ha ha

Ine kiii,

(7071) ssin Ikhoa,

i;

(

)

Ine

kdi:

"I

\k4,

Ikhwditenlkhwditen, jkuf hd

Ika!"

Hd
Ine

tlken

ha

ha
(7072) Ine

Ine ttdi Ihin
jkaii le iih6;

lla

au Ikhoa

;

han ha

ssuen

:

han
(

han
u'i,

Ine Iki Ihiii

jkhwa
;

tsa^afli;

)

han ha
Ike
lla

Ine ttai

au han Ikan-na hi

han

Ine ttai,

Ikhoa ka Ikannuii-a-ss^,* han ha
:

Ine ssuen.

Han
(7073)

ha Ine kui

"
(

Oh wwi ho
)

!

" au ha

Iki le

jkhwa

tsapj^au

au

Ikhoa.

"

A koa
i
;

Iku jkhweten ssin Ihin, a ssin Ikue, i." f
haii Ine Nan

a sse

Iku ddi
e,

ku

likho, ti e,

He

tiken

ha ha

Ine ttdi ui,
te hi;
;

hho

Inuin,

(7074) han
Ine

Ine

+ganimi

han

Ine

hho

llkhwai,

han
Iki,

(

)

luhaf Iho llkhwai
lla,

he, ha

ha

Ine
lla

Ikuei

hah

Ikuiten

au han Ine
e,

jkiiiten, jkg

lineih.
'*

H^
(7075)
Ika,

tfken
n.

0/
a?"

lnl-0pua ha Ine J.03

kiii

:

Iktiru

koa Ikuei
(
)

00

au

Ikoin,

Ikaggen, ha Ikaggen likhoa au

tuituften

Hd
ddoa

tiken
e,

e,

Ikdggen ha Ine kui:

"

Ihiilhii llkuaii

Ikha OpuaOpudiddi, jgaunulla,

tsa;^au

;

n

llkuaii

ddoa Iku

au

hiii

jkhumma

Una,

(7072')
(7073')

* "^^
t

','^??i^

^

;

"^l'^ e llkau

jkhe jkhod |na

tssi;

hine, Ixai^ka

jk'e ta |kaniiun-a-ss§, 1.

Ha

likug,n ka,

jkhwa

sse !k'6u,

ha

sse Ik'ou ju^ sse.

;

THE SON OF THE MANTIS,
!

31

ggu * ye must go " while the baboons watched him ascend as he flew up, as he flew to the water. Then he popped into the water on account of it; ( )(7071) while he exclaimed: "I Ik^, tt^n jkhwaitenjkhwaiten, !kuf hd i Ika " t Then he walked out of the water he sat down; he felt inside (his) bag; he took out the child's eye; ( ) he walked on as he held it; he (7072) walked, coming up to the grass at the top of the water's bank J; he sat down. He exclaimed: "Oh wwi ho " § as he put the child's eye into the water. " Thou must grow out, that thou may est become ) ( (7073) like that which thou hast been." Then he walked on he went to take up (his) kaross, he threw it over his shoulder; he took up the quiver, he slung on (7074) ( ) the quiver and, in this manner, he returning went, while he returning arrived at home.
! ;
!

;

!

||

;

;

Then the young Ichneumon exclaimed " Who can have done thus to my grandfather, the Mantis, that the Mantis is covered with ( ) wounds ? " Then (7075) " The baboons were those who the Mantis replied
:

:

killed grandson,

\gaunu-isqj(m; I went [the Mantis
slowly here], as they were

speaks very sadly and

translator,

* The meaning of \hau \yerri-ggii, is at present unknown to the but the Mantis is still addressing some of his possessions, and ordering them to leave the scene of his defeat. f Of these words of the Mantis (which frequently appear in stories concerning him) the narrators were not able to furnish
a sufficiently clear explanation, so the original text
% It
is
is

given.

grass

;

the grass which stands upon the top of the water's

CjMOi^
^
'

bank
§

;

it is

that which the

Bushmen

call

[kaMuh-a-ssL
right

At the same

time, putting the

first finger of his

hand

mouth, against his left cheek, and drawing it forcibly out the eye being meanwhile in the palm of his right hand, shut down
into his

by
II

his other fingers.

He

desired that the child should live; that

it

should living ("7073')

return.

32

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN POLKLOBE.

(7076) au OpuaOpuaiddi tsa;^*^; jkliumma hi hi. H^ tlken
Iku-g Ine llgwl-ssiii,
1.

h
e,

(

)

Hkiiaii

Ine

Han,

©puaOpudiddi tsa^au
e,

H^

tlken

IhulM
hin
"
e,

Ine ta,

h
)

(7077) a

Iki

hi

;

Ihiilhuken Ine ddii ii;
i
;

h^

ti

n

Ine

(

ddili hi,

he,
e,

n

Ine Ikuei \ki,

n

Ine llkhou ssa."

H^
(7078)

tfken

Ikuamman-a ha

Ine

kui

:

N

kah

ka,

a +kakka jkoin, tssa ra
l;;^drra?''
(

^a
e,

a,

Ikoiin ta

Iku

le lie jk'd

e

)

H^

tlken

Ikaggen ha Ine kui:

"A
ssd,

koa ka,

llkain yati llkuan Ikii e, a

n

le lla

Ihulhii a ? "

an ha ^auki +kdkka Ikuamman-a ggu,
Iki le

ti e,

ha

Ikhwa tsa^au au jkhoa.

(7079)

(
llelle
lid,

)

H^

tiken

e,

ha ha Iku
e,

Ine Una,

au han >auki
i,

Ikhoa.

H^

tiken
e,

ha ha
ssiii Iki
( )

Ine
le

lla,

au hah
tsa;{^au,

Ine
i.

ha

llwko^n, ti
Ine llkho

ha

jkhwa

(7080) He, ha ha

kkamma,

au han ka, ha ssih
Ine

ya'uki ikoroka ssa.

Hd

tlken

He
kiii

jkhwa ha
;

Ine ttiii ha,

kka^M ssa. au hah ^auki kamm ssa au
e,

ha ha

(7081) llkhwfeten

he jkhwa Iku-g Ine sstiken
le

lii,

han

(

)

Ine

liyobbi-ttu
i,

jkhoa.
llkdin.

Ine ywe-i,

au hah

H^ tlken e, He ha ha Ine

Ikdggen ha
Iku Ikiiiten,

llk(5aken jkuiten.

Hd

tlken

e,

jkhwa ha Iku-g

Ine kki, i;

hah Iku-g

(7082) Ine ddl ( ) kiii llkho, ti e, ha ssiii Ikue, i. Hd tlken e, Ikaggen ha Ine ssa, i ; au hah ssa lliikoen ; he, ha

ha
(7083)

Ine Ikuei Iki,

hah

ttdi ssa.

Hah ha
(

llnau,
)

au hah

ttai

tau lli/kodnya

ssa,

hah

Ine loiiwi

jkhwa, au
Ine ttdi

jkhwah
ha, au
Ine
le

Ine Ikara ss'o.

H^
;

tfken

e,

jkhwa ha

hah j^oroka
I

ssa

jkhwah

Ine

+hou

ui,

jkhwah

jkhoa.

He, ha ha
)

Ine Iku lliiko^n,

Ikhe, Ikhe,

(7084)

.Ikhe,

hah

(

Ine Iku jx^ohni.

Hah ha

Ine Iku lla;

;

THE SON or THE MANTIS.
playing at ball there

33

went

to

-witli grandson's eye; I ( )(7076) play at ball with. them. Then grandson's

eye vanished. Therefore, the baboons said (that) I was the one who had it ; the baboons were fighting me
therefore, I

was

(

)

fighting

them

;

and I thus

did,

(7077)

I flying came."

Then \Jcuammah-a
grandfather,
to

said
is
it

:

"I

desire thee to say to

Why

that

grandfather continues

people who are Then the Mantis answered " Thou (7078) ( ) dost appear to think that yearning was not that on account of which I went among the baboons " while
[literally,

go among strangers

diflerent] ? "

:

;

he did not tell \kuammah-a and the others that he came (and) put the chUd's eye into the water. Then he remained there [i.e. at home), while he (7079) ( ) did not go to the water. Then he went there, while he went to look at the place where he had put in the And he approached gently, ( ) while he (7080) child's eye. wished that he might not make a rustling noise. And the child heard Therefore, he gently came. him, because he had not come gently when afar ofE; and the child jumped up, it ( ) splashed into the (7081) water. Then the Mantis was laughing about it, And he while his heart yearned (for the child).
returned
;

altogether returned.

Then the child grew; it became ( ) like that (7082) which it had (formerly) been. Then the Mantis came while he came to look and he in this manner walking came. While he came walking and looking, he espied ( ) the child, as the child was sitting in the (7083) sun. Then the child heard him, as he came rustling
;
;

(along)

;

the child sprang up, the child entered the

water.

And

he looking stood, he
to

(

)

went back. (7084)

He went; he went

make

for the child a front

34

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine

han

Iku llan

ddd \khwa.
;

lluhi, hia.

k6a

llkoroko.
Ine
(

Han
(7085)
le

Ine Iku Ikii tcliueii

li6

tlken
;

e,

ha ha Iku-g
ha Iku-g
ine

llkho lluhi,
Iki,

hin k6a llkoroko
lla
;

hari

)

han Iku-g Ine Ikuei Iki, han ssa He, ha ha llnau, han hail Iku-g Ine llkho kam-ma. kkamm ssa, han louwi jkhwan Ikara ta, au jkhwan
Ikuei
haiv

(7086) Ine tan Ikdra !gw^ ta !kh9a. Ine kkafiMQ, jke ssa jkhwa.
ttiii

H^ He

tlken

e,

ha

(

)

ha

jkhwan

Iku-g Ine

He Ikaggen ha au ha <5aken llnau, au jkhwah ka jkhwa sse u, Ikakkaken ha +hau (7087) !k'u ssa, han kiii llnipp, au jkhwa. ( ) He, ha ha han ha Ine lluhobbaken Ikilkl Ikhwa, au ha Iwkw'ai
ha,

kkamm

ssa.

:

Ine lluhobbaken jkhwa, han hd ka

:

" Tsa ra
;

^a

a,

a-g Ine Ihammi

n

a ?
;

A

da kan ddda e n

n a

(7088) Ikaggen,

n ddpa a !gaunu-tsa)^au n e
;

n Opuon ddoa e a, dken e ( ) lkd,ggen, n a Opuon e a a oaken
;

e n-n."
Ihin lluhi,

He

jkhwa ha

Ine ssuen,

i

;

he,

ha ha

Ine Iki

han

Ine Iki Ihin llkdroko.
( )

Han

Ine lluhiya Ine lluhiya

(7089) jkhwa; han
Ikhwa.

Ine llkorokoa

jkhwa; han

Hd

tfken

e,

ha ha

Ine Ikhau Iho

Ikhwa

;

hin
lla

Ine Ikuei Iki,
llnein.

hin

jkiiiten lla;

hin Ine jkuiten

jke

Hd
(7090)
(

ti

hin

e,

lni-0pua ha Ine kdi
? "

:

" jkuru koaa, ssd
Ine

)

hi

Ikaggen

He Ikuamman-a ha
tiii,

kui

" Tsara a jhamm ssin
lla

ti e,

jkoin ssin ta,

ha hA

Ihiilhu,
ti e,

au hiii jkhuiii-ma Una, au Ikhwa tsa;j;au? ya
llkua

(7091) au
i
;

jkoin

ddoa Iku ^'uwa ha "
!

(

)

jgwe

ttiii

ha Opuon llkuan
jke ssa
lirJke
:

Ike ssa, hi
i.

He, hi ha
e,

Ine

jkiiiten,

llneiii,

Hd
ii

tiken

Ini-Opua ha

Ine ta, haii

" Tsara

jkoin Ikaggen ssin

jhamm

; ;

THE SON OP THE MANTIS.
kaross (or apron), that and a Wkoroko*

35

He
this

put the

things aside

;

then he put the front kaross (into
;

a bag), that and the Wkoroko

he

(
;

)

in

manner (7085)

he approached went ; he in this gently. And, as he approached gently, he espied
the child lying in the sun, as the child lay yonder,
in the sun, opposite the water.

manner came

Therefore, he

(

)

(7086)

gently came up to the child.

him, as his father gently

And the came. And

child heard

the Mantis,

when

the child intended to get up, the Mantis sprang
( )

forward, he caught hold of the child.

And he (7087)

anointed the child with his scent; he anointed the " I art thou afraid of me ? child ; he said
:

Why

am

thy father

;

I

who am

the Mantis, I

am
;

here

thou art ( ) \gmi,nu-tsaj(mi I am (7088) thou art the Mantis, I whose son thou art; thy father is And the child sat down, on account of it myself." and he took out the front kaross, he took out the
son,

my

He put the front kaross on to the child Wkoroko. he put the Wkoroko on to ( ) the child he put the (7089) Then he took the child front kaross on to the child. with him ; they, in this manner, returning went ; they
;

returning arrived at home.

Then the young Ichneumon exclaimed: "What
person can

he who comes ( ) with the Mantis ? " (7090) And \kuammah-a replied: "Hast thou not just(?) heard that grandfather said he had gone to the baboons, while they were playing at ball there with the child's eye? while grandfather must have been his son comes yonder with (7091) playing ( ) before us And they returned, reaching the house. him " Then the young Ichneumon spoke he said " Why
it
;
! ;
:

did

my

grandfather, the Mantis,
* Another

first

say that the

article for the child to

wear.

36

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ihulhii e

(7092) ka, han l«ke,
Iku-g Ine a ? "

(

)

Ikha jkhwa,
e,

au

ti e,

jkhwa
=

H^

ti

Mn

Ikaggen ha In^ **
ya'uki

^^
J

koa yau Ihamm

lliiko^nya, haii

^wa

Inaiiln^a,

au han
(7093)
( )

tatti e,

n 6a ssan
e,

Ilka Iho

ha

au n ka, n
;

ssin ll«kodii, ti

e, ti

^^ !^^9^ Inu ^auki sse kkii
tsa;;^^)

i-ya kg
jkhoa.

h^ tfken

n 6a ssan
;

Ilka [ho
ti

ha tsa^au, au
e,
e,

(7094)

Hah ^auki ywK ha
h
ssih
Il«k9^n, ti
e,

Iku Ihin jkhoA
( )

h^

hin

a liakoen,

Inaul.naua.

Hd
\6

tiken

h
ya

Iku ka,
;

+kamOpua,
ha

IlkuaAfiinllkuaiiiiii Ikilki

n

sse

Inti

>a'uki sse

kku ka

llilli."

I.— 7.
s.

IIGO
{Dictated, in 1875, in the

KA XUMM*
dialect,

Katkop

ly Ikweiten ta ||keu; wh)

heard

it

from her mother, +kamme-an.)
ttal

(4055)

!k'e

a

Ihannjhann f

;

ha ttan

;

he ha lauwi

jkui a jke Ma

ha

llnein

;

ha ssih
z> z>

jhari-na ttih.
a, ' a,

Ha
(4056)
ta,

kkui Ikui amm Ikauwa ha oD
ttah.
jkui

ha
i.

llkuallkuann

oaf
Ikii-g

he

Ikauwa

(

)

ha
i.

He, ha

Ine llkdaken jkanh llwei 6 jkui,

jkui l«kal!::ika Iku-g
i.

Ine llkoaken
Il^a,

j^v^kken +nu6bboken,

ha lauwi

jkui kko, a jhahn ssa.
:

He

ha

llxam,

(4057)

(

)

kii-kkui,
jkui a

hah l«ke
l!:::!kaliika

"Ine
ssih

amm

Ikauwa kki."
leta

He
of a

j^wakken +nu6bboka

* The above story was considered by Dr. Bleek to be a variation myth (L II.— 5. 566-624, 8. 811-882) describing how the Mantis is tricked by the Great Tortoise. jThe a here to be pronounced as the u in bun in English.
'

'

IHE LEOPARD TORTOISE.

37

baboons were those who ( ) killed the child, while (7092) the child is here ? " Then the Mantis said ''Hast thou not seen (that) he is not strong ? while he feels
:

that I

came

to

I wished that I

put his eye into the water ( ) while (7093) might see whether the thing would,
;

not accomplish itself for

me;

therefore, I

came

to

put his eye into the water.

He came

out of the

water;
strong.

therefore,

Therefore,

thou seest (that) he is not ( )(7094) I wished that I might wait,
;

taking care of him
will not

that

I

may

see

whether he

become strong."

I.— 7.

THE STOEY OF THE LEOPAED TOETOISE.*
The people had gone hunting: she was ill; and (4055) she perceived a man f who came up to her hut he
;

had been hunting around. She asked the man to rub her neck a little with fat for her ; for, it ached. The man rubbed it with
fat
(

)

for her.
it.

And

she altogether held the

man (4056)

firmly with

%

The man's hands

altogether decayed

away

in

it.

§

Again, she espied another man,

And
a

she also the

(

)

spoke, she said

:

who came hunting. " Rub me with fat (4057)
in

little."

And

man whose hands had decayed away

* Testudo pardalis.
t The narrator explains that this misfortune happened to of the Early Kace. J
§

men

By drawing
The
flesh

nails,

in her neck. decayed away and came ofE, as well as the skin and leaving, the narrator says, merely the bones.

38

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.
llkuallkuann, liah j^ei lia l^kalwka, jkuko ^a, see

ha
Ini

he, ti

e, lie

lywakken

+iiii6bboka,
i llkaj^ai;

i.

He ha
( )

kkui:

(4058)

"in
llkuan

Ika'u
la,

wwe,
i

amm

Ikau

ta,

jkajkarro

o

llka^aiten !kou tta.

A

ss'e-g Ine ll^ani

Ikau

i llka^ai, a."

Han

l^ei

ha IWkal«ka, jkuko ^a

sse Ini he.
Ilgo

\n6 ka:

" Ikaulkau
Iki le

Iki

le,

6

n

llkuallkuann."

(4059)

(

)

He, ha Ikau

ha l^kal^ka, o
llko

Ilgo llkuallkuann;

he llgogen kkui ttchotto
6

ha

Ina,

6 ha llkuallkuann;

ha liikalwkaken
;

Ikii

llko-llkoaken le-ttin
jho Ilgo, i; 6

ha

llkua+i,

llkuann

he ha jkuiku
Iki Ilgo.
(

han

ka,

ban

(4060) ha sse jku

)

He,
Iki

Ilgo Ikii

jkann

liwi, a.

jkukoken
ktii:

Ikii-g
ti
e,

Ine
ssiii

Ihiiiya

ha

liikalvi/ka,

he ha

" Tta

n

ll^am tta he; " he ha llneya

Ikiiko

ha \^M\^k^,

i;

he jkukdken

li^kaliika

Iku-g

(4061)

'ii8

llkdaken Id-ttin Ilgo llkuallkuann.
hail

(

)

He

ha

Ikii

ui,

Iku

jkuiten

llneiii,

i.

He
Ine

jkuko

ikii-g
lla;

Ine

jkiijku jho

Ikiiki

Ilgo; o haii

jkuiten

he ha

kui, jkukd ll^am tta ti e
*
\

ha

ssiii tta he.

Ti ttwaiten
the other

He

sat,

putting his hands behind him,
died

when

man

came, taking them out from the Leopard Tortoise's neck.

The moon
ill,

'

',

lay

the narrator explains.

and another moon came, while she still " "Whilst in the preceding myths
its origin, is

of the Mantis, the

Moon, according to

only a piece

of

leather (a shoe of the Mantis),

—in Bushman astrological mythology
man who
incurs the wrath of the
{i.e.

the

Moon

is is

looked upon as a
is

Sun, and
latter.

consequently pierced by the knife

rays) of the

This process

repeated until almost the whole of the

Moon

;

THE LEOPARD TOETOISE.

39

her neck, he was hiding his hands,* so that the other man should not perceive them, namely, that they had decayed away in it. And he said: "Yes; my

mate

rub our elder sister a little with fat for, the moon has been cut,t while our elder sister lies Thou shalt also rub our elder sister with fat."
!

;

(

)

(4058)

ill.

He

was hiding

his hands, so that the other one should

not perceive them.

The Leopard Tortoise
put (thy hands) into

my

" Rubbing with fat, neck." ( ) And he, rubbing (4059)
said
:

with fat, put in his hands upon the Leopard Tortoise's neck and the Leopard Tortoise drew in her head upon her neck while his hands were altogether in her neck and he dashed the Leopard Tortoise upon the ground, on account of it while he desired, he thought, that he should, by dashing (it) upon the ground, break the Leopard Tortoise. And the (4060) ) ( Leopard Tortoise held him fast. The other one had taken out his hands (from
;

;

;

;

behind his back)

and he exclaimed " Feel (thou) that which I did also feel " and he showed the other one his hands and the other one's hands were altoAnd (4061) gether inside the Leopard Tortoise's neck. ( ) other one was he arose, he returned home. And the dashing the Leopard Tortoise upon the ground while he returning went and he said that the other A pleasant thing ( ) (4062) one also felt what he had felt.
;
:

!

;

;

is

cut

away, and only one

little

piece

left;

wliich.

the

Moon

piteously implores the

Sun

to spare for his (the Moon's) children.

(As mentioned above, the
being.)
until
it

Moon

is in

From

this little piece, the

Bushman mythology a male Moon gradually grows again

processes

becomes a full moon, when the Sun's stabbing and cutting recommence." ("A Brief Account of Bushman Folk-lore and other Texts." By W. H. I. Bleek, Ph.D. Cape Town, 1875.
P. 9, § 16.)

40

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

(4062)

(

)

^auki
lla

e,

ha

ssin le-ta he.

Ike,

han Ikuiten

lla
;

jkd

llnein,

!k'e

kkui: " Tirre ka, a ssin Una he?"
1 1

He ha
le-tS

kii-kkuiten Ibke,

go ddoa a ha

liikaliika ssin

(4063) ha ilkuallkuann ; ( ) tiken e, ha ^a ka Jkiiiten, i. " jk'e kktii ka e Igebbi? ;^6aken-ggu j(a ^a'uki a llkhou a ? Ilgo kail ka Ikweiten yhwon ha sse Ikuki,
:

A

o ha ddau-ddau

i."

THE LEOPARD TORTOISE.
(it)

41

was

not,

in
;

whicli

he had been
:

!

He

yonder
?

returning went

(he) arrived at home.

The people exclaimed

"

Where

hast thou been

"

And he, answering, said that the Leopard Tortoise had been the one in whose neck his hands had been that was why he had not returned home. The (4063) ( ) " Art thou a fool ? Did not (thy) people said parents instruct thee ? The Leopard Tortoise always seems as if she would die; while she is deceiving us."
;
:

Ufalkwam.

II.

Sun and Moon.

44

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN TOLKLORE.

IL— 15.
THE CHILDEEN AKE SENT TO THROW THE SLEEPING SUN INTO THE SKY.
(487)

Ikaukaken

e

l^tierri

h&a

Ilk6ml«katten-ttu,
tta.
;

au

Ilk6ml»katten-ttu

w^ken Opuoin
ha
xpa,
llkoin, i;

jkaukaken Ikaukaken
ti e, llkdin

tatti e,
lla

a +kakka

he

ti hin. e,

Ine

au
hi.

llkoiii

yaii +;^iya, au

ta hi,

Opuoin ta

(488)

Inutarra

koken a +kakka

jkiiko, a

;

hh

ti
i.

hin

e, (

)

Ikukoken Ine +kakka jkuko ka jkauken,*

Inutarra
lla

koken +kakka jkuko,
l^uerri

ti

6,

(kuko ka jkauken sse

hd

llkoinlwkatten-ttu, hi

sse hefruki llkaiten
llkoin
ssi

llkoinlwkdtten-ttu,

W^e

ssi

llkdwa hi,

+^i

l^oe ta

ku

;

au

llkoiii

yaii tatti e, llkoiii Ine ttai, haii
hail
Ine

Ine ttai !gwa;i^u

ka ku,

+^iya tikentiken ka
i;

ku

;

he
e,
(

ti
)

hin

e,

haii Ine

+x^ya jkau ka ku,
;

au haii

(489') tatti
a,

jkauken Ine e datta ha
a,

hin

tatti e, Inutarra

+kakka jkuko

he

ti

hin

e,

jkukoken

Ine

+kakken
sse

" Ikauken

we

!

U

kuaii ssaii Ikeike

llkoiii, llkoiii

Opuoin, ten,

ta, i

dd6a yko.
;

U
u

sse

ttumOpua
au
ii

l^uerri

ho ha, au ha Opuoin, tta

u

sse Ikea hi,

ka ku,
ha

u ka
(488')

ku, liken \km hoa ha;
a,

sse hdrruki llkaiten

* Inutarra kogen
Ikauken;
a, Iki

+kakka
Iki

Ikiiko,

jkdko sse +kakka Ikuk5 ka
;

ta,

ha yauki

jkauken ka ttuken Opuonni
e, sse

ta,

!k6ko

Ikauken ka ttuken Opuionni e llkuakka, te
||a

llkuakken

akken, au hT |ne

ha jkom.

;

THE SUN AND THE CHILDREN.

45

IL— 15.
B.

THE CHILDEEN AKE SENT TO THROW THE SLEEPING SUN INTO THE SKY.
Tlie
to lift

cMldren were those who approaclied gently (487)

up the Sun-armpit, while the Sun-armpit

lay-

sleeping.

The children felt that their mother was the one who spoke therefore, the children went to the Sun whUe the Sun shone, at the place where the Sun lay,
;

sleeping lay.

Another old

woman was

the one
( )

who

talked to the

other ahout it; therefore,

to the other one's children.*

the other one spoke (488) The other old woman

said to the other, that, the other one's children should

approach gently to
rice

lift

up the Sun-armpit, that they

should throw up the Sun-armpit, that the

Bushman

might become dry for them, that the Sun might make bright the whole place while the Sun felt that the Sun went (along), it went over the whole sky, it made all places bright; therefore, it made aU the
;

ground bright; while it felt that ( ) the children (489') were those who had coaxed (?) him because an old woman was the one who spoke to the other about it, "0 children ye must therefore, the other one said
;
: !

to sleep, wait for the Sun, that the Sun may for, we are cold. Ye shall gently approach to lift
lie

down

* Another old woman was the one who said
;

to the other, that

(488')

the other should tell the other one's children; for, she (herself) had no young male children for, the other was the one who had

young male children who were clever, those who would understand nicely, when they went to that old man.

46

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Hiii Ikueda, bin +kakkeii, Imitarraken
ti

au \gwax^."
Ikueda,

ban tkakka jkuko; he +kakka

hiii

e,

Ikukoken

Ikueda, ikdkoken

ha, haii llxam Ine Ikueda,

han +kakka ha ka jkauken.
"

jkiikoken +kakka ha:
ha,

Kumman

a a, ha

h +kakka h&

u koa

ssan jkejke

llkoin."

Ikaukakeu Ine

ttai ssa,

Ikaukaken
I

ttai

I

la; Iniitarra-

ken tkakken
(490') ha,
( )

:

" U kkuan ssan
li^koen, ta,
ti

la

ssuin,

au u ll^koenya
ssuiii,

ti
;

e,

ha

u kua
Ine

ssan
Ine

au u

Ikejke

ha " he

hin

e,

jkauken

Man ssuin, au

jkaukaken
llkaiten

Ine jkejke

ha; han

tten,

han

Ine Iki

ha

jkotten-ttu,

ha

li^^kattenttdken Ine l^i jk^m,

au han

tta.

Hd

ti

hin

e,

jkauken Ine herru
iniitarra

ja

jho
hi.
o

ha au Igwa^ii, au hin

tatti,

a +kakka

Imitarraken +kakka Ikauken: " Ikauken o o
o

we

lla, li 7

kua 3

ssan +kakka ha, au
o

li

hdrruki llkaiten ha."

Imitarra3

ken +kdkka Ikauken: " Ikauken we Ma
o o

!

U kua
ha Iku-g

ssaii
3

+kakka

h^, ti

e,

ha

Ikii
lie,

ilk6aken sse di llkoin, ha sse

iku-g Ine ttai Iku
llkdaken e
ilkoiii,
li,

au haii
li;

tatti e,

Ine
i,

a tta

he

ti hiii e, ll;^e Ine llko,
)

(491') au hail Ine tta
tta
li,

jka jhda
ja

ha au !gwa;^u;

(

haii Ine

au

hail Ine

jkhe jgwa^u."
;

imitarraken a +kakka jkauken &
Ina jkuita
;

au

haii tatti e

ha

jkaukaken ttumm-i ha, hin ttumm-i hi ta
;

mSma,

hi

jj^oa

ha ^oaken
i.

Ine

+kakka
ti hiii

hi a, ti
e,

e, Iniitarra

Ikueda, haii

+kakken,
ti

He
hi Ine

hi Ine Ikueda,
i.

Mil

+1.

He

hiii

e,

Haii

ssueii,

jkhwa

:

THE SUN AND THE CHILDREN.

47

him up, while he

ye shall take hold of him, all together, all together ye lift him up, that ye may throw him up into the sky." They, in this manner, spoke; the old woman, in this manner, she
lies asleep;

spoke to the

other;

therefore,

the

other

in

this

manner spoke
story

to her, she also, in this

to her children.

The other

which I

tell thee,

said to her ye must wait for the Sun."
:

manner, spoke " This (is the)

The children came, the
old

children went away; the

woman said: "Ye must go to sit down, when ye have looked at him, ( ) (to see) whether he lies (490') looking; ye must go to sit down, while ye wait for him." Therefore, the children went to sit down, while the children waited for him; he lay down, he
lifted

up

his elbow, his armpit shone

as

he

lay.

Therefore, the children threw

the sky, while they felt

upon the ground, him up into that the old woman had
!

spoken to them. The old woman said to the children " children going yonder ye must speak to him, when ye throw him up." The old woman said to the children: "0 children going yonder! ye must tell him, that, he must altogether become the Sun, that he may go forward, while he feels that he is altogether
the Sun, which
is

hot; therefore, the

Bushman

rice

becomes dry, while he is hot, passing along in the sky; ( ) he is hot, while he stands above in the sky." (491') The old woman was the one who told the children about it, while she felt that her head was white the children were listening to her, they were listening to their mamma, their mother their mother told them
; ;

about
said.-

it,

that which the old

woman

in this

manner
There-

Therefore, they thought in this manner.

fore,

they went to

sit

to another, therefore, they

down. An older child spoke went to sit down, while

48

SPECIMENS OE BTJSHMAN POLKLOEE.
f

Ik^rri-Opua Ine +kakka jkiiko, he
(492') ssueii, au
Ine ttai

ti

Mn

e,

M Ine Man
t

Mn
I

jkelke lia

;

hm

Ine llaA ssuen.

(

)

Hin
lla

u

la,

hin Ine lyuorri ha, hin Ine jkhe, hih Ine
:

liakoen ha, hin Ine ttai lk€ Ma
ha, hih Ine
Ikg'i

hih Ine lyuorri jke
Ine Ikei ha,

ha, hi

ta kugen

Ikeya

ho ha, hih
ti

Ine !kai-ki likaiten ha,

au hah ta
i,

li.

H^
li
!

hih

e,

hih Ine herruki likaiten ha,
tta
li
:

au hah

tta

hih Ine +kakka ha, au hah

" llkoih

we

A

koa llkoaken au a tta li."
llkaita

liyi

ikh^, a

koa

ttai

lla,

a koa
likhoa

ll>I jkhe,

Imitarraken Ine +kakken, hi
ha,

kah
jkhe.

herruki

hah

likhoa

ll>I

ja

Hih

i-da, hih

+kakken, hih Ikueda, hih +kakken. +kakken: " Ilk6il«katten-ttu kah Ike
Ikauken herruki
llkaita
;

Ha
liyi
jd,

Ihah Ine
jkhe,

ha

ha; ha ssih
ti

tta,

hah

jkeita,

ha

ssih

Opuoiuya
i."

he

hih

e,

jkauken herruki

llkaita

ha

jkaukaken
(493')
(

Ine

jkiiiten ssa.
i:

He

ti

hih

e,

.Ikauken

)

Ine ssah
Ikei

+kdkken
;

" ikeh a

a,

hah

Ikea ha,

h

ll;^aiQ

ha

Opua koken
koken
llwei a.'
'

Ine

h Ilka-Opuaken Ine Hxam Ikei ha Ikeh
;

Ikei ha,

h

llka-

a a, ha IlkaOpua
'TJ

llvaih Ikei ha.

N
'

Ine +kd,kken:

kuah Ikahn
+kakken:

N

Ine Ikueda,

h +kakken; h
'

Ine

Hdrruki

llkaitau
i.
'

ha

!

Hd ti hih e,
:

jkauken Ine h^rriiki

likaiten ha,

au jkoih
jkdih
! '

!

jkanh llwei yu, JN" +kakka jkaiiken: N +kakka jkauken Herruki llkai-tau
'

He

ti

hih

e,

jkauken Ine herrdki

llkaita

jkoih, i;

ha jkoih

llkoih;

au hih
Ine

tatti e,

Inutarra a

+kakka."

jkhwa jk^rri-Opuaken
e,

+kakken, au han

tdtti

ha a ^arro

;

jkukoken il^am e ya'uddoro, hih

:

THE SUN AND THE CHILDREN.

49

they waited for him (the Sun), they went to sit down. They arose, going on, they stealthily approached (492') ) ( him, they stood still, they looked at him, they went

forward

they stealthily reached him, they took hold of him, they aU took hold of him together, lifted him
;

up, they raised him, while he felt hot.

Then, they

threw him up, while he
while he felt hot
:

felt

hot
!

"0

Sun

they spoke to him, thou must altogether
;

stand fast, thou must go along, thou must stand

fast,

while thou art hot."

The old woman said (that) they seemed to have thrown him up, he seemed to be standing fast ahove. They thus spoke, they in this manner spoke. Her
(apparently the mother's) husband said:

"The Sun-

armpit

is

standing fast above yonder, he

whom

the

children have
sleep
;

thrown up; he lay, he intended to therefore, the children have thrown him up."
Then, the children ( ) (493') " (Our) companion who is here, he

The children returned.
came (and) said
:

took hold of him, I also was taking hold of

him

;

my

younger brother was taking hold of him, my other younger brother was also taking hold of him (our) companion who is here, his other younger brother was
;

also

taking hold of him.
this

I said

:

'

Te must
;

grasp
said

him firmly.' I, in Throw ye him up
'
!

manner,
'

spoke

I

'

Then, the children threw him
:

up.

Grasp ye the old man firmly Throw ye up the I said to the children old man Then, the children threw up the old man that old man, the Sim while they felt that the old woman was the one who spoke." An older child spoke, while he felt that he was a youth; the other also was a youth, they were
I said to the children
! '
:

*

!

'

;

;

50

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

yauyarroken ka Ikaolkao, bin Man herruki llkalten (494') llkuil«katten-ttu. Hii ssan +kakken, ( ) yaoddoroken tkakken, yaoddoroken +kakka ha {kdite: "N Ikd'ite
e

we
ti

!

8S1

tan herruki

llkaita ha, ssi'ten Ine
li;

+kakka

ha,

e,

ha

sse llkoaken di llkoin, a tta

ta ssi ^ao.

Ssi'ten Ine

tkakken: 'N jkoin

llkuil«katten-ttu
li;
ll;it^e

we!

A-g
ssi
;

llnallna ti;

a di llkoin a tta

sse IlkowS

a sse +^i jkau ka

ku

;

jkau ka

ku
i;

sse di
li.

ku

tta
ti

li,

au Ilkuonna; a
e,

sse llkoaken di kii tta

He

hih

a ssin
llkoin

llk(5aken +^i,

ho Ma

llga,

a ssia

ttai ssa,

ilgagen ttai Ha.'

yan

tt§I

ssa,

llgdgen ttai
le,

lla,

llkoin
ssa,

yah
jkau-

ttai

ssa,

llkoih

yah

Ilgagen
;

ttai

jkarroken ttai ssa au llga

jgaueten khwai,* llkoih
lla,

yah
ttai

Ihih

ssa,

Ilgagen ttai

llkoih

yah

ttai

ssa.

jkaulkarroken Ihih ssa, Ikaujkarroken

+j^i llga,

Ilgagen
+;^i
le.

u
lla

lla;

jkaujkarroken Ihih ssa; jkaulkan-oken
;

(494) ho

llga

(

)

ban

ttai

lla,

han

+;^iya llga,

hah

llkoih

yah
lla

Ihih ssa, llkoih

yah l^hai

ti lla llga,

llkoih

yah yah
he
Ine

Iki

Ikaujkarro, Ikaujkarroken Ine jkhe, llkoih

llkeinya ha, au llkoih ta jgwarra, au

hah
hih

jkhe;
e,

ti

hih

e,

hah
:

Ine

l^wakken,

i.

He

ti

hah

+kakken
ti

" llkoih
llkoih
i,
i.

w^
ine

!

luhiya jkauken Ikudrri."

He
ti e,

hih

e,

luhiya
ti

jkauken
e,

Ikudrri, i;

(495) llkoih yah Ine

(

)

He

hih

llkoih Ine+kakken,

llkoih sse luhiya jkauken Ikuerri, au llkoih yah
;

Ihurhm ha
ti

llkoih

yah

Ine luhiya

jkauken Ikuerri; he
lii,

hih

e,

Ikaujkdrroken Ine diirru
Ine diirru lla;

hah
e,

Ine diirru llkoih Ine

jkiiiten,

au hah

he

ti

hih

* The narrator explained here that the word either with or without the cerebral click (!).

khtoai

may

be used

"

;

THE SUN ANB THE CHILDREN.

51

young men(?), they went to throw up the SuuThey came to speak, ( ) the youth spoke, armpit.
the

"0 my youth talked to his grandmother grandmother! we threw him up, we told him, that, he should altogether become the Sun, which is hot
:

(494')

for,

we

are

cold.

We

said

:

'

my

grandfather,

Sun-armpit!
the

Eemain

(at that) place;

become thou
rice

Sun which

is h.ot;

that the

Bushman

may

dry for us; that thou mayst make the whole earth light; that the whole earth may become warm in the.

summer;
the

that

thou mayst altogether

make

heat.

Therefore, thou

must altogether

shine, taking

away
go

darkness

;

thou must come,

the

darkness

away.'

The Sun comes, the darkness goes away, the Sun Sun sets, the darkness comes, the moon comes at night. The day breaks, the Sun comes out, the darkness goes away, the Sun comes. The moon
comes, the

darkness departs;
shines, taking
it

comes out, the moon brightens the darkness, the the moon comes out, the moon

away the darkness ( ) it goes along, (494) made bright the darkness, it sets. The Sun comes out, the Sun follows (drives away ?) the darkness, the Sun takes away the moon, the moon stands, the Sun pierces it, with the Sun's knife, as it stands; therefore, it decays away on account of it.
;

has

Therefore,

it
!

the backbone
the

says: Sun! leave for the children " Therefore, the Sun leaves the back;

"0

bone for the children

the Sun does

so.

(

)

Therefore, (495)

Sun says that the Sun will leave the backbone for Sun assents to him; the Sun therefore, the leaves the backbone for the children moon painfully goes away, he painfully returns home, while he painfully goes along; therefore, the Sun
the children, while the
;

52

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN POLKLOEE.

luhi,

au han

tdtti e, llkoin

luMya jkauken a
ti

Ikuerri,

au

llkoin Ine
(-

jhumm
)

lia

;

lie

bin

e, llkoin Ine luhi

(496) au Ikuerri;

au

llkoiii

yan

tdtti, llkoin Ine

jhumm
lii,

ha; he
tail Ine

ti hiii e, llkoiii

Ine luM, 1; haii Ine diirru
ll;^a,

ddurru

jkiiiten; haii Ine
;

haii Ine Mail di

Ikaujkarro ko,
Ine
ll^a,

hag +xirru
He

haii ll^a, haii jkauwih, haii

haii Ine jkauwih,

au han

tatti

e,

ha

Ikii

Ikiiken dau-dau.

ti hiii e, haii
)

Ine di Ikaulkarro

(497)

llk|ii

;

au han

tatti e, haii ll^a,
;

(

haii ll^de jho Ikda

hail Ine llkhou !kwi

au han

tatti e, haii Ine e jkau-

jkdrro a +urru
ttai ssa,
tatti,

;

he

ti

hiii e, haii

Ine

Ikwiya
I

;

han
llga,

ine

au han jkau-wa.

Han
ttai

Ine tai
llga,

la

au

han

ha e Ikaujkarro a
;

au

au han
llga.

tatti,

.Iktiken Ikii e
llkoiii

he
a,

ti hiii e, haii

Iku ttai au
llkoiii

yan

jkaii

ka
(

kii +x^ya,
)

yah

a,

jke

(498)

ttai
hiii

au tiken +ka,
lliikoen jke

jkauii

+ka

;

jkdten
eii,

Ini

Ohoken,

kuiten; hih lliikoen

e hi hi hi;

hiii

ll^amki llwkoen whai,
hiii

hiii ll;^amki

juhatten whai,

au llkuoima;
llkoiii
l;^ai

\\j(&mkl juhatten ttoi,
ttoi,

au

hiii tatti
;

+x^ya

;

hih ll^am juhatten

au llkuonna

hiii hiii

whai au llkuonna, au whai ;
j^au,

hiii tatti, llkoiii

+x^ya,
;

Ine llwkoen

hiii llj^am \j(noin.

jkhwai

hih

ll;^ain

(499)

(

)

l;^;uofri

au

hiii

tatti ti ta

ku

+;^iya; hiii

llj^am ;^;ahnugii hi Ikagen,

au

hiii tatti e, llkoiii

+x^ya,

jkauii

llj^ain

+;iciya,

llkoiii

yah +^iya

jkharra.

Hin

;;

THE SUN AND THE CHILDREN.
desists,

53

while he feels that the Sun has

left for

the

children the backhone, while the
therefore, the

Sun

assents to
;

him

Sun

leaves the backbone

Sun Sun

feels that the

Sun

assents to
;

him

;

while the (496) ( therefore, the
)

on account of it he (the moon) painfully goes away, he painfully returns home; he again, he goes to become another moon, which is whole; he again, he lives he again, he lives, while he feels that he had seemed to die. Therefore, he becomes a new moon while he feels that he has again ( ) put on (497) a stomach ; he becomes large while he feels that he therefore, he is large he is a moon which is whole He goes along at night, comes, while he is alive. he feels that he is the moon which goes by night, while he feels that he is a shoe * ; therefore, he walks
desists
;
;

;

;

;

in the night.

The Sun
earth
( )

is

here, all the earth

is

bright

;

the Sun
light,

is

here, the people
is

walk while the place
;

is

the

the people perceive the bushes, (498) they see the other people; they see the meat, which
light

they are eating;

they also see the springbok, they they also head also head the springbok, in summer the ostrich, while they feel that the Sun shines ; they
;

head the ostrich in summer; they are shooting the springbok in summer, while they feel that the Sun shines, they see the springbok; they also steal up to the gemsbok; they also ( ) steal up to the (499) kudu, while they feel that the whole place is bright
also

they also visit each other, while they feel that the Sun shines, the earth also is bright, the Sun shines

upon the path.

They

also travel in

summer; they

off

* The Maatis formerly, when inconvenienced by darkness, took one of his shoes and threw it into the sky, ordering it to become

the Moon.

;

54

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ilj^am
.llmnn,

jkwa au llkuonna

;

Mil
Ini

l;^ai

au llkuonua,
;

hiri
hiii

au llkuonna

;

hin

whai, au llkuoima
;

Ine juhatten

whai
;

;

hin Ine jga tin

hin

tdtti e, hi
l.kau,

llkoita llkditen

hin l^erriya
ttai ssa.
33

llkiiiten

ka

hin

Ine tten, /

au whalten

FURTHER REMARKS.
The second version
is

of the preceding

myth, which

unfortunately too long to be conveniently included
the

in

present volume, contains a few interesting

notes, furnished by the narrator, WMbbo ("Dream"),

"which are
that the

given below.
a

Wkdbbo
;

further

explained
in

Sun was

man

but, not one of the early

race of people
their

who preceded

the Flat

Bushmen

country.

He

only gave forth brightness for
dwelling.

a space around his

own

Before the children

threw him up, he had not been in the sky, but, had As his shining had lived at his own house, on earth.

NOTES FROM THE SECOND VERSION OF THE PRECEDING STORY.
(3150')
!;^w^-lna-ssho jke
Ikii
e,

ssin mmaii, hin Una jkaii.
Ikii

H^ Hd
hin

ti ti

hin hin
ti

e, e, e,

hi ta jkauken
jke e Ine

e Ine tabba llkoin.

Una, hi-hi ta Ix'^e, hin e Ine
llkaita
llkoin,

tkakken
hherruki

jkauken e ttabba kl

au

tatti e, hi ;^(5aken-ggu e
llkalta hi llkoin
;

Iwkabbeya,

ti e,

hi sse

llkoin sse Ikarraka hi Ik'aii

hi ssg ttaa llkoin ta Ikdrrakenlkarraken, hi sse dd(5a-g
Ine Ikarra-lkarra
ssiii.

; ;

THE SUN ANB THE CHILDREN.
are

56

shooting in

summer
;

;

they espy the springbok in
to

they hunt in summer summer; they go round
;

they

head the springbok they lie down they feel that lie in a little house of bushes they scratch up the earth ra the little house of bushes, they lie down, while the springbok come.
;

been confined to a certain space at, and round his own dweUing, the rest of the country seemed as if the sky were very cloudy as it looks now, when the Sun is behind thick clouds. The sky was black (dark ?). The shining came from one of the Sun's armpits, as he lay with one arm lifted up. When he put down his arm, darkness fell everywhere when he lifted it up again, it was as if day came. In the day, the Sun's light used to be white but, at night, it was red, like a fire. When the Sun was thrown up into the sky it became round, and never was a man
; ;
;

afterwards.

TEANSLATION OF NOTES.
inhabited (3150') the earth. Therefore, their children were those who worked with the Sun. Therefore, the people who

The

First

Bushmen * were

those

who

first

inhabited their country, are those who say that the children worked, making the Sun to ascend,
[later]

while

they

felt

that

their

mothers

had
for

agreed

together that they should throw

up, for them, the

Sun

;

that the

Sun might warm the earth
feel the Sun's

them

that they

might might be able to sit in the Sun.
* The

warmth, that they

men

of the early race.

!

66

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
!;^w^-lna-8slio

(3151')

!ke
fk'ik.

e

llgwiya,

8sw^-ka-!keten
e,

Ine

llneillnei
llj^all;^a

hi
lii

ta ta

H^

ti

Mil

Sswa-ka-jke Ine
jke

jkauken,

au

l^we-lna-ssho

ta

kokommi.
(3155')
llkoiii

yan

ssiA e jkui,

han +kdkkeii;

hi ta
ti

kugen
e,

+kakkeii, hin jkukko jkaulkarro.
ssiri

He

hin

hi

Una
Ine

[k'Sfi

;

au

hiii

tatti

e,

hi +kdkken.

Hih

yauki

+kakken, au hi

Ine

Una Igwlx^i-

II.— 22.
L.

THE ORIGIN OF DEATH; PEECEDED BY A PRATEE ADDEESSED TO THE YOUNG
MOON.
{Dictated, in 1875, in the

Katkop

dialect,

ly DiajkwaiE.)

(5159)

I kkaii llnau, jkajkauru Ikaityi jkou ttih-ssa, ften
llnau,

jkukko Iwkeya hi Ikajkaiiru, iten Ine jkwe
)

lla,

(5160)

ti e,

(

jkukko Iwkeya hi jkajkauru,
i
1

i,

he,

i

Ine llnau,

iten

ka
6

jkwe

lie,

iten Ine Ini jkajkauru, he, i-g Ine

(5161)

llnau,

ka
6
i
ii

Ini

ha

e,

iten

Ine

(

)

jkunh jhan
:

i

tsaj^aiten,

l^kalwka, iten Ine kkui

" jkabbi-a
Ike a

Ike

!

*

Ika

^u, Ike a
ix

!

A
llnau,

sse

akke a ^u

(6162)

(

)

A

sse Ika

^u
)

Ike a

!

He

^auki tta +haiinuwa.

A

sse

akke a
sse
ii

;ifu, e,

a
i

ka

a Ikuka, a
ini a,

Ikii ll;^a, Ikii

a

(5163) jkou

ttiii
;

;

(

6

yauki ssih

a

ll^a a,
Ike,
llj^a

tteii sse

sse

ll^^ffi,

llkelike a-a.
(

Ta, jkei

a a

(5164) jkwaiten ddda
Ikou ttlh
sse,

Iki ha, Ike a,
i

)

hd, a
;

ka

Ikii

o

^auki

ssiii Ini
Ikii

a

6

Inaii

ddoa +kakka
( )

(5165) ha

a, ti e,

a ssiiikwari

Ikwei Ikwelkwe.
is

Aken

* The meaning of \kdihl-&

not yet clear.

THE ORIGIN OP DEATH.

57

When
Flat

the

Bushmen had passed away, the Bushmen inhabited their ground. Therefore, Flat Bushmen taught their children about the
the
first

(3151')

Bushmen. The Sun had been a man, he talked; they all (3155') talked, also the other one, the Moon. Therefore, they used to live upon the earth while they felt that they spoke. They do not talk, now that they live
stories of the First
;

ia the sky.

II.— 22.
L.

THE ORIGIN OF DEATH; PEECEDED BY A PRATER ADDRESSED TO THE YOUNG
MOON.
We, when the Moon has newly returned alive, (5159) when another person has shown us the Moon, we look towards the place at which ( ) the other has shown (5160) us the Moon, and, when we look thither, we perceive the Moon, and when we perceive it, we shut oui-(5161) ( )
eyes with our hands,

we exclaim
!

:

" \kdbhi-a yonder

!

Take

my

face yonder
(
)

Thou

shalt give

yonder!

Thou

shalt take

my

thy face face yonder! That (5162)

me

Thou shalt give me when thou hast died, thou dost again, living return, ( ) when we did not (5163) that perceive thee, thou dost again lying down come, I may also resemble thee. For, the joy yonder,
which does not feel pleasant. thy face, (with) which thou,

thou dost always possess
that

it

yonder,
to

(

)

that

is,

(5164)

thou art wont again
did not perceive thee
it,
;

return alive,

when
Thou (5165)

we

while the hare told thee

about

that

thou

shouldst

do

thus.

(

)

58

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
ti e, ssf

Ilkuan o +kakka,

sse

kwan,

ll;^^am ll^a ssi

jk'au

jkum
(5166)

sse,

o

ssl

Ikuka."
a,

jnau Ilkuan ddpa

Ikwei

(

)

kkoa.

Ha

ku-kku,

ha Iwke, lia yauki ka lia sse +gou, ta, ha j^da ^auki (5167) ka ha sse ll^a ha jkau jkum sse ; ta, ( ) ha j^oa llkoaken Ikuken. He tfken e, ha sse ^wa llwei, o ha ^oa.
(5168)
jkalkauruken ku-kuiten Ikeya !nau
ttii

a, (

)

jnaii

^u

ha ^oa yauki llkoaken Ikiiken. Ta, ha ^da Ikuka, ha sse ll^a ha jkou jkum sse. jnaun Ine
;

ywa

ta,

(5168i) ku-kiiiteu

l!:!ke,

(

)

ha ^auki ka ha
;^oa

sse

+gou
ll;^;a

;

ta,

ha

Ikii +en.-iia, ti e,

ha

yauki ka ha sse

ha jkou

!kum
(5169)
(
)

sse.

Ta, ha llkdaken Ikuken.
Ikalkaiiru IWkwain,
i
;

He
;

ti e,

jnau kwaii Ikwei

kkui,

o hail >'au
( )

jhumm
llnau,

ha.

He ha

jgwa

Iki

jnaii

(5170)

ttu, i

he ha

han jgwa

Inaii ttii, haii kkiii:

" jkui

a,

ha ttu

e a,

ha ttu kke
ttu

ssin llkoaken Ikwei
ssiii
(

(5171)

u, o

ha kki-ssa
sse

e jnaii;

han ka ha
;

)

llkdaken

Ikammainya
ii,

ttwi, o

ha

ha sse kwan. Iku ssiiken
lid.

ha

kwaii Iku |kdujkdii-a jkhe
;

jkuiiijkuiii

(5172)

sse kwaii Ikii llkhauka

hd

sse

( )

kwaii

llnaii,

he Ika-a
sse
Ikii

ha, he sse

kwan
he

Iku jkanh tt^ett;^eta,*

ha

llkdaken Ikiiken.

(5173)

"He
ttal,

e, jk'e,

sse

kwSfi

Ikii

llkdaken

(

)

Ikuken

6 he Ikuka.f
a, ti e,

Ta, ha yauki ka ha jhurnm ii,o-g

n

l^keya ha
(5172') (5173')
* Or,
-I"

ha yauki

sse

ywa, 6 ha

xpa.

;

ta,

tBsi,

ttxue-ttxueten

M.
sse llkoaken

jk'e ssS

kwan

llnau,

he Ikuka, he
sse.

Ikuken
a,

ttai

;

o

he yauki

|lxi,

hg !kou jkum
l^^ke, ti e,

Ta, Inafi Ijku^

Ikwli kku,

ha 4:kakk§n; ha

ha xoS yauki ka ha

sse |lxS

ha jkou

jkum

ssS.

THE ORIGIN OF DEATH.
didst formerly say, that
alive,

59

we

should also again return

when we

died."

The hare was the one who thus ( ) did. He spoke, (5166) he said, that he would not be silent, for, his mother would not again living return for ( ) his mother was (5167) Therefore, he would cry greatly for altogether dead.
;

his mother.

The Moon

replying, said to the hare ahout
;

it

(

)

(6168)

that the hare should leave off crying

was not altogether dead. The hare replying, she would again living return. said ( ) that he was not willing to be silent; for, he(5168i) knew that his mother would not again return alive. For, she was altogether dead. And the Moon became angry about it, that the (5169) ( ) hare* spoke thus, while he did not assent to him (the Moon). And he hit with his fist, cleaving the hare's mouth; ( ) and while he hit the hare's mouth (5170) with his fist, he explaimed " This person, his mouth which is here, his mouth shall altogether be like this, even when he is a hare;t be shall ( ) always bear (5171) a scar on his mouth he shall spring away, he shall doubling (?) come back. The dogs shall chase him; they shall, ( ) when they have caught him, they shall (5172) graspiug tear him to pieces,^ he shall altogether die. "And they who are men, they shall altogether ( ) (5173) dying go away, when they die. § For, he was not
:

mother For, his mother meant that
for, his

;

* It was a yoTing male hare, the narrator explained. (5169 ') the Moon cursed him, /5]^70') t The hare had also been a person; but, ordering that he should altogether become a hare.

him to pieces. (5172') The people shall, when they die, they shall altogether dying (5173') For the hare go away; while they do not again living return. was the one who thus spoke he said that his mother would not
X Or, bite, tearing §
;

again living return.

;

60

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(6174)

lia ;^6a

ka ha

sse

(

)

ll^a

ha

Ik'au
sse

ke,
sse.

ti e,

ha

;^oa

^auki ka ha
e,

han ll;i^a ha
;

Ine

+kakka

jk'au

jkum
jnaii.

He
e,
(

tfken

ha ka ha
kwaii
ti

sse llkdaken ddi

(5175)

He

) jk'e,

he

sse

Ikii

llkdaken Ikuken.

Ta,

ha llkuan he kie

a,

+kakka,
sse.

e

ha

;^oa
(

^auki ka ha
)

sse ll^a
a, ti e,
;

(5176) ha Ik'au jkum
sse

N

llkuan
;

+kakka ha

n ka
(5177) Ine
(

llnau,
)

Hkellke n-n ti e, n ka ddf he ka Ikuka, n ll^a n jk'au jkum sse. +nwai n, o kah kah +kakka ha a."

Wxa^
6

he-g

Han
ha 6a

He

tiken
ti

e,
e,

mama-ggu +kdkka

ke, ti

e, [d&vl

(5178) e !kuf;

ha Ikwei koa, i, hin e, ll^kauwa ha, i, ha sse llkdaken ddi gguken
kail liikeya ke, ti
;

(

)

Ika.lkaiiru

jngu.

Mamaha
Iniiu,

e,

\niu
(

Iki jkui ta a, 6

(5179)

llkatten-ttii

he tlken

e, ssl

ka

) llnau, ssi

Ikha

o

ssi

ka

ssl sse

ha

Inau, sslten

ka

Iki Ihin
;

Ikwaii Ike,
ti

e !kui ta a, ssi Ij^ugen, ;^u ttu

ha

o ssiten tta Ilka

(5180)

e,

(

)

ha

a, a,

jnau,

ha ka a yauki
e.

e.

Ta,

lli/ke a,

ha

6a e !kui

hA ka a
e, )

He
a

tlken
(

mdma-ggu yauki ka
Ilka ti e,

ssi hi,

ha a-Opua
a,

(5181) 6 hin tta
Ikii e.

a

a,

jnau

Ikii

6 e jkui
ssi a,

ha ka
Ino

Mdma-ggiiken kan Iwkeya

ssi-g

to obtain a hare, so that it

* The meaning of WMtten-tiii is not yet clear; and the endeavours might be exactly ascertained from the Bushmen which piece of meat was meant, were unsuccessful. The tta, at the end of the word shows that some sort of hollow of the human body is indicated. Since these sheets were sent to press. Dr. J. N. W. Loubser, to whom I had applied for information regarding this particular piece

was so good as to send me the following lines, accompanied by a diagram, which unfortunately it was already too late for me to include in the illustrations for the volume " As regards the biltong flesh ', I have often watched my mother cutting bUtong, and know that each leg of beef contains really only
of meat,
: '

THE ORIGIN OF DEATH.
willing to agree witli me,

61

when

I told
;

him about

it,

that he should not cry for his mother

mother would ( ) again live; he said to me, that, his mother (5174) would not again living return. Therefore, he shall And ( ) the people, they (5176) altogether become a hare. For, he was the one who said shall altogether die. that his mother would not again living return. I ( ) (5176) said to him about it, that they (the people) should that which I do ; that I, when I am also be like me He ( ) contradicted me, (5177) dead, I again living return. when I had told him about it." Therefore, our mothers said to me, that the hare was formerly a man; when he had acted in this manaer, then it was that ( ) the Moon cursed him, (5178) Our that he should altogether become a hare. mothers told me, that, the hare has hiunan flesh at therefore, we, ( ) when we have (5179) his Wkdtten-ttu*
for, his
; ;

killed a hare,

intend to eat the hare, we out the " biltong flesh " t yonder, which is human take

when we

flesh,

we

leave it;

while
it is

we

feel that

(

)

he who

is

(5180)

the hare, his flesh

not.

For, flesh (belonging to) a man,
it is.

the time

when he formerly was

Therefore, our mothers were not willing for us to

meat; while they felt ( ) that (5181) it is this piece of meat with which the hare was formerly a man. Our mothers said to us about it, did we not feel that our stomachs were uneasy if we
eat that small piece of
one real biltong,
i.e.

usual oblong shape, but has this a priori.
a muscle of this form.

the piece of flesh need not he cut into the In other words, it is

Prom my

anatomical knowledge I can

only-

find it to correspond to the musculus biceps femoris of the

wiU
t

therefore be a muscle sitting

man. It rather high up the thigh (B of

Figure)."

The narrator explained

\T<,'wq&.

meat that can be cut into

strips

to be "biltong flesh" {i.e., lean and sun-dried, making " biltong").

"

62

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(5182) >au ttfi, ti e, ssi ka kkauruken, o ssl hS ( ) ha a-0pua, o ssften tta Ilka ti e, jkui ta a Iku e he
;

yauki e jnau ka
(5183) hail tta

§,

;

ta a a taauiikko Una taau, h4 e

;

o

Ilka ti e, jniii
jnaii,
i

6a e
;

jkul.

(

)

Se

ti'ken e,

ha

jnaunkko Una
e,

o jnau ka ddi-dditen llkuan
I i
;

Ikajkaiiru llvT/kauwa

f

sse

kwau
sse

Iku.

Ilkdaken

(5184) ikuken.
ssih sse

Ta,

i

ssih sse

(

)

kwan
!kum

llnau, i Ikuka, iten
;

kwan

ll^a i Ik'au

jnauh llkuan

ddda a, yauki Ihum-ma Ikalkaiiru, o Ikalkauruken (5185) ka ha +kakka ( ) ha a; han Ine +nwai Ikajkauru.

He
(5186) e
jk'e,

tiken

e,

jkajkauru Ine ku-kkui, ban Iwke

:

" TJ
(
)

u koo

sse

kwan

llnau,

u

Ikuka,

ii

kwah
ii

Iku

ilkoaken

Ikuken tchu-ru

ssih.

Ta,

h

llkuan

ssih

+kakken,
(5187) Iku
Ta,
ll^a

u k"wah u kkoah Ihih,
ti e,

Iku llnau,
ii

u
h

Ikuka,
(
)

kwah
sse.
;

yauki llkdaken
ll^a

Iktiken.

h ka

llnau,

o ka Ikuka, h

Ik'au

jkum

N

llkuan ssih ka,

ue

jk'e, ii
;

ssih

ll;i^am

llkellkeya

h-h

(5 J 88) ddi tlken

ka ddi he

Ikuken
tfken

OD3
e,

ttai.

U

e Ik'eten, llkuah

'07037
Opuoih,

(

)

he-g

h yauki
e,

ta llkdaken

dda ha ddi

he 7—
;

h llkuah ssih +i, ti e, h a hii jkei. jnauh Iku 6 kah llkuah tta (5189) llnau, o kah kah ( ) +kdkka ha a, Ilka ti e, h llkuah +eh-na, ti e, jnaii ^oa yauki likdaken

Ikiiken, ta,

ha
)

Ikii

jnaiih Ine a,

+kakka
o

ke,

(5190)

ti

e,

ha

(

j^Sa

yauki Opuoih; ta ha ^oa llkdaken
e,

Ikuken.

He

tfken llkuah
Ikii

h jwkwain,

i

;

kah
Ikii

Ikii
(
)

(5191)

ssih ka, jnaii
Opuoiti.'

kkii:

'I,

mama kah
jwkwain

llkuah

Ta, h^

ti,

he

e,

ha

Ine

jnaii, i;

ti e,

jnSii

kwah
kkdah

Ikii

Ikwei kkiii, o jnaiih yau kkiii:
Ikii

"i,

mama

(5192) kah llkuah

Opuoih
jnaii

Ihih."

hah ka ha sse ( ) Ikaltyi wa oa jhumma jkajkauru, hih
tta
;

"

;

THE OEIGIN OF DEATH.
ate
)

63

(

that little piece of meat, while

we

felt that it

(5182)

was human flesh; it is not hare's flesh; for, flesh which is still in the hare it is while it feels that the hare was formerly a man. ( ) Therefore, it is still (5183) while the hare's doings are those on in the hare account of which the Moon cursed us that we should
; ; ;

altogether die.

For,

we

should,

(

)

when we
;

died,

(5184)

we

should have again living returned

the hare was

the one

who did not assent to the Moon, when the Moon was willing to talk to ( ) him about it; he (5185)
contradicted the

Moon.

Therefore, the
people,

vanish
died,
(

Moon spoke, he said: " Ye who are ye shall, when ye die, ( ) altogether dying (5186) away. For, I said, that, ye should, when ye
arise,

ye should again
For,
I
I,

ye should not altogether

)

die.

when

I

am

dead,

return.

had

intended, that,

I again living (5187) ye who are men, ye

should also resemble
(

me (and) do the

things that I do

)

that I do not altogether dying go away.

Ye,

who (5188)

are men, are I

those who did this deed; therefore, had thought that I (would) give you joy. The hare, when I intended ( ) to tell him about it, while (5189) I felt that I knew that the hare's mother had not really died, for, she slept, the hare was the one who said to me, that his ( ) mother did not sleep for, his (5190) mother had altogether died. These were the things that I became angry about; while I had thought that the hare would say: 'Yes; my mother is ( )(5191)

;

asleep.'

For, on account of these things, he (the Moon) became angry with the hare; that the hare should have spoken iu this manner, while the hare did not say: "Yes, my mother lies sleeping; she will
(

)

presently arise."

If the hare

had assented

to the

(5192)

64

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
e !k'e,
i

e, i

ssin ssin

kwan
(

Iku llkdilkeya jkajkauru;
)

(5193)

ta, jkajkaiiru llkuan

ha oa

Ikwei-dda,

ti e, i

^auM
llkuan O D

see
e,

kwan

llkdaken Ikuken, o o
Ine
( )

Inati
i,

ka ddi-dditen
o

Ikajkaiiru

llwkau

i

;

he

i

ta

Ine
a,

llkdaken

(5194)

Ikuken, i; 6

kkumm
;

a,
i

jnau llkuan

tkakka

M.
ttai
(

Ha kumm, han
(5195) a
;

llkuan a,

ka llkdaken Ikuken

o Inau ka ddi-ddi
jkalkaiiru
;

lie

ha llkuan

a,

yauki

)

Ihumma

6 jkajkaiiruken ka ha +kakka ha

a; han Ine +nwai Ikajkaiiru, o Ikajkauruken k^ ha

Iwkeya ha

a.

(5196)

jkajkaiiru Ine ( ) ku-kuiten

l«ke,

ha ka ha
e,

ssin

!uhi!uhi-ttin
ti
e,

+ka

;

jkde-ttau
;

wa
Ikii

ssin

tssi-i

ha, 6

ha tten-tten he
ta,

ha yauki

ssin llannllann ssin

(5196^) Ohoken;

ha

(

)

kwan

juhi-ta

+ka; o ha
-

yauki ta 0h6.

Ha kwan
6

Iku

juhijuhl

ttin +ka.

He
(6197)

tiken

e,

Inau ka llnau, ha ssuken ui, ha ttauko
;

toajnabhi-ten
jkoe-ttau,

hd

(

)

Inajnabbi-ten

tta-ttdtten

o ha laa, e jkoe-ttau lihinya he; o han
e,

tta Ilka ti

Ikde-ttau Ine ilhin Ikaun-a a Ina.
(

He

(5198)

tiken

e,

ha

)

Inajnabbiten,

jkde-ttau kkuiten sse

tta-ttat-ta

ha

a.

THE ORIGIN OP DEATH.

65

Moon, then, we who are people, we should have resembled the Moon; for, the Moon had formerly ( ) (5193)
said, that

we

should not altogether

die.

The

hare's

doings were those on account of which the Moon cursed us, and we die altogether; on account of ( )(5194)
the

which the hare was the one who told That story is the one on account of which we on account of the altogether die (and) go away hare's doings; when he was the one who did not
story

him.

;

(

)

assent to the

Moon; when
it;

the

Moon

intended (5195)

to tell

him about

he contradicted the Moon, when
(the hare) (5196)

the

Moon intended to tell him about it. The Moon ( ) spoke, saying that he
lie

should
lying;

upon a bare place

;

yermiti should be those

who were

biting him, at the place where he

was

he should not inhabit the bushes; for, he should lie upon a bare place; while he did not (5196^) ( ) He should be lying upon a bare lie under a tree. Therefore, the hare is used, when he springs place. up, he goes along shaking his head; while he ( )(5197) shakes out, making to fall the vermin from his head, in which the vermin had been hanging; while he feels that the vermin hung abundantly in his head.
Therefore, he
(

)

shakes his head, so that the other (5198)
out for him.

vermin

may

fall

(This,

among the

different versions of the

Moon and

Hare story called "
selected

The Origin of Death ", has been on account of the prayer to the young Moon with which it begins.)

;

66

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

II.— 24.
L.

THE MOON
{^Dictated,

NOT TO BE LOOKED AT WHEN GAME HAS BEEN SHOT.
IS
in

1875,
it

in

the

Kathop

dialect,

by Dia!kw|in, who

heard

from Ms mother, ^:kamme-an.)

(5643)

Ssiten ^auki sse liakoen Ikajkauru, 6 ssi \j^ ©pual;
ta, ssi Ikii llwkoen,

jk'o

!h.(5a

ssi Ina;

o ssiten yauki

(5644) jkwejkwe
jkalkauru

!a

llkho,
+j^i.

6

(

) !gwa;^;u;
e,

o ssiten jliuniim

ka
Iki

Hiii
ssi

ssi
ti

.Ihummi
e,

he.

Ta,

mama-ggu
(5645)
Ta,

+kakka
i

a,

jkajkauru ^auki

e llein jkui, o

ll^koen ha.
( )
i

hg

llnau,

ll^koen ha,

o

i

l^a

Opuai,

llkheten-llkh^tan ssan hi Opuai, 5
ta,

Opuai ya Ikuken
llnau,

o

i

lli^koen

jkajkauru.
( )

Opuaiten
Iki
ti

ha

;^a

(5646)

Jkiika,

jkajkauru

llkhu kaii e

jk'aui Opuai.
e,

Ta,

mama-ggu

Iki

+kdkka
*

ssi

a,

jkajkauru

llkhiigen Ike, ssi

ka ll^koen he, he
llki.

Iko ss'o

Oho, h^

(5647) ta llkho

(

)

jkhoii

Hiii

e,

llkaii - ssiii

Opuai

Opuaiten kkoaii

Ihiii,

o he llkau-ssinya Opuai.

Hin
ttai,

Ine Iki sserriten-ssdrriten

jgauoken
Ihiii,

e, i

l;^a

Opuai, i;

(5648)

(

)

he Opuai

Ikii-g Ine

kkoaii

haii Iku-g ine

6 hail yauki
ywSii,

ine ddi

jgauoken; 6 haii ki

llkuaii ssin
Ikii e, Iki

ha

sse Ikiiken.

jkajkauru llkhd kaii
ikii-g Ine jk'auwi,
i.

(5649)

(

)

ttwaita.

Hd, ha
e,

He
(5660) kail

tiken

mdma-ggu ^auki ka
e,

ssi jgoa-i, ssi j(i

sse ll^koen, tchueii

Una jgwa^ii; o mama-gguken
)

l^keya

ssi

a,

(

ti

e, l;^a

jkajkauru

llnau,

ssi

llwkoenya ha,

Opuai

a,

ssi

ha, haii Wx^Wl ttai

MOON NOT TO BE LOOKED

AT.

67

II.—24.
L.

THE MOON

NOT TO BE LOOKED AT WHEN GAME HAS BEEN SHOT.
IS

We
shot

may

not look at the Moon,
for,

when we have (5643)
;

game;

we

look, lowering oui- head, while
( )

we do we

not look up, towards

the sky

while

we (5644)
it,

are afraid of the Moon's shining.
fear.

It is that

which

For, our mothers used to tell us about

that the For,

Moon
if
( )

is

not a good person,
look at him,

we

game, the beasts of prey will
the
the

if we look at him. when we have shot (5645) eat the game, when

game lies dying, if we look at the Moon. When game does not die, the Moon's ( ) water is that (5646) which causes the game to live. For, our mothers
used to
tell

us about

it,

yonder, (that)
( )

we

see,

which

liquid honey.

It is

the Moon's water on a bush, it resembles that which falls upon the (5647)
that,
is

game; the game arises, when it has fallen upon the game. It makes cool the poison with which we shot the game ( ) and the game arises, it goes on, while (5648) it does not show signs of poison * even if it had appeared as if it would die. The Moon's water is that which ( ) cures it. And it lives, on account of it. (5649)
; ;

Therefore,

our mothers did not wish us to

be
us

looking about,

we

should not look at the things which

are in the sky;

while our mothers used to

tell

about
the the

it,

(

)

that the

Moon,

if

we had

looked at him, (5650)

game which we had shot, would also go along like Moon. Our mothers said to us about it, did we
* Literally, " make," or "become poison."

68

SPECIMENS OP BrSHMAN FOLKLORE.

kui (5651)
e,

ywah

Ikajkauru.

Mama-gguken
Opwurru-e,

liikeya ssi a, ti

ssi-g Ino

^au

ll^koen,
lla,

Ikajkauru ka
ta,

ttai?

(

) lia

yauki Ikelkem
jkhwai, o

ti

jgaue ta Iku
llj(;am i
( )

M ttauko
Opuai

ttaj.

Opuaiten ssin
jgaueten
ttai
;

ya,
sse

(5652) o

ssi

ll^koenya

.Ikajkauru.

Iku

.Ikhwai,

o

ya

ttauko

o

ha

llk^llke
e,

Ikajkauru, a ssf ssin W^ikoenja, ha.

Hi

tfken

ssi

Ihurhmi ha,

ssi

llwkoen .Ikajkauru; o ssften tta Ilka
Iki li^^keya ssi a, ti e,
ssi,

(5653)

ti e,

(

)

mdma-ggu
Ikum
lid
lie

Opuai ka ha
he.
( )

sse Ine Iki

6

ti e,

jkhwa ^auki Una ha ddui-ddui-sse

(5654) Ssi kdo Ine
Iki

Iktiken, 6 llk'oin, o

Ikum

lla ssi,

6

ti e,

jkhwa ^auki Una he.

MOON NOT TO BE LOOKED
not see the Moon's manner of going?

AT.

69

(

) lie

was not (5651)
going

in the habit of going to a place near at hand, for,

the day was used to break, while he was
along.

still

The game would also do the same, if we had looked at the Moon. The day ( ) would break, while (5652) tbe game was still going along; while it resembled Therefore, we the Moon, at which we had looked.
feared to look at the

Moon
tell

;

while

we
it,

felt that (

)

(5653)

our mothers used to

us about

that the

game

would

desire to take us

away

to a place

where no

water was. could (?) go to die of thirst, while it, leading us astray, ( ) took us away to a place where (5654)

We

no water was.

Ikweiten ta llkenj

III.

Stars.

;

72

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ill— 23. B.

THE GIRL OF THE EARLY RACE,

WHO
;

MADE
(2505)

STARS.*
e,

N
!ki
Ikiii

x^k a +kakka
ha

ke,

ti

Ikuila kkoiin Ihin

ban

leya

l»kali:;ka

au jkui; hail
ikiii

llkau ki llkaiten

au Igwa^u.

Han +kakka

:

"

jkiii

e a,

M
lae

(2506)

kkwan
jkditen
ttiii

sse llkda-ken
!a

Mi

jko.

(

)

Hi

ssiii

kkwaii
Ikhd

tta

Igwa^u,

Ikualkuatten

sse

lulii

jko,

au jkowaken

Ine e jko,
ssiii Ine

au

M

ssiii

e ikiii."

Hiii llkdaken ddi jko. jko

llnwarriten hi Ikua-

(2507) Ikuatten

;

au jkogen

(

)

tatti e, jko tteii llnwarriten
lla

au Ikualkuatten jgw^e-ten
lla

;

h^

ti hiii e,

jko tteii-a

hi Ikualkuatten.
;

Ikogen llnau

ti e,

Ikd kkaii Ikhe

(2508)

Ik'au, i

jkogen

llkuaii llnwarriten (

)

juha, au Ikogen
tatti e,

ka, jko sse llkhau Ikhejkhe,

au jkogen

Ikuatdtti,

Ikuatten Ine kkaii j^uonni;

au Ikualkuattaken
( )

(2509)

llkdifi

a j^uonniya
;

;

haii Ine
Ine

juhi
;

ssiii

ha-ha ka
hiii

!;^drra

Ikualkuattaken
jgaiie
;

j^uonni

au

Ine

+kanuna
Ine tten

hi sse-g Ine tten akken, au jkd

wa-g
Ikhe

akken.
O

Ikualkuatten sse-e Ine O
to \\kdhho

ODO30

11

/Lo

yam

* This story was related

by

liis

mother, Ikwi-dh.

THE GIEL WHO MADE

STARS.

73

III.— 23.
B.

THE GIEL OF THE EARLY EAOE,

WHO

MADE
My motlier was
arose;

STARS.*
who
told

the one

me

that the girl (2505)

she put her hands into the

wood ashes; she

the

threw up the wood ashes into the sky. She said to wood ashes " The wood ashes which are here,
:

they must altogether become the Milky Way. ( ) They (2506) must white lie along in the sky, that the stars may
stand outside of the Milky
is

Way,
it

while the Milky

Way

used to be wood ashes." They (the ashes) altogether become the Milky Way.
while

the Milky

Way,

The Milky
lies

while the Milky

Way must Way (

)

go round with the stars; feels that, the Milky Way (2507)

going round; while the stars sail along; therefore, the Milky Way, lying, goes along with the Stars.

The Milky Way, when the Milky
the earth, the Milky

Way
)

stands upon

while the Milky

Way Way means

turns

(

across in front, (2508)

to wait(?), while the

Milky

Way

feels that the

Stars are turning back;
is

while the Stars feel that the Sun

the one

who

has turned back; he

turn back;
that they
nicely.

his path; the Stars (2509) ( while they go to fetch the daybreak;
)

is

upon

may

lie nicely,

while the Milky
also

Way

lies

The

Stars shall

stand nicely around.

have been one of the people of the early ("2505') and the 'first' girl; and to have acted These \j(wi-\naill. She was finally shot hy her husband. 8shd-Wi are said to have been stupid, and not to have understood
girl is said to

* This

race

{\'xwi-\na-s8h6-\h''e)

things well.

74

SPECIMENS OE BUSHMAN EOLKLOEE.

(2510) ttin akken.
Inw^,
he,

(

)

Hi

sse-g Ine jgwee-ten juhi ssin hi

hi Ikwaiten jgwetenjgweten Ikei hi. hi iku e Ikualkuatten, e Iko.
jkui'la
;

Au
llkau

hin

tatti,

jkogen Ine tten-ssa, jko jkhwaiten, he

(2511) ki

llkaita Ikiii,
lla,

i,

(

)

ha sse-g
tatti e,

Ine Iko

dkken

ha

ssin

Ine ttenya

au ha

ha
lla,
7

Ikii

juhitta Igwa^ii.
tatti e, Ikna/ o 3

Ha

ssin Ine tten, llnwarrita 7 3
llnwdrri-ten,

au han

Ikuatten llvam 030/L.O

30

Hin
Ikii

llnwarri-ten 3

luhi o»o

(2512) hh<5a

( Ikii

)

jgwaj^u.
e,

!gwa;i^uken
;

tta; Ikualkuatta-

ken
ssin

ttal

lla

au hin

tdtti e, hi jgweten.
;

Hi

lele

;

hi ssin

ll;^a,

hi Ihinlhiii ssa

hi ssin jgwetenjkiii-ten,

(2513) jgweten

Ikei hi jnwd.

Hin
yan
• /

llkhau
le,

au
;

(

)

llkoin Ihih ssa.
'

Ilkoin

hin jkhe +a ttin
' '

au

hin

tatti e, hi ssin 7
/

llnwam-ten Ikunssho
;

3D*
hiii

llkoin.
/

llgagen Ine Ihin ssa

Ine

llkhaii
( )

jki

;

au hin

(2514) ssin jhamm
3

jkui-ta.

Hiii Ine tatti,
Ine

hi Ine .Ikhe
tatti,

+ka ttin; hi sse-g
Ine e. Ine

Igweten; au hin

llga-g

Hin

e,

jke Ine

jkagen

i

;

au

hiii tdtti e, jk'au

+ka+k^ka.
llgagen
;

Au

hiii tatti,
(

Ikualkuatten ttafaOpua

(2516) +j(ija.
jkoeya
hi

Una

)

jk'au.

jkogen ttamOpua

aii

hiii tatti e,

jkiii

llkuaii e.

H^
e,

ti hiii e,

ttamOpua

jkoeya,

i.

Aii hiii tatti

jkulld

a

+kakka, jko

ssiii

kkwon

jkdeya jke

a, jke sse

jkagen
ssiii

(2516)

jkiii-ten, (

)

au

llga

ttss'umma.

Ta, jk'au ^auki

Ikdeya, au Iko ^auki

»//•

WnL
ha
3

Hiii

kda Ikualkuatten. 03030
ki llkaiten Ihuiii o o

Ikuildken o o

+i, J

ti

e, J

ssaii

llkhaii

THE GIRL WHO MADE
( )

STARS.

75

They

shall sail along

upon

their footprints,

which (2510)

they, always sailing along, are following.
feel that,

While they

they are the Stars which descend. The Milky Way lying comes to its place, to which the

threw up the wood ashes, ( ) that it may descend (2511) nicely; it had lying gone along, while it felt that
girl
it

lay upon the sky.

It

had lying gone round, while

it felt

that the Stars also turned round.
(
)

round passed over
that they
sail.

the sky.

They turning The sky lies (still) (2512)
;

the Stars are those which go along; while they feel

They had been
;

setting; they had,

again, heen

coming out

they had, saibng along, been

following their footprints.
( )

the

Sun comes
;

out.

They become white, when The Sun sets, they stand (2513)

around above

while they feel that they did turning
red,

follow the Sun.

The darkness comes out they (the Stars) wax while they had at first been white. They feel
;

that
sail

(

)

they stand brightly around
it

;

that they
night.

may

(2514)

along; while they feel that people go by night
is
;

is

Then, the

while they feel that the ground
that the Stars shine
)

made
little.

light.

a

While they feel Darkness is upon (
Therefore,
girl
it

the
it

ground.

The (2515)
it

Milky

Way
ashes.

gently glows; while

feels that it is

wood
Milky

gently glows.
little light for

While

feels that the

was the one who

said that

the

Way

should give a

the people,

might return home by night, ( ) in the (2516) middle of the night. For, the earth would not have been a little light, had not the Milky Way been there.
that they
It

and the

Stars.

The

girl

thought that she would throw up (into the

air) roots of the \hum, in order that the \huih roots

;

76

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(2517) gi-gij \hmh eh-eh sse ddi Ikualku4tten

;

(

) e,

h^

ti

Mil

e,

Ikualkuatten jklya,
e.

i

;

au

hm

tatti

Ituin

en-en Iku

Hail jliamm

+kamOpua

llkau jka tte jkui,

au jgwa^u,
;

ha
(2518)
d

sse

Ine Ikati llkau ki llkaiten Ihuiix eii-en

au han
yauki
ta,

tatti e, ( )

ha I'dkwa.mja ha
e Iwkwaiya,

j^oa, ti

e,

ha

;^6a
;

ha Ihuih en-en
Una
llneih.
ilii,

ha

sse

ha

llwei

ha

Iku

Han

^auki

llei,

han a l»kua; ha
;

(2519) ssin Ine
Ikf Ikf-ssa

ha kkom-ma ha Ihuih
tta, llneih.

(
;

)

ha ha

ssin Ine
llkah-a

ha-ha k hi; ha ssin

Ine hi

td,

au hah jkhauken
e, ttai.

Ha

^oa-kengguken Iku
hi Ihuih;
he,

Hd
( )

e,

l^kua.

Hih

Ikilki-ssa

hi
;i^oa
;

(2520) ssih

hi,

Hah

Iku leta ha
hi.

ka llneih-0pua,

ha

ttdbba jhoa ha a

Ha

ka llkha-ken
llkeh.

Ikii Igii

jkhe

au hih

tatti e,

ha ^auki jnaunkko
llneih.

He, ha
)

Ikii

(2521) jnauhkko Una

Ha

;i^6a-ken Iku a, (
leta

Ikilki-ssa
;

ha ha.
^oa-ken
(2522) Ta, ha
+i, 7 ti

Ha
Ikii
e, 7

ssih Iku

haha

llneih-Opua

au ha

+i, ti e,

ha ^auki hi yauyaurrii-ken jkhwai.
Iniiyo,

hi

ha 6a a

ha jkhwai.
ddi kui
;

(

)

Au

hah
ta

yaiiyaurrii-ken o

l^kalwka
Ine

ssah ddi 3
ta

kku

sserriten.

Hd

e,

Inwa

ssefri-ten.

jgwdrra a jkauh ssho, hah Ine yap

au Igwdrra-ken

(2517')

* She threw up a scented root (eaten by some Bushmen) called the red (or old) \hum making red stars, This root is, the white (or young) \huin making white stars. Ukahbo says, eaten by baboons and also by the porcupine. The same girl also made locusts, by throwing up into the sky the peel of the \M'iss1 [an edible root] which she was eating. (2521') t ^^^Mo here explained that, when a girl has 'grown', she is put into a tiny hut, made by her mother, with a very small aperture for the door which her mother closes upon her. "When she goes out, she looks down upon the ground and when she
\hum, -which became stars
; ; ;

;

)

THE GIRL "WHO MADE STARS,
should become Stars;
)

77

tterefore, tlie Stars are red; (2517) while they feel that (they) are \huih roots.*
(

gently threw up wood ashes into the sky, might presently throw up \huih roots while that she she felt that ( ) she was angry with her mother, (2518) because her mother had not given her many \huin for, she was in roots, that she might eat abundantly She did not herself go out to seek food; the hut. that she might get (?) \huih for herself ( ) that she (2519) might be bringing it (home) for herself; that she might eat for, she was hungry while she lay ill in the hut. Her mothers were those who went out. They were those who sought for food. They were bringing home \huih, that they might eat. ( ) She (2520) in her little hut, which her mother had made lay

She

first

;

;

;

;

;

for her.

Her

stick stood there

;

because she did not

yet dig out food.

And, she was still in the hut. Her the one who ( ) was bringing her food. (2521) mother was That she might be eating, lying in the little hut f
;

while her mother thought that she (the girl) did not eat the young men's game {i.e. game kiUed by them).
For,

game of her father, who was an While she thought that the hands of (2522) ( ) Then, the arrow the young men would become cool. would become cool. The arrow head which is at the
she ate the
old man.
top,

would be cold ; while the arrow head felt that the bow was cold ( ) while the bow felt that his (2523)
it
;

retm-ns to the hut, she

sits

and looks down.

She does not go

When presently she becomes far, or walk ahout at this time. a big girl ', she is allowed to look about, and to look afar again being, on the first occasion, allowed to look afar over her mother's hand. She leaves the small hut, when allowed to look about and
'

around again; and she then walks about like the other women. During the time she ie in retreat, she must not look at the springbok, lest they should become wild.

(2522

'

;

78

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

(2523)

tdtti

e,

Ihouken

Ine

^ao

;

(

)

au Ihouken
llki, '

tatti e,

ha

I»kal«k4 e ^ao. 3 3

Au
eh-eii

Ikufla-ken +i ha a o
;

e

ha hA ki

e
(2524)

hi,

au whai

ha

llki-ten

kkan

le

Ihou, Ihou

iikai-e Ine

ddi kkui ta ssefri-ten; hah Ikue-da,

hah

(

)
i.

+L

He

ti

hih

e,

ha Ihammi yauyaurrii-ken Ikhwai,
hi,

Ha

(5a-keu a,

ha jkwai

au ha-ha.
7
;

Au

hah

tatti e,
I

ha ssih ttabha ha 6a liikalwk^ 3
lla,

ha ssih ttabba ki hih 3

ha

llki.

III.— 28.
L.

THE GEEAT STAR,
SINGING,

jGAIJNU,

WHICH,

NAMED THE
;

STAES.

{Related, in 1875, Jy

Diajkw|in.)*

(5576)

Igaunu, hah ha 5a e Ikuatten jkdrri
Ike e

h^ tiken

e,

ha
a,

Igauuu, i;

o

hah

tta

Ilka

ti

e,

ha

Iki

ha
)

(5577) jkwitenlkwitya Ikualkuatten
Ilka ti e,

Ikeilkei,

o hah
e,

(

tta

ha

Ikf e

ikferri.

He

tfken
i.

ha jkwiten-

Ikwiten Ikualkudtten Ikeilkei,
Ikuatten
Iki

He
ha

tiken e Ikua-

he

Ikeilkei, i

;

6 hih tta

Ilka ti e, jgaunti

(5578)

Iki

a jkwiya he Ikeilkei.

Hah
hih

(

)

jkutten, o

ha

jkwi Ikualkuatten Ikeilkei.
Ikualkuatten e tenhttau
;

Hah
e,

ka: " ll^whai," o

ha dda he a ll^whai

hd ka
(5576')
* "

inailnain,

hih

e,

e ll^whai.

N

!k6m Ixuggnddfken a 6a tkakka ke Ikuatten ka kkumm."

;

THE GREAT STAR, JGAUNU.
(the

79

young man's) hands were cold. While the girl thought of her saliva, which, eating, she had put into the springbok meat; this saliva would go into the bow, the inside of the bow would become cool she, in this manner, ( ) thought. Therefore, she feared (2524) the young men's game. Her father was the one from
;

whom

she alone ate (game).
(i.e.

While she

felt that
;

she

had worked

treated) her father's hands

she had

worked, taking away her saliva (from them).

III.— 28.
L.

THE GREAT
SINGING,
\gdunu,* he

STAE, \GAUNU, WHICH, NAMED THE STAES.
;

was formerly a great Star

therefore, his (5576)

name is \ffaunu; while he feels that he was the one who formerly spoke (lit. "called") the Stars' names;
while he
feels that he is a great one. Therefore, (5577) ( ) he called the Stars' names. Therefore, the Stars possess their names while they feel that \gaunu was the one who called their names. He ( ) formerly (5578) sang, while he uttered the Stars' names. He said " \\j(whm " t to (some) Stars which are very small they are those of which he made \\j(whai ; their small,
;

fine ones are those

which are

\\)(wh¥i.

*

"My (paternal)
star's stories."

grandfather, \xi,ffm-ddi,

was the one who

told

("5576')

me

f The stars Wxtvhai \aiti and Uxwhai-Qpua were identified as "Altair"or "Alpha Aquilae", and "Gamma Aquilae", respectively, by the late Mr. George Maclear and Mr. Finlay of the Royal Observatory, on October 10, 1873, at Mowbray. Wxtvhai gwm was behind a tree and too low to be distinguished.

;:

80

SPECIMENS or BUSHMAN rOLKLOEE.

(5579)

H^
ta,

tfken

(

) e,

llgmi^u

llnaii,

he Ikualkuatta
llnallna

ssueii-

ssuen !;^uoriniya, lian ^aiiki ta ha sse

Ikaa^u
(

(5580)

ha

+efi-na, ti e,

Igaue

e,
;

o ll^whai
ta,

ya

)

tten

jjfTionniya.

Han
;

Ikii
e,

Ikuiten

ha
;

Iki

lliikoeh,

he

Ikualkudtten
i,

hm

ha

Ik5a-sse he

6

han

tta Ilka ti

ha

+efi-na, ti e, jgaue ta Ikualkuatten e.

III.— 27.
L.

WHAT THE

STAES SAY, AND TO A STAE.

A PEAYER

{Related, in

May, 1879, hy iMn+kass'o.)

(8447)

Hi
t&en

llkuan ka, hi ssin Hj^amki Iniini
e,

tchuen.
li,

H^
hi

hi In^ ta, Ikuatten sse Ikea hi
ttan,
li,

e hi

lli:;kua

(8448) yauki ttamOpua
Ikuatten
i.
li,

i

;

Ikuatten

()

sse

a

a

Ikuatten

e Ikuatten ddi jj^ougen-ddi',*
;

Ta, Ikuatten yauki tsfce
ha.

Ikuattaken llkhoa ha

iki

H^
(

ti'ken

e,

hi In^ ta, ikuatten sse a hi &

(8449) Ikuatten

) li,

hi

ssiii

ll«kua ^auki ttaA,

ikualkuatten

llkuaii

ka ka

:

" Tsau

!

Tsau

!

" h^ ^ hi
ta:

tiken e l-^am-ka-lk'd ta ka, Ikualkuatta

lli^kao
!

(8450) wai

(

)

tsa^aiten

;

Ikualkudtta ka

:

<'

Tsau " hi

'<Tsau! Tsau!"
if-ii

a

ssiii

ttumm-i

hi.

N tiitu
yan
jk'e
ii

n

Ikoin, ti e, tss'e

de Inu e Ikueida. (8451) ikualkuatten ( ) " Tsau " au hi
!

N
e,

jkoin

Ine

+kakka

ke, ti

e,

e

Ikueida.

Ikualkuatten e ta

ll!::!kao

a

wai

tsaj^aiten.
hi.

H^
Ikua3

tiken O

e, J

n

llnau, '

ii

Ine ki, '

Ine

ttumm-i

(8447')

*

'xoTij

'rich'; pi. Ixouken.

WHAT THE
Therefore,
(
)

STARS SAY,

81

sitting,

when these Stars have, (5579) he will not remain on the hunting ground for, he knows that it is dawn, when Wjfwhai has, ( ) lying, turned back. He returns (5580) home for, he is used to look at these Stars they are those which he watches while he feels that he knows that the dawn's Stars they are.
the porcupine,
hack,

turned

;

;

;

;

III.— 27.

WHAT THE
They
(the

STAES SAY, AND A PRATER TO A STAR.
Bushmen) wish,
that they

may

also

(8447)

perceive things.*

Therefore, they say that the Star

shall take their heart,

with which they do not a
)

little

hunger
heart,

;

the

Star

— the

(

shall

Star's

heart,

them the Star's (8448) with which the Star sits
give
;

ia plenty.
as if it
shall

For the Star is not small the Star seems had food. Therefore, they say, that the Star give them of the Star's ( ) heart, that they may (8449)
Stars are

not hunger.

The

wont

to call,

" Tsau

!

Tsau " there!

fore the

Bushmen
!

are

wont

to say, that the Stars
;

them the spriughoks' ( ) eyes the Stars (8450) " Tsaii " they say, " Ts^ Tsgui " I am one who was listening to them. I questioned my grandfather (Tsqtsi), what things it could be that spoke
curse for
say,
! !

thus.

My

grandfather said to

me

that the Stars

(

)

(8451)

were those who spoke thus. The Stars were those who said, " Tsau " while they cursed for the people
!

*

i.e.

things -which their dogs

may

kill.

(8447')

;

82

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(8452) Ikuatta Ine ta
l»kd
a.

:

" Tsmi

!

Tsa^ "
!

(

)

llkuarinan a hi

N
hi

llkuaii tatti,

n

iku ten-ten

M n Ikoin, n a Ine
He
wai
tiken

ss'6,
e,

n
)

Ikoin,

au ha ku^rre

juhi ss'o.

n

(8453)

(

Ine tutti ha,

au tchudn e Ikuefda.
;

Han

In^ ta,

Ikualkuatten e Ikueida

he

lliikao & jk'e

tsaj[;aiten.*

N
(8454)
( )

Ikdin llkuah

ka

ssin

+kdkken, au Il«k6agu, au
;

ll!:ik(5agu

wa

Ikati Ihin

ha
i,

In^ ta:

"A
n

koa
li,

sse
li

dkke

a

li,

e a ddf !^6ugen-ddi
i.

a sse Ika

n

e

h
(8455) hi

Ilwkua ya'uki ta jkhejkhe,
a.
( )

N ssin
n
llkah-a.

ll^amki Ikauith,

Ta,

n ddda

ilkan-a.

Ta, a llkhoa jkauenya

hiii e,

a yaiiki tsdrre.
i.

Ta,

A sse dkke
n
llkii,

a

jkautu, e a jkauenya,

A
i.

sse Ikea

jkautu, a sse

(8456) ll;^amki
Ik^ sse

llkan.

(

)

Aken

llj{;amki

akke a

a sse

h

llkii

e

h

ya'uki Ikhi,

Ta,

n ddda
ri

ttan-i.

A

akke a
)

llkii.

Ta,
Ikii

n

llnau,

h

llku e a,

ttan-i, i."

(8457)

(

Ha

llkuah

ka, jnwa ssin jkhejkhdya ha wdi;
a,

hih

e,

ha ka Ikuatten a ha

Ikudtten

llkii,

au Ikuatta

Ine Ikei

ha

llkii,

e

ha

ttdh-i,

i.

(8458)

Ha
Ihih
;

llkuah Iku

Ine

Ikam

lii

ha ha

( Ikii

)

ttii,

hah Iku
sse ssd

hah ssueh

;

au han

tatti,

ka,

ha

ko Ikoh jnwa.
(8453')
*

^

llkuai +1,

ti e,

wai ta

kii

Mkuaii |ku

i.

!

WHAT THE
the springboks' eyes.

STARS SAT.

83
I

Therefore,

when

grew up,
sound.

I was listening to them.

The

Stars said, " Tsa^i

Tsau "
!

(

)

Summer
sat

is

(the time)

when they

(8452)

Because I used to sleep with
the one

my

grandfather, I was

who

with

my

grandfather,
(

when he
)

sat in

the coolness outside.

Therefore, I

questioned (8453)

him, about the things which spoke thus.
the Stars were those

He

said,

who

spoke thus

;

they cursed for

the people the springboks' eyes.*

My
give

grandfather used to speak to Canopus,
;

when

(

)

(8454)

Canopus had newly come out

he said

:

" Thou shalt
sit

me

thy heart, with which thou dost

in plenty,

thou shalt take
I

my

heart,

—my

heart,

—with
also

which
full,

am

desperately hungry.
thee.
(
)

That I might

be

Uke
be

For, I hunger.

For, thou seemest to (8455)

satisfied

(with food); hence thou art not small.

For, I

am

hungry.

Thou

shalt give

me

thy stomach,

with which thou art
thou

satisfied.

Thou

shalt take
( )

my

stomach, that thou mayst also himger.

Give (8456)

me

also

thy arm, thou shalt take
For, I miss For,
(

which I do not kiU.
shalt give

my arm, with my aim. Thou
which
is

me thy

arm.
it."

my arm
)

here,

I miss

my

aim with

He

desired that the (8457)
;

arrow might hit the springbok for him

hence, he

wished the Star .to give him the Star's arm, while the
Star took his arm, with

which he missed
he wished to

his aim.
sat

He
down
;

shut his

(

)

mouth, he moved away, he
sit

(8458)

while he

felt that

and sharpen

an arrow.
* I think that
it

was

all

tte springbok.

(8453')

:

84

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

III.— 30.
L.

jKO-GjNUIlsf-TARA,

WIFE OF THE DAWN'SSTAE, JTJPITER.
1879, by |han+kass'o, who heard
it

HEART
from

{Related in April and May,

his mother, Ixabbi-an,

and her mother, +kannni.)

(8393)

Hi

llkuaii

\^\v3.

jliaken,*

hm

Ine

llk^n-f jliaken.
llkdn-'i

Hin ha

lue ll;i^aiya tin,
llnau,

au jhaken

ati

hi

jhaken.

(8394) He, hi ha Ine
le,

jhaken ka ssufenssuen
lli:;ke,

(

)

yan ka

hin Ine Ikannjkann

hin Ine

llj^ai

jhaken ka

ssufenesTien,

au
j-

!kou;^u.
Ine

He

gwai

ha

hoho ha Iwkarralwkarra-ttii ka
(
)

(8395) +iianna, han ha

Ine llkhde te hi

au jhaken.

He,
jkd-g-

hi X Iku Ine a jko-glnijih-tara a jhagen.
jnuin-tara

He

ha
Ikii

Ine

kili,

han +kakka ha ll;^a-Opua
ii

"A
(8396)
(

kail

sse ta jhaken e;
Ikiiki

ssiii

Ikii

a ha hi.
hi liikuai

)

Ta, a a ssan

jkhwa.§

Ta, jhaken

e,

ya'uki ta +haiiniiwa."

He
r6790')
ha

tiken

e,

jkd-gjnuin-tara hd, Iku llnau, ha

ha

ss'o

* jhakakfn
llxe.

llkellkeya "
e

w« "

;

M ta

ssuerissuen

yai

Ine llkhoa
Ilka ha,

jbakaken Iku
jhaken llkan.
laiti.

h| ka tohueii;

han.

yauki aken

au

e

(8394') (8395') (8396')

t jgwai

X jgW'S-g'^ llkuan § jko-gjnuin-tara
laiti

e,

hin koro-ggu, hin |k'o-ggu, llhoe-ggd.
e.

ka jkh-wS llkuan

|gaue-|in a jkuken jhoa

a Ikhwa, au jhuin.

THE WIFE OP THE DA.WN's-HEART STAB.

85

III.— 30.
L.

\K6-a\NUIN-TARA, WIFE OF THE DAWN'S-

HEAKT
They

STAE, JUPITEE.
were digging out (8393)

souglit for \haken,* they

\haken. Tkey went about, sifting \haken, while they were digging out \hdken. And, when the larvse of the \hdken ( ) were intending to go in (to the earth (8394) which was underneath the little hillock), they collected

together, they sifted the larvae of the \hdken on the

huntiag ground. And the hyena f took the blackened perspiration of her armpits, she put it into ( ) the \hdken. And (8395) they J gave to \k6-g\nuih-tdra of the \hdgen. And \k6-g\nuih-tdra exclaimed, she said to her younger

Thou shalt leave this \hdken alone I will be the one who eats it. ( ) For, thou art the one (8396) who shalt take care of the child.§ For, this \hdken, its smeU is not nice."
sister
:

"

;

Therefore, as \k6-g\nuin-tdra
* \haken resembles "rice"
are like (those of)
{i.e.

sat,

eating the \hdken,
rice");
is

"Bushman
\hdhen
it is

its larvae

(6790')

"Bushman
it is,

rice",

a thing to eat;

there
t

is

A female
was

nothing as nice as hyena.
(it)

when

fresh.

X The hyenas

was, with the jackals, the blue cranes (and)

(8394') (8395')

the black crows.
§ It
>

\k6-g\nuih-tara's child.

The Dawa's-Heart was the (8396')

one who

buried the child away from his wife, under the Viuin (a plant with a handsome green top, and little bulbous roots at the end of fibres in the ground. The roots are eaten by the Bushmen

raw, and also roasted and made into meal, which \Mn^lass'd thinks that the flower is red excellent.
seen the plant since he was a child).

is said to
;

be

but has not

S6

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMiN FOLKLORE.
Hi liiri (

(8397) au iMken, jkmijkammin * ha Iku
.Inuin

)

llhfinu.t

yan Nxamki kuerre, tauii yan Hxamki ssuen. Ikudbba dken llxamki kkuerre Ihin, jkuabba aken
Iku ssudn.
Ikujkiiken llj^amki kuerre.

H^
hd

tfken

e,

(8398) ha h4

(

)

Iku-g Ine
Ilk.

!°kalii

ui, % haii Iku-g Ine Ikuei Iki,

han
(8399) Iku-g

Ik'dtten

Ha
Inwa.

ll^a-Opudken

Iku-g
lid
;

Ine

llk^rriya
Ine

jkun
Nan

leta ha.§
le

Han ha Iku-g Ine Hah ha Iku-g ( )
kii'i
:

han
Han

Ine

IlkhoesBin tawa.

Ha
a

llj(;a-0puaken
sse

hd

Ine

" Ikd-gjnuiii-tara

we

!

^a yauki

jhamm

a

jkhwa kkwaken?"
( )

He,

(8400) ha hd
sse

Ine kui:

"A

llkuah

sse

Iki

sse

ha,

ha

kkwaken, n

ssin llkdaken

+kdkka

ha,

au n likhoue,

llkhougen jnaunko Ikhejkh^ya."

Hd

tfken

ha ha
ssih

(8401)

\n4 ta,

hah +kakka ha
jkhwa au jgaue."

(

)

ll^a-0pua:

"A

kod

ardko
Iki sse

Ikilki ssa

jkhwa, au h Inaunko +ehna, he, a ssah

Ha

ll^a-Qpuaken Ine jkhiten, hih kda Igwai, au
(
||

(8402) Igwain jkuotta
jgaue- li-guken
jkuiten ssa, au

)

jkaulkainmi, hih Ine Ikuiten, au jgaue- lih Iku-g Ine

Iku Una jhahn.

jkhwah Iku ^wa Una, au ha jkoukiIki

Opuaken
(8403)
( )

Ikii

a

jkhwa.

Hah hd

Ine ssa,

hah hd
Ikoi

Ine kiii:

" Tssa ra d

jkd-gjnuih-tdra

^au ddoa

au jkhwa, au jkhwa

(8397') (8396') (8398')

*

m°i
Ha Au

(Pl-

Ik^lkammi).
hiii

t lltnari J §

iMulMn,

Iku ssuenssuen jk'au.

llkuan tatti, ha Iku-g Ine ddnikkllkhe.

han kaha [kdxe Ikea ha

llkaxai.

(8402')

II

1^ ilkuan +1, ti e,

ha

llkuaii ||na !k'e kkuiten.
ss'o

1^ llkuan +i,

ti &,

koro lhouk|n-ggu llkuan

6a e

;

hi tau ||iikhwf-ggfi, hi tau

!k'6ulk6-ggu, hii toi-ggu.

THE WIFE OF THE DAWN's-HEART

STAR.

87

the ornaments * (i.e., earrings, bracelets, leglets, anklets)
of themselyes
(
)

came

off.

f

The kaross

(skin cloak) (8397)
sat

also unloosened (itself),

the kaross also

down.

The

skin petticoat also unloosened

(itself),

the skin

petticoat sat down.
selves).

The shoes
(

also unloosened (themup,:j:

Therefore, she
trotted away.

)

sprang

she in this (8398)
shrieking,

manner

Her younger
(\k6-ff\num-tdra)
sit

sister,

followed her. §
into the reeds.

She
(
)

went; she went
(8399)
!

She went to
exclaimed
:

in the reeds.
\k6-ff\num-tdra

Her younger
wilt thou not

sister

"

allow the child to suck ? " And she (the elder sister) said: " Thou ( ) shalt bring it, (8400)
first

that

it

may

suck; I would altogether talk to thee,
still
)

while

my

thinking-strings
(

stand."

she spoke, she said to her

younger

sister

Therefore, " Thou (8401)
:

must be quickly bringing the child, while I am still conscious and thou shalt bring the child to-morrow
;

morning." Her younger
returned home,
II

sister

when the hyena had put on

returned home, also the hyena, the ornaments ; they (8402) ( ) while the Dawn's-Heart and the

were (stUl) out hunting. The Dawn's-Heart rest returned home, as the child cried there, while his younger sister-in-law was the one who had the child.
(
)

He

came, he exclaimed:

"Why

is it,

that(8^03)
while

\k6-ff\num-tdra is not attendiag to the child,

the child cries there?"

The hyena did not speak.
(8397') (8396') (8398')

* Bracelet, anklet, leglet. down upon the ground. t (They) came off, they sat
J §

She

felt

that she became a beast of prey.

Because she wanted to run to catch hold of her elder sister. /q i r^n >\ I think that he was with other people. I think that they (8402 ) seem to have been the jackals' husbands, and the quaggas, and the wildebeests with the ostriches.
II

;

88

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
?

ddoa ywa, Una

"

Igwain ha ya'uki tkakken.
Iki

I^e-dde;

(8404) y&ejhken ha dddtten
llka;^ai

jkhwa.

Han

(

)

Ine Ikk

ha

|han Ine Ihann, he, ha Ine jk'ou jkhwa.

Ha
jnwa.

Ine Ikaih Ha

ha

llka;^ai

;

ha ha

Ine ttai, jkhe

lla

(8405)

Ha
ha

ha

Ine kui:

" jkd-gjnum-Ura
llkaj^ai
Iki,

wwe
ssa

!

(

)

Ink

jkhwa
jnwa

kkwaken."
llka;^ai

He, ha
Ine

ha

Ine ssiiken ihih
;

Ikuei

ha

!kTi;^e
(

ha llka^ai ha
]khwa.

(8406) Ine Ikei ha, ha Ine

llkdo,

k ha

) llka;^ai

Ha
Ine

ha

lue ta:
Ine

"N kan

Iku a."

He, ha
\n6 ta

llka;^ai
:

hA

k

Ikhwa
(8407) ai'6ko
tan

kkwaken.

Ha hA

"A

koa ssan
td, (
)

Iki sse

jkhwa, au h jnaunko +enna ;

n

h

llkhoullkhdugen sse Ik'u.lk'u."

He, ha llj^a-0pua au ha llka^ai
Ine

ha

Ine jk'ou jkhwa,

ha

Ine jkuiten;

lla \h

jnwa.
llnau
jkxiii

(8408)

He, ha ha
lika;i^ai
;

Wxk, ha

(

)

Ine

Ikam

lla

ha

au han

tktti,

ha

llka^ai a ssih Ikuei koa,

ha

a; ha llka^ai ta:

"A

koa ssan ardko
au
u,

Iki sse jldiwa,
tdtti, (
)

(8409)

t&,

h tan n

ssin +i-lkam-u,

au ka

n
lla

ya'uki Ine teiina."

He, ha

ll;i(;a-Opua
lla

hd

Ine

Iki

jkhwa au
Ikhe ssa.

jkiii

\\j(k,

ha

Ine
:

ha

llka;ifai,

ha hd

Ine
!

Ha
(
;

ha

Ine kiii

" Ikd-elnuih-tara
llka;^ai
lla

wwe

(8410) ink jkhwa
Ihih

)

kkwaken."

Ha

ha

Ine sstiken

jnwa

ha

Ine jkii;^e jkhe

ha

Il;^a-0pu4.
:

He,
"

ha

Ine Ikei

ha ll^a-0pua.
)

Ha

ll^a-0pud hd ka

N

(8411) kah

Ikii a, (

h kan

Iku a."
:

Ha hd

Ine

k jkhwa Ine
sse sse, td,

kkwaken.

Ha hd

Ind ta

"A
u,

kod ardko
ii

h

tail

h

ssiii

+i-lkaih-u

au

koa ^auki

kkfet-tau

; ;

THE WIFE OF THE DAWN S-HEART STAR,

89

\j(e-dd6-y6e* was soothing the child. She waited (8404) ( ) her elder sister's husband went to hunt and she took the child upon her back. She went to her elder sister; she walked, arriving at the reeds. She " exclaimed \k6-g\nuin-tdra let the child (8405) ( )
; ;
:

!

sprang out of the reeds her elder sister, in this manner, came running her elder sister caught hold of her, she tm-ning (her bodysister
;

suck."

And

her elder

on one side) gave her
said
:

(

)

elder sister the child.

She (8406)

" I

am

here

!

"

And

her elder sister allo^'ed

She said: "Thou must quickly bring the child (again), while I am still conscious
the child to suck.
I feel as
for,
(

)

if

my

thinking-strings would

fall

(8407)

down."

And

her younger sister took the child upon

her back, she returned home; while her elder sister

went into the reeds. And, near sunset, she
while she
felt that

(

)

went

to

her elder sister ; (8408)

her

eldei' sister

was the one who

had thus spoken to her about it; her elder sister " Thou must quickly bring the child, for, I feel said
:

as

if

I should forget you, while I feel that

(

)

I do (8409)

not know." And, her younger sister took the child near sunset, she went to her elder sister, she stood. She exclaimed: "0 \k6-g]nui'h-tdra let the child ( )(8410)
\

suck."

Her

elder sister sprang out of the reeds
sister.

;

she

ran up to her younger
of

And

she caught hold
sister

her younger
!

sister.

Her younger
!

said:

She allowed the child (8411) am here ( ) I am here She said: "^Thou must quickly come to suck. (again) for, I feel as if I should forget you, (as if)
;

"I

"

I should not any longer think of

you."

(

)

Her (8412)

* The name of the younger sisterof!*(5-^!«MW-^ara was \xe-ddi-yde. (6547')

She was a

\j(wi-\\na-ss'6-\kui (one of the early race).

: !

90

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOKE.

(8412)

Ine +i ii."
lla,
Ife

(

}

Ha
ha

llj^a-0pud Ine Iktiiten,

au ha

Ine

jnwa.
llj^d-Opua
;

Ha
llka;^ai

Ine llnau, jgaiie,

ha

Ine

Ikam

lla

ha

ha hd

Ine ttdi, ssa, ssa, ssa, ssa,
(

hd

Ine jkhe

(8413)

ssa.

He, ha ha

)

Ine kiii:

" jkd-gjnuin-tara
Ilka;i(;ai

wwe

!

Ink
Ihiii

jkhwa kkwaken."

He

ha

hd

Ine

ssuken

\nwa, ha hd, Ine jkuj^e jkhe ssa ha llj^a-0pua,

ha
k

Ine Ikei

ha ll^a-Opua.

Ha
(

ll^a-0pua ha Ine
)

llkoo,
Ikix

(8414) ha Ikhwa.

Ha
e,

ll;^a-0pua

hd ka:

"N kaA
n;
td,

a."

Hd

tfken

ha hd

Ind ka,

ha +kdkka ha ll^a-0pua

"A

koa yajaki kkettau

Ine sse sse

n

yaiiki
(
)

(8415) kkfettau Ine tan n +eiina."
Ine jkuiten,
i,

He, ha ll;^a-0pua

hd

He, hi

Ine

Man \h6 jku,*
Ine llgwften

i,

Hin
hi,

Ine llgwiten.

jk'e

ta tiikaken

hi

au Ikakaken e au

Ine

jkoeten, au jk'e ta tiikaken e Ine jgabba,

jk'e ta

(8416) Ikakaken

(

)

e Ine jkoeta hi.
lla

Hd

tiken

e,

jgaue-li

hd

Ine jgabba, jkhe

ha !kouki-0pua, han
tiken
e,

Ine llkei-llkho Ine

a !ko'uki-0pua.

Hd

ha jkoiiki-Opua hd
) kiii
:

(8417) kui, jkammi-ssi.

Han ha

Ine (

" Ine ikouki

u Ihouken-ggu, jgwai

Id-tdra-ggu f Ine sse jkdeta hti."

Hd
(841 5')
* Hi

tfken
llkuaii
;

e,

!gaii6-li

ha Iku-g
ti e,

Ine

jku^e jkhe

lla

ka

sin |ku 4:kakkeii,

hi uken-ggu

wa ha
tuken
a,

jne jho
;

!ku, llgwiten

hi xoaken-ggiL

wi

|ne e jkoeten, jkoeta

tuka

Ine jgabba.

(8417')

t

Han

Ikii

ka Igwai
a.

le-tdra,

au

iyuaiii

;

jyuain yai

ha ka

!gwai le-tara

THE WIFE OF THE DAWN's-HEAET

STAR,

91

yoTinger sister returned home, wliile she went into the reeds.
sister, on the morrow, she went her elder sister ; she walked, coming, coming, coming, coming, she stood. And she ( ) exclaimed: (8413) " let the child suck." And her \kd-ff\nuin-tdra
!

Her younger

to

elder sister sprang out of the reeds, she ran

up

to her

younger sister, she caught hold of her younger sister. Her younger sister, springing aside, gave her the child. Her younger sister ( ) said: "I am here! "(8414)
Therefore, she (the elder sister) spoke, she said to her

younger
to
;

sister:

"Thou must

not continue to come

me for, I do not any longer feel that I know." And her younger sister ( ) returned home. And they went to make a \ku * there (at the house).
They played.
The men played with them, while the

(8415)

women were those who clapped their hands, while the men were those who nodded their heads, while the women ( ) were those who clapped their hands (8416)
nodding his yoimger sister-in-law, he laid his hand on his younger sister-in-law (on her shoulder). Then his younger sister-in-law swerved aside. She ( ) exclaimed: "Leave me alone! your (8417) wives, the old she-hyenas, t may clap their hands
for

them.

Then, the Dawn's-Heart,
to his

head, went

up

for you."

Then the Dawn's-Heart ran

to the

hyena

;

he took
(8415')

* This is a dance or game of the Bushmen, which lAdre+tos'o has not himself seen, but has heard of from Tuai-ah and ^Icqmmi, two of Tsdtsi's wives. They used to eay that their fathers made
a
\krl

(and) played.

Their mothers were those

hands, clapped their hands for the
heads.
j-

men

;

the

who clapped men nodded

their

their

of

She said [gwai \i-tdra from anger; anger was that on account (8417') which she said [gwai \e-tdra.

92

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN- FOLKLORE.

(8418) jgwai
llk^n,

;

han Iku-g
ti
e,

loe tte ssa
ssiii

+k^n,* hah Iku-g Ine
hi,

(

)

Igwai

ss'd

f

au jgwain Iku-g

Ine

sstiken Ihii,

han Iku-g
lla
;

Ine Ik'oa, Ilka llkho,

au

li,

au

han
(8419) au

ssiiken Ihin
e,

au Ikaulkammin Iku-g

Ine ss'6,

ti

ha

(

)

ssin

ddda

ss'o hi,

he ha ssin ddda
lla,

jkgtta hi.

Han
ss'o.

Iku-g Ine ssiiken Ihin

au hin

Iku-g Ine

He
(8420)
Inii a,

!gaue-li

ha Iku

Ine li/ke

ha jko'uki-Opua,
ssin ine
(

tss'dra

ha jkouki-Opua ^auki ddoa
;

)

arrdko
;

+kdkka ha a
ti

han ddda Ix^ja
llwkoen,

Iki ha,

au jgwai
ddda

u h^

hi

^au

e,

ha ddda
^a'uki
( )

ti e, laiti

tss'etss'd

ssin ha,

hah

dd^a jkhejkhe

ssin ya.

Han ddda
tss'etss'^

(8421)

tss'etss'^ ssin

ha;

la'itiken ssin a,

Ikhelkhe ssin ha.

jkui a ssin

l;^ara,

hah ddda Iku a
In^ ta,
ti

hd ddda

ha.:|:

He, hah hd
Iki

ha jko'uki-Opua dd6a
e laiti ss'o
(

(8422) sse antau
llnd hi.

jkhe jho ha, au

)

dd(5a

Ha

[koiiki-Opudken hd ka:
;

"A
llk'oih

llkuah sse

Ikk, tf sse
ti e,

+ka

§
i.

ta,

a ss'd ka,
lie

Iha kkettau likhda

ha ssin

Ikue,

I sse

Iha,

au

ya

Iha,"

(8417') (8418')

* llkuan

!k:'6a

||kh6

114.

t -^* llkuan llkhoe-ss'o
|ki|ki Ihin ui

llneiii,

au Ihammi.

He
Ine

tiken

e,

ha
ka,

Ine

jkaulkammi au ha lixuoHxuorieten, au han

ha

ssin Iku-g Ine

kw&

ss'o;
!k'e

au

han. tatti,

ha |ku

^^
e,

ui tchuen. |ne

Ha
lla

llkuan
Iki,
i,

||ki, ti e,

Iku-g jne jho jku, he ti'ken

ha ya'uki

au

hail tatti,

ha ddoa |ku Ikainmainya Iko-glnuin-tara

ka tchuen.

(8421') (8422')

J

Au

hail tatti,
e.

ha

ssin Ihaiiss'o jgwai,

au han

tatti,

ha +i,

ti

e jko-gjnuiii-tara §

Au han

tatti, llgii

Iku

t

THE WIFE OF THE DAWN'S-HEAET

STAR.

93

aim (with, his assegai),* he ( ) pierced the place (8418) where the hyena had been sitting,! while the hyena
sprang out, she trod, burning herself in the fire, while while the ornaments remained at she sprang away
;

the place where she

(

)

she had been wearing them.

had been sitting, and where (8419) She sprang away, while

they remained.

And
in-law,

the Dawn's-Heart scolded his younger sister-

why was

it

that his younger sister-in-law had
;

quickly told him about it she had concealed (8420) ( ) from him about the hyena as if this was not why he had seea that the woman had been sitting with her back towards him, she had not been sitting with her face towards him. She had been sitting with her back towards ( ) him; the {i.e. his) wife had (8421)

not

;

been sitting with her face towards him. A different person, she must be the one who was here, she had And he said that sat with her back towards him.J his younger sister-in-law should quickly explain to him about the place where the (his) wife seemed " Thou (8422) His younger sister-in-law said ) to be. (
:

shalt wait, that the place

may become

light §

;

for,

thou dost seem to think that (thy) wife is still like will go to (thy) that which she used to be.

We

wife,

when

the sun has come out."

* (He) brought himself to a stand (in order to take aim). t She sat in the house, being afraid. Therefore, she took

(8417
off

)

(8418')

the bracelets from her wrists, while she desired that she might sit She suspected quietly; while she felt that she left the things.

that the people were making a IM (on her account), therefore she did -not go to the Uii, while she felt that she had been wearing
\Ji6-g\nuin-tdra'' s things.

was
§

married the hyena, because he thought that X Because he had \h6-g\wiih-tdra.

it

(8421 ')
(8422')

Because

it

was

night.

;

94

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(8423)

H^
kiii,

tfken

e,

(

) lia

hd

Ine llnau Igaiie, lian

M
(

ine

ha jko'uki-Opua ddda
e,

sse arrdko a hi ttdi.

Hd
sse
)

tlken

ha !kouki-0pua hd
biirri, i sse Iki
lie

Ine kiii:

''I

ddda

(8424) ssuai Ikam
tfken
ti
lid

bdrri au Iha."
biirri, I II
i.

H^
lla

of
e,

hi

ha Ine ssuai Ikam D'
ssudi
ti
lla

03«

Hi

Ine ssuai 03

bdrri,
.

biirri;

hi Ine lid jkhe
'

biirri
f,

au Inwa.

He, hi
7

Ine ssuai jho burri, i.* n 3
(

(8425)

l^e-ddd-ydeten hd Ine l«ke ha

)

llkaj^ai Iha,

han
tssi;

hd

Ine

kd'i,

ha

llka;^ai

Iha

sse

llnirn

jkhe ha

jk'e kiiiten

koa

Ine jkhd, llnim ta

ha

llk^;^ai Ihi, tssi,
e,

au ha
(8426)
(

Ine a, Ik'a Ikhe burri.
t

H^
J
!

tfken

ha ha
\

Ine

)kui: " Ikd-gjnuin-tara wvre

Ink

jkhwa kkwaken."

He
(8427) Ine

tfken

e,

ha llk^^ai hd Iku-g
Ikuei
Iki,

Ine sstiken Ihin jnwa,
ssa.
)

hah Iku-g
llnau,

Ine

han

Iktijj^e

Haii hd

han jkii^eya ha

ll^d-Opui., (
lla,

han

Ine Ini

biirri,

hah
Ike'i

Ine llkhou llkua Ikhe
biirri.

au

biirri.

Hah

hd

Ine

Igaue-li Ine Ikei

laiti,

au

laitiken

Ikei bdrri

;

au ha jkoiiki-Opud, l;^d-dd^->'6eten ll^amki
jk'e ta

(8428) !kei(

) laiti.

kugen Iku-g

Ine llkdaken IkeV ha.
b]irri,

!k'e kliitaken Ikelkei

bdrri; hih illkaueten
lla,

hih

Iku Ikoulkou Iki Ihih

hih

+^umm

jkd-gjnuih-tdra

(8429)

(

)

au

lla.

Hih jkann +nohu Ikuken.f
'

He
kdi
:

tfken

e,

ha ha 3
sse

Ine llnau,

hah

Ine ssueh, '

hah hd 3

Ine

" XJ koa O 3

turuturu Ikauh Iho Ikdken au
* Hi llkuan lk4, burri
t Ikukgn e

h Inulnuhtu lelemmi
Ikhe.
i.

(8424') (8429')

sse

ha

ssin ddi |ku-g!nuin,

THE "WIFE OF THE DAWN'S-HEAET STAR.

95

Therefore, ( ) on the morrow, he said that his (8423) younger sister-in-law must quickly allow them to go. Then his younger sister-in-law said: "We ought to
drive, taking goats, that

we may take

goats to (thy)

wife."

(

)

Therefore, they drove, taking goats.

They (8424)

drove along goats, drove along goats ; they took the goats to the reeds. And they drove the goats to
a stand.*
\j(e-dde-yde'\ directed her ( ) elder sister's husband, (8425)
sister's husband should stand behind her back, the other people must stand behind her elder sister's husband's back, while she must be the one to stand beside the goats. Then she " let the child (8426) exclaimed \Jc6-ff\num-tdra ( )

she said that her elder

:

!

suck."

Then her
had run
goats,
to

elder sister sprang out of the reeds

;

she,

in this mamier,. she running came.

She,

when

she

her younger

sister,

(

)

she perceived the (8427)

she turned aside to the goats.

She caught

hold of a goat. The Dawn's-Heart caught hold of (his) wife, while the wife caught hold of the goat; while his younger sister-in-law, \j(S-dd6-y6e, also took
hold of
All the people altogether caught (8428) Other people were catching hold of the hold of her. goats; they cut the goats open, they took out the contents of the stomach, they anointed \k6-g\huin-tdra They, taking (8429) stomachs. ) with the contents of the
(
)

the wife.

(

the hair { (from her skin). Therefore, when she sat down, she said: " Te must, pulling, leave the hair on the tips of my ears; for, in that
hold,

rubbed

ofE

* They left
is

off (driving), in order that the goats
girl.

t \}S means, the narrator does not kno-w.
}

a young

might stand still. (8424') "What the whole of \xi-ddi-y6e' s name

The

hair,

with which she had become a lynx.

(8429')

96

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
hi e

(8430)

t4,

(

)

n

ssa tui,

i

;

td,

ii

yaiiki tan

n

ssa tui."

He
(8431)
1

tfken

e,

tiiken

hd

Ine turutiiru Ik'aun Iho

Ikdken

au ha
ii,*

jnujiiuiitu

lelemmi,

M
( )

Ikiiken,

hin e kg Ine
hi.

a jnujnuntu lelemmi,
tiken
e,

Ikaujkaun jkhd
ssiii

Hd
ssi

jgaue-li

ha ka

Iku ilnau, ha Ine

Ikui'ten ssa,t
ttd,'iya,

ha hd

iku-g Ine llkdn leya, ha ha Ilk^h
Ine
jkiiiten
ssa.

au Iguara, au ha
( )

Ha
ttai

(8432)

tsa;^a'ita

h4 Iku-g

Ine Igattenjgktten,
Ik'e
;

au ha
hd,

ssa; hi

Iku-g Ine llkhda lltenliten.

Iku Ine
ti e,

jhainmiya ki ssd ha, au ha tsa;^aiten

au hin td

ha

tsa;^aita

ttdi ssa.

hd iku-g Ine llkhda lltenliten, au K6ro-ggu ha Iku Ine Ihammiya, ki
ssa.

hd, Ine

ssa ha,

au ha Ikuiten

In order to throw more light upon that portion
of

the

story of

\k6-g\nuin-tdra

which

is

contained

in the version here given, the following extract is supplied from page 11 of Dr. Bleek's " Second Eeport

concerning

Bushman Researches ",

printed at Cape

Town,

in

1875:—

" Dawn's-Heart " (the star Jupiter) has a daughter, who is identijied with some neighbouring star preceding Jupiter (at the time when we asked, it

"The

was Eegulus or Alpha Leonis). Her name is the ^'Dawn's-Heart-child," and her relation to her father He calls her "my heart," is somewhat mysterious. he swallows her, then walks alone as the only
(8430') (8431')
|i,

*

^^^

l'^^

Inulnuntu.
t

He

*% ^^ ya'uki ssa tiii, au Ikiiken ka ku wa jkojkoa a t(k§ii e, gwai sse kwe Ikuken kuiten a jnulnuntu.

2^^

Ikweiten Iku ine lya, au jgwai-ggu e ddi jywainya ha
iaiti.

hin iiik6wa

THE WIFE OP THE DAWN's-HEART

STAR.

97

manner
as
if

(

)

I shall

come
off,

to hear

;

for, I

do not feel (8430)

I

should hear." *
left
is

Therefore,

the

man
tips of

(her

husband), pulling

the hair on the tips of

her

ears, that hair
(

which

thus

-f

on the

the

ears,

)

standing on the top of them.

(8431)

Therefore, the Dawn's-Heart used,

when he was

returning home, J to put an arrow on the bow, he walked, sticking the end of his assegai into the ground, as he returning came. His eyes were ( ) (8432) large, as he came walking along they resembled fires.
;

The people were
fires,

afraid of

him

as

he came, on account

of his eyes; while they felt that his eyes resembled

he came walking along. The jackals were afraid of him, as he returniag came.
as

Dawn's-Heart Star, and, when she is grown up, he spits her out again. She then herself becomes another (female) Dawn's-Heart, and spits out another Dawn's-Heart-child, which follows the male and female Dawn's-Heart. The mother of the latter, the first-mentioned Dawn's- Heart's wife, was the Lynx, who was then a beautiful woman, with a younger sister who carried her digging-stick after her. The Dawn's-Heart hid his child under the leaves of an edible root (\Missi), where he thought that his wife would come and find it. Other animals and birds arrived first, and each proposed herself to the Dawn's-Heart-child as its mother; but they
* She said that she should not hear, if all the hair were ofi (8430') Therefore, her husband should leave the other hair on

her ears.

her ears.

t Holding up two

fingers.

always (henceforth) did thus, because the hyenas had made J bis heart angry, they had poisoned (his) wife.

He

(8431

')

H

98

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

were

mocked
its

at

by the

child,

imtil

at

last

it

recognized

own.

mother.

Among

the

insulted

animals were the Jackal and the Hyena, who, to revenge themselves, bewitched the mother (Lynx) with some poisoned " Bushman rice " (so-called " ants' eggs"), by which means she was transformed into a lioness. I a the dark, the Hyena tried to take her (the Lynx's) place in the hut, on the return of the Dawn's-Heart ; but the imposture was made known
to

him by
fled,

his sister-in-law.

The Dawn's-Heart
fire,

tried

to stab the

Hyena with

his assegai, but missed her.

She
it

putting her foot into the

and burning

severely.

of

The bewitched wife was enticed out the reeds by her younger sister, and then caught

by her brothers, who pulled off the lion skin, so that she became a fair woman again. But, in consequence of having been bewitched by "Bushman rice," she could no longer eat that, and was changed into a lynx who ate meat. This myth, which contains many minor, and some beautiful incidents, is partly given in the form of a narrative, and partly in discourses addressed by the Dawn's-Heart to his daughter, as well as in speeches made by the Hyena and her parents, after her flight home."

III'/.

Other Myihs.

"

!

100

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLOBE.

Ilia.— 34.
L.

THE SON OF THE WIND.
{Related, in April, 1878, hy lhan+kass'6,

who heard

it

from

his

mother, lxabbi-an.)

(6687)

jkhwe tan hd 6a Iku +gou-wa.
Ina-ka-ti,

He,

M
:

Ine llgebbita *

Han hd

lue

kui

:

" Ina-ka-ti
Ine

wwe

!

ttau

(6688) ho

!

"

He
!

!n|-ka-ti ( )

ha

kui

" Iken

wwe

ttau ho
Ike.

" au Ina-ka-tfken O 3
ti

tatti, J

ha ^aiiki +en-na ha
:

Hd
"

hin

e,

jna-ka-ti

ta
:

"

Ik^ii

wwe
( )

!

ttau
!

(6689) ho

!

Hd
!

a jkhwe, haii a ka

" jna-ka-ti

wwe

ttau ho

H^'tiken
Ikiikko Ike.

e,

jna-ka-ti

ha

ine

Nan ttuttu ha ^da au

Han hd

Ine kiii:

"

Ita'u

wwe

!

Ine

ddda

Ikwiya ke, Iken a ke, ha Ike;

ta,

Ikdn ddda [kwi n

(6690) Ike;

(

)

n ^auki ddda jkwl
Ike,

Iken Ike;

n

ssin

kwan

Ine

jkwi Ikdn

au ka

llgebbita ha.

Ta,

n ^auki ddda
Ike,

jkwi Ikdn Ike;

n

ssin
( )

kwan

Ine !kwi

ha

au ka-g
Ine kiii
:

(6691) ine llgebbita ha."

Hd

ti

hii

e,

ha ;^da ha
Hkyaii

/ggg-n
(6688')

*

llkiiaii

llgebbita
ta,

ha au

llkuarrl.

N
{ )

^,

ti e,

llkuarri
i,

jjkuan ssho 6a e;

llkuarri ||kuan
I,

e, ssi-g

Ine llgebbiten-i,

au

ssften Ine ta, ssi ssin lxa H^^koeu

o jkui a

kd I^S ttwai-i

o jk'e kuiten.

He

tfkgn

e, ssi

ta llgebbitgn-), au llkuarri.

Ilkuarriten Iku

Una

ssi ta !x6e.

Hin. Iku Ihauwa,
;

ikii

!khe

ta.
e.

He

tfken

e,

l^o hi hi.

Ssften yauki hi hi

ta,

Igaiiokgn Ike |ku

:

THE SON OF THE WIND.

101

Ilia.— 34.
L.

THE SON OF THE WIND.
The (son
he rolled *
of the) (a
ball)

Wind was
to

formerly

still.

And

(6687)

\m-ka-ti.

exclaimed:

There it goes!" {na-ka-ti ( )(6688) comrade! There it goes!" because \na-ka-ti felt that he did not know his (the other " one's) name. Therefore, \na-ka-ti said comrade There it goes " He who was the wind, he was the one who said: " \nq-ka-ti There it goes " (6689) ( ) Therefore, \na-ka-tt\ went to question his mother "0 our about the other one's name. He exclaimed mother Utter for me comrade who is yonder, his name for, comrade utters my name ( ) I do not (6690) utter comrade's name. I would also utter comrade's name, when I am rolling (the ball) to him. For, I do not utter comrade's name I would also utter his name, when I roll (the ball) to him." ( ) Therefore, (6691)
\na-ka-ti\

"0

He And

exclaimed

"0

:

!

!

!

!

:

!

;

;

;

* Rolled (a ball been WkuArri
(a
ball),
;

of) \\kudrr\ to

him.

I think that

it

must hare ^6687')
are
rolling
)

for,

Wkudrri

is

that with which

we
(

when we wish

to aim, seeing ourselves,

whether ("6688')

a

man

aims better than the other people.

Therefore,

we

are

rolling (a ball) with ttiudrri.

Wkudrri
are poison.

is

found in our country.

They stand

in

numbers around.
;

Therefore, the porcupine eats them.

"We do not eat them

for they

thinks that

t The name \nd-ka-U IhaA^kass'o was unable to explain. He (6689') it must have been given by the parents, as [nd-ka-ti
still

was
of

a child.

He

further stated that the

word

\na is the

name

an insect which resembles the locust. It is large, and also resembles the Aeridium, rufioorne. It is red. It affects the eyes of Their eyes become closed and they writhe with the Bushmen. pain on account of the burning caused by this insect.

:

102

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

"N

kan

yaiiki sse jkwiya

hk

Ike Ike.
llj^^ouwa
llnein.

Ta, a

Ikii

sse
<5a

+karii0pua; da sse

+kam0pua
11;^^^
i.

hi llnein,*

(6692) sse +kam©pua
Ikwiya ha Ike
jkwiya ha a Ike

(

)

"wei
e,

H^

e,.

n

Ine

Ike,
IkS,

Hd

a ssd Ine ilnau, au ka

a koa ssa Ine Ilnau, au
(

n a jkwiya
Ikhe, a

(6693) ha a

Ike Ike, a

ko|

) ssaii Ilnau,

au ka jkwiya ha a
yii
;

Ike Ike, a

koa ssan Iku ku, iuhunnin
;

koa

Iku jku^e llnein

a

sse Iku ssa

le llnein

au a

tdtti e,

(6694) jkhwe

(

)

Iku ssan ttchu ki tt|i 4."
e,

H^
(6695) hail

ti

hin

jkhwa ha Iku-g
i.

lue

lla,

hin Iku-g Ine
Ine
ll;^a,

llan llgebbita llnellini,
lla

H^
) Ine

tiken
ll;^a,

e,

ha ha

ha ^6a, han au jkiikko
y(5a

(

han

Ine llaA ttiittu

ha

j^da,

Ike.

He
(6696)
)

ha

hd

Ine kiii

:

" i^rriten-lkuan-lkuan ke
;

!g|xi-!gauhu-ti ki e,
(

han e Idrriten-jkuan-jkuan
;

han

e !gau-!gaubu-tl

han
ha

e l^rriten-!kuan-!kuan."
Ine
lla, i.

He
hail

tlken

e,

Ina-ka-ti

Han ha Ine
(

Iku Han

(6697) llgebbita

llnSlIni,

au han ^auki jkwi jkiikko

) Ikl,
:

au

tiltti e,

ha ^6a a ssin Ikueida ha.

Han ka
-

"A
ssa
Ike.

koa yauki ssan Ihammaki, Ikwi ^^ OD
1
*

3«3

Ike ike.
( )

A

koa 03
a

(6698) ihariima

Ikii
e,

+goTiwa

;

Ikd
7

koa Iku a

jkwi

Iki,

H6

tiken

o33
(

a ssan Ilnau, au a Ikwiva Ike Ike, a koa
;

•«
Ine

7o3

ssan Ikii-g Ine jkii^e llnein ssan ttchu ki ttdi a." 3 3

au a

tatti e,

jkhwe Iku

(6699)

Hd

ti'ken

) e,

jnd-ka-ti

ha

lla, i

;

hiii Ine Ikii
Ike.

Han llgebbita HnSlIni, au .Ikiikkoken Iku a jkwiya
(6691')
* Hi llku^n
sb'o
Ikl

Hneiii, llnein.

han

Ilnau, ti e,

HneiA 4:anni.

Hi

||ku|ii

6a

|k^ ||k|

ka

THE SON OF THE WIND.
liis

103

mother exclaimed:
first
)

"I

will

not

utter

to

thee

comrade's name.

may

For, thou shalt wait; that father shelter for us the hut * that father may
;

first (

strongly shelter the hut.f

utter for

thee

comrade's name.
the one

And And

then I will (6692) thou shalt,

when
must,

I have uttered for thee comrade's name, thou

when

I

am

comrade's name, thou must,
for thee comrade's

who has uttered for thee when I have uttered (6693) ( )

name, thou must scamper away, thou must run home, that thou mayest come into the hut, whilst thou dost feel that the wind ( ) would (6694) blow thee away."
Therefore, the child went
;

they (the two children)
Therefore, he (\na-ka-ti)

went

to roll (the ball) there.

again, he

went

to his mother,

he

(

)

again,

he went

to

(6695)

question his mother about the other one's name. And his mother exclaimed: " \4rriten-\kuan-\kmn
is
(
;

it

\gau-\gquhu-ti

it is.

He

is

Writen-\kuan-\kuah

;

he

(6696) on account of it. He went to roll (the ball) there, while he did not utter the other one's ( ) name, while he felt that his (6697) mother was the one who had thus spoken to him. She said: "Thou must not, at first, utter comrade's name. Thou must, at first, be silent, even if comrade be the one who ( ) is uttering thy name. Therefore, (6698) thou shalt, when thou hast uttered comrade's name, thou must run home, while thou dost feel that the wind would blow thee away." Therefore, ( ) \na-ka-ti went on account of it (6699) they went to roll (the ball) there, while the other was
) is

\gm-\gaubu-ti, he

is \4rriten-\kuah-\kuan.''^

Therefore, \na-ka-ti went

;

* They had a hut
a mat
t
hu.t.
is,

.

.

.

the hut

was

small.

They probably had (fi691')
mat hut.

That

make

a strong screen of bushes for the

:

104

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Au
(6700) au

han

tatti e,

ha
(

ka,
)

ha

<5a

sse

+kamOpua
ti e,

lljfdu

llgwi
Ine

llnein.
e,

He,

ha

Ine

lliikoen,

ha 6a
Ike,

ssuen, h^

ha

Ine jhou,
e,

ban
Ine

Ine !kwi
ll;j^6u

jkukko

au

ha
(6701)

Ine liakoen, tf

ha da

llgwiya au llnSn.
(
)

He
ha 6a

tiken

e,

ha ha

llnau,

ha

Ine

liakoen, tf e,
Ine kui

Ine llj^ou llgwi
!

au llnmn, hin

e,

ha ha
!

" Ttaii ho
!gaubu-ti

I^rriten-!kuan-!kuan
!

wwe

ttati

ho

!

jgau-

wwe
( )

ttau ho
jkhe,

!

"

He, ha ha Iku-g
Ine
!ku;i(^e

Ine kxii,

(6702) juhuiinin

u

han Iku-g
lla,

llnein;

au

Ikiikkoken ha Ine tt'uara

he Ikiikko ha

Ine ttktten

(6703)

Ik'ui,

i.

Han ha
hih
e,

Ine +nais8i ll;^enll;^en juhita

(

)

jkou.

H^

ti

jk'e

ta

Iln6illnei,

ha Iku-g

lue iu§,nna,

jkhw^ten ha iku-g Ine
hiii

ttchii

l^wai, hi ta 0h6ken,
Ine lo'uwi,
Ihiii

k6a
jk'au.
;

lln^illnei,

au Ik'^ten ha ^a'uki
e,

au

(6704)

(

)

H6

tiken

ha ^6a ha

Ine

ssa
;

au ha
Ine Ine

llnein

* ha jj;6aken ha Ine ssan, jkann
Ine jkann jkw'ai !h6 ha.

hho ha

^6aken ha

He, ha ha
jf6aken ha

(6705) ddwaiiten, ha

kkwe

ttiii.

(

)

Ha
e,

Ikann Ikw'ai Iho ha.
ss'up,
1
;

H^

tiken

Ikhwe hd
ha
ta,

ine kiii,
jk'tii.

au jkhwe ssin Ihamm

ilnau

Ik'aun

(6706)

H^

ti hiii e, ssf

e l;^am-ka-!k'e, ssi
;

(

)

tii-g Ind ta:
ttchiii.

" Ikhwe

llkuaii ta ta

ta,

ha
au

yaiiki

ttamOpua

(6704')

*

Ha

ka

llnein

yan |ku

!khe,

lian tatti hi-hi e

ikhwe.

THE SON OF THE WIND.
the one

105

who

uttered his (\nd-/ca-ti's) name.

(\na-ka-ti) felt that
first

"While he he wished that his father should
shelter
for the hut.
sat

finish
)

making the

And

(when)

down, then he (6700) ( would, afterwards, utter the other one's name, when he heheld that his father had finished sheltering
the hut.
Therefore,
finished

he saw that his father

when he
!

(

)

sheltering
it

the

beheld that his father had (6701) hut, then he exclaimed:
!

" There
goes
!

goes

\gqu-\grqubu-ti
(

scampered one began

to

There it There it goes " And he while the other (6702) ) away, he ran home lean over, and the other one fell down.
\ernten-\kua'h-\kuan
!

!

;

There- (6703) fore, the people's huts vanished away, the wind blew,
(
)

He

lay kicking violently

upon

the vlei.*

breaking their (sheltering) bushes, together with the huts, while the people could not see for ( ) the dust. (6704) Therefore, his (the wind's) mother came out of the hut t (i.e. of the wind's hut) his mother came,
;

grasping (him), to raise him up
(him), set

;

his mother, grasping

him on

his feet.
lie
still. (

And
)

(and) wanted to

he was unwilling, His mother, taking (6705)
Therefore, the

hold (of him), set him on his
;

feet.

wind became still while the wind had, at first, while he lay, caused the dust to rise. Therefore, we who are Bushmen, we ( ) are wont (6706) " The wind seems to be lying down, for, to say For, it does not gently blow (i.e. it blows strongly).
:

when
stands

it
;

stands (upright), then
for,
it

it

is

seems to be lying

when down, when
still,

it
it

* A depression in the ground, sometimes dry, sometimes covered with coarse grass and rushes, and sometimes filled with water. it felt that they themselves (6704') f Her hut remained standing, while were wind.

106

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
llnau,

Ta, ha ka

ha

jkhe, hin
ta,
( )

e,

ha ka

llk;6wa,

i,

au

hd
(6707)

jkhe; ta,

ha ta
ta,

au ha

Ikueita.

Ha
i

Inuan a

Vdike,

au ha ta;

ha Inuan kwan l»ke.
hi, i ssan ttai
;

N

ssin

ta,
ti
i

ha ttchu-ttchu ttenya
Ike kie,
i ssaii

ssan llkaiten

llwkoen, Iwka Ike, llnun jkhd.
Iki wa'i

Ta,
tiken

dd<5a ssin
)

Ikhw^ten
jke
ila

au
Ike,

ti

e a.

H^
i

(6708)

(

e,

wai ddda

XiM.

llnun jkhe.
ti

Ta,

i

>'auki
\j(h

ddda tlamOpua i^aa wdi au
llko'in,

^; ta,

dd<5a

ki leya

au wai, au

ti

e a."

.Ikhwe.

(6709)

ikhw^ten* hd da
llgerriten-ti.-t-

e

jkui.

Han
;

Iku-g

Ine

ddi

He, ha Iku-g
ha ha
(5a

Ine ll^oui,
ta,

au han ^auki
(

(67.10) ine

dda,
he,

ti

e,

ttai

ha Iku-g

)

Ine

ll^o'ui,

ha Iku-g
ll;^6ui.

Ine

Una Ikou. da
e

H^

tiken

e,

ha

Iku-g Ine

Han ha
;

jkui.

He

tlken e,
tatti
;

ha ha da
(6711)
e, e,

llgebhiten-i

han llkuan l^ai; au han
( )

hd

e jkui.

Han

Iku-g Ine

ddl llgdrriten-ti
Ine
hi,
i.

hi

ha Iku-g

Ine llxoui,

he ha Iku-g
Ihinlhin

Henna jkdu ka

jku.

He, ha Iku-g
he
(

Ine

han Iku-g
He, ha
Ihiii l:i;

Ine

(6712)

ll;J^ouwa tin,

)

hi

Ine jkiiiten,

Ine ssa,

Opuoin hi; he, ha
(6709')

Ine jkagen
tchtii,
;

kau

jko

ha
e,

Ine

* ilitwe-Opua llkuan
liken-ggu Ijkuan
ss'o

au Ikhw^-Qpuaken
ta,
lii

tatti

ha

6a tchui
Ta,

Ijkuan. |ku e

jtliwe.

He

tfken

e,

hi llkuan tchui.
ta,

jk'e

e

yauki

:j:kakka

ke jkhwS

xoaken-ggu;

(6695')

t

+kakka ke jkhwe-Qpua. Jthwe llkuan ha 6a e jkui han Iku-g Ine ddi
hi |ku
i
;

||gerriten-ti.
e,

He

tlken

e,

ha |ku-g

|ne ixaukgn |eta ixi-

Ha

ttu

ssiten Ine

ta ixi a.

;

THE WIND.
does in this manner.
a noise,
Its

107
is

which makes knee does (6707) ( sound. I had wished that it might gently blow for us, that we might go out, that we might ascend the place yonder, that we might behold the river bed yonder standing behind (the hill). For, we have driven away the springbok from this place. Therefore ( ), the springbok have gone to yonder (6708) (dry) river bed standing behind (the hill). For, we have not a little shot the springbok at this place for, we have shot, letting the sun set,* at the springbok at this place."
that

knee

when

it

lies

down;

for

) its

The Wind.
The Wind t {i-e. the Wind's son) was formerly man. He became a bird. % And he was flying, while he no longer walked, as he used to do for, he ( ) was flying, and he dwelt in the mountain (that is, in a mountain hole). Therefore, he was flying. He was formerly a man. Therefore, he was formerly rolling (a ball); he was shooting; while he felt that he was a person. He ( ) became a bird and he was flying, and he dwelt in a mountain's hole. And he was coming out of it, he And he came flew about, and ( ) he returned to it. to sleep in it and, he early awaking goes out of it
a
; ; ;

(6709)

(6710)

(6711)

(6712)

* Literally, " having put in the sun." f The young wind blew, while the young wind
fathers seemed formerly to have blown
;

(6708 ')
felt that its

/girOflM

for,

they were the wind.
tell

Therefore, they blew.

the wind's parents

;

for,

For the people did not they merely talked to

me about
about the

me

young wind. he became a bird. Therefore, /gggg^'j J The Wind was formerly a person he is tied up in stuff. His skin is that which we call stuff.
;

108

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
ttai, ll^a,

ll;^^ou

ha

ll;^ou

ttai.
e,

He, ha

Ine

\\j(&,

ha ha

(6713)

Ikiiiten,

au han

tatti

(

)

ha llkuai l«kua.
ha Ine
hi.
ll;;^;a,

He

Ine ha, ttin, ttin,

ttin,

ttin,

ha Ikuiten.

He, ha

Ine ll^a,

ha ssa Opuoih

Added ly

Ihan+kass'o.

lls;6o-ka-lkui ilkuan Iku a,

6a +kakka ke Ikhwe, au

(6714) han Iku

i

Una,

ha

(

)

ka

Ihti,

Jacob Kotz^.*
a,

Han
;

Ilkuan ka j^oe a, ha 6a Ina jkhwe

hd e Haarfontein f
;

au l^amka ha Iken

Ine e

+koa^a

au ha

Ike e, Ihu

e-g Ine jkwl hi, hin Ine e Haarfontein.

(6715)

llg6o-ka-!kui
Ikou.

(

)

Ine

Ini

jkhwe, au Haarfontein ta

H6

tiken

e,

ha hd

Ine Ik'aiten-i Ikhwe,

au han
i.

ka ikuerrelkuerre
(6716)

e.

He
(

Ikhwe ha Iku-g
^auki
Ine

Ine Ikhwi,

H6

tiken

e,

jkhwe ha

)

ttamOpua tchui;
hd,

Ikhw6ten Iku-g Ine Ikam

Ik'au,

au han

ka, Ik'aiten-

a Ikhwe.

Ikhw6ten Iku-g Ine Ikam
u.

Ik'au,

au Ikhw6ten
jkii,
(

(6717) hA ka, ll^ou

jkhweten Man
;

le

Ikou ka

)

he Ikhwe ha Iku-e Ine Ikhwi
ttaihOpua tchui.

Ikhweten ^auki

Ine

He, ha Iku-g
(6714')

Ine

Ihammi Ikam
Han
e,

lla

llneiu;

han Iku-g
".

* Jacob Kotzeten
f

e Ikuara.

Haarfontein ta jkauiikaken

6a Una " Hartus Kloof ha Ini 'khwe, i.

J

;

THE WIND.
he
flies

109

away, again, he flies away. And lie again returns, while he feels ( ) that he has sought food, (6713) And he eats, about, about, about, about, he again returns. And he, again, comes to sleep (in) it. [That this curious belief, that the wind now wears the form of a bird, was even lately in active existence

among the Bushmen, the following

will

suffice to

show: Smoke's Man* was the one who formerly spoke to me about the wind, when he was still living with his ( ) master, Jacob Kotze.f He said that (6714) the place at which he had seen the wind was Haarf ontein % while its Bushman name is ^Jcod^^d while its name (by) which the Europeans call it, is Haarf ontein. Smoke's Man ( ) espied the wind at Haarfontein's(6715) mountain. Therefore, he was throwing a stone at the wind, while he believed (it) to be a \kuerre\kuerre And the wind burst on account (a certain bird). Therefore, the wind did ( ) not blow gently (6716) of it. the wind raised the dust, because he had thrown
; ;

a

stone at the

wind.

while the wind flew away.
a mountain's hole,
(

)

The wind raised the dust, The wind went into and the wind burst; the wind (6717)

did not gently blow.

And he (Smoke's Man), being afraid, went home; he went to sit under the hut's bushes, § while he
*
("
\\ff6o-fca-\kui,

or " Witbooi Tooren",

was the son of IIMoJio /6713')

Oud

Jaatje Tooren ") and his wife, Ucudbba-an (" Oude Lies ").

\hah^7cass'6

used to teach "Witbooi"
is

being already grown up

how to hunt springbok; when "Witbooi" was still a child.

t Jacob Kotze
§
i.e.

J Haarfontein's

a Bastaard. He used to live at " Hartus Kloof ". ('6714'^ mountains in which he saw the Wind. the bushes broken off and used to make a shelter for the /'6717^

mat hut.

110

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(6718)

Ine Man, Ikuiten ssin llnein,

au han yaiiki
III,

Ine

(

)

Ikoi

au !gS.

jg^iten Iku-g Ine

jgeiten jkiiiten ssa,
tdtti,

au
Ine

liaA Iku-g hie

IkMten

ss'o

;

au han
e,

ha yauki
Ine
(

(6719)

inl

!gei,

au
ss'o

jk'au.

He

tfken

ha Iku-g

)

Man
a,

IkMten

;

au han ka, jk'au

sse

kku

llgwaiya ha

han Iku-g
ll;^oull^ou,

Ine Ikuiten ss'o,

Ikuiten Iko ss'o llnein ta
ss'o
;

au han

tatti,
e,

ha kkuii

au han

tdtti, !i tatti,

(6720)

ys.b.

(

)

H^
ss'o.

tfken

ha

ine Ikuiten ss'o,

au han
lii,

ha kkuh
ll;^arra,

He, ha

Ine jhou,

hah

Ine

hah

Ine

juhi llkho ssa !gei,*
le.

au

Ihorro,

au han
Ine ll^a,

tdtti,

(6721)

llkoih Ine

H^

ti'ken

(

) e,

ha Iku-g
;^(5a

hah

llan Ikuiten ssih,

au hah ka,,ha

sse Iku a-g Ine Iki
Ikiiiten ssih,
Iku-i; Ine

ssa,

ha a ha.f

He

tfken

e,

ha Iku ssah
au
Ihdrro.

(6T22) au ha juhi llkho ssa
llah,

jgei ( )

Hah

Ikhiten ssih llnein, au ha j^6a a tabba
ila

ilria,j

hah
Ine

Iku a sse-g Ine Iki
Ikuiten ss'o, au

ha

ha.

Hd

tfken

e,

ha Iku-g

han ka, ha
)

sse Iku tteh.

(6723)

H^

tfken

(

e,

ha
Iki

;^6a Jku-g Ine tdbbatabba,
Ila

ha ha
ti
i

;^6aken Iku-g Ine
* ka Iku

ha, a ha.

Hd

tfken

e,

('6720')

'f^*^

llkii|n

!ulii !kliS, ti e

+ka, [kuara ka

jgei.

He

hiii e,

" wachter " ka-g Ine
f,

lleiin

ss'o jgei

Hx^X'^ f

>

korohi Ine

jkhS Igei ilx^xu

au jgeiten Ine jkhou jkhe.

(6721') (6722')

t

Wa

llkuan Iku 6a e Ikhwa,

t Tal^loa

"na

jhQ, jkuara.

THE WIND.
did not
(

Ill

)

look to the

sheep.

The sheep* by (6718)
felt that

themselves, the sheep returning came, while he sat

under the
not
Therefore,
for him,

(hut's) bushes; while

he

he did
dust.

perceive

the
( )

sheep

on- account
to
sit

of

the

he

went

under the (hut's) (6719)

bushes, while he desired that the dust should settle

under the (hut's) bushes, sat close under the hut's sheltering bushes, while he felt that while he felt that the he sat warming himself Therefore, he sat under the (6720) place was cold. ( ) (hut's) bushes, while he felt that he sat warming himself. And he afterwards arose, he drove bringing to the kraal, while he felt that the sun the sheep had set. Therefore ( ) he again, he went to sit (6721) under the (hut's) bushes, while he wished that his mother should be the one to bring him food.J Therefore, he came to sit under the (hut's) bushes, when he had brought the sheep ( ) to the kraal. (6722) He went to sit under the hut's bushes, while his mother who worked there, § she would be the one Therefore, he sat under the to bring him food. (hut's) bushes, while he desired that he might lie down. Therefore, ( ) his mother worked (and) worked, (6723)

he

sat

;

"f"

"Africander" sheep (those with the thick tails) will (6718') home alone; while the "Va'rland" sheep do not return home alone, but remain where they were left. Wod is the name for " Va'rland " sheep, or " Moff ". ysi is the name for "Africander" sheep, "Kaap Schaap."
{{hah^Jcass'o says) return

*The

\

The sheep stand upon a bare (unenclosed)
Therefore, the shepherd dwells
;

place, the Bastaard's

(6720')

sheep.

{i.e.

has his hut) on this
(the opposite) side of

side of the sheep

the

wagon stands on that

the sheep, while the sheep stand between. t He was (at that time) a child.
§

Worked

at the master's, the Bastaard's.

(6721') (6722')

112

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Iku-g Ine ha ho, he hd 0pu(5iiiii,

han Iku-g
)

Ine tten;

(6724) au han

tatti e,

Bastaard Ike
<5a

(

llkuan yauki jkou
d,kkeii

dkken
Kotze

ha.
Iha,

Slllaken a

jkou

ha,

—Jacob
han
ha a hi
e,

—au

han

tdtti e, l^am-ka-lkui, Ike e;

+kAkken
hi.

l;^am.

Iten ta Iku .Ikauin
Silla,

^u u

ha, e

N
hi.

da Una ha.

Jacob Kotzd, bin

n

(5a

Una

Ilia.— 35.
L.

+ZAGAEA.*
{Bictated, in 1879, ly |han.+kass'5,

who heard

it

from

his

maternal

grandmother, ^ikammi, and, after her death, from his mother,
Jxabbi-ai.)

(8637)

Hi
ban
he,

IlkTiah

hd

6a,

+kagdra ha 6a +;^amma ha
;

ll;^a-0piia,
;

Ine llah +ni

ha

ban

Ine llan +ni ha,

au Ibaunu f

ha
)

Ine Iki jkuita,

au ha ;^daken-ggu.
lln^n

(8638)

(

jbaunu Ine jubatten ha jkhwi, han ha

h6a

Ikdo.
;

Ikuakaken ha ssuen-ssufen ssa

Ikuagen e ^auki

akken
(8639)

llkd hi,

hin Iku ssuaitau
:

ii-iii.

+kagdraken hd ka

"A
;

kod, ttai."

(

)

Ha

ll^a-

Opudken ha

ttdi tau li/kudn tchuen, gwa'i ta tchueh.

Han hd
(8637')

ka:

"A

kod

ttdi

ta ilnein ^auki jMn."
|ne ||ke||keya

* Kwaritgn Ijkuan e; yani-Qpuaken |ku i; han
kuru-llk^i'tau. t !kui llkuafi e
e.
;

jkhgagen

i.

N +i,
i

ti

e, Iklioa

ka

!gi;;^a ss'o
i

6a

Ha

Ike ||ke||keya

" sloete" a

ta ssuai Ihii ha,
I.

au

Inunu, e

luerriya, he lxatn-ka-!k'e Ine ta, Ihaulhaun,

;

+KifGi(RA

AND IHAUNU.
food.

113

his

motlier brought
this little food,
( )

him

Therefore,

he ate
felt that

up

he lay down; while he

the Bastaards
liberally. liberally,

are not accustomed to give food (6724)

"Silla" was the one who gave food Jacob Kotz^'s wife, while she felt that
a

she

was

Bushman (woman)

;

she

speaks

the

Bushman
live

(language).

We

used, being satisfied, to

leave the food which

she gave to us. I used to with her (i.e. at her place). Silla (and) Jacob Kotze, they are those with whom I used to live.

Ilia.— 35.
L.

^kagara* and ihaunu, who fought 'each other with lightning.
formerly went to fetch his (8637) went to take her away; he went younger sister, he and he took (her) to take her away from \haunu f back to her parents. [haunu gave chase to his brother-in-law, he (8638) ( )
+^fflyara
;

They formerly,

passed along behind the

hill.

The clouds came, clouds which were unequalled in beauty (lit. " clouds which not beautiful like them ")
they vanished away. ^kdgdra said: J "Thou must walk on." ( ) His (8639) younger sister walked, carrying (a heavy burden of)
*
j-

A bird
A man

(it)

is; a little bird (it) is; it resembles tbe

Zanius ('8637')

CoUaris (a Butcber-Bird).
(it) is
;

the Eain

(it) is.

I think that a Eain's Sorcerer
of)
is

(he) seems to have been.

which we are used to which the Bushmen call \hau\hauh. X To his younger sister.

His name resembles (that blow out of our nose, which

the mucus
thick, that

(8638')

114

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ihaunu ha llnun hoa.

(8640)

Ikuakaken Iku ssuen-ssufen
llgwillgwi ssin.

Bsa,

Ikuakaken

(

)

Iku

+kagdraken ha ka
ll^koen."

:

"A
!

koa

ttai,

ta,

S

Iku

a

He, ha
:

lid Ine, tatti, llnein Ine llkhou jliin,

han hA
(8641)
(

Ine kiii

" Tt&ija

Ttdiiya!"

Han hd
ll;^i

Ine jka

)

ha Ilj^d-©pu4; ha il^^-Opuaken Ine
Ine kiii
:

ssa ha.

Han hd
hi
?

"

TssMe ^a ddoa

e,

a ddoa l^kuan

" *

He
(8642)

tlken
(

e,

Ihaunu ha Ine Ikhamma,

i;

f

ll;;5;^ukaken

Ine ttdro

)

jkhe d Inulniitu;

han

Ine Iku Ik'auwi
llkhabbe(t),:j:
d,

ha
ha

jkhwi.

Ha

jkhwi Ine

Ikii

kui,

jkhwi ine ll^amki jk'auwi ha.

Han

Ine kiii, llkhabbe(t),

(8643) a Ikhwi.

Ha
ka:

jkhwin

(

)

ha

Ine llxamki batten ha.

Han ha

"A

koa

ttdi

ii^ki

Ika Ikhe ssa
;

n;
ta,

ta,

a llkuah Iku a llwkoen, Ihan yaiiki a hi ll^k^

ha

yauki Ikwailkwai batten."
(8644)
(8641')
ta

Hin hd
* Tohuen

luaita ki Ha

(

)

hi Ikagen.
hi,

jhaunu ddda ka,

e laiti

IkaAmainya

hin

hg,

||ke||keya Ikhoa; hin e

lyuS, herri-t ha; au hin tatti, hi ya'uki |uern'ya, hin Ine i^ua, ||nun

ha tsin^u.
f jhaunun a

Hxauken

Ine Ihin a Inujnutu,
e

au

haii ka, Ikhainma.
i.

(8642')

(

)

Han

Ikhanima au ha ka tchuen,

+kagara

i^i^a,

J llkuan llxarra ha jkhwi.

Jlxarrallxarra llkuaii

g,

au
(

Ik'e kui'ten jgw§,-I hi Ikagen.
)

I|;^arra-

(8644') jjxtoa
jku-kko

llku|n
llku.

a,

hi ta

ka

hi

km,

jkhi S llku, au hi llxarra

Ha

llkuan llxarra jku-kko jkhweitgn.

+kXgXra and

IhaTjnu.

115

things, (her) husband's things.

He
is

{^Mgdra) said:

"

Thon must walk on

;

for,

home
(

not near at hand."
hill).

\haunu passed along behind (the

The clouds came, the clouds

)

vanished away.

(8640)

^Mgdra said: "Thou must walk on, for, thou art the one who dost see." And he, because the house
became near, he exclaimed " Walk on "Walk on " He waited for ( ) his younger sister his yoimger (8641) sister came up to his side. He exclaimed " What * can these be, which thou dost >heavily things
:

!

!

;

:

carry ? "

on account of it f blood poured out ( ) of his nostrils he stealthily lightened (8642) His brother-in-law fended at his brother-in-law.
sneezed,
;

Then \haunu

;

him quickly
in-law.

% his brother-in-law also stealthily lightened at him. He quickly feuded off his brotherofE,

His brother-in-law

(

)

also lightened at him. (8643)

He

(^kdgdra) said:
;

"Thou must come

(and) walk

close beside

see that

me for, thou art the one who dost husband does not allow us time; for, he

does not singly lighten."

They {^hdgdra and \haunu) went along angry with
* The things which the wife carried, they resembled water /g 641 ') while they felt that they were not hard, they did in this manner {i.e. swayed forward), behind her back. , j\hmnu was the one from whose nostrils blood came out, when he intended to sneeze. ( ) He sneezed on account of his things, (8642') to which ^hqgara did in this manner {i.e. felt at roughly). The X In the word \\kMhhe{t) the t is barely pronounced. meaning of this word is explained by the narrator as follows (He) fends ofi his brother-in-law (by motioning with his arm). Fending ofl (it) is, when other people are fighting their fellows with their fists. Fending off is that which they are wont to do, they wave off with the arm, while they fend off the other one's ('8644'") ( )
; ;
:

they, in this manner, were pushing at her

arm.

He

{^kdgdra) fended

ofi

the other one's lightning.

;

116

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
sse e, bdtten ludnna
ti, llldialteii,

ha

Ikam +k4gdra.

+k4g4rakerL

a yauki

hi Iku IlkhAbbetenllkliabbeten ha
(
)

(8645) ll;t^-0pua
batten-i

Iha,

jhaunu.

Ha

ll^a-Opua Ihan ll;^amki

ha

;

han

batten-i ha jkhwi.

H^

ti hiii e,

ha

ha Iku-g

Ine

jk'auwi ha ll;;^4-0pua Iha, au jkhw^iten
(
)

(8646) a Ihoaka,* liah Iku-g Ine

batten

kiii

sswerrikau

Ikam ha.

Ha

ll;i^g-0pua Ihaii Iku-g Ine Ikuei Iki, haii tten Ha

hah hd Iku-g

Ine Ikuei Iki,

hah Iku-g
)

Ine

jkuemten
lui, liah

(8647) !khe,t au +kagaraken Ine

llhih (

ha lna,J au

Iku-g Ine Ikuiten jkhe Ha llneih.

Hah

Iku-g Ine Hah, tt^h llneih, au jhaunuh hd Iku-g
(

(8648) Ine Ikejkeya tk;§ hah Iku-g Ine jkuerriten Una, au

)

tkagaraken Iku-g
ss§,,

Ine

Hah

ta,

au ha jguruwa hi au

ssS, sea, ssa,

hah Iku-g

Ine ten.

r8645')

* jl^liweiten a Ihoaka han a lkh{
Iku llkellkeya |kabbu, (ten Iku
i

i,

ha

i

^auki

Ini kl ssa

ha;

}ia

llkgo

au lku|ggn ka jkueiTiten,
ta.

au Ikukoken Iku-g Ine

ta, Ilka toui'ten

ki

(8646') (8647')

t X
S

-^uha Ineti.

^^

'"1^

llkuan tan, ha Ina llkuan

Iki.

JYam-ka-lk'S, llkuan ka ka, wai a kan Han
Ikilken.

yua^ua-a

ta

;

han

^auki ta ha antau

;

+.K;AGjtRA

AND IHAUNU.

117

\h(mnu had intended that he should (8644) be the one lightening to whisk away ^kdgdra. ^kqcfdra was one who was strong (Kt. " was not
(
)

each, other.

light ", or " did not feel light "), he continued to fend His (8645) off his younger sister's husband, \haunu. ( )

younger sister's husband was also lightening at him he was lightening at his brother-in-law. Then he stealthily lightened at his younger sister's husband with black lightning,* he, ( ) lightening, whisked (8646)

him up (and

carried

him

to a little distance).

His younger sister's husband, in this manner, lay dying; he, in this manner, he thundered, f while +Mgdra bound up ( ) his head J with the net, he, (8647) returning, arrived at home. He went to lie down in the hut, while \hdunu lay thundering § he thundered there, while ( ) ^Mgdra (8648) went to lie down, when he had rubbed them sister) with buchu, {i.e. himself and his younger buchu, buchu, buchu, he lay down,
;
||

* Black lightning

is
;

that which kills us, that which

we do (8645')

not perceive

it

oome

it

resembles a gun,

we

are merely startled

by the clouds' thundering, while the other man lies, shrivelled up lies. (8646') t As he lay. X His head ached; his head was splitting (with pain). (8647') but the narrator explained that § To thunder is \kuerrtten and illustrated the \'kl\hiya id here means to lie thundering expression by saying that "the Bushmen are wont to say that the springbok is one which goes to lie bleating it is not willing to
;
'

'

;

;

die quickly ".
II

Buchu

(in

"Webster's

International Dictionary of 1902)

is

stated to be

"A

South African shrub {Barosma) ".

118

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Note by
(8643')

the Narrator.

N
!kh^,

Ikoetiika In^ ta

:

" +kdgdra-ggu

wk

e,

^u

Iko

hm

koa Ihaunu."
lie

Au

Ikudka Ine luerriya,

Ikuagen Ine
Ine

llnau,

au
he
Ine
e,

Ikuaka Ine luernya, he Ikuaka

Una
e,

ti

e

a,

Ikuagen
bdtten-i,
hiiv

Ine
i.

llkellkeya

Ikoti

;

hin
Ine

Ikuagen
" +kagara

He, n jkoetuken

ta

:

koa Ihaunu."

+k1g1ra and Ihaunu.

119

NoU

hy the Narrator.

grandmothers used to say: '' ^kdgdra and his (8643') companion are those who fight in the East, he and
jAoMWM."

My

When
place,

the clouds were thick, and the clouds,

when

the clouds were thick, and the clouds were at this

and the clouds resembled a mountain, then, the clouds were lightening, on account of it. And my grandmothers used to say " It is ^kqgdra, with
:

lAoMMM."

BUSHMAN,
From

c.

the Breakwater.

IV.

Animal Fables.

;

122

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

IV.— 27.
7).

THE HYENA'S EEYENGE.
First Version.

(257)

jgw^in a
datten llkha

lla

llkha

ga

llnein, lie ti
i,

Mn

e,

haii Ine

:

au tan

tatti
e,

likha

Ikwakka ha au
jgwai ta
;

liakhwi ta en; he
llnein,

ti hiiv

llkhaii Ine ssa

au jgwam

j^aiia Una,
i.

au Igwai ta jkoa

jgwain

(257')

(

)

Ine !;^aua ttoi ta ei,
tt hiii e,

Hd
e,

jgwain Ine a llkha a l;^dbba, h^
jkoa,
i,

ti

hih

llkhah Ine

Ik^i'

au jkoan
;

tta

If,

jgwain llj^am
:

jkanna au jkoa au ha Iwkalwka
" llkhah-au
!

Igwain Ine tkdkken
llkaie,
;

Indkki
le

n

kii

le,

a ttu

au
h^

l;^dbba."
ti

jgwain Ine

ku

llkha ttu

au l;^abba

hin
ttd

e,
li

hail Ine Iki le Ikoa ttii

au

llkha Ina,
;

au Ikoan
( )

(258') l;^abbaken Ine llkai
Ine ll;^am Ilka le

llkha tsa^aiten

l;^dbbaken
e,

ha

ttu
li,

llkai.

H^

ti

hin

ban

Ine

kko^

l;^abba e tta

au ha ddomm, han
li,

Ine

kkonn
au ha

Ikuken ha, a^ l;^abba e tta
Inaii leta jkoS.

bail Ine Ikiiken,

Igwain Ine ho jgwai ta

Ilka,

Igwain Ine |ka'uken-i
Igwain Ine |ka'uken-i
e,

ha
ha,

ail Ilka,

au ha
Ine

Inari leta |koa,
Iki
e,

Igwam

|kauken
ti

|koa; au Igwain tdtti

Igwai a datta ha, hd
(259')

bin

hah

Ine ssa |gwai
If
;

i.

Igwain
tatti
e,

(

)

Ine

iki

ha, au Ip^abba e tta
If,

au hah

|koa ssih Ilka |khe

bah

ine Ikf Ibiii |koS

au

;

THE hyena's revenge.

123

IV.— 27.
B.

THE HYENA'S REVENGE.
First Version,

The Hyena was the one who went
house, then, he
that

to the Lion's (257)

deceived the Lion

;

while he

felt

the Lion had acted
;

about the quagga's flesh to the Hyena's house, when the Hyena was boiling there in the Hyena's pot the Hyena ( ) boiled (257')
;

grudgingly towards him therefore, the Lion came

ostrich flesh in

it.

Therefore,
therefore, the

the

Hyena gave soup Lion took hold of the
:

to

the

Lion

;

pot,

while the

pot was hot
his hands
;

Hyena also grasped the pot with "0 Lion Allow me Hyena said to pour soup into the inside of thy mouth." The Hyena poured soup into the Lion's mouth then, he
;

the

the

!

;

put the mouth of the pot over the Lion's head, while the pot was hot the soup was burning the Lion's
;

inside of his (258') ) the soup also burned the Then, he swallowed hot soup with his throat, he swallowed, causing himself to die with hot soup he died, while his head was inside the pot.

eyes

;

(

mouth.

The Hyena took up the Hyena's stick, the Hyena was beating him with the stick, while his head was inside the pot; the Hyena was beating him the
;

Hyena Hyena

struck, cleaving the pot asunder
felt

;

while the

that

the

Hyena had

deceived

him

;

Hyena. The Hyena ( ) killed him, with hot soup while (259') he felt that the pot had stood upon the fire he
therefore, he

came

to the

;

;

;

124

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.
tatti e,
If
;

If,

au hah

ha ka ha

ssi Ilka

Ikuken

llkha,

au

l;;tabba

ka

au han h6

tatti e, llkha ssih

Ikwakka ha,

em

liiikhwi ta eh,

ti

hin

e,

hah

Ine dd-tten
ssi
i
;

ha

i,

au

tt6i ta
Ina,

eh

;

au hah
h^
ti

tatti e,

ha ka ha

lk| 1^ llkhah

au
)

jkoS,

hih

e,

ha datten ha

au hah

tatti

(260')

e, (

ha IlkuAh Iku Ihah ssho Igwai

laiti,

hah ll^am
e

Ikii

e
i.

IgwS gwai

;

h^

ti

hih

e,

ha

Ikii

^wakken

likuh

llkh|h

\\xa.m.

Ihah ssho llkha

laiti,

au llkhah e
laiti,

llkha

gwai.

jgwain H^affi Ihah ssho jgwai
llka'ueten
llka'ue

au Igwam

e Igwai gwai.

Wx^m

Ihah ssho

llka'ue laiti,
)

(261') au llka'ueten e

gwai.

Ikwah^uken

(

Ihah

ssho Ikwah^ii

laiti,

au Ikwah^iiken e lkwah;^ii gwai.

THE HYENA'S REVENGE.
Second Version.
(362)
Igwain a Ha llkha ga
llneih,
ti

he

ti

hih

e,

llkhah Ine
i

IkwAkken Igwai,
he
(363)
ssi
ti

i

;

h^

hih e Igwain Ine Igwain
llkha,
i,

hih

e,

Igwain Ine dddtten
(

ha

si il;^;am

ha ga

llneih.

)

Igwain Ine +kakken: " llkha we!
;^ahniigu
llkha;
i;

A

kua ssah
e,

ll;^am

h ga
ti

llneih
e,

;

" au
llkhah

han
Ine
(

tatti

ha ddatten

he

hih

(364) ;^ahnugu ha ga
llkha,

llneih,

hah

Ine Hah,

ddatten

)

au

l;^abba.
:

Igwain Ine +kakken

"N

ka

kii

1^

|kwa

a, ttii

au

;

THE hyena's revenge.
took the pot
off

125

he intended
soujj's

to

heat

;

from the fire, while he felt that burn the Lion to death, with the while he felt that the Lion had been

towards him about the quagga's flesh therefore, he deceived him with the ostrich flesh
niggardly

while he felt that he intended to put the Lion's head into the pot therefore, he deceived him while he felt that ( ) he had married a female Hyena, (260') he also is a male Hyena; therefore, he is a "Decayed Arm ",* on account of it. The Lion also marries a Lioness, as the Lion is a male Lion. The Hyena also marries a female Hyena, as the Hyena is a male Hyena. The leopard also marries a leopardess, as the leopard is a male leopard. The hunting leopard t ( ) marries a hunting (261') leopardess, as the hunting leopard is a male hunting
; ;

leopard.

THE HYENA'S EEVENGE.
Second Version.

The Hyena was the one who went

to the Lion's (362)

house, then, the Lion acted grudgingly towards the

Hyena

therefore,

Hyena became angry about it, Hyena deceived the Lion, that he should also come to his house. ( ) The Hyena said (363) "0 Lion! Thou must also visit my house;" while
;

then,

the

the

:

he felt that he deceived the Lion; therefore, the Lion visited his house on account of it he went to deceive ( ) the Lion with soup. (364) The Hyena said "I am accustomed to pour soup
;
:

* This expression
f Felis julata.

is

used to denote a person

who

acts

un-

generously regarding food,

; ;

126

SPECIMENS OF BtTSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ip^abba,

n

llj^am

ku

Id

jkwa

a, ttii

au

l;^abba,
le

n

ll;^am
(

(365)

ku
ail

\6

jkwa

tM

au l;fabba; n

ll^?'®

ku
ttii

n

Iha ttu

)

l;^abba."

Hd
Ine

ti hiii e,
le

ban

Ine

ku

le

llkha

au

Ip^abba,

ban

ban tatti e, ba ba ssi llkoaken (366) Ik^ llkba, au ( ) lydbba ka li; au ban tatti e, ba e jgwai a ddatten jkd kkuiten, ban tkakken, bd ti bin e, ba +kakka llkba, I. Ilkban Ine lixavi +kakken,
Ikei

llkhan Ina au Ikoa, au
le

llkdaken Iki

llkba

Ina au

Ikoa

;

bin +kd,kka, bi Ikagen, h6
(367)
i,

ti

bin

e,

Ilkban Ine

jbumm

au

(

)

ban

tatti e,

ba ll^am Iku
llkbl

e llkba a IgebbI,
;

au ban
bl
!k'e,

tatti e,

ba Iku e
be

a

Ikl jk'^

ban N^am
tatti,

Igwain Nj^am

Iki

jk'e,

au jgw^n
Ine

ba

llj;am bl jk'e;

ti biii e,

jgwam
Ine

Ikammain bo

Inutarra,

i.

(368)

(

)

He

ti

bin

e,

jgwSn
llkba,
Ilka,

bd

Ilka

i,

ban
e,

Ine

Ika'uken

tAtten bo
jkuarri

au llkba

Inaii

I

eta

jkog

ban

Ine

ba au

au ban

tatti

llkbin

Ine Ikuka,

au ba Inan

leta jkoS.

IV.— 28«.
B.

IlKHl,

HE-KKO TTOi XA
his

KUMM

E.

{Dictated, in 1875, in the
it

from

Kathop dialect, hj DiajkwSin, who heard paternal grandfather, jxugenddi.)
e,

(4320)
ta,

He

likb| l«kabbe,* ti
Ikii

be

sse

ddda dddtten
ikii i

ttoi

Ikagen ka

llnau ttoi,

bin
the

Ikuerre ttoi o

(4320')
Ilkhlii
e

* Explanatory Note hj
jkui,

Narrator.
hit

ttoi-tgn

||xam

e

jkui,

ll^keten a

llkh|

4naiya

ttoi llhatten-ttu, a; o

Mn jgumm

+g^bbi-gg6.

He

tiken

THE LION AND THE OSTRICH.
into this child's
child's

127

mouth, I also pour soup into this mouth, I also pour soup into the child's mouth I also pour into my wife's mouth ( ) soup." (365) Therefore, he poured soup into the Lion's mouth, he put the Lion's head into the pot, while he felt that he altogether put the Lion's head into the pot; that he might altogether kill the Lion with (366) ) ( the soup's heat; while he feels that he is a Hyena who deceives other people he speaks therefore, he talked to the Lion ahout it. The Lion also speaks they talked to each other therefore, the Lion assented, because ( ) he also is a foolish Lion, (367) because he is a Lion who kills people he also eats
; ;

;

;

;

;

people.

The Hyena
feels that

Hyena Hyena
(
)

carried off

also kills people, while the he also eats people therefore, the the old woman * on account of it.
;

Therefore, the

Hyena took up

the stick,

he (368)

struck the Lion down, while
inside the pot;

the Lion's head

was

he

felt

he beat him with the stick, while that the Lion died, when his head was inside

the pot.

IV.— 28a.
B.

THE LION JEALOUS OF THE YOICE OF THE OSTEICH.
"It
is

the

Story of the Lions and the Ostrich"

And
* This

the

Lions

conspired f
;

together

that

they (4320)

might deceive the Ostrich
is

for,

the

women

% were

an allusion to a favourite Bushman stoiy. Vide § 80 Account of Bushman Folk-lore and other Texts", Cape Town, 1875. t The Lion was a man, the Ostrich was also a man, at the time (4320') when the Lion kicked the Ostrich's Whatten-ttH, when, they called
of Dr. Bleek's " Brief
;

:

128

3PECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(4321) jgumm ttwaiten;
lie Ine

(

)

Ikakaken yaiiki Iku^rre he.
:

He
sse
ti

ku-ldtiii-ten l^ke

"I

kka sse
l^ke
:

" tte iki, i ddatta ? " I
( ) i

He
e,

llkbl

kko

kii-kkiii, hail

kan ddoS

(4322) |«ke Ikageu

sse ddi
ll;^a

+g^bhi-ggu,*
ti e,

sse liikoSn,
;

Ikagen sse
i

he ddi
;

h^ ka ddi he

he, he
ti

Iku dd6|
(4:124)
ikei
llau
ti

lla

ttoi

i

sse ll^koen

kvu-kkwah,
tto'i

e,

Inu ddo|

a,

Ikagen Ma

a.

I sse
llkha

(

)

ll«koen,

e ttoi sse Ikuei Ikue-lkue, i."
:

He
kk5

kkg

kii-kkiii, haii li/ke

" Ttsa dde

j(ti

ddoa
llkha

a, ttoi

^auki

ttuSisse IguBTui ttwai-i a ? "

He

ku-kkiii,

(4325) hail

liike:
e,

"Ttoi

(

)

kaii jgunim 6

ha sso-ssoken; he
i.

tfken

ha

ddomm
ti e,

Ikuedda, i; ha .Ika^u ka jkha,
ttii
;

Aken

llnau

a jgumni o a

he tiken

e,

a ^auki

jguimn akken,

i."

(4326)

llkha

(

)

kko ku-kkui,

haii l^ke
ttoi,

:

"

U

kkd|
Ihiii

ssg ddi

+gebbi-ggu,
ssoken,
ii li

u

sse
i
;

Ikha

u

sse Iki

ttoi ssoi,

sse

ha

he u sse

jgumm

kii !^"wa ttoi,

6

ha

ttoi sso-ssoken."

e,

ttoi IlkuiTu

!>'wukka
tfken
e,

i,

6 hiii tta Ilka
T.

tt

e,

ha 6a +nalya
tiken
e,

llkh|

luan-ttd.

He
Igoii,

he jywakka,

He

jk'e-ten Ine
e.

llnau, ttwi Ike sa'o ttoi llhatten-ttu,

hin ka llkh^ llkurru

* The

or 4:gebbi-ga, as performed

among

the Grass Bushmen,

teas described

ly Ihan4:kass'6, in 1878, as follows
;

(7978)

^^ llkngn lieu jgun'im jgumm Ikageu. ikakaken
'1

e

Ikakaken llkuan jkoeta hi; hin Ine +n|; hin |ne jguulm. He Ikut laiti,
au
jk'e

(7979)

^^

'ne Ihin

||a,

ha Ine

jlihe,

kuiten e

Ikij,

hi ine

(

)

jk'i

16

ssa, Jk'e

ta ttiiken,

au

jk'e ta

ttuka Ine jgurfim.
iku jxwan ttoi

jgumm ttwaiten
au Ikakaken Ine

Ilka hi, ta, hi e jkitten,

ddgmm

Hin Vauki kwokkwan;

au

jk'g ta ttiika |ne

jgumm.

THE LION AND THE OSTRICH.

129

wont, with regard to the Ostrich, they only praised
the Ostrich for calling finely

not praise them.
said:

shall we deceive?" And " We must tell he said the women to make a (game of) ^g&)hi-ggu* ( ) that (4322) we may see whether the women will agaia do as they are wont to do when they only admire (?) the Ostrich that we may really see whether it be true that the women admire (?) the Ostrich. We shall see what the Ostrich will do." And another (4324) ( ) Lion spoke, he said: "Why can it be that the

And "In what manner

did (4321) they (the Lions), speakiag,
;

(

)

the

women

another Lion answered,

:

;

;

Ostrich

calls

so

well

{lit.

does

not

a

little

call
:

sweetly) ? "

And
(

the other Lion answered, he said

"The

ostrich

) calls

with his lungs; therefore, his (4325)
; ;

throat sounds in this
dost call with thy
call nicely."

manner his chest's front. Thou mouth therefore, thou dost not

The other ( ) Lion answered, he said: "Ye must (4326) make a (game of) ^g4bhi-ggu, that ye may kill the
Ostrich,
(in) the

that ye

may

take out the Ostrich's lungs,

^gilM-ggu.
decayed.

Therefore, the nail of the Ostrich decayed,

while

it felt
it

that he (the Ostrich) had kicked the Lion's luan-ttH.

Therefore,

Therefore, the people, with regard to the
Whdtten-tiii,

soar yonder

on the Ostrich's

they say that

it is

(from)

the Lion's nail.
of the Ostriches and of the Lions. * The Igoo or 4:gebbi-gu among the Grass Bushmen. They (the Grass Bushmen) call [like the male ostrich]; the women clap their hands for them they (the men) call to the women. The women are those who dance they (the men) call. J
; ;

The women

(7978)

And

goes out (from the dance), she stands [being weary], while two other persons {i.e. two other women), they ( )
this

woman

(7979)

come forward in among the men, while the men call. They more sweetly than anybody, for, their throats sound like
oBtriches
;

call

real

while the

women

are those

who

sing,

while the

men call.

K

;

130

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(4327)

(

)

He

llkh| Ine ku-kkiii,

Mn

l«ke Ikdgen:

"Ddi

+gebbi-ggu."

He

sse

ttumm,

ti e, jkeY llau

Inu a ttdi

Igumm

ttwai-i a.

He
ilnelh;

Ikagen llkuan Ine ddi +gebbi-ggu, i; he llkha
i.

(4328) Igumm,

(

)

Ttoi-ten taaunkko kaii

llnd,

ha ka

llkh| Igurom, i;

Ikakaken >auki

ywS tugen
ttwiil-i

llkh|

;

6 Mil ta

Ilka ti e, llkh|
(

yauki Igumm
)

(4329)

ta,

he Iku Il«k6en 6 llkhf;
I:

he

ttoi

llkuan Ine
i.

ssa,

hg

ttoi
:

IlkuaA
I^ kaii

Ing

kui

Ika-ii ssiii,

He

Ikagen kkui

*'

ddda ka

llkha

Ikuedda, ha
ta

jgumm;
(4330) o
ti
e,

ta,

ha ka Iku j^wan ha jnum
)

ha

lanni,

ttdi ta (

!k'6tten

ko IgumS."

He

llkha ku-kkui-ten
ti

l«ke:

"Akken yau
ttdi,
i

ddda
;

llwkoen,

e,
i

Ikagen ddda Ikuei ^o, 6
llnau tt6i, hSii Iku /
Iki

he,

he ddda Iku 3 3
(4331) ha, 6 hS
( i

ddda 3

a, 3^
a.

he kkokS —
Ikakaken

)

ddda

l.gumm ttwaiten a

ddoa Iku 33

kkoka ha." —
kko Ikwain,
i; ti e, ttoi

He
ha

llkha

Iku ddda a Ikagen
lla,

(4332) kkoka ha; he ha
llki

ywan ha

jkhe Ihin

i;
i.

(

)

he

ttoi llhatten-ttu, i;

llki

tt^erri he,

He, ha

kkui-ten

Iwke:
tt<5i

" Ttsa ka
llMtten-ttu. o

jgumm

ttwaita
11

^a e?"
O

6 han +nai 33

He

tt6i

/Vo

yam -33 iMrra-ken
ha
ha
" Ikui
a,

(4333)

ssiii,

l.j^uonni,
i
;

i.

(

)

He

ttoi ll;^;am +nai, tt^erri

luan-ttu,

he

ttoi

ku-kkui-ten \^ke:

luan-ttu o

e,

/CJ*337
ha-g
Ine

Ikwain n, o

ti e, 7

ha

llkuaii Iku a, J 03

"

THE LION AND THE
that ye

OSTRICH.

131

may

eat

them; and ye

will call, sounding

like the Ostrich,

when ye have

eaten

th.e

Ostrich's

lungs."

And th.e Lions spoke, they said to the women (4327) "Make a (game of) +g^bbi-ffgu." They would listen
(
)
:

whether

were true that the Ostrich calls finely. women made a (game of) ^gebli-ggu on account of it and the Lion called. ( ) The Ostricli (4328) was stUl yonder at his house; the Lion called; the women did not applaud the Lion, because they felt that the Lion did not call well; for, they continued to look at the Lion; ( ) and the Ostrich came; (4329) and the Ostrich called, sounding afar. And the women exclaimed " I do wish that the Lion called in this maimer for, he sounds as if he had put his tail into his mouth, while the Ostrich ) calls in (4330) ( a resounding maimer." And the Lion, answering, said: "Dost thou not see that the women act in this manner towards the Ostrich? and it is only the Ostrich whom they cherish, because he ( possesses this sweet call. (4331) )
it

And

the

;

:

;

The women cherish him only." And the other Lion became angry on account of it namely, that the Ostrich was the one whom the women cherished; and he seemed as if he were about to move away; ( ) and he scratched the (4332)
;

Ostrich's Whdtten-ttu; scratched, tearing
called out
:

it.

And he
?

"Is

it

a thing which

calls

sweetly

while he kicked the Ostrich's Whdtten-ttu.
Ostrich
also

And

the

quickly (?) turned back. ( ) the Ostrich also kicked, tearing his \uah-ttu',
the Ostrich, speaking, said:
\uan-ttu,

And (4333)
and
his

"This person,

it is

he
is

is

one who

wroth with me, because he is the wont to hold his tail in his mouth

;

132

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(4334) ka jnum ta ha lanni, o ha
llkuaii
e,

(

)

Igumm; he tiken
o Ikakaken

Ikagen yauki Ikuefre ha, I;

llkuai ta
a.

ka

ti e,

ha yauki jgumm thaiiriuwa Ikagen,
e,

He
)

tlken llkuai

Ikagen ya'uki kke he dda hS
ta,

a,

(4335)

(

+gebbi-ggu, !; Ikakaken llkuan
i;

Ilka ti e,

ha

yanki Igumm kkui Ij^wan £,
ssin ssin Ikuerre ha, i."

he

llkplin e,

Ikagen

He
(4336)
t,
(

tiken

e,

n !k5m
ll;^aih.

Ine

ku-kkUi, han l^keya
ti e,

ssi

)

ssi sse

llkelike,

llkha

hh| 6a dda
Ine hi ttoi

ttoi a he,

hi ha hha 6a Ikhi
6 han ka, ha sse

ttoi;

han

8s6-S8oken,

jgamm kku j^wani.

(4337) \j(wah
]Sr

ttoi.

He

tiken

e, (

)

ha h! sso-ssoken,
ha,
tt<5i

.Ikoin yaii Ine

H^^-A ^

ssi

sso-ssoken, ssi

sse llj^am

llkelike ttoi;

he ssi-g

Ine

ku-kkui, ssiten
sse
(
)

(4338)

ttuttii ssi jkoin, ti e, ssl-g Inii
Iki
likd

yau

jkhaugen
kiii,

ttdi sso-ssoken;
ssi a, ssi ya'uki
Ikvi

he
sse

ssi Iki

jkoin Ine
Ilka

han.

+kakka
(4339)
ta, ssi

ttoi sso-ssoken
( )

Ikuei Ikuaii, hhi ttdi sso-ssoken,

Iku

llkan he.

Ta,

ssi ssaii llnaii, ssi

hha

ttoi sso-ssoken

6 he
ttoi,

Ilka,

ssiten ya'uki ssan

jgumm kku j^wSnlj^wan
Ilka.

6

ssi

hha
(
)

he,

o he
ssi

Ssi

jkoiii

yaii

Ine

(4340) ku-kkiii-ten

iiiJkeya

a,

ssi

yaiiki

sse

llkhwai

ttoi sso-ssoken, ssi Ikii sse

kkonh
ssi

Iho he,

o h^ Iku
ttoi

+ufru.

Ta,

ssi

ssaii

llnau,

IlkhwSya

sso(
)

(4341) ssoken, ssiten yaiiki
ttoi,

ssaii

jgumm

kkii !jf-waii|;^wan

6

ssi ssi

llkhwaiya he.

He,

koin Ine ku-kkiiiten l«ke

:

"

U

sse

Ine

THE LION AND THE OSTRICH.

133

when he
praise

(

)

calls;

this is

him;
are

while

the

why women

the
feel

women do
that
is

he

not (4334) does the

not call nicely for the women.

This
(

why

women
for

not willing to
feel

make
that

him; the women
;

he

) a ^gSbbi-ggu (4335) does not call,

sounding like me in that case the women would have praised him." Therefore, my grandfather spoke, he said to us* about it, ( ) that we should also do as the Lion (4336) formerly did to the Ostrich about it, when he had formerly killed the Ostrich; he ate the Ostrich's lungs, while he wished that he might call, sounding like the Ostrich. Therefore, ( ) he ate the lungs. (4337) My grandfather also gave us the Ostrich's lungs to eat, that we might also resemble the Ostrich; and we spoke, we asked our grandfather, whether we should not ( ) baking cook the Ostrich's lungs; (4338) and our grandfather spoke, he said to us about it, that we should not cook the Ostrich's lungs; for,

we

in this

manner
For,

eat the Ostrich's lungs,

(

)

eat (4339)

them raw.
Ostrich's

not

call,

we should, if we were to eat the lungs when they were cooked, we should sounding like the Ostrich, if we ate them
cooked.
it,

when they were
(
)

Our

grandfather, speaking,

told us about

that,

we

Ostrich's

lungs,

we

should
For,
Ixings,

should not chew the (4340) swallow them down,

while they were whole.

chewed the

Ostrich's
(
)

we we
if

should,

if

we had
call,

should

not

sounding like them.

the

Ostrich,

we had chewed (4341)
:

And, our grandfather, speaking, said "Ye must come and stand around, that I may be cutting off from the Ostrich's lungs, that I may be giving
* "

We who

were

little

boys," the narrator explains.

134
jkhe ttii

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN EOLKLOEE.
sse,

h
a a

sse

Ikhaulkhau Ikam, o ttoi ssowe,

(4342) ssoken,
he." ttan

kkgS-kko^ ( ) jho He ssi kii-kkui-ten l«ke " N jkoiii wwe Ssi He ssi >aiiki sse lia ttdi sso-ssoken, 6 he lk|."
A
sse

hu

u

sse
:

!

Ikoin ku-kkui haii +kakka ssi

a, ssi llj^am

ka

ssi sse

(4343)

llkelike

(

)

llkh|;

ha

Ine

ka jgumm ttwaiten.
ssi

hh| 6a Ikwaia ttoi, o ttoi Ssi'ten ll^am ka ssi sse llnau,

ttui ti
ssi

e,

ssi

Ikagen
Ine

Igumm kdi !^wa
ssi (
)

ttwaiten

(4344) llweiya,
Ine
ssi
ttiii,

kkoa-g

jkwain
kiii

Ikagen, o ssi-g

ti e,

he Igumm

!^wa ttwaiten llweiya;
ssi tta Ilka ti e,

kkqa-g

Ine

dda he

a, la,
ssi.

o

Ikagen
(

(4344^)>'a'uki Ine

^wa +ugen
Ssften

He

ti'ken e, ssi-g

) Ine

jkwain,

i.

Ine

ddia

Iki-lki

he; o ssi-g
ssi.

Ine

Ikwain

ti e,

Ikagen yauki Ine

^wa

+iigen

N^otes hy the Narrator.

(4320')

llkhan e jkui, ttoi-ten llj^am e jkui,
llkha +naiya ttoi llhAtten-ttu, a
;

ha

lli^keten

a

o hin .Igumm +gdbbi-

ggu.

He

tiken

e, ttoi

llkiirru

!>Vakka

i; o

hih tta
e,

Ilka ti e,

ha 6a +naiya
i.

llkha luan-ttu.
e,

He

tiken

hg

jywakka,

He

tfken

ss'o ttoi llhdtten-ttu,

ft ka hih
a.
i
;

jk'dten Ine llnau, ttwi Ike
w

llkha llkiirru i,

(4335')

liake a llkha ^aiiki Ikha ttdi a,

ha kah

a,

he dda

+g^bbi ggu ka
ttoi
a,
;

la

Hah
h^ ha-g

Iku-g Ine jhaugen Ikhi

he ha

Ine hhi ttdi,
;

o llwke llkah, hah Iku Ine
Ine

ha
:

Ine hhi ttoi a

dda ha ka

ttss'a,

o

ttdi

h& tlken

e, Ik'e

ike-lk^rriten
(

kah

l!::!ke,

llkha e

(4336')

ttss'd a,

kd ha

sse llnau,

)

o ha Ikha

tt(5i,

hah

yaiiki

THE LION AND THE OSTRICH.

135

them

to you, that

ye

may be

swallowing

(

)

them (4342)

father!

granddo not wish to eat the Ostrich's lungs when they are raw." And our grandfather answered, he said to us about it, that we also wished to resemble ) the Lion; he formerly became angry with the (4343) ( Ostrich, about the Ostrich's fine calling. We also should be wont if we heard that our companions called, sounding very sweetly, we should become angry with our ( ) companions, when we heard (4344) that they called, sounding very sweetly we should fight with them, if we felt that the women did not applaud (?) us. Therefore, ( ) we become angry. (43d 4^) are fighting with them, because we are angry that the women do not applaud (?) us.

down."

And

we, answering, said:

"0 my

We

;

We

Translation of Notes.

at

The Lion was a man, the Ostrich was also a man, that time when the Lion kicked the Ostrich's Whdtten-ttu when they were calling the ^g4hli-ggu.
',

(^4320')

Therefore, the nail of the Ostrich decayed;
it

while

he had kicked the Lion's \udn-ttu. Therefore, it decayed on account of it. Therefore, the people are used to say to the scar which is yonder upon the Ostrich's Whdtten-ttu^ that it is the
felt

that

Lion's nail.

The time when the Lion had not killed the Ostrich, (4335') was the one at which they made the ^g4bhi-ggu^ s fight. He, afterwards, killed the Ostricli; and he ate the Ostrich; it was at a new time that he ate the Ostrich and he made " a food's thing " of the
;

Ostrich;

therefore,

the

old
is

people

say,
)

that,
it

the

Lion

is

a

thing which

wont,

(

when

has (4336')

136

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
sse llkdo (llg^bbe) j^u ttu ttoi

ta

ha

llnau, llkoo,

ha ka ha sse ha sse i kki-ssa tyakken-i ha, han ^auki ka xu ttu ttoi. Ta, ha ka ha sse Ikwa-lkwa i, o i
;

ta,

kki-ssa, +i, ti

e, 1

ka,

i

jhe Iki ttal ha.

IV.— 34.
B.

THE RESUREECTION OF THE 08TEICH.
{Related hy lajkunta.)

(1171)

l^dm-ka-lkuiten
la
It
°

Iki toi
2
3

au
4

toi-ta Ikwiten;
S 5

han
6

Ine
7

lo

Ikammin-ti-lla toi au llndin.
8 9
3

He
11
18

e,

ha Ihdn
6 12

Ine
7

ho
13

4

10

(1172)

toi-lkii, e sin
3

juhf-ssho
17

U
6
7

(

)

lui,

au hin
19

Iki
20

ll^auken;
21

15

16

6

han

ine Man
22

Ikdnn
II

llkd hi.
24
6

Hin
6

Ine hi toi ^n-en.
7

23

23

S

26

llgollgo-Ouaken
27

Ine
7

ss'a
23

hi-hi;
6

han
6

Ine
7

ts'ii-hhd
29
13

(1173) toi-lku.
S
14

Toi-lkii-Oua
3 14

a
16

Iki
20

(

)

ll;^a;uken,
21

han
6

Ine
7

30

ts'u-ki
29
31

llkaiten
32

lkiiken-0ud
14 27

au jgwa^u.
4 33

Ikilken-

U
Ine
7

Ouaken
27

Ine tatten ja
7

Ihin jgwaj^u, haii
36
33

ttofri37

34

33

6

(1174) ttoffiya

(

) llkoe,
38

han
6

Ine le jkhw^, haii Ine Ilka l^-tin
7

39

40

6

7

41

39

42

jkhwa, han Ine Iku
40 6
7

llnau,
44

han
6

leta
39 45

jkhw^, han Ine di
40
6
7

43

46

(1176)

toi
3

dn-en; han Ine
26
7

Ikf-Iki
47

Ikuken,
48

(

)

haii Ine jhdjho
6
7

49

ha
6

llkullkuii, haii Ine Ikl-Iki
50
6
7

ha Ikwajkwagen, au
6

haii
6

47

40

19

Iku leta jkhwa.
43
39 43

Haii Ine Iku tae
G
7

Ihiii
36

jkhwa, haii Ine
40
6
7

40

43

51

RESURRECTION OF OSTRICH.
killed
fear,

137

an Ostrich,
leaving
tlie

it

is

not willing to go
;

away

in
if

Ostrich

for,

it
it,

is

wont, even

we
to

are speaking very angrily to

it is

not willing
For,
it

go away in

fear,

leaving the Ostrich.
us,
if

would be very angry with
that

we even thought

we would

drive

it

away.

IV.— 34.
B.

THE EESURRECTION OF THE OSTRICH.
The Bushman
eggs; he carries
kills

an Ostrich at the Ostrich's (1171)
to

away the Ostrich

the house.

And

his wife takes off the Ostrich's short feathers
(
)

which were inside
bloody;

the net, because

they were (1172)

she goes to place

them (on the bushes).

They

eat the Ostrich meat.
little

A
has
(

whirlwind comes to them

;

it

blows up

the Ostrich feathers.
)

A
it

little

Ostrich feather that
little

blood upon

it,

blows up the
feather falls
(

feather (1173)

into the sky.

The

little

down
)

out of

the sky,
it
it

it

having whii-led round
it

falls

down, (1174)

goes into the water,
is

becomes wet in the water,
in

conscious,
it

it

lies

the

water,
( )

it

becomes
on
its

Ostrich flesh;

gets
legs,

feathers,

it

puts

(1175)

wings,

it

gets

its

while

it

lies

in the water.

138

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
llkao
53

(1176) ikdrra
62

(

)

tin
42

jkhw^-ka-ja^u,
40

au ban
19
6

tatti,
65
;

ha
6

54

jndunko i toi-Oud.
66 57
3

Ha
6

Ikiiken
48

Iku e llkdtten
43
15 58

au
19

27

(1177) han
6

tatti e, lia
55
IS 6

Iku Iku e Ikuken-ta-.lkduken.
14

Hin
6

(

)

43

15

48

16

27

llidaka;
59

au hin
19

tatti,
55

toi-gwai-0ua
3

&.
67

Han
6

jkurru61

6

60

27

kenlkdrruken

llkau-ta
63

!khwa-lna-ts'i-ta
40
62 63

jaii,
64 (

ha se
6

45

64

(1178) jhau ha tae
65

li,
66

au ha Ikiiken-ka-jkduka
19 6

) jkiirnika,
61
67

6

51

48

27

67

ha
6

Be tae
6(
51

Imlni
68
;

ha jkwajkwagen.
6

Ta ha
69
6

Iku-ss'in
43
70

40

leta
39 45

Ikhwa
40

ha se tae Ikwdinlkwain ha Inodlnoa, au
6

64

51

71

6

72

19

(1179) ha
«

tatti e,
55

ha ka ha jnodjnod
6
73 6

se
64

(

)

juhltte Ikwiten,
74
74

au
19

72

han
6

tatti
65

ha
6

.Inoa
72

Ine jkwaia.
7

Au
19
78

ban tae
6 SI

Iji;6al;g6a
76

71

(1180) ha Inodjnod, han ten-ten, ha jnajna ha
6 72 6
77 6

!ka;^u, (
79

)

ha
6

6

llgorro se di jkwa.
80 64

Han
6

td§-tae
61
81

iii,
66 82

han hi kdrru-ka
6

46

40

25

83

IkAuken, au han tatti to'i-Ou4 Iku at o
27 19

i.
57

Ha
6 55

Iku llhon —
43
84

6

65

3

27

43

(1181) Ohogen-ka jkduken e 86 n 27 15 85
Iku
43

(

)

+enn; au han
87 19

tatti

t6i-0ud
3

6

27

e.
57

Ha
6
29

Ilk6tten-0ua Iku a di toi eii-en, ha Iku a
58

27&30

43

15

46

3

26
;

6

43

15

jkw^
81

ts'ii-hoa ha,
13 89 6

au jkw^ten ^ Ilg6llgo-0ua
19 88
;

han +i
6

67

27

90

(1182)

ti e, (
91
15

)

ha sin
6

l;^drriya hi
92
6

haii kiki ha,
6

ha
6

se
94

jhdmmilnain

16

93

ki,
93

ha

se Ikati

Ine ten-ten-ya
siii

Ikam He ha-ka
(

(1183) Ikhwditen, he ha
Ipfdrri llk(5e

Ikiiken

)

tenya

hi,

ha

se

lla

sin

llnaiii

ts'drroken,

au

haii Ine

+^d,mma
;

ha-ka Ikagen.

Ha

se Ine

Ik^m

ja like toi Iditikg

au

RESUERECTION OF OSTRICH.
It -walks out of the water, it basks ia the sun

139

(

)

(1176)

upon the water's edge, because
Ostrich.
Its
its

it

is

still

a

young

feathers
feathers

are

young

feathers (quills);

because

are

little

feathers.
it is.

They

(

)(1177)

are black; for a little male Ostrich
(his feathers) lying

He

dries

upon the water's bank, that he

may
(
)

afterwards walk away,

when

his little feathers

are dried, that he

may walk
for

unstiffening his legs. (1178)

For he had been in the water; that he may walk
strengthening his
feet,

he thinks that his feet

must
feet

(

)

be in (Ostrich's) veldschoens, because his (1179)
strong.
lies

become
he

While he walks strengthening
(
)

his feet,

down, he hardens his breast,

(1180)

that his breastbone

may become

bone.

He

walks

away, he eats young bushes, because a young Ostrich

he

is.

He
it

swallows young plants which are
is.

(

)(1181)

small,

because a Httle Ostrich he

His
it

little

feather

was which became the

Ostrich,

was

that which the

wind blew up, while the wind was
;

a

little

whirlwind
)

he

thinks
;

of
lets

the

place

on

which

(

he has scratched
first

he

himself grow, (1182)
afterwards,
old
place,

that he

may

be grown, that he
go
)

may

lying (by the way),

to

his

house's

where he did die

(

lyiug there, that he

may

go (1183)

to scratch in the old house,* while

he goes to fetch

his wives.

He

will

add

(to the

two previous ones)
(1183')

* Making the new house on the old one.

;

140

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
tatti

(1184) ha

ha

sin Iku Ikuka, (

)

ha
ha

se Ihan sin toi-ta
llgorro Ine e !kwa,

Ikagen e
hail

!ii(5afra.

Au ha

tatti e,

Igumm

Inajna

ha j^nlail, ha laujau
i,

se dl jk-waken.
e,

(1185)

(

)

H^

e,

hail Ine l^^rri
sifi-na \kii
lla

au ha

tatti

ha llkwan
;

Ine

iMlun

llnain

jkhw^iten

haii Ine
( )

(1186)

Igumm

jkui toi-ta

Ikagen, toi-ta

Ikagen se Ine
1,

llkau ha.

He

ti

hiii e,
;

ha Igumm Ikwi
e,

ha se ha se

Ini
lla

toi-ta Ikaka ssa

ha-ha

h^

haii Ine jken hi,
( )

(1187)

jkaii
;^<5-u
Ikii,

A Ikagen; ta ha

siii

Iku

Ikiika;

ha Iku Ikuken

ha-ha-ka Ikagen.
ta ha-ka Ikagen
Ikii

Ha
yoa

se lli/koen ha-ka Ikagen
Ine aken.
(

(1188)

Au

hail llkwarriiillkwdrriii

)

Iki

ha

eii-eii,

ha

siii

Ine tta

kkden, au haii Ine tae

ss'a,

au ha

tatti e,

ha
Ine

|kwa|kwag' Ine |kui|kuita,
(1189)
(

ha

Inodlnoadeyaken

)

|kui|kuita,
Ine

haii

Ine

jkiiwa
Ine

Ikukken
e

Ikejketten,

au hail

tatti llkotten

Ikuken |ke|ketten

IkiLkaken Ine |na, hiii Iku Ine e Ikuken |kheigu.

He
i
;

(1190)

ti

hiii

e

(

) haii

Ine

Igiimm

llkwei,

au ban

tatti e

jaulaii

Ine |kui|kuita.

He

ha

Ine e toi |kdrri,

ha
(
)

(1191) llkuilkuii-ka Igauaken
ti
e,

Ine |k<5|koka.

Haii Ine +i
;

ha

se

l;;^erri,

Ikagen se |h6|ho Ikwiten

ta

ha
se

llkullkutten llkwaii Ine lurriya, hin Itkwaii tail

ha

(1192)

jp^^rri

;

ta ha llkwaii |kau ki ssa

(

)

Ikagen au

llnaiii

Ikhwaiten.
e,

Ikakaken llkwaii Ine ha jkhe.
Ine tai !(k)ui, haii Iku Ine l;^^rri,
(

He
au

ti hiii

ha Iku

toi-ta
llaii

(1193) ikakaken Iku Ine ha Una.

)

Haii |hamm Iku
tatti

\^6m Ikauwaken
llndiii llkaie

llko

llnain,

au han

Ik^rri

e,

se llko.

Toi-ta Ikakaken Ine sail
( )

llt/koeii

(1194)

llnaiii, toi

Iditi

a |kwai

haii Ine ten tatta llnain,
;

hail Ine ta ti e llnaiii

yoa dken

haii

Ihamm

Iku

liiii

RESURRECTION OF OSTRICH,
another she Ostricli; because
lie

141

did die,

(

)

Ke will (1184)

marry three Ostrich wives.
is

Because his breastbone

bone, he roars, hardening his ribs, that his ribs bone.
(
)

may become

Then he

scratches (out a (1185)

house), for he

does

sleeping (by

the way) arrive
calls
( )

at the house's place;

he roaring

the Ostrich

wives, that the Ostrich wives

may

come

to him. (1186)

Therefore he roaring

calls,

that he

may
for he

perceive

the she Ostriches come to him; and he meets them,
that he

may run round

the females

;

had

(

)

(1187)

been dead; he dying
be

left his

wives.

He

will look

at his wives' feathers, for his wives' feathers appear
to
fine.

When
are
( )

he has strengthened

(

)

his flesh, he feels (1188)

heavy, as he comes, because his legs are big, his knees
large; he has

grown great

feathers, because

(1189)

the quills are those which are great feathers; these
feathers

Therefore
big.

become strong, they are old feathers. strongly, for the ribs are (1190) ) he roars ( And he is a grown up Ostrich; his wings'
are
long.

feathers
scratch,

He

thinks

(

)

that

he will (1191)
for
his

that the females

may

lay
;

eggs;

claws are hard, they waat to scratch
(
)

for he brings

the females to the house's place.

The females (1192)

stand eating. Therefore he goes back, he scratches, while the she Ostriches eat there. ( ) He first (1193) goes to scratch drying the house, because it is

damp, that the inside of the house
she
Ostriches
(
)

may

dry.

The
she she (1194)

shall

look

at

the

house;

one

Ostrich,

she

lies

down

to try the

house,

tries whether the house seems to be nice; she first sleeps opposite the house, because the inside of the

;

142

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
llnain,

(1195) jgwetih

au han Ikwa

tatti e, llnAin llkaie Ika,

au
e,

(

)

llndinyan

tatti

Ikati kau.

He
(

ti

kin

hi

iMmm
(1196)
llnain
i.

Igwelgwetin

llnain

i,

hin

lunlun
)

jgw^ssin
llnain;

Han

Ine san ten jkwdbbo

ka sin

kan jhamm Iku ten !kw(5bbo ka sseten
llkaie se Ikiirruken, laitiko

llnain, llnain

se ssa [ahi

\h6 jka'ui,
Ika.

ati

(1197)

llndin

(

)

llkaie-ya llkowa, ta llndinta jau
llan

Han
ban

jbdm Iku
(1198)
\\x^

jgwetin

llnain.

laitiko
;

a
( )

.Ikwai

ban

ssa,

ban san

\h6 [ani llkanko
tatti e

ban jhamm

Iku

sail llkain llnain,
;

au ban

Ikwlten-ta Ikauken
llndin.

jku jkbe

ban

ll;^a

ban Iku Han Idn jgw^ssin
( )

(1199) Ikagen-ka kiiwaken

e Ine lun llndin.
llnain,

Han
ban

jkagen
san
)

kau
(1200)

latten

Ikam

ss'a

Ikagen au
;

Ine
(

!u;^e Ikiiki

Ikagen au llnain
laitiko

hi-takiigen Ine

tag

jkbe ss'a llnain.
biii
ll;^a

a l^drra bail Ine jbo
ba.

jaiiiko
Iki

bin

llkain

Ikiiki

Haii ssVei
(
)

[or

(1201) ssVei ki] ta§ Ikagen, bail Ine jubfttin

llndiii,

Ikakaggen

Ine

Ikaujkaumken jkbe

ss'a

ba au

llnain;

Ikakaggen jkann bbo ba, bi kakiigen llkain* jkwlten.
(1202) Hail Ine tae au bail
teii
llnaiii
; ;

lla

ba.

Ikagen e

jkii

(

)

bin

Ine

laitikogen ll;^am tae bi ba, bin Nan
biii luii.
!ii

ba

llnaillnaii

Ikagen e jku bin
(

lii

llnain.

Hi fi

(1203) jkagen kau,
sail

jkuiten

) ss'a,

bin
ta

sail

Ikagen kau
laiti

jkdnn bo Ikagen e

jkii,
;

be

siii

llnaiii.

a

sin Una ha, bail \h6 jauiko

Ikakagen Ine tae, Ikagen

(1204)

(

)

ka

kii,

au ban

Ine ten,

ba se Ooeii
ti

llnaiii.

Ha

ssaii !u;^e koro, au bail +i

e koro
ti

ka
e,

sse Ikwiten,
( )

(1205)

k(5ro ss'a berri-a jkwiten.
[* The word
possibly also
'

He

hin

ba llkann
over',

Wkdin
*.]

sometimes means

'rejoices

and

caresses

RESURRECTION OF OSTRICH.
house
is

143

wet,
first

as

(

)

the rain has

newly

fallen.

(1195)

Thus they

lie

opposite

the house, they sleep

opposite the house.

She shall lie, making ( ) the (1196) ground inside the house soft; she first lies, making the ground inside the house soft, that the inside of the house may be dry, that another female may come and lay an egg in the inside of the house ( ) (1197) which is dry, for the earth of the house is wet. She first goes to lie opposite the house. One other female again comes, she comes to lay another new egg; ( ) she first comes to fiap her wings in the (1198) she again house, for two small eggs stand (there)
;

goes to sleep opposite the house. All the females He galloping (1199) are those who sleep at the house. ( ) in the dark drives the females to the house; he

running take the females to the house; they walking arrive at the house. Another (1200) ( ) female, a diflferent one, lays another egg; they He drives again flapping their wings peck at it. the females away; he lies inside ( ) the house. (1201) These females, following each other, reach him at these females send him oflf, they all the house He goes, for he goes away to eat. lay eggs. Two wives ( ) lie in the house; another wife also (1202) goes with him, they go to eat together they sleep.
shall
all
;
;

wives sleep in the house. They two (the male and female) return early, ( ) they shall (1203) early send off the two wives, who had lain in the The wife who had been with him, lays house. another egg; the wives go, all the wives, ( ) whilst (1204)

The two

he

lies

down, that he
drive

may

sleep

at

the

house.

He

will

away the

jackal,

when he

thinks

that the jackal is coming to the eggs, the jackal Therefore ( ) he takes care (1206) will push the eggs.

'

144

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
i,

.Ikwften
ti

hiii e,

(1206)

k(5ro se

au han tatti e, ha-ga laiiken llkwan e. He ha ll^am llkanu hi i, ha se llkwdrra kdro, ^auki Ika ha Ikauken, ( ) ha se +nai-a kdro

au ha

Inodlnoa.

PAET OF THE PEECEDING TALE PARSED

BY
la, \)(^am

DK. BLEEK.

a word that as yet has only been met with
'

name for Bushmen \^d7n-ka-\ei (sing. a Bushman '), further in \^dm-ka\X,dm-ka-\km ^Jcakken Bushman language \^dm-ka-\m Bushman ground, Bushman land', and in hih ^kdkken \^dm they talk Bushman etc. This seems to refer to the Bushmen in general as a nation, whilst the noun
in the general
',
' '

',

Ss^wd-ka-\kui

(pi.

Ss'wd-ka-\ei) seems

to

indicate

merely a Flat-Bushman. The noun ss^wd is also used separately to indicate a flat, a plain '. Other names of different kinds of Bushmen are \kdoken'

ss'o-le

'

Bergbushmen

',

sing,

\kdo-sso-\kui,

fern.

\kdo-sso-\kui-\attt, pi. \kdo-sso-\e-ta-\kdffen.

Similarly
pi.

a

Ss''wd-ka-\kui is

also

called

Ss'wd-ssd-\kui,

Sshvd-ss6-\e.
Ih. -Jm afl&xed genitive particle,

corresponding in value

with English -'5, Hottentot -di. After a long vowel its consonant is pronounced more softly, almost like ^, and after a short vowel more strongly, approaching to kk. After i and e (with or without an interveniQg nasal) this k (as well as that of most other particles beginning with this letter) is, in this

Bushman

dialect,

\c. \-)(am-ka-\kuiten

from k of which (according to the just-mentioned rule) after i and e
\-}(am-ka-\kuij

the

commuted into t. Bushman, nominative
-Aew, the

with the ending

'

'

PAUSING.
of the eggs,

145

because his children they indeed
jackal, that the jackal
)

are.

Therefore, he also takes care of them, that he drive

may
kill

away the
(

may

not

his children,
his feet.

that he

may

kick the jackal with (1206)

is

commuted

into

t.

The noun
:

\kui

'

man

'

is

very

irregular in its declension

Singular.
Ace. (& Wom.) Ikui

Nominative
Genitive

man \kuiten man
'

'.

'

'.

\kuita

*

man's

'.
!

Vocative
Alterative

\kuw% \kuk6

'

man
another

'

man
'.

'.

Plural.
Ace. (& Nom.)
\{Tc)e

or

\ei

'

men
'.

Nominative
Genitive

\(k)eten or \6iten
\{k)eta
'

'

men
!

'.

men's
' '

Vocative
Alterative
\ki
'

\(k)duwe

men
other

\{k)ekuiten

men

'.

to kill'. Another form is \kd, used in the perfect and subjunctive. ostrich, ostriches ', the same in singular and plural tot
'

2.

3.

(nom.

toiten, gen. toita

'

ostrich's

'

or

*

ostriches'
'

').

OM a preposition with a very general meaning with reference to, with regard to, at, on ', etc. \kwiten eggs ', an irregular plural, the singular being \kdui egg ', which is thus declined
' *
:

4.

5.

Singular.

Accusative
Genitive
Alterative

egg '. Nominative \Muiten egg
\kdul
' '

'.

\kdulta

*

egg's

'.

\kduik6

*

another egg

'.


146

specimens of bushman folklore.

Plural. eggs '. Nominative \kwiten eggs '.
Aoousative
Genitive
Alterative
6.

\kwlten

'

*

\kwitenta

'

eggs'
'

'.
'.

\lcwiten-kuiten

other eggs

han
is

'

lie

',

nominative, the ending -ken after a preceding
n.

nasal vowel being converted into

This pronoun

thus declined

:

Singular.
Accusative ha or hd, ha-ha or ha-ha Nominative han he, she, it '.
' '

he, she, it

'.

Genitive ha-/ca or ha-ha-ka

'

his, her, its

',

Plural.
Accusative
hi,

hi or hl-hi
'

'

they,
'.

it,

she

'.

Nominative hin

they,

it,
'

she

Genitive hi-ta or hi-hi-ta
7. \ne

their, its,

her

'.

verbal

particle,

for

the

indicative

and
'.

the

imperative.
8.

\kdmmin
is

'

to carry

',

\kdmmin-ti

'

carries taking

This

\kdmmin-ki in Flat-Bushman dialect, whilst the

9.

M

Brinkkop Bushmen say \kdmmin-\ki. away, thither '. Verbs of motion end generally
'

either in sha

'

towards, hither

'

or

lla,
'

just as such
'

10.

Hawaiian verbs end either in mai hither or aku thither, away '. Main 'house, home', gen. Wndinta 'house's', pi.
'

WnaiWndin
11. hS
e

'

houses
'

',

etc.
',

conjunction

and

really

'

this (or then) it is

'.

12. <hdh nominative of \hd 'consort, wife, husband', the

termination -ken after the very short vowel being usually contracted to -h; yet one hears also \hdken.

The nouns indicating

relationship, as well as those

expressing members of the body, have generally

PARSING. the
genitive

147

before

them without the
wife, or

genitive

particle {-ka-).

Thus n

\hd

'

my
'

my

husband

'.

thy wife, or thy husband '. ha \hd his wife, or her husband '.
a \hd
'

Wkdbho \hd

'

Oud
is

Jantje's wife

'.

The

plural (or dual ?)

\hdukengu

'

husband and

wife, consorts'.

The verb
Instead of
'

'

to
'

marry
'

'

is \hdn.

wives
'

the

Bushman
which
is

generally says

women, females
\aiti
'

\kdgen^
'.

the irregular
as

plural of

female

This noun

\Jidgen requires,
it,

however, always the genitive particle before
ha-ka \kdgen 'his women, or his wives'.

ho
\ku

'

to
'

lift,

pick up, take
feathers
'

off'.

13.

hair,

singular

and

plural

(nom. 14.

\kuken) has the genitive without genitive particle

before
e

it.

'which', relative pronoun, plural of
(«) is

used with reference to be represented by ha or hd 'he, she, it', and the former (e) similarly with reference to such nouns as can be represented by hi or hi they, it, she '. The latter pronoun is not entirely restricted to the plural, but is also sometimes used where the noun to be represented seems clearly to be in house ', etc., Uu skin '. the singular, as Wndih This is probably the scanty remains of a former
'
' '

The latter any noun which can
a.

15.

more extensive
sin verbal

classification of nouns.

particle,

indicating the

past perfect

or 16.

pluperfect.
\uhi 'inside', \uM-ssho 'sit inside'.
\'hi
'

17.

thread made of ostrich sinews, also a sack or net 18.
of such thread
'.

made

148

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
(4) used as con-

19.

oMthe preposition above-mentioned
junction
*

because '. 20. \M 'to take, possess, have', not to be confounded with \ki to kill '. But tbe former is also sometimes long \ki. 21. \\yauken 'blood'. This noun is always a plural in

on account

of,

'

Bushman,
22. Wan or Waken
'

i.e. it

is

represented
'

by

hi
',

to go to

or

'

to go

and

and e. always followed

by one

or

more other verbs.
Wci
'

This appears to be

a form of the verb

another form

is also We.

go away ', of which The last form is likewise
to

followed by another verb.
23. iMnn. 24. Wko to put down, to place
'

'.

25.

M

'

to eat

',

generally nasal
is

hi.

Another form (perfect
of Sh, the

and subjunctive)
'

hd or ha.
',
'.

26. eh-eh ' flesh, meat, body plural of a meat, flesh
27. \^g6Wgo
'

reduplication

WgoWgo-Qua a little whirlwind '. The ending -Qua forms diminutives in the singular,
',
'

a whirlwind

whilst in the plural this changes to -ka \kauken,
i.e.

the noun \ka'uken

'

children

'

(plural of \khwa or
to

\kqa 'child')

with the genitive particle attached
noun,
as
Wg6?cen\\goken-ka
'

the
'

preceding

\kduken
'.

little

whirlwinds ',
it

literally

whirlwind's children

This renders
its
'

probable that the ending -Qua
i.e.

is in

origin only a contraction of -ka [khwd,
'

-\khwd

28. ss'a

following a noun in the genitive. come to '. This appears to be the respective form of the verb ssH to come '. There are, besides this, two other terminations a to verbs (as remarked above), one indicating the perfect and the other
child
'

'

the subjunctive.
29. t£u^ 'to blow', ts'u hho 'blowing lift' or 'to
lift

by

blowing

'

or

'

to

blow up

'.

'

PARSING.
toi \ku

149

'

ostrich haii-

'

requires (as stated above) the 30.
it,

plural pronouns to represent

but the diminutive

toi-Mcu-Qua

'

little

ostrich hair'

demands the singular

pronoun.

^(?)

|M 'totake'. 31_ Wkaitm 'to ascend', ts'u \lci Wkditen 'blowing takes to 32. ascend ', i.e. to blow up '.
'

=

\gwaj(U
tdtten
\d
'

'

heaven, sky
'.

'.

33^
34.

to fall

'along'.

35.
out'.
td{ten \d \hin 'falling 36.

\hm

come out, go along came out of '.
'out,
went

Uorfi-ttoffiya

(apparently)

perfect

form,

'

having 37.
38.

whirled round.'
WTzoS 'fall
le

'to enter,
'

down, come down'. go in, in, into '.
'

39.

\khwh

not

(nom. confounded with \Jt^wd 'hartebeest, hartebeests' (nom. Sfc'wagen., gen. \k''waga\ nor with \kwa leg (nom. \kwagen., gen. \kwaga^ pi. bone \kwd\ku)d and \kwa\kwdgen), nor with \kwd (nom. \kwdkken, gen. [kwakka^ pi. \kwdgen), nor with \khwd, the perfect and subjimctive forms of \khwi 'to break', nor with \khwd 'child' (nom. \khwdh, gen. Ikhwdka, pi. \kduken); nor with \kwd nor with l^qd gen. 'gall' (nom. ), nor with \kwd gen. (nom. pot ),
water, rain
Xkwaken.!

gen.

\khwhka\ 40.

to

be

'

'

'

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

'

'

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

'anger, to be angry'.

There are still other words which an unaccustomed European ear could hardly distinguish from the above. \Vwd-\kwdka \kwd. \khwd \kqnn \khwdn

The
or
'

child holding breaks hartebeest leg's bone.
broke!

The

child breaks the bone of the hartebeest leg

'.

'

150

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.
a

\khwd

\lchwai

han
it

\kdnn

\khwd
broke

\k'wd

Child wMcli
a

one

holding breaks hartebeest

\khwai ha \kwa\kwagen ka \kwagen.

which
or
'

one

its

legs'

bones,

One
'.

child breaks the bones of the legs of one

hartebeest

\khwagen
'

\eta
is
'

jwoa.
'.

The water
'

in the pot
is

\khwu
{hi, e),

water

always used with plural pronouns
\eta
is

as e
ytqa.
'.

\khwa
'

The water which

in the pot

41. llM *to be wet',

not to be confounded with Wkhd
pi. Wkhditen),

'a stick' (nom. Wkhdgen, gen. Wkkdga,

nor

with

Wkhd

*

lion,

lions
'

'

(nom.

Wkhdh,

gea.

Wkhaga),

nor with Wkd
tin

brother,

elder

brother

(nom. Wkdn, gen. Wkdka,
42. ii^
'

pi.
'

Wkdnde).

round, about

',

\e

being

in,

turning surparticle,
'

rounded by'. 43. \ku verb substantive, auxiliary verb, or verbal not to be confounded with \ku or \ku hair 44. Wndu 'be conscious, be aware, think',
'

(14).

f^a
"[le

'

to lie'.
'

#a

entering
',

lie, lie

in

',

46. dt 'to 47. \ki\ki
'

become
to get
',

also di (short vowel).
\kt

reduplication of

(20).

48. \kuken 'feathers', here evidently not nominative, but

merely plural (14). put on '. 50. IIM arm, wing' (nom. Wkuh, his wings ', etc.). tde to walk, to go '. 51. 52. \kdrra 'to bask in the sun'.
49. \h6\ho
' '
'

pi.

WkuWkuh, ha WkuWkuh

'

; '

PARSING.
llMo
'

151

be mounted, upon ', \Mrra WMo tin 53. sitting be mounted around '. \au ground, dust (nom. \ciun). 54. tatti probably for ta tti e lie at the place whicb ',55. han ta tti or aii hah tatti e for, because ', etc. also au ha tatti e in some positions (?).
or

Wkau

'

'

'

'

m

'

\nduhko
e

*

yet, still

'.

56.

'be, be equal to, be identical', etc., not to be con- 57.

founded with

e

'wbicb', the plural of the relative
is a,

pronoun, of which the singular
Wkotten
Mioctka
'

whilst

e

has

the same form in the singular and plural.
'

young
black
'
'

feathers

'.

58.

gwat or -goai

(singular and plural), 59. male ', usually only used as sufiix. In 60. the plural the noun affix -tuken is used affixed to Thus tot gwdi the preceding noun in the genitive. ^ male ostrich has in the plural toi ta tuken. In
'

a similar
sex, \diti

manner the
'

affix indicating the opposite
is

used as an independent noun), is in the plural exchanged for the noun \kagen 'mates, wives' with the genitive before
female
'

(which

also

it.

Thus

toi \diti

'

female ostrich

',

and

toi ta \kagen

'female ostriches'. Eegarding the plural of -Qua (which affix is never now used as an independent noun), which is also formed in a similar manner, Thus toi-gwai-Qud a little he ostrich vide 27. has in the plural toi-ta tyken-ta \kduken little he
' '

ostriches

'.
'

\kurruken\Mrruken to dry ', v. tr. The reduplication 61. seems, as in Hottentot, to imply, among other meanings, also a transitive or causative meaning.
\nd
'

head

'

(nom. \ndh, gen. \nd-ka,
. .
.

pi. \na\ndh).

62.

7?1 'back' (nom.
'

,

gen.

ts^i-ta).
',

\khwA-lna-tsH-ta\au QS.
i.e.
'

water's head's back's ground

water's bank

'.

'' '

152

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

64. se 'must', auxiliary verb, standing usually

between the pronoun of the subject and the verb, and is then most frequently to be translated 'that, in order that ', as a ke a, n se ha give me flesh, that
'

I
65.

may
'

eat

'.

\hm

do afterwards, subsequently '. This is one of the verbs, which we should translate by adverbs. They are always followed as well as preceded by Similarly W^a do again the subjective pronoun.
'

is

construed.
'.

66.

u away
'

67. -ka in \kurruka

and at the end

of

\kuken-ka \kduka

stand either instead of the usual ending -ken or
as a contraction for -ken-ka. The -ka probably here a particle indicating the perfect, though frequently indicates also the subjunctive. It
is it is

probably due to the influence of the consonant
of this particle that the genitive particle in the

diminutive has also the original k instead of the here more usual
68. \ni\ni
'

t.
',

to unstifEen

69. ta 'for' (conjunction). 70.
«'««.

71. \kwdm\kwain 'to strengthen', causative of \kwain 'to

be strong, to get
72. \nqd\nqd
'

strong'.-

feet

',

pi.

\nqd-ka), not to

foot (nom. \nqdn, gen. be confounded with \nwd arrow
of

\nqd

'

'

'

(nom. \nwdn, gen. \nwdka,
'

pi.

\nwd).

\nqd

*

foot

',

has in the singular (as well as plural) always e which and hi it as its pronoun, whilst \nwd
'

'

'

'

arrow
'

'

has in the singular d

'

which

'

and hd

'

it

as its pronoun.

73.

lea

to think that
'

'.
'

74. \uhitte

in lie

',

i.e.

lie in,

be in

'.

; :

PARSING.
\kwiten

153

= toi
'

ta \kuken,

'

ostrich's veldschoen,' the skin 75.

covering
l;;^Qffll;^Qg

its foot.
',

to strengthen

causative verb.
td
'

76.
'.

ttn-ten

'

lying
to

down
'

',

from

to lie

down

77.

harden ', causative form of verb. 78. \ka-j(U breast, chest (nom. [Mj^^uken, gen. \Mj(uka, etc.) 79. has in the plural the irregular form \ka\Miten-^u breasts, chests '. A similar plural form is that of
\nd\na
'
' '

\kau-ttu 'belly
\[ggrro
'

',

which
'

is

\kau\kauten-ttu

'

bellies

'.

breastbone

(nom. Wgdrroken, gen. W^grroka, 80.
8J
82.

pi. WffdttenW^gtten, WgottenWgottaken).

toM-tai

L^
\kqrru
'

bushes

'

(blossoms
'.

?).

83.

Whon

'

to

swallow
pi.

84.

QM

'

plant, tree,

wood, anything vegetable

'

(nom. 85.
86.

Qhoken),
\kduken
'

Qhogen.
'

children

not to be confounded with
(\ko'uken)
'

to beat
'.

',

\auken.

\kaoken

'

stone
'

\(k)auuken
\cm
'

body

',

laiiuken or \duken.

\kWiiken

ground '. Knorhaan,
' r

Otis Vigor sii\
,

an

,

\kaukaken \kmken \kMken \k(du)uken au
'

\au.

The children beat the Knorhaan's body on the
ground.'
little', pi. of ^erri.

^Snn 'small,
singular.

The

adjectives of 87.

^ze have in the plural different forms from the

Thus
'

\urn

short

',

pi. \utten

;

\uitten

\j(Owa

'

tall,

high

',

pi.

\x6\xoka

;

;

'

164

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE,

\kmya
yduki
This last
is

'great, large, big, stout', pi. \kui\kuUa',
ts'Srre
'

'

not small
',

',

pi.

yauM ts'^tten

korre-Ttorre

round

pi. korritten-korreten.

not exactly an adjective, but a noun
of

indicating a ball or round thing.

All other adjectives besides these
88. \kwe

size

have

the same form iu the singular and plural,
'

wind (nom.
' '
'

\kweten^ gen. \kweta).
to lift

89. hod perfect of h6

up

'.

90. 91.

tTor Ve
ti e
'

to think

'

(a Hottentot verb).
'

place

which

or
,

'

this place

',

used for

'

that

after verbs of

...

like Hottentot,

IV.— 43.

THE VULTURES, THEIR ELDER AND HER HUSBAND.
(^Dictated,

SISTER,

in

1879, ly Ihan+kass'o, who had
Ixabbi-an.)

it

from

his mother,

(8351)

ikul

ha 6a ddd hi

llkaj^ai

au

jkui

;

* bin Ine Una ha.
wai, hi Iku

Hf

Ine Iku llnau, hi llka;^ai Iha

f

Iki ssa

(8352) bbai wai.

He, ha

(

)

llka^ai

IhS.,

bd

Ine lliikao hi,

ha

ha

+kwaii hi.

He, ha J

llka;j^;ai

ha

Ine

h6 wai
wai

ttu,

ha ha

Ine Ikii hi.

Ha

llka^ai
hi.

hd

Ine

j^aua

ttii,

llka^ai

Ine

wwarra
(8351')

* !kui laitikea
Ijna-es'o !kuf.

a,

hi dda hi ||kaxai

a.

!kui

jaiti

||ku|n e !xwe-

t !xwe-||na-ss'o [kuiten jku e.

(8352')

%

Ha

llka^ai jlkuan Iku Ikwai,

hiii

e Iiikwai5'a.

THE VULTIJEES.
\-xerri
'

155

scratch
*

'.

92.
at,

\-x6rriya

scratch

scratch for

',

etc.

ti e

ha
'.

sin

\-)(6rriya hi
it
',

'the place which he has scratched

on
at

i.e.

'

the place on which he has scratched
kai.

ki

'

to

grow
'

'

= Hottentot
grow,

93.
'

Mka make
se auxiliary

let

grow

(vide 61).
'

verb (or verbal particle)

that, in order 94.

that

',

standing

between
*

the

pronoiin

and the
'

verb, perhaps expressing

must '.

It is uncertain
to

whether

it

is

a form of the verb ss^a and ssH

IV.— 43.
L.

THE YULTUEE8, THEIR ELDER AND HER HUSBAND.
The Vultures formerly made
a person
;

SISTER,

their elder sister of (8351)

* they lived with her.

They, when their elder sister's husband f brought (home) a springbok, they ate up the springbok. And their ( ) elder sister's husband cursed them, (8362) he scolded at them.

And

their

:{:

elder sister took

up the skin

of the

Their elder sister boiled springbok, she singed it. the skin of the springbok, their elder sister took it
out (of the pot).
* A woman was the one of whom they made The woman was a person of the early race.
f

their elder sister.

(8351')

A man

of the early race (he) was.

explains the use of the singular form of the pronoun, here, in the following manner: "Their elder sister was
j Ihah^kass'o

(8352')

one, they

were many."

;

156

SPECIMENS OF BUSHM4.N FOLKLORE.

(8353)

He

(

)

M
hi,

ha

Ine

lkglkg-f* ttu

ka tfkentiken,t

hi Iku-g Ine kkonnkkonii llkho hi.

Hi

llka^ai Ih^
llkd;^ai,

ha +kwai
(8354) au wai
It^a,

ti

e,
)

hi ta ll^a, hi h^ hi ha

ttu,

au

(

hi Ik^dda ssin ha wdi

eii-eii,

hi

hi ha, hi

ha

llka^ai,

au

-wai ttu.

He, hi ha
(8355) hi
hi
ttdi
lie

Ine

jhammi hi

llka;^ai IhS, hi
Iki,

ha

Ine k6a,

tduken, hi Ine Ikuei

hi ssueh.

He

(

)

ha

Ine ii^koen

ha

llka^ai Iha, hi

ha

Ine Ikaiiru-i

ha

llka^ai Iha.

Ha
lla

llka^ai Ihd

ha

Ine jhann.

Ha ha
llka;^ai

Ine

ll;^a,

ha
Ine
Ine

Ikhi wai;

ha

Ine Igouij: ki ssa wdi.

Hi ha
Iha

(8356)

ll;^a,

hi

(

)

ssd bbai wai.

Hi
ha

M

+kwai

hi.

He, hi ha

Ine Ihih, hi !hau.§

Hi
(8357) Hi

lika^ai Ine Ikii

wdi ttu
a,

;

Ine

j^aua wai ttu.

llkaj^ai Ine

a a hi

(

)

ttti-ka tfken-tfken, hi Ine

kkonnkkonh

llkho hi.
e,

H^
(8358) ha

tiken

hi llka;^ai Iha,
Ine kdi,

ha

Ine llnau, Iga'ue, hi

llk^^ai Ihaii
ssafi

ha

ha

Iha

ddda
(

sse

Una hi hS
ta,

llkoaken

kan.
||

ha au

)

jkou-^ii;

ha
e,

Ikhoukuken-Opuonni
laiti

ta Ikii bbai wai.

H4

tiken

sse Una hi ha.

H^

tiken

e, laiti

Iku-g Ine Una

hi ha.

(8353')

*

N
Ha
Au

llkuaii +1,

«
i

e,

hi |»ka|iJka llku^ii e; au hi jnu ss'o 6a

jku Ikllke-i tchueii
t

ttu; ta, hi |ku llkhoui.

IlkSxaiten

a,

h| ka

ssin \nS a i hi,

au wai

ttu.

(8355') (8356 ') (8358')

t llkuan §
II

Ikammainya wS.
;

en Iku llgwfya

hi |ku hi llgwiya en.

>S%. Ika'uki-Opui.

;

THE VULTURES.

157

And
skin,t
sister's

(

they were taking hold* of the pieces of (8353) they swallowed them down. Their elder husband scolded them, because they again,
)

they ate with their elder
skin,

sister,

of the springbok's

when

springbok,

they had just eaten the body of the (8354) ( ) they again, they ate with their elder

sister of the springbok's skin.

And they were afraid of their elder sister's husband, they went away, they went in all directions, they, And ( ) they looked (8355) in this manner, sat down. at their elder sister's husband, they were looking
furtively at their elder sister's husband.
sister's husband went hunting. He went (and) killed a springbok he brought They the springbok home, slung upon his back.J again, they ( ) came (and) ate up the springbok, (8356) Their elder sister's husband scolded them. And they moved away, they sat down.§

Their elder

again, he

;

Their elder sister singed the
she boiled the springbok's skin.

springbok's skin

Their elder

sister

was giving

to

them

(

)

pieces of the skin, they were (8357)
their

swallowing them down. Therefore, on the morrow,

elder' sister's
;

must go with him she should altogether eat on ( ) the hunting ground (8358) for, his younger sisters-in-law were in the habit of Therefore, the wife should eating up the springbok. go with him. Then, the wife went with him.
husband said that
his wife
;

* I think that it was (with) their hands, if they were not taking hold of things with their mouths for, they flew. Their elder sister was the one who had heen giving to them
;

(8353')

f

of the springhok's skin.

J Carried the springbok. § "When the meat was finished

;

they had eaten up the meat.

(8355') (8356')

;

158

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOKE.
tlken
( )

H^
(8359) ttfiya,

e,

hi* ha

Ine

llnaxi,

ha llkaxaiten

Ine

hin hd Ine Ihm

llnein,t
i.

hin Ine !gw^ ssin

llnein,J he, hi

ha

Ine

Ibkkbbe,

Hin h^

Ine kiii,

Ikukko a han hd Ine kui:

"A

kan

sse ilkaiten, he,

(8360) a-g Ine ssan +kakka
Ikukko ha Ine kui
:.

ssi, (

)

ti e, ti ss'o

Ikul, i."

He

" llk^^ai-0pua § kaii

a, sse ttatta

h^

e,

ha

Ine

+kdkka hi."
Ine
iii,

H^

e,

ikuI a, e Ikul jkuila-

0pua, ha hd
(8361)
(

haii Ine Ilkaiten.

)

Hin hd ka:

" Ika hi,

i

sse il^ko^n, ti e ll^ae,

Opua
Ini hS.

sse Ikuei Iki, i."

H^

tiken

ha ha
Ine

Ine kiii,

tkiibbu

ssin

Ilk

!gwaj^u,||

hin

^aiiki

kk^ttau

(8362)

Hiii Iku-g Ine jhauwa; hiii Iku tk-i
ll;^a-0pua ssaii ilkhde a.

(

)

llbke a hi

Hd
Ihiii

tiken

e,

ha ll^a-0pua

ha Iku-g

Ine tatten

jk'a

jgwa^u, haii Iku ine

jkhou ssin hi ta kammaii.

(8363)

He

hi

ha Iku

Ine (

)

kui:

"A!
"I
Ta,
ti

ti

^a

te

fi

?

"

He, ha ll;^a-Opua ha
ssi Ilkaiten,

Ine kui:

Ilka ^f

a kaii Iku

ha

ssi

Iku lliikoen.
i

llkuaii llkhoa,

(8364)

i

kwai

Ini tss'a,
e,

au

Ik'a

(

)

Una."
jkferri,

H^

tfken

ha

llka^ai a jkuila

ha ha

Ine ui,

hail Ine Ilkaiten, haii Ine kui,

+kubbu

ssiii Ilk

\gwi^\i.

(8368') (8359')

*
t
I

Ikni,

,

Hi Hi

ilkaxai-ta

llneiii,

a hi ssin

Una hi llkaxai

a.

llkuaii tatti, hi Iku e Ik'e.

(8360') (8361')
(8363')

§
II

jkui latti-Opu&.

The narrator thus explains the expression +kubbu

ssin 114

igwaxu

=

ya'uki Ine In! ha "did not perceive her".
a,

H Ha

llkaxaitgn

ha +kakka ha.

THE VUliTUEES.
Therefore, gone,
( )

159

they,*

when

their
tlie

elder

sister

had

they went out of
to
it.

house,t they sat (8359)

down
"

opposite

the house, J

and they conspired
one said:

together about

They

said, this other

Thou
us
(

shalt
)

ascend, and

then thou must come to
to

tell

what the place seems

be like."

And (8360)

another said: " Little sister § shall be the one to try;

and then, she must

tell us."

And

then, a Vulture

who was
(
)

a little Vulture girl, she arose, she ascended.
said:

They

"Allow

us, that

we may

see

what (8361)

little sister

will do."

Then, she went, disappearing

in the sky, they no longer perceived her.

They
their

sat;

they were awaiting
sister

(

)

the time

at

(8362)

which their younger
younger
of the
sister

should descend.
{lit.

Then,

descended

fell)

from above

out

sky,

she (came and) sat in the midst

of them.

What is the place (8363) hke?" And their younger sister said: "Our mate|| who is here shall ascend, that she may look. For,
And
they
(
)

exclaimed

:

"

Ah

!

the place seems as

if
(

we should
)

perceive a thing,

when we

are above

there."

(8364)
a

Then, her elder

sister

who was

grown up

girl,

she arose, she ascended, she went, disappearing in
* The Vultures.
t Their elder sister's house, in their elder sister. X

which they had been

living with

(8358') (8359')

They

felt that

they were people.

§AUttlegirl.
II

Her

elder sister

was the one

of

whom

she spoke.

(8360') (8363')

160

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Han
(8365)
(
)

M

Ine Iku tdtten Ik'a Ihin,

ban

Ine Iku jkhou ssin

jk'e-kkuiten-ta * kariiman.
Ik'e-kuiten lia Ine kiii
kii'i
: :

He
ha

" Ti

^a

te
ii

u?
;

"

He
ti

ha
Iku
(
)

Ine

" Ti

llkuaii

^auki te

ta,

(8366) ssuassukraken.
Iku

Tiken Iku aken llweiya;
kti;

ta,

n n

ll«koen ti-ta

Ohioken f lukenliiken,
llkh.6a i

Iku

ll^ko'en hi;

tiken llkuah
;

kwan

Ini

wdi, au wai

yk
(8367)

Ikota G5h.o

ta, ti

Iku aken llweiya."
(
)

He

tiken

e,

hi ha Iku-g Ine llkoaken

ui, hi-ta
ta,

ku, hin Iku-g Ine llkalten !gwd^u,J au
llka^ai sse

hiii

ha

kwan ha
e,

;

ta, hi llka;^ai Iha
ssiii

+kwai

hi.

He
ha ka

tiken

hi
(

hd ka
)

llnau,
ssi

au hi louwi hi

(8368) iM^ai Iha
:

ssa,

hi hd hk

llkakenllkaken.
ssi

Hi

" TJ koa hi, u koa
/

hi,

u koa ha
7

llkdken-

llkaken, ta, 7 o

ha Inu

Ikui o

ha

Ike ssa,

ha yauki

ssiii

ddda 3
( )

(8369)

iki i."

He, hi h4
l^uabba

Ine bbai wdi, hi

hd

ine llkhou

jk'ui,

jk'tii,

hi Ine Ikuei
Ine ssa,

Iki,

hi kaii jkhd

ila;

au ha

llka^ai Ih^,

hd

h6 jkwagen.
llkd;^ai Ine
Ila

Hi ha
(8370)
Ini hi,

llnau, hi Ina
llka;^ai
)

wai, hi llkhoe, he ha
Ine

ha

(

llkauken§ Ikam

hi.
ii

Hi
ssiii

ha

hi,

hi, hi !goa-i

;

hi

hd ka

:

"

U
u

kod

hi,

!g6"d-i,

u
*
t X

ssah

Iki

Ikwinya

llka;^ai,

ssari

kkweya

(8365'} (8366') (8367') (8370')

Ikui.

©token

Ikgjkgtten.
Ikui.

Au

hii Mtti, hi jku Ine llkoaken ddf
e, i

§ Ikulten |ku

llkanken

hf.

THE VULTURES.
the sky.

161

She descended from above, she
the other people said:

sat

(

)

in (8365)

the midst of the other people.*

And
like?"
is

"What
is

is

the place

And

she said: " There
;

nothing the matter
clear.

with the place

for,

the place
I
(

is

The place

very beautiful;

for,

)

do behold the whole (8366)

place; the stems of the trees, f I do behold them;

the place seems as
if
is

if

we

should perceive a spriagbok,

a springbok were lying xmder a tree ; for the place

very beautiful."

Then, they altogether

(

)

arose, all of them,

they (8367)
that

ascended into the sky, J while

they

wished

their elder sister should eat; for, their elder sister's

husband scolded them. Therefore, they used, when they espied their elder sister's husband coming, ( ) they ate in great haste. (8368) They said: "Te must eat! ye must eat! ye must
eat

in

great haste

!

for,

that

accursed

man who

comes yonder, he could not endure us." And, they finished the springbok, they flew ( ) away, flew (8369) heavily away, they thus, they yonder alighted;
while their elder
the bones.
sister's

husband came
a

to

pick up

They,

when they
( )

perceived

springbok,

they
them,
ate,

descended,

and their elder

sister

perceived

their elder sister

followed them up.§

They

(8370)

(they) ate, they were looking around; they said: "Te must eat; ye should look around; ye shall

leave

some meat for (our) elder

sister;

ye

shall

* The Vultures. t Large trees.
altogether became Vultures. i While they felt that they are those which we follow up. § Vultures

(8365') (8366') (8367') (8370')

162

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ikuditen * au

Ilk4;^ai

u

ll«kodn, ti

e,

llkaxai a ssa."

(8371)

(

)

He, hi

M
(

Ine louwi

M

llka^ai ssa, hi

hd

Ine

Mi:
llnau,

" llkaj^aiten

tiiko llkhsa Ike ssa,

u koa

sse

kw^ en ya
hf, hi Ine

Una wdi ttu."t

He, hi ha
hi

Ine

kwe.

He, hi ha

(8372) hi ll«koen,

) ti e,

llk^;^ai Ine Iko ssa

au

k6a, hi ttdi He toiiken.

Hi
Ikuei

llkaj^ai

ha
a,

In^ ta:

" Oeya
ssiii

!

Ts4-ra
ii

u ddoa

Ine

yu& au n

una
)

+k-wai

" ?

(8373)

He
•wai,

hi ilkij^ai

(

ha
au

Ine jkhe ssa wdi,

haj

Ine

h6

ha

Ine jkiiiten,
lla,

Ikui Iku Ine Ik'ui, hi Iku-g
Ine llgdue wai-ko, a hi

Ine llkhouwa ttin
ta, ll^a

au hi Iku

hi ha ha.

lY.— 37.
L.

DDI-;^EERETEN,

THE LIONESS, AND THE
CHILDKEN.
who heard
ii

{Belated, in January, 1879, hy Ihan^ikass'o,

from

his

maternal grandmother, -^i^vami, and, when
Ixabbi-aii.)

older, from his mother,

(8177)

Ddi-j^erreten § llkuan

hd

(5a

linau, llkha likuaraken
llan

Una Ikhoa, lkuenya,|| han Ine
(8370')
* En
t
%
llku§.n e
;

Ikuen
jklia.

Una; Ddi-

Ikuaitaken e Ikajkdtta jkha
ttS.
llk^;^ai.

(8371 ')
(8373') (8177')

Hi Iku ha lli^ke Hi \\Vij(&h Ikui

§ !Jt°wS-llnis8'o Ikui

kan Iku
jkoii.

k.

Ha
II

Inan h| 6a |ku &

N

llkuan +1,

tt e,

ha

ss'o

6a Ikuen

Iki

jkhwaa-ta Ikoa

;

ii,

ha

llku|n Ikht jkhwM.

;

DDi-;^ERRETEN.
leave for (our) elder sister the undercut,*
see that (our) elder sister is the one
( )

163

when ye who comes."

they perceived their elder sister coming, they (8371) exclaimed: "Elder sister really seems to be coming
yonder, ye must leave the meat which
is

And

in

the

springbok's skin." f And, they left (it). J And, when they beheld ( ) that their elder sister drew near to (8372)

them, they went away, they went in " Fie Their elder sister said
:

all directions.

in this

how can ye act manner towards me? as if I had been the one who scolded you " And their elder sister ( ) came up to the springbok, (8373) she § took up the springbok, she returned home while the Yultures went forward (?), they went to
! !

fly about,

while they sought for another springbok,
to eat.

which they intended again

IV.— 37.
L.

DDI-j^ERRETEN, THE LIONESS,

AND THE

CHILDREN.
the Lioness was at (8177) the water, dipping up,^ (when) she had gone to dip
Ddt-j(erreten^\\ formerly,

when

* It

is

meat; the \kuditm

is

that which lies along the front of

(8370')

the upper part of the spine.

The word [huqiten, translated here as "undercut " (in accordance with the description of its position), bears some resemblance to that given for "biltong flesh", in the Katkop dialect, by Dia\kw^in,
which
t
j It
is Ikicaii.

They atrthe skin together (with the meat).
is

(8371')

possible that the

pronoun hi may have combined with the

verb here.
§ Their elder sister, the Yultures' elder sister.
II

(8373')

he was. His head was stone. (8177') dipped up water with a gemsbok's i[ I think that she probably stomach for she kUled gemsbok.

A man
;

of the early race

;

164

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(8178)

;i^erretakeii tatti e, llkhk

a .Ikannlkann

(

)

ll«keya jk'e-

ta Ikaiiken, au llkhkn tatti, llkha e

llosa,

a llnwaiStu

M
S

tiken

e,

lia Ine

Ikannlkann

llir^ke

|k'e-ta jkaiiken,
ta,

(8179) jkauka ssin Una ha, |kauka ssin
llosa,

(

)

dda ha a;

hd

h^ ha yauki ddi
tlken
e,

Igl tchueii.
lia

He
(8180)
)

Ddi-^erreten Ine

ha

llnein,

au han
llnein,

Ikuenya.
(

Ddi-;j;erretaken Ine |kou ttih ha,
lia

an

Ddi-^erretaken Ine

|ka'uken,

au

llnein.

DdiDdiIne

j(;erretaken

ha

Ine

lia

Inein, |kh^

Ha |kauken.

^eri'etaken

ha

Ine

ssuen.

He

Ddi-^erreten hd

(8181) kkiii:
ta
li

(

)

" |kauken-Opuondde

wwe
lii,

ss'6

!

IJ-ka |k'e-

tan
e,

e,

Ikoiko |kh^ya, |kulrri a Iko |khe ssa."
Ikii,

H^
Ha,

tfken

|kauken e
)

hi

ha

Ine

hin Ine Ikam

(8182) hi-ta

(

|k'e.
\\j(k

Ddi-;{;erretaken ha Ine

han

kiii
li

:

" |ka'ukene Ikoulkou

Opuondd^ ww^

ss'S

!

U-ka

|k'e-ta

kan

jkhdya |kuirri a Ik'ou |khe."

He

|kauken e ha Ine

(8183) llkhou Inuannan, hin

(

)

Ine Ikuei Iki,

hin

Ha,

au hin

Ikam

lia

hi-ta

|k'e.

He, ha ha
ss'6
!

Ine ll^a,
|k'e-ta
li

han
kah
(

kui'

:

" |khwa-Opua

wwe
Ine

A-ka

e,

Ikoujkou |kheya |kufrri a
Ine ui,

(8184) Ik'ou |khe ssa."
Ikul'i Iki hail Ha,

He

)

jkhwa hd
lia

han

au Ikhwan Ikam

hi-ka

Ik'e.

Hail
TJ-ka

\\j(k

haix kiii:
li

" |kauken-Opuondde
e

wwe

ss'o

!

jk'e-ta

kaii

|k6u|kou *
llnSn llkhoe

|kheya,

jkufrri

f

^81 84'")

* "^^ ^^^
f Hail

tatti,

ss'o jkufrri.

ll;\;ainki

+kakken

|ku)rri-kko.

DDI-;[;BREETEN.

165

up water there, Ddt-x4rreten felt that the Lioness was the one who had gathered ( ) together the (8178)
people's children, because the Lioness felt that she

was an invalid on account

of (her) chest; therefore,

she gathered together the people's children, that the
children might live with her, that the children might
(
)

work

for her;

for,

she was an invalid, and she (8179)

could not do hard work.
Therefore, Ddi-j(6rreten went to her house,

when

she was dipping up water.

her absence to
the children, at

went in the house, ( ) Ddi-y6mten went to (8180) Ddi-y6rretm went to the the house.
Ddi-j_^rreten

house reaching the children.

Ddi-j6rreien sat down.

And
The

Ddi-j(4rreten said
fire of

:

(

)

"

children sitting here

!

(8181)

your people is that which is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top (of the hill)." Therefore, two children arose, they went

away
The

to their

own

(

)

people.

(8182)
children sitting here
is
!

Ddi-j(6rretm again said: "
fire of

your people

is

that which

below the
this side

top of the ravine which comes
(of the hill)."

down on
(
)

And

three children*
to their

thus went, (8183)

while they went

away
is

own
is

people.

And he
Thy

again said:

"0

little

child sitting here!

people's fire

that which

below the top
this

of

the ravine which comes
hill)."

down on
it

side (of the

And

(

)

the child arose,
to its

thus went, while (8184)

the child

went away

own

people.
sitting here!
is

He
fire of

again said:

"0
is

children

The

your people

that which

below t the top

* Literally, " childrea which hecatne three." not where the water (8184') t Because the house is in the rayine {i.e., flows, but among the bushes).

166

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN POLKLOEB.
jk'ou jkh^ ssa."
lii,

(8185) a

(

)

He

jkaluken
Iki,

ha
bin

Ine
Ha,

IlkliOTi

jkuken, bin Ine

hin Ine Ikuei

an bin

Ikam
(8186)

lla

hi-ta jk'e.
Ine
) llj^a

He, ba h4

ban kui
li

:

" jka'uken-OpuoMde
e,

wwe

ss'o

!

(

U-ka
ui,

!k'e-ta

kan

IkoIko jkbeya,

Iknfrri
jkliken,

a Iko Ikb^ ssa."

He

Ikauken ba Ine llkbou
bin
lla.

bin Ine

bin

Ine Ikuei Iki,

He, ba ba
(8187)
(

Ine ll^a

ban

kiii:
li

" Ika'uken-Opuondde

)

wwe

ss'5!^U-ka

jk'e-ta

kan

e,

IkoIko Ikb^ya

Ikuirri

a Iko jkb^ ssa."

He
Iki,

jkauken e jnuanna, bi
;

ba
(8188)

Ine ui,

bin Ine ikuei

biii lla

au bin Ikam

lla

hi-ta !k'e.
(

)

He, ba ba
!

Ine

ll;^a,

ban kui: " jka'uken-Opuondde,
li

wwe
(8189) bin
jk'e;

ss'o * TJ-ka

jk'e-ta

kaii e, IkoIko jkbdya, jkuirri
Ikii,

a Iko Ikb^ ssa."
Ine (
)

He
Iki,

Ikauken e

bi

ba

Ine
lla

lii.

Ikuei

bin

Il4;

au
Ine

biii

Ikain
ss'6,

bi-ta

au Ddi-^erretaken ba

!ka

au llkba

llkuara.

He
(8190)
iki,

llkba llkuara

DO

ba O

Ine Ibin Ikboa, bail

'of
(
)

ba 3

Ine Ikuei o

ban ban

Ikiiiten ssa.

Han ba
jkauken.

ttai-tau llwko^nya

ssd;

ya'uki

Ini

He

ba ba

Ine

kiii:

"Tss'^ ra a jkauken jkauken jkauken jkauken, jka'uka
(8191)
j(a tt^ Ika

ka? be jkauken ^au dda
llnd ?

iH e,

jka'uken

(

)

ka llgwiten

He yoa
i,

e jkui a ss'o llnein,

ba

Ina

Ine llkboa Ddi-;^^rreten,t i."

He
(8188')
ha

ba ba

Ine jba,

au ban ka ba

Ini

Ddi-^erreten.J

* Hd-ka
Iki hi.

jka'ukaken

ya'uki

Una;

ta,

jk'e-ta

Ikauken

Ikii

6,

(8191')

t J

Han Iku teiina ha. Au han tatti, ha ya'uki

|ni

jkauken.

!

DDi-;^EKEETEN.
of the ravine*

167

which ( ) comes down on this side (8185) And two children arose, they thus went away, while they went away to theii- own
(of the hill)."

people.

And
(

he again said
ravine

:

"0

children

sitting
is

here

)

Tour
the

people's fire is that

which

at the top (8186)

of

(of the hill)."

which comes down from the top And two children arose, they thus
:

went away.
he again said " The fire of your people
of the ravine
hill)."

And

children
is

(

)

sitting here
is

!

(8187)

that which

at the top
(of the

which comes down from the top
three children arose,
to their

And.

they thus went

away ; while they went away

own

people.
!

he again said: " O children sitting here f (8188) ( ) The fire of your people is that which is at the top of the ravine which comes down from the top (of
the hill)."

And

And two

children arose, they

(

)

thus (8189)

went away;
people;
Lioness.

while they went away to their while Ddi-y6rreUn sat waiting for

own
the

An,d the Lioness came from the water, she thus She ( ) came along looking (at the (8190) house) ; she did not perceive the children. And she exclaimed " Why do the children (stammering with
returning came.
:

rage) children children children, the children not do
so to
( )

me ? and
wont
house
;

the children do not play here, as they

at the

do? It must be this man who sits (8191) head resembles Ddk-^erretenP % And she became angry about it, when she perceived
are
to

his

*

He

speaks of another ravine.

\ Her children were not there; for the people's children '^ere /o-i those whom she had. Vo-i \

(8184') oo j\
q-i
j

\

She recognized him.

^

^

!

168

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine kkdi:

(8192)

Han ha
ss'o
!

" Ddi-^erreten
ttd'i

(

)

llkuan

ddoa a
3

"

Han ha
3

Ine

3-Ikhd

ssa llnSn.

Han hi

Ine

kui

:

"

Ine

lauwaki jkauken."

He

Ddi-^erreten hi

Ine kdi:

" I-i-ta Ikaiiken
Ine
( )

kwa da
"

dd(5a Ine e."
Ine

He
Ine

(8193)

llkiia

h4

kui:

Oeya

!

x6a! a-g
Ine

lauwake a jkaiiken!"
*'

Ddi-;^erretaken ha

kdi:

I-i-ta Ikaiiken llkuan ya'uki O O 3

6a dd6a e." D

He
(8194)

llkha 3
)

ha Iku-g O 3

Ine Ikei

ha

Ina.

Han hd
3

Iku Ine

kiii: * (

"^dbbabbu!" au

Ikiikko Ina.
li
!

He
ii

ha hd

Iku-g Ine kui: "

Ouuuu
fe,

!

if!

if!

if!

IlkeillkS
ssaii

He
(8195)

ti,

hi kail yda
ki

Inii

jkui a,
llnein
!

ha Ina gwa'i
"
(
)

llkh(5

jk'aun

ss'o
:

n-ka
"

Au

Ddi-

^erretaken hd Jn^ ta
ta tkauken yaiiki O
(5a

N

llkudii lii^keya ha, ti e, i-i-

ddoa 3
gwai

e."

llkha 3

hd kui 3

:

"
i.

1^

A kan

V

yfii.

ddda
(
)

a,

Ind

ssaii llkho ki ss'o."

"

I-i-

(8196) ta Ikaiiken t

llkuan yaiiki 6a
lii,

ddoa

6."
;

He, ha

hd,

Iku-g Ine

haii Iku-g Ine jkiiiten

au

llkhaii Iku-g Ine luaitenlua'ita ss'o

ha-ka

llneiii

;

ti e,

(8197) ha
Iku

kwon

Iku ssan,

(
;

)

Iki ttaiya

ha jkauken, e ssin ha ssin Iku ddi

kkweya au ha

au

haii tdtti,

dkken
au ha
(8193') (8195')

Iki jkaiiken, haii

^auki ttaihOpua kkoka jka'uken,

lya.

* Igaunfl lea
t

Ina.

Ddi-xlrretaken a Ikuli dda.

"

DDI-j(;ERRETEN.

169

Ddi-j(j^rreten.*

She exclaimed:
here
!

^^

Ddi-j(4rreten

(

)(8192)

indeed (?)

sits

"

She walked up
are

to the house.

She exclaimed:

"Where
:

my

children

?"t And
thee
!
!

Ddi--)(6rreten said

" Our children (they) are not."
(

And
leave

the Lioness
ofE
!

)

exclaimed:
give

"Out on
the

(8193)

thou
:

must

me

children

Ddi-j(irreten said

" Our children (they) were not."

And

the Lioness caught hold of his head.
:

She

exclaimed

(

one's head.

" j(dhhablu " % (growling) to the other (8194) ) " Oh And she exclaimed Oh dear
:

!

!

Oh
be

dear

!

Oh

dear

!

Oh
"

dear

!

my

teeth

!

This must
sit

why

this cursed (?)
!

man's big head came to

in
:

front of

my house While Ddi--xerreten said (8195) ( ) " I told thee that our children they were not." The
Thou
hast been

Lioness exclaimed: "Destruction!
the one whose big head
children §
(

came

to sit (here)."

" Our
(8196)

)

(they) were not."

And he
come (and)
felt

arose,

he returned (home)

;

while the

Lioness sat in anger at her house; because he had
( )

taken away from her the children, (8197)
(living) peacefully with her
;

who had been
that she

for she

had done well towards the children; she did not a little love the children while she was
doing
so.

* Because she did not perceive the children.
t are

(8191')

The

narrator's translation of \ne

\mwaki \kauken was "Where

my

the children "

children?" but "Give me the children" or may be verbally more accurate.

"Show me (8194
)

§ Bdi-'xirreien

% Growling put in the head. was the one who spoke thus.

(8195')

:

170

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN POLKLOEE.

IV.— 47.
'

THE MASON WASP* AND HIS WIFE.
1878, ly Ihan+kass'o, who heard
mother,
Ix^bbi-aii.)
it

{Dictated, in June,

from

his

(7098)

Igabbakenlgabbaken f ban b^

llnau,

au ban

ttai

lla,

au
"

laitikea

Ine
!

ttai

Ikunss'o

ba,

laitiken

ba kui

N

Ib^

wwe
(

\j^ boa ke, loa a."

He
i;
?

jgabbakenjgabbaken"

(7099) jgabbaken

)

ba

Ine

tte

llkbwai,
ya,

jgabbakaken ba Ine kiii: "loa ba Ine kiii: " loa kan a ta."
3
3

dde

He

laiti

He
lla.J

Igabbakenjgabbaken ba

Ine
(

iki
)

Ibin

jnwa, f;

(7100) jgabbakenjgabbakaken Ine Ikuli

Iki,

ban +nammi
!

He
^,

laiti

ba

Ine kui:

"Ine llkbda tauii
?

Tsa
e,

ra

^a

a ;^au ka ka, a llkbo jnuin
Ine

"
ti
)

Hd
H^

tfken

jgabbakenjgabbakaken

ttaittaiya,
(

kau kudrre
tiken
e,

(7101) jnuii l^ka; ban Ine llkbo jnuin.
laiti

ba 3
e,

Ine

kdi

:

"A

>'<5a
3

ddda 3

Ikuei-ii ? S o O

Hd

tiken Q

yda

a yaiiki ta ka, a
tfken
e,

kwan

llkho Inuiii, i."
ttai,

H^

jgabbakenjgabbaken ba Iku Ine
(

(7102) ttin j^uorini; ban
Iku-g Ine
kiii,

)

Iku-g Ine k§kauaken
ttg jguara
i.

laiti,

ban

tt^au,

^abbu

au
"

laiti
e,

jka^u.

He
(7103) Ine
Ikii
Iki,

laiti

Iku-g Ine jkou ttin,

Hd

tiken
!

ba ba
(

kiii

:

" Yi
laiti.

u

bibi

!

N
Ine

Iba

w6

M

li

ba yau

)

a

l^i

Han

^wa,

ti e,

ba yoa Iku Ikuei

ban Iku
Ha

\j^ laiti;

laitiken Iku Ine Ikiiken.

(7098')

* Igabbakenjgabbaken llkhfe +kakken-llklio-ttSim.
•j-

llkuan h| 6a e jkui
e,

;

he tfken

e,

ha llku^n |M Ihou;
IpJ^a

hd tfken

ha

llkii|n Ine Ixi ISti,
jk'gafi lla,

au han yau Iku
loa ssin Ine

ho jnau.
ta.

(7100')

X 1 llku|n

ka

au

i

ta,

kkwe, jxe

f7101')

§ "^^ llku§.n kkuirriten gwai, au gwii jkauogen-ka

ti e

jkhou,

he 4:hetten+het-ta

;

hin

e,

ha kknirriten gwS,

I.

;

THE MASON WASP,

171

IV.— 47.
L.

THE MASON WASP* AND HIS WIFE.
The
Mason Waspf formerly
(his) wife

walked along, while
the wife
that hare
his
!

said:

'<

my
the

did thus as he (7098) walked behind him, husband! Shoot for me

" quiver;

Mason Wasp ( ) laid down (7099) the Mason Wasp said: "Where is

And

the

hare?"
the

And

(his)

wife said:

"The

hare

lies

there."

Mason Wasp took out an arrow the in this manner ( ) went stooping along.J (7100) And the wife said " Put down (thy) kaross Why is it that thou art not willing to put down (thy) kaross ? " Therefore, the Mason Wasp, walking
;

And

Mason Wasp

:

!

along, unloosened the strings of the kaross

;

he put
:

down

the kaross.

(

)

Therefore the wife said
to

(7101)

"Canst thou be

like this?§

This must have been
lay

why

thou

wert

not

willing

down

the

kaross."

Therefore, the
side

Mason Wasp walked, turning

to one

; he ( ) aimed at (his) wife, he shot, hittiag the (7102) (head of) the arrow on (his) wife's breast (bone).
||

* The Mason Wasp resembles the Palpares and Lilellula. It (7098') The Mason "Wasp flies, and is to be seen in summer near water IAa«4:to«'o has seen it in our garden at Mowbray. It is rather smaller than the Palpares and Lilellula. f He was formerly a man therefore, he had a bow therefore, he shot his wife, when he had not shot the hare. % "We are accustomed to go along stooping, when we wish that (7100') the hare may quietly lie hidden (knowing that people are at hand
has a small body.
;
; ;

lying
§

still,

thinking that

it

will be passed by).

She mocked at the man on account of the middle of the man's ('7X01') body, which was slender hence she mocked at the man.
;
II

«.^.

breaking her breastbone.

_

(7102')

172

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(his) wife fell down, dead on account of it. Then he exclaimed: " Ti it hiht! my wife Al!" (crying) (7103) as if he had not ( ) been the one to shoot (his) wife. He cried, that he should have done thus, have shot

And

his wife

;

his wife died.

I

m

td'i

iehu

i.

\

My

mother's hut
tchii g.

it is.

im father's hut it My
/
)

Id

is.

o
6.
it is.

m \Jcuh Inu-i, h'lma liwi a tehu H. My grandfather's, the big \uma't,
hut
it is.

Q

(

1.

(

Wkdshe

\\ni

&

tehii i.

\
(

The big grandmother's hut
Wffu Tea
i,

i ti shin.

y**^^^^^

(

The water -which we drink.
Gdba Wgii, Gdha \\hhumm. The Makoba's water.

%._^Jjtf

i

\

\uma, Oct. Zrd, 1881.

2.

1.

\kqo,

hill.

2.

\khuirri\Jchuirri,

rayines.
4.

3.

\\hhn

lea

Wneih,

house of the

lioness.
3-

\kduhen,

the

children.

0.

4.

5.

Ddt xerretm.

6.

\kdtihm ha

\k'i

ta

Wnei

line*,

the

children's people's houses (at the upper part of the ravines).
\haa:^ka»'o, Jan. 26<A, 1879.

2d.

Id.

Sd.

BUSHMEN.
From
the Breakwater.

y.

Legends.

174

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

v.— [37.

THE YOUNG MAN" OF THE ANCIENT EACE, WHO WAS CAERIED OFF BY A LION, WHEN ASLEEP IN THE FIELD.
{Dictated, in 1875, in the KatTcop dialect, hy D£a,!k-w|in,

who had

it

from
jkui ^^auddoro a

his mother, 4:kamiiiS-an.)

(4457)

hM

6a

jliami

llkaiten

lla

W-x^l',

hail Iku ddi kui ttS

Opuoin; o han
(
;

sso

ko

jgoai,

(4458) han Iku ddi

kiii ttS

Opuoin.

)

He ha hha
ta,

ku-kkui,

han

+i,

ha ka ha

sse

am'm tten

ha ^auki ttamsse
Inix a,

ddi kui tta Opuoin.

Ta, ttss'ddde
)

ddf ha, o
tta.

(4459) llkoin-ta

ti

^ ? ti

e, (

ha yauki amin ka Ikuei
i,

He ha
ssa;

tten, i;
!;^u Ha,

he ha Opuoin,

o llkhan da ttai

hSn

o llkuonnan Ikha ha, han llk'oinya;

(4460) he ha

Ini (

)

Ikuiten

Opuoin
;

tta

;

he ha hho
ti e,

jkui,

i.

He

jkui jk'abbe

Ihiii, i

he ha lauwi,

I

Ikha 6a

a hho wa.

He ha
ta,
(
)

kii-kkui-ten +i, ha ya'uki sse

(4461) ddarraken;

llkha

ssan ttssi
lliikoen,
ti

Ikh4 ha, o
e
llkha

ha

ddarraka; han am'm sse
Ikuei Ikuelkue,
i
;

ka ha

ta, llkha

llkuan

Ikii

llkho +i, ti e,

ha Ikuka.
(4462)
(
)

He

llkha
i.

Ikammainya o jkhwakki

;

he llkha ha
Ikii

.Inau-tte

ya,

He

llkha

ku-kkiii-ten

45,

;

;

YOUNG MAN

CA.ERIED OFF

BY LION.

175

V.-[37.
B.

THE YOUNG MAN OF THE ANCIENT RACE, WHO WAS CAREIED OFF BY A LION, WHEN ASLEEP IN THE FIELD.
was tlie one who, formerly hunting, (4457) ascended a hill; he hecame sleepy; while he sat looking around (for game), he became sleepy. ( ) (4458) Aad he thought that he would first lie down; for he was not a little sleepy. For what could have happened to him to-day ? because ( ) he had not (4459)
previously felt like this.f

A young man*

And he

lay

down on account
it

of it

;

and he
it

slept,

while a lion came;

went

to the water, J because
it
;

the noonday (heat) had " killed "

and

it

espied the

(

)

was thirsty and it took (4460) the man lying asleep
;

up the man.
and he saw that And he it was a lion which had taken him up. that he would not stir ; for ( ) the lion (4461) thought would biting kill him, if he stirred; he would first

And

man awoke

startled

;

lion intended to do; think that he was dead. appeared to

see

what the
)
;

for

the lion

(

And

the lion carried
laid

him
in

to

a

zwart-storm(4462)
the lion

tree §
*

and the lion

him

it.||

And

He was a young man of the early race. from another version of this legend, given by t It is evident, unusual ta \\Un (71.-2, pp. 4014-4025), that the \kwiiten
sleepiness is supposed to be caused

(4457') (4459')

by the

lion.
_

J as being a large tree, which § This is described by the narrator has yellow flowers and no thorns. The lion put the man half into the tree, at the bottom of it
II

To

a water pit.

/i^con (44dJ
)

his legs

were not in

it.

176

SPECIMENS or BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

llkoinya,

ha ha
)

jkiu

;

han

§iin'm

sse !^u,

ha
;

sse
ta,

I

la

(4463) ywS;
Ikii

(

ha

sse ssa jhau

ha ha, o ha ^wa

ha

llk'oinya,

ha hha.
le

H6 ha
(4464) ha
ttaii

Ik'oa

jkui Ina, o

jkwaggen-ka !kau,
(
)

i

;

he

Ikuonni,

i.

He

Ikui jkaim

kkui, gguerri

a, Ina.

He
Ikii

llkha jkwe Ma, i; ti

e, ttss'a

dde

Inii a,

Ikui •o

Ina

ddarraken

oat
ddoa

a,

o

ti e, '

ha

ssin

amm
3

+i, ti e,

77
Iku-g

(4465) ha !k'5a
4i,

llki

\Mk

jkui Ina.
tte

(

)

He

llkha ku-kkui-ten
;

ha Qa

ya'uki sso

akka

.Ikui

ta, jkui

Ine ttatten ui.

He ha

il^an, jk'oa ttchoo

le

jkui Ina,
jkui
e,

(4466)

1,

o jkwaggen-ka jkau,

i.

(

)

He
jkui

ha

tt'atten

tsaj^Sten-ka jkhwetyi,

i.

He
He

>Va,
tta,

i

;

hin
e,

ha

tt'atti

jkui

tsa^aiten.
liken

jkui

ti

Oho
(

(4467) yauki ttamsse

jkhe

ha llkhauru; he
ll>I

jkui

)

ywanni ha

Ina, i;

o han llwkoeii

jhda,

6

llkha,

han ywanni ha
ddga
(4468)
(

Ina.

He

llkha

ll^koen, ttss'a

a

ti

Ikii

^'wan, jkui a dddrraken.
I.

He ha
Hg

tt'atten

)

jkui tsa;^aiten-ka jkhwe-ten,

llkh| kii-kkdi,

han
(4469) sse

+1,

ha k4 ha

jk'oa ttchoo

kwo-kkwan
ha Inu
(
)

jkui Ina,
a,

ha

lliikoen

kwo-kkwan,

ti e,

ddoa

yauki

;

YOUNG MAN CARRIED OFF BY
thought that
ate the
it

LION.

177

would (continue to) be thirsty if it would first go to the water, that it might go to drink; it wonld come afterwards (4463) ( ) to eat, when it had drunk; for, it would (continue to) be thirsty if it ate. And it trod, (pressing) in the man's head between the stems of the zwart-storm tree and it went back. And the man ( ) turned his head a little.* And the (4464) lion looked back on account of it namely, why had the man's head moved ? when it had first thought that it had trodden, firmly fixing the man's head. And the lion thought that it did not seem to haye (4465) ( )

man;

it

;

;

laid the

man

nicely

;

for,

the

man

fell over.

And

it

again trod, pressing the man's head into the middle
(of the stems) of the

zwart-storm

licked the man's eyes' tears. f

hence

it

licked the man's

tree. ( ) And it (4466) And the man wept And the man felt eyes.

that a stick X did not a little pierce the hollow at the back of his head; and the man ( ) turned his head (4467)
a
little,

turned his head a

while he looked steadfastly § at the lion, he And the lion looked (to see) little.
as if the

why

it

was that the thing seemed

moved.

And

it

licked
it

(

)

the man's eyes'

man had tears. And (4468)

the lion thought

would

tread, thoroughly pressing
it

down
it
(

the man's head, that

)

might really see whether had been the one who had not laid the man (4469)
of the

* The tree hurt the back
it

man's head

;

therefore he

moved (4464')
lion's

a t

little.

The man

cried quietly, because

he saw himself in the

(4466')

power, and in great danger. explains that the stick was one of those pieces J The narrator of that had broken off, fallen down, and lodged in the bottom
the tree.
§ see if the lion

The man looked through almost closed eyes; but watched remarked that he moved his head.

to

(4467')

;;

178

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

tte-tte

4kken

Ikui.

Ta,

ti

ddoa Iku ywan, jkui a
ti e, ti

dddrraken.

He
o

Ikui llWko'en,

ywaii llkha
)

llkl,

(4470)

tl

e,

ha

Ikii
i,

ddoa Ik'auwa; he

(

ha yauki

Ine

ddarraken,

Ohoken kki-ssan

llken-i ha.

He

llkha
tte

llkuaii InS llii^koen, ti e, ti-g

Ine llkh.o,
(

ha llkuan
)

(4471) akka jkui

;

ta,

Ikui llku|n
l(a,

yauki Ine
lla

ddarraken
i,

he ha tt^ jkhe

i;

he ha jkwe

jkui,

6 jkufteu
Iki

ttchu-ttchuruka ha tsa^altyi; han llwkoen
hho, o ha tsSj^;aiten-ka
llgerre
;

Ilkh5e
ti
e,
lla

han
ttai,

llwkoeh,
f,

(4472) llkh|

(

)

Ikuli ^o,

i.

He

llkhf
i;

llkaiten

llyau, i;

hS llkha ttchdaken,

o Ikuiten ttamsse Iho
ti e, llkha

!;^u6nni,

ha

Ina,

8 han ka ha llwkoen,
(
)

Inu

(4473)

!kei llaugen, ttai.

He ha

llii^koeri, ti e,

llkhf llkbo,

llkha ttohdaki; h8

ha lauwi,

ti e,

llkha ll;^an, kkebbi,

!khe ssa, o llj^au Ina ttss'i; o llkhan

kan
;

+i, ti

dd^
e,

(4474) ssin Iku

(

)

ywan

jkui

Ikii

ddda Ik'auwa

h^ tiken
Ta,
(

ha

amm

ka ha,

ll^a

ha liakoen kwo-kkwan.
;

ti

(4475) Iku ttan jkui Iku kS ha u
jkui

ta,

ha Iku

dd^
;

+i, ti e,

)

ddda Iku

Ikiiken ddau-ddau.

He ha

llkuan Ine

lli/koeh, ti e, jkui

llkuan jnaunkkg tta
sse orrtiko jku;^e
(

he ha ku-kkui,
)

(4476) hail
lla

+i,

ha kd ha

jkhwa, ha sse
sse,

ywa; ha
hha.
;

sse ll^a

ha

kaii
;

orruko Ihin
haii

ha

sse

ssa

Ta,

ha

llkan-a
e,

a

yauki ttamsse
lla

llk'oiiiya

hd tiken

ha amin ka ha
;

^wa, ha

(4477)

(

)

sse ssa, jhau

ha hha

o ha J^wa.
ya, ti
e,

jkuiten tten

ko llwkoen

ha Ikuei ^o,

i

;

TOUNG MAN CAERIEB OFF BY

LION.

179

down
had
as
if

nicely.

For, the thing seemed as

if

the

man

stirred.

And

the

man saw

that the thing seemed

the lion suspected that he was alive; and he (4470) ( ) stir, although the stick was piercing him. And the lion saw that the thing appeared as if it had laid the man down nicely ; for the man did not ( ) (4471) stir; and it went a few steps away, and it looked towards the man, while the man drew up his eyes; he looked through his eyelashes ; he saw what the
did not
lion
( )

was

doing.
hill
;

And
man

the

lion

went

away, (4472)

ascending the

and the

lion descended (the hill

on

the other side), while the

gently turned his head

hecause he wanted to see whether the lion had really gone away. ( ) And he saw that the lion appeared (4473) to have descended (the hill on the other side) and he
;

perceived that the lion again (raising

seemed as if the man (4474) were alive therefore, it first wanted again to look thoroughly. For, it seemed as if the man had intended to arise for, it had thought that ( ) the man (4475) had been feigning death. And it saw that the man was still lying down; and it thought that it would quickly run ( ) to the water, that it might go to (4476) drink, that it might again quickly come out (from For, it was the water), that it might come to eat.
)
; ;

peeping behind the top of the thought that the thing had (

hill

;

its head) stood * because the lion

hungry
)

;

it it

was one who was not a
first

little

thirsty
it

therefore,
(

intended to go to driak, that
to
eat,

might come afterwards
at
it,

when
which

it

had (4477)
did

drunk.

The man lay looking
* The lion came back a
sight) to look again.

at that

it

little

way

(after

having gone out of

;

180

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
llkuan lli/koen
I,

he
(4478)
e,

Ikiii

ti e, lia )

Ina-ka Ik'iilk'u Ivuonni

ha

jk'u j^uonni,

(

he llkuan ywaii ha llkoaken
+i,

Ha.

He

!kui

ku-kkui-ten
sse

ha ka ha
e,

sse

amm
sse

kkwe
(4479)
||;i^a

ttin,

ha

llwkden,
sse.

ti

likha Inu
(
;

>^u

ha kkebbi jkhe
;

Ta,

)

tssa

a jkhwiya

ha
ha
(4480)
ta,

^

ha kd ha

sse

ddau-ddau ha

ti

ya kko ^wan,

!kei llaugen

tt^; o ha ka, ha sse kkoan Ihin;
Ikii

ha ddoa

ssin

ywah, ha

a,
a,

(

)

ddarraken.

Ta, ha ya'uki
llnau,

dd^
e,

+en-na tssa
tte

jkui

ddda

ssin

ha
Ikii

+i, ti

ha llkuan

akka
tiken

jkui,
(
)

jkui'ten

(4481) dd(5a

ttattenttdtten ui.

H^

e,

ha ka
sse ssd

ha

sse oriniko Iku^e,

ha

sse

oiTuko
tta.

sse,

ha

llvikoeii, ti e,

Ikui Inu

Inaudkko

He
( )

Ikui llkuan

(4482) ine llbkoen,
ll;^a

ti e,

au llkuan

Ine ssueh,
ti

o

ha yauki
ywan, ha
sse

ha kkebbi Ikhe sse; he

llkuan

llk(5aken Ha.

He

jkui kii-kkui-ten +i,

ha ka ha

amm +kam0pua
(4483) Ilkha,
(
)

ddi

;

ta,

ha

Ikii

ssaii
ti 6.

Ikhw^ten

o Ilkha Iku taaunkko Una

He

jkui

lli/koen, ti e,

aii-Opu^ llkuan Ine ssuen, hg ha ^auki
;

Ine

Ini

ha,

i

he

ti

llkuan ywan,

ha

!kei

llaiigen,

ttaiya.

(4484)

(

)

H^, ha
ya'uki
Ihin,

Ine Ikii ddi akka, o ti Ike,

ha
ta,

tta

he
Ikii

hail

Ikii

kkoaii

Ihin,

hah

ttai;
ti
e,

ha

(4485) kkoan
6
lla

hah Iku

|mm
ha

ssuken
ti

e

l;^arra,

(

)

hah ka
he.

Ilkha >^uki sse +emi,

ha

ss'o

Ikain

Hah

Iku llnau,

Ikuei Ikua,

bd

ddi,

bah

;

YOUNG MAN CARRIED OFF BY
and the man saw that
disappeared),
its

LION.

181

head's* turning away (and disappearing), with which it turned away (and
( )

seemed

as

gone.
lie

And

the

man thought

still,

that he might see

had altogether (4478) would first whether the lion would
if
it

that he

not again come peeping.
;

For,

(

)

it

is

a

thing (4479)

which is cunning it would intend to deceive him, that the thing might seem (as if) it had really gone away while it thought that he would arise For, it (4480) for, he had seemed as if he ( ) stirred. did not know why the man had, when it thought
;

that

it

had

laid

the

man down

nicely,

the

man

had been falling over. Therefore, ( ) it that it would quickly run, that it might quickly come, that it might come to look whether the man still lay. And the man saw that a long time had passed ( ) since it again came to peep (at him); (4482) and the thing seemed as if it had altogether gone. And the man thought that he would first wait a little; for, he would (otherwise) startle the lion, And the (4483) if the lion were still at this place. ( ) passed, and he man saw that a little time had now had not perceived it (the lion) and the thing seemed
;

thought (4481)

as if it
(

had

really gone away.

did nicely at the place yonder where (4484) he lay; he did not arise (and) go; for, he arose, he first sprang to a different place, ( ) while he (4485) wished that the lion should not know the place to
)

And he

which he seemed to have gone. He, when he had done in this manner, ran in a zigzag direction,t
* The only had
lion, this

time -when

it

came back

to look at the

man,

its head and shoulders in sight. He did not run straight but ran first in one t sprang to another place, then ran again, etc.
;

direction, then

;;

182

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN POLELOEE.

(4486)

Ikii

Ikwe
sse

ti

ssuen

ti

ko

jkuj^e,

6 ban ka,

(

)

llkha

;^a
ti

jkhou Ihin ha jnwa, llkha Vauki sse +enh,
ss'6

e,

ha

Ikam Ma he; llkha sse
Iku
llgaue
IkTIki
ti

Ikii

llnau,

o ha
e,

ssa,

ha

sse ssa
+i,

ha.

Hd
ti

tiken

(4487)

(

)

ha kan

ha ka ha Ikwe

ssuen
;

ko

Ikti^e,

llkha ya'uki sse Ikhou Ihin ha Inwa
llnein;
ta,
( )

ha

sse Iku ttai
ssa,

llkha

kd ha

sse llnau,

6 ha
e,

han ka
sse

(4488) ha

sse

ssd llgaiie ha.
le

He

tiken

ha ^auki

Iku !ku;^e, Ike

llnein, i;

ta, llkha

ka ha

sse llnau,

o ha

ssa

jko ha,

llkhan ka ha sse
(
)

Ikaa ha

Inwa

(4489) llkha sse !gau6-ken llgaue ha,
ti e,

llkha sse lli/koeh,

llkha Inu

^au

sse Ini ha.
llnau,

H^
hah
(4490) oa*
tfken

tiken

e,

ha Iku

hah

jkhai Ihin ssa
ti e,

ll;^au,

Iku Iwkeya llneih-ta jk'e a,
(

ha

ttiiko

dd6a
he

)
e,

o llkoih yah

jkaii

!khe,

hah

dd^

oa;

he kie sse llwkoeh jkw'a
le

ttii-ttu e li/kwaiya,

h^

sse

ttemmi
(

ha,

i

;

ta,

ha
e,

ttxiko

ddda

oa, 6 llkoih

(4491) yah !;^owa.
sse llnau, 6
Ine ssa jko

)

H^

tiken

ha

+i, ti e,
lla

llkh|a
he,

kd ha

ha

Iha, ti e,
;

ha ssih Ikam

ha kkoo

ha
(

hah ka ha
ha ka
jk'e

sse llgaue llkhwi Ihin ha.

(4492)

He
he

tiken

e,

)

kkQO

sse

ttemmi
Ini

le

ha, 6

Ikw'a

ttii-ttu e

Iwkwaiya, llkha ^a sse ssa
^,

ha.

Ta,

ttiiko Ikii e, +eh-na, ti e, llkha Iku
(

ttssd a,

ka

(4493)

Ikii llnaii,
;^ii

)

ttss'A

a ha ssih Ikha ha, hah ^auki ta

wa, o ha j^ hha ha.
ttii- ttii,

H^

tiken
le

e, jk'e
i
;

sse llnau,
Ilka

kw'a
(4489')

jk'e sse

ttemmi
e,

ha,

hd ko

*^ = h6i
Han
jk'g I,

jnanna-8s6 llkh|; he tiken
I.

ha Ikuli k6i-ten, j^ke};!

YOUNG MAN CARRIED OFF BY
while he desired
out his footsteps,
( )

LION.

183

that the lion should not smell (4486) that the lion should not know

the place to which he seemed to have gone; that the lion, when it came, should come to seek about

him (there). Therefore, ( ) he thought that he (4487) would run in a zigzag direction, so that the lion might not smell out his footsteps; that he might go home; for, the lion, when it came, would ( )(4488) come to seek for him. Therefore, he would not run straight into the house for, the lion, when it came (and) missed him, would intend to find his footprints,
for
;

that the lion might, following his spoor, seek for him,
( )

that the lion might see whether

it

could not get (4489)

hold of him.
Therefore,
hill,

when he came

out at the top of the

that

he called out to the people at home about it, he had just been " lifted up " * ( ) while the sun (4490) stood high, he had been " lifted up " therefore, they must look out many hartebeest-skins, that they might roll him up in them for, he had just been "lifted up", while the sun was high. ( ) Therefore, (4491) he thought that the lion would, when it came out from the place to which it had gone, it would come (and) miss him it would resolve to seek (and) track him out. Therefore, ( ) he wanted the people to roll (4492)
;
;

;

him up

in

many

hartebeest-skins, so that the

lion

should not come (and) get him. For, they w ere those who knew that the lion is a thing which acts thus to
(
)

the thing which
it

it

has killed,

it

does not leave

it,

(4493)

has not eaten it. do thus with the hartebeest-skins, the people must roll him up in them ; and also (in) mats these (are)
;

when

Therefore, the people must

* He avoided (?) the name of the lion manlier told the people about it.

;

therefore,

he in this('4489M

184

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
e,

(4494) tchiien

(

)

Ik'e sse

ttemmi

le

ha,

i

;

llkha

ya'uki

sse Ini ha.

He
o
Ilka,

Ik'e

llkuan

i,

i

;

Ikdten llkuaii Ine
;

ttemmi

le

ha

h^ ko jkw'a
'(

ttu-ttii
Iki

he, he

ttemmi llwke hi

(4495)

Ilka,

i.

)

Ta, jkui
e,

llkuan a Ikuei-dda he a; he
le

tiken llkuan
ttu-ttti;

he llkuan Ine ttemmi
Ilka ti
e,

ha 6 Ikw'a
lid 6
;

6 hin tta

he
sse

li-ka

yaudddro

(4496)

(

)

ha he ^auki ttan llkha

hha

ha.

He

tiken Ta,

c,

he kie \^e a dkka, llkha ^auki

sse Ini ha.
)

.Ikui

(4497) yauddoro a he ya'uki ttamsse kkoka ha,

(

ha iku
ha,
i
;

e.

He
he (4498)

tiken

e,

he ya'uki ttan llkhf
he kie sse ll^ou
le

sse Iku

hha

he

li/ke, ti e,

ya'udddro, 6 llneiii-ta
( )

||;^oull;^ou,*

llkha sse Iku
Ikilki

llnau

6 ha

ssa,

ha
sse

sse
Ini

Iku ssi,

llgaiie

yaudddro

;

ha ^auki

yaudddro, 6 ha ssa

;

ha
)

sse Iku ssa, llgaue Ikilki ha.
i
;

(4499)
1
;

He,

Ik'e

l«kua

(

Ikui-sse,
i,

he he

llkdii Ikui-sse,

he he

Iki ssa jkiii-sse,
jkiii-sse,
T.

6 llkiionna-ka llwke, hd he
IjJ^amka-lnuyo llnau,
hari

jkaugen

He

(4500) lliikogen
jkiii-sse,

lla,

(

)

laityi a, laityi sse like, llkau llkho,

6

ha lauwi

llkha, o llkh|ii Ikhai Ihin ssa, ti e,

(4501) yaudddro ssin jkhaa Ihin ssa he.
(4497')
*
l|nein-ta

He ha

li^ikeya

(

)

llxouHxw.

YOUNG MAN CARRIED OFF BY
things which
(
)

LION.

185

the people

must

roll

him up

in,

(4494)

(in order) that the lion should not get him.

And

the people did so

;

the people rolled

him

U])

and also (in) harteheest-skins, which they rolled together with the mats. ( ) For, the man was (4495) the one who had spoken thus to them about it therefore it was that they rolled him up ia harteheestin mats,*
;

skins,

while they
( )

felt that

their hearts'

young man
to eat.

(he) was,

whom

they did not wish the lion

(4496)

Therefore, they intended to hide
lion should not get hold of him.

him

well, that the

For, a

young man

whom

they did not a little love ( ) he was. Therefore, (4497) they did not wish the lion to eat him ; and they said that they would cover over the young man with the
hut's sheltering bushes,! so that the lion,

came, should come seeking about for the young
it

should not get hold of the
;

when it (4498) man young man, when it
(
)
;

came

it

should come seeking about for him.
( )

And

the people went out to seek for
;

Ucm-sf^d
;

(iidQ)

[an edible root] and they dug out \km-ssS and they brought (home) \km-ssS, at noon, and they bakedj
XJiui-ss^.

And an
wood
(
)

old

Bushman,

as

he went along

getting

for his wife, in order that his wife (4600)

might make a
as the lion

fire

above the

\kui-sse^^ espied the lion,

came over (the top of the hill), at the place which the young man had come over. And he told it and he spoke, he said: (4501) ( ) the house folk about
;

* Many mats.
t

The

screen or shelter of the hut.
it.

The narrator uses the word (4497')

scherm for

has been previously heated, J In a hole in the ground, which and which is covered over with earth when the IMi-sse has been

put into
§
i.e.

it.

on the top of the earth with which the hole had been

covered over.

;

186

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

llnSn-ta jk'e a
Ikii
e,

;

he ha ku-kkui, han l«ke: "
Ike a,

U kan
ha

llwkoeii ll^aS

ha

Ina ttss'i, ti Ike,
ti e, (
)

(4502) yauddoro, ha ssin jkhai Ihin ssa he,
Ikuei u, I."

he-g Ine

He, yaudddro
yaiiki a llkha sse

;^oa
le

ku-kkui, han l«ke
;

:

"

U k6o

sse

sse llnein

u

sse Iku jkou tte ya,

o ha yavki sse llnein."

(4503)

(

)

He,
;

jk'e juhai llkhwaillkhwai, i;

he he jken

lla

llkha, i

he he l^ai

llkha,

i

;

llkhan yaiiki

ka ha

Ikuki,

o jk'^ten kki-ssan

Ij^ai

ya.
:

(4504)

He
auwi

Iniitarra

kko ku-kkui, han l»ke
jkhwa, llkh|
d<5a

" Ddoa

(

)

llkha

a,

sse

ttaiya

hi a."

llkha ku-kkui,

han

Iwke,

ha ^auki +kauwa jkhwa
ha
ssin
( )

(4605)

ta,

ha

Ikii

+kauwa

jkui a,
;

tt'alta

lia

tsa;^aiten-ka Ikhw^tye

ha
\^ke

Ikii a,
:

ha +kauwa ha.
;^a

He
l;^a-i,

!k'e kii-kkditen

"

U

dd^
ii

tte

yogen

6 llkha? he

ii

^auki ddda ka

Ikha llkha?"

(4506)

(

)

He

Iniiyo kkg, kii-kkui,
!gi;^a
;

han l«ke: "TJ ^a >au

ddda

llwkoeri, ti e,
1

ddda e?

Ha
Ikii

^auki ta ha

Ikiiken, o

l;^ai

ya

ta,

ha ddda

jgwarra o jkui

(4507)

a,

(

)

ha

ssin

hhoa ha."
a, llkha a,

!k'6-ten

l^^gen

jkauken; llkhan ^auki
;

tkaliwa jkaiiken e
lliikoenllwkoeii,
j(Vi

\k'e

l^ugen a ha, a he

ta,

ha

Ikii

he.

(4508)

(

)

!k'e-ten l^a-i Ik'e-ten

ha

;

6 ha llgaue jkui, ha sse
Ik'dten

Ini

Ikui,

lya-i

ha.

kail

Ibke

:

" Ine

(Idda Iki ssou i hi a, !guatten-ta-llkhaiten, i-g Ine

ddda

: ;

TOtJNG

MAN CARRIED

OFF BY LION.

187

"

Te

are those wlio see the hill yonder, its top, the
(-where) that

place yonder

young man came

over,

what
"

(

) it

looks like

"
!

(4502)
;

And

the young man's mother spoke, she said

Ye must

not allow the lion to come into the huts *
it

ye must shoot
the huts."
(

dead,

when

it

has not (yet) come to

)

And

they went to meet the lion
at the lion
;

the people slung on their quivers; and (4503) and they were shooting
;

the lion would not die, although the
it.

people were shooting at

And
( )

another old

woman
us."

spoke, she said:

"Ye

must

give to the lion a child, (in order) that the lion (4504)

may go away from
that
it

The
it

lion answered, it said
;

did not want a child

for,
(

it

person whose eyes' tears
the one

had

)

licked

wanted the he was (4505)
;

whom

it

wanted.
:

And

the (other) people speaking, said

" In what

manner were ye shooting at the lion that ye could And another old (4506) not manage to kill the lion?" ( ) man spoke, he said: "Can ye not see that (it) must
be a sorcerer?
it

It will not die

at it; for, it insists

when we are shooting upon (having) the man whom ( )(4507)
;

carried off."

The people threw children to the lion the lion did not want the children which the people threw to it for, it, looking, left them alone. The people were shooting t at it, while it (4508) ( )
sought for the man, that it might get hold of the man, the people were shooting at it. The people

f The narrator explains here that several huts were in a row The lion must not the mother means all the huts, not merely one. come into the werf{= " yard ", or " ground ").
;

f

They wanted

to shoot

him dead, before he could

find the

man.

;

188

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
) ttii

(4509) Ikha Ikam

(

llkha."
;

!k%n

l^a-i

M, han

ya'uki

ywan

!k'e

llkuan

Ij^S-i lia

hm llkeh-i ha, 6 !guatten-taHan
yauki

llkhalten,

6 hin kii sse llkdn Ikha ha.
( )

(4510) ywgii

!k'e llkuaii llkdn-i

ha

;

ta,
Ikii

ha Iku ddd| llg^g
+kaiiwa yaudddro
;

yaudddro
a,

;

ban

Ikii li/ke, ti e,

ha

ha ssm ha
( )

tt'aita

ha tsa^aiten-ka
ha.

jlthw^ten. *

ha Iku

(4511)

a,

+kauwa

Han

llgwai Ikiiriiwa Ik'e a llneillnei, o

han
:

llgwai-a

llgaue ^audddro.

He

jk'e

ku-kkui-ten
( )

li/ke

"U

^a

(4512) yati dd<^
Ikauken
liike
:

ll^ko^eri, ti e,

llkha

yauki dd6| ka, ha ha

e, i

ddda a-a ha a he

? "

He
ti

lk'6
e,

ku-kkui-ten
.Igi^S

"

TJ ;^a

^au
( ) i

dd^

lli^koen,

Ukuan
au
sse

(4513) ddd| e

? "

He

Ik'eku-kkuiten l^ke

:

" Ine

dd^
^au

llkha a, jkuil^,

sse ll^koeii, ti e,

llkha Inu

ha ha, ha
(4514)
(

sse ttai."
i

Ilkhan )'aiiki
jkui, a,

+kauwa
ssin

Ikuila; ta,

)

llkha Iku
Ikii a,

tkaiiwa

ha

ddda hhda ha

ha

ha +kauwa ha.
ku-kkui, hin Iwke, he yaiiki +en-na
( )

He

!k'e

ti

e,

(4515) he sse Ikuei

Ikue,

he sse ddi

llkha, i; ta,
Iki

jgaiie llkhaii
llnau,

llkuan ddda a, he

ssiii

ddda lya
;

llkha a

;

(4516) ya'uki ddda ka, ha Ikuki

ta,

ha ddda Iku
also given here.

(

)

* The word \hhuityK was

; :

YOUNG MAN CARRIED OFF BY
said:

LION.

189

kill ( )
it

must bring for us assegais, we must The people were shooting at it (4509) did not seem as if the people were shooting at it
* the lion."
;

"Ye

they were stabbing f it with assegais, while they intended to stab it to death. It did not seem as if the people were stabbing ) it ; for, it continued (4510) ( to seek for the young man it said that it wanted
;

the

young man whose

tears

it

had licked

;

he was the
(4511)

one

whom

it

(

)

wanted.

It scratched asunder,

breaking to pieces for the
scratched asunder, seeking

people the huts, while
for the

it

young man.

And

the people speaking, said
will not eat the (4512) ( ) given to it?" And the

"Can ye
children

not see that the lion

whom we have
speaking,
(it)

people
sorcerer

said

:

"

Can ye not

see that

a

must
"

speaking, said:
that

be?" Te must

And

(

)

the

people (4513)

give a girl to the lion,
will not eat her,

that
girl
;

we may see whether the Hon it may go away." J The lion
for,
( )

did not want the

man whom it (4514) he was the one whom it wanted. And the people spoke, they said, they did not know in what manner they should ( ) act towards (4515) the lion for, it had been morning § when they
the lion only wanted the
;

had carried

off

;

shot at

the lion

;

the lion would not die

;

for,
it

it

had,

(

)

when

the people were shooting at

it,

had (4516)

kill the lion,

* As their arrows did not seem able to reach a spot which would they thought that they might do better with their
j-

The narrator

explains that some threw assegais

;

others stabbed
;

the lion with them.

The people were all round it but it did not bite them, because it wanted the young man whom it had carried off. have eaten her at the houses. I The lion would not late, and they had been shooting at the lion since the § It was now morning, and did not know what they should now do to get rid of it.

190

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
ha,

!k'e
e, i

l;^;a-i

Mil

Iku ddqa ttaiya ttin.
ti
e,
i

"

He

tiken
i

yauki +en.-na
i.

sse-g Ine Ikuei Ikue,
i

ddi

(4517)

llkhl,

Ta, jkaukeii

e,

a-a llkha

(

)

a he, llkhan

Iku ddoa Igwirra, 6

[km
hA

a,

ha ssin ddqa hhoa ha."
"Ine l«ke yu yaiiddbro
kki-ssa ilkainya yauddoro,

He
(4518) j(oa
a,

!k'e kii-kkuiten l«ke:

ha-g

Ine llnau,

(

)

ha-g Ine
o

Iki Ihih

yauddbro, ha-g Ine a llkha a yauddbro,
6.

ha

li-ka
(

Ikhwa kki ssa
) ti e, llkoin

Ta, ha llkuan Iku
le,

a,

(4519) ll^koeh,

llkuan

o llkhan

ll;^e

Iki i;

llkhan yaiiki ta

ha

ttai,

^u
Ine

ttu i; ta,

ha

Ikii

ddda

Igwarra, o yaudddro."

(4520)

He

yauddoro ytk llkuan

(

) a,

ku-kkui, han l«ke:

" IF ian, llkuan In^ sse a llkha
ya'uki a llkha sse

n-ka Ikhwa, u sse
n-ka jkhwa

hha h-ka jkhwa, llkha sse ttaiya
;

(4521) ttin

He, ta,

u

sse ( ) lldia llkau tte ha, o

ha
(4522)

sse Ikuken, llkeiike,

n-ka jkhwa; ha

sse Ikuken,

ilkauttin

n-ka jkhwa."
)

He
ha

jk'e llkuan Ine llnau, (

6 yauddbro j^oa-ken ka
Ihiii

Ikuei kkii, jk'^ten Ine Iki
e,

yauddoro, 6 jkw'a
yauddoro,
i,

ttu-ttu

he
a
(

ssiii

ttemmi

le

ttS

hiii

(4523)

llkuaii Ine

) llkha a yauddoro.
I
;

He

llkha Ine ttss'i

Ikhi yauddoro,

jk'^ten llnau,

ha

ttss'ia Iki,
i

yauddoro,
Ine

Ik'eten lya-i

ha; Ik'^ten
i.

llkdh-i

ha; he ha llkuan

(4524)

(

) ttss'i

Ikhi yauddoro,

He
a,
(

llkha ku-kkui, haii
llkuaii a,

Iwkeya

jk'e a, ti e, llwke
;

a

ha
a,

ha
)

In^ sse

Ikuken a

ta,
;

ha

llkuaii Ina

1525) jkui
Ina

ha
!

ssiii (

ddda

llgaue Iki

ha

haii llkuaii Ine

ha

He ha
tta; hail

llkuaii Ine Ikuken,

i,

6 Ikui-ten

II

va Ikmiiken

M^am Ikuken

tta,

hi jkui.

; ;

YOUNG MAN CARRIED OFF BY
been walking about.
in

LION.

191

" Therefore,

we do
lion, (

not

know
For,

what manner we

shall act towards the lion.

the children
carried off."

whom we

gave to the

)

the lion (4517)
it

has refused, on account of the

man whom
:

had

" Say ye to the young man's mother about it, that she must, ( ) (4518) although she loves the young man, she must take

And

the people speaking, said

out the young man, she must give the young
to the lion,

man

even if he be the child of her heart. For, she is the one who sees ( ) that the sun is (4519) about to set, while the lion is threatening us; the for, it insists upon lion will not go (and) leave us (having) the young man." And the young man's mother ( ) spoke, she said (4520) " Te may give my child to the lion; ye shall not
;
:

allow the lion to eat

my my

child;

that the lion
( )

may
it

go walking about;

for,
it

ye shall
child."

killing

lay

(4521)

upon
it

my

child; that

may

die, like

my

child; that

may

die,

lying upon
(
)

the young man's mother (4522) had thus spoken, the people took the young man
the people,

And

when

out from the hartebeest-skins
rolled
lion.

in

which they had
to the (4523)

him

up, they gave

(

)

the young

And

the lion bit the

man young man to

death;

the people,

when it was biting at the young man, were shooting at it the people were stabbing it and it ( ) bit the young man to death. (4524) And the lion spoke, it said to the people about it, that this time was the one at which it would die for, it had got hold of the man for whom it had
;

(

)

been seeking
it

;

it

had got hold

of

him

!

(4525)
;

And

died, while the

man

also lay

dead

it

also

lay dead, with the man.

;

192

SPECIMENS OF BU8HMAK FOLKLORE.

Y.— 49. L.

A WOMAN OF THE EAELY EACE AND
THE EAIN BULL.
{Dictated, in 1878, ly Ihan+kass'o,

who hemrd

it

from

kit

mother, Ixabbi-ai.)

(7434)

jkhod kan ha 6a

llhaita jkuf la,

au Ikuildken Una Wneih
jkhodgen
;

au han

tatti,

ha Iku jnaunko

ttan.
i

Ine Iku
( )

(7435) jkhou ha, he !kh9a Ine iku
Ine

Ihiii,

au tfken
Ikuei

hd

Ikorowa.*

He, ha hd
llhaita

Ind

Iku

Iki,

han

llhaiten ssa,

au han
Iku
ta,

Ikuila,

au

Ikuila Iwkwai.
ssk,
)

Hah hd
au Inuih

Ine

Ikuei

Iki,

hah

Ik'dtten
(

au

(7436) jkuildken ha
;

au hah

Ine jkann luhita

jkhwa

hah
hd,

Ine ta. Ine Iku Ikhou ta

He, ha

au Ikhoa Iwkwai, au
e,

tiken In^ ta !kah,f au tfken tdtti
Iki

ha ttuttu e

Ine

jhah ti;

h^J

e,

ha

Ine llkh(5e h(5 ssa hi,

hih Ine

llk^llk^ya

Ikhumm.
jkuila
;

(7437)

(

)

He
r

h4

Ine iku ta ha,

au hah Iku-g

Ine

Ikou Ikhe ssa

au hah llkabbe ta ha.
__

He

Ikuila

ha
»

Ine Iku louwi ha,§

au hah
jk'eten
Iki

ttdi ll^i ssa ha,
Iku
ti,

au

llneih
ke,
;

(7435')
ti

* llkellkeya
e,

Ikhumm.

Ikulida, hin

+kakka

Ikhoa ttuttu ha ka
ttin,

Ihan
ss'o.

au ha Ine Ixkud Ihin

ha

ine

hda

Ikhuinm a Ine
llkuaii
e,
e.

(7436')

t jkhQa

li/kwSi
;

Ik'eten

tatti,

ha

'wkw^ yauki

ttwaitfn llkd hi
\

hin
e,

jk'e ta, hi ta

jkan.

Ha ttuttugfn
e.

ha jne jlkhoe ho

ssa hi.

(7437')

§ -^^ llkuan Iku Ilk6||keya xo^O) au

han

tatti e,

Ikhoa enen

Iku

WOMAN AND RAIN

BULL.

193

v.— 49.
L.

A WOMAN OF THE EARLY EACE AND
THE EAIN BULL.
wliile the

The Eain formerly courted (?) a young woman, (7434) young woman was in (her) hut, because she felt that she was still ill. The Eain scented

her,

and the Eain went forth, on account of it; while the place ( ) became misty.* And he, in (7435) this manner, courting (?) came, while he courted (?) the young woman on account of her scent. He in this manner trotting came; whUe the young woman was lying down, while she held (her) ( ) child (7436) (by her) on the kaross; she was lying down.

she lay, smelling the Eain's scent, while the place was fragrant, | while the place felt that his
(the Eain's) breath

And

place;
it

it

was that which closed in the was that J through which he coming passed;

resembled a mist.
(

) And the young woman became aware of him, (7437) he came up while he lowered his tail (?). And the young woman perceived him, § as he came past her, at the side of the hut. And the young woman

as

;

* Eesembling a fog (or mist). The people spoke thas, they /b^ocjn ' me that the Eain's breath was wont to shut in the place, ' when he came out to seek food (while) he was eating about, the mist was " sitting " there.
said to
;

The people say that there f The Eain's scent it was. scent as sweet, hence the people say that it is fragrant.
X His breath
§

is

no/iriggn

He

is that through which he passing comes. resembled a bull, while he felt that (he) was the Eain's (7437')

body.
that a bull

^

The word x^" ^° {x^" ff^i^^)

means an ox; but the narrator explained is meant here.

;

194

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(7438) llkd^u.

He
ti

jkuil^
a,

ha

Ine kiii:

" [kui
haii

a,

(

)

ta ^a
Ine

y&a

ss'o

ddda

ggauwa n?" au

ha Iku-g

Ik'oe *

jkhe ssa.f

Ikuildken Iku Ine igoihm Ihih ssa, jkuilaken Iku-g
Ine llkou juhi llkho
lla

ssa a ^u.
)

He

jkuila

ha

Ine

(7439) kkdiin

lii

;

he

Ikuila (

h^
lla

Ine llkei juhi llkho

a x^

Ikuilaken Ine +ka Iho Ihin

ha; he Ikuila ha Ine hh6

Inuin

;

jkuila Ine llhih
Ine

Ikwe ha.
Ine Ikann Ine jkann Ine Ik6

Ikmlaken ha
(7440)
kiii

akken

llwei

jkhwa

h6 Ikhwa, ± Ikuilaken Ikuilaken ( ) hd
;

kui dkken llwei luhi
te
lla

tte

Ikhwa au Inuih, han

jkhwA. §
;

i.||

Hah Ine llkalten jkhoa he jkhoa Ine Iki jk'u lid ha, Han ha Ine lla hah hd llwkoehya Ilk au ©hoken.
;

(7441) He,

(

)

ha h4
lid

Ine

lla,

hah ha

Ine kiii,

hah l«ke

:

"

A
lla

koa

sse

Oho

Ike tan

ssudhya kd ha.
Ihaihm
(7438')
ha
•f

Ta,

jkhe, ha jkuiya, a h-ka tfken-tiken ttaii

sse
;

a sse

lla,

ssuehya ke ha."
e,

Hd

tiken
i;

e,

jkhoa ha
tatti,

*

Ha
Au Ha

jnujnimtu llkuaii 6; he

ha kokoa,

au han

|k'oeya.
hail tatti,

ha llkuan jku-g
6a |ku ta

Ine jkaun Ikhe

Hnein
tatti,

tt&.

(7439') (7440')

t

||ku§iL ss'o
;

gwai jkhwa, au han
lla, l|a.

ha

llkuan.

ya'uki sse jk'ou ddi jga, au
ha, §
(
)

ta,

ha Iku jk'ou-wa
lie

Ha,

||a,

han Iku
a,

||an

jkhoa ka,

ts|xuken, ts|x;uken a ddga

ha Ihin

han Uhaiten Ma.

Au
Au

Ijnein.
jja

Han
,

jku te ya, au han +i,

ti e,

ha llkuan Iku

sse

Ikuken,
II

ddi jga.

jkhoagen
a,

tatti e,

jkhoa llkuan ddga

lla,

jkhoa-ka Hnein,
Ine

tsa^uken

ha Ihin ha.

He

tiken

e,

jkulla

kui,

ha

lla

ssuenya ha.

(7441')

jk'eten ijikakken,
ts|j5;uken,

ti

e,

jkhoa-ka xoro Iku-g Ine ihin, au ha-ka
llkb, i
e,
;

he tsap^uken ine

au han

tatti e,
llko,
i.

jkhga Ine Ihin,

jkhga-ka xoro.

H^

ti

hin

tsgxiiken Ine

"WOMAN AND RAIN BULL.
exclaimed:
to

195

"Who

can. this

man
(?) *,

(

)

be who comes (7438)

came up.f The young woman took up buchu in her hand, the
his forehead.

me

? " while he, crouching

young woman threw buchu upon
she arose
;

And
down (7439)
she

and she

(

)

pressed (the buchu)

upon

his

forehead (with

her hand)

;

she pushed
;

him away;
tied it on.

and she took up (her) kaross

The young woman took up the
child very nicely
laid the child
;

child, J she
(it)

held the

she, (

)

holding
;

very nicely, (7440)
(it),

down upon a

kaross

she, covering

laid the child § away.

She mounted the Rain; and the Eain took her
away.||

She went along

;

she went along looking

at the trees.

And

(

)

she

said

:

" Thou must
is

she went along, she spoke, (7441) go to the tree standing

yonder, the one that

big, thou shalt go (and) set
;

me down
felt that

at

it.

For I ache

thou shalt

first

go to

* His ears (they) were; those which he laid down; while he/'743^'\ he crouched (?). f "While he felt that he stood in front of the opening of the hut. I She seems to have laid the child away for (her) hushand; (7439') while she felt that she was not going to live for, she would living go, go, go, go, she would go to hecome a frog, for ( ) the Eain (7440 ') intended that she should go to the water pit, that water pit from which he went forth, he com-tiag (?) went. She laid it down, while she thought that she § At the hut. should die, (and) go to become a frog. "While the Rain felt that the Eain was going to the Eain's (7440') home, the pit from which he came out. Therefore, the young woman said he should go to let her sit down. The people say that the Eain's Bull goes out from his pit, and (7441') the pit becomes dry, while it feels that the Eain has gone out, the Eain's Bull. Therefore, the pit dries up on account of it.
;
II

196

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
llkhou llkua jkhe
lid

(7442) ine jk'dtten
IkuOT-iten.*
IkuCTriten.
lk(5

(

)

ha,

au Ikuerritenlla

He, ha hd

Ine Ik'dtten Ikhe

IkuOT-itensse \\^k\
lk<5

He
Oho

Ikuila
lu."
lu.

hd

Ine

kui

:

"A
ha ha

kod

ssin
(

lie

H^

ti hifi e,

Ine ll«ki
;

(7443) ssin

) Ilk

©h6

jkuilaken ha ll»kodn ha

jkui-

laken Ine
tiken
e,

Igomm

Ihin ask,

ha

Ine
i.

jguru f ha.

H^

jkhoa Iku-g Ine Opuoin,
e,

Hd
han

tlken

ha ha
(

linau,
)

han

lli:;koen ti e,

Ikhoa Ine

(7444) Opuoin, ha Ine Iku
Ine

ilkaiten,

han

Ine Iku

kkwa

ui,

Iku

Ilkaiten,

han

Ine

Iku

jnabba

Ilkaiten

Ikuerriten-lkuerriten.

He, ha ha

Ine Ikii
Ha,

kan

llkhoe,

han
(7445)
(

Ine Iku Ikuei Iki,

han kkwa-kkwd

au jkhodgen

)

Iku
;

Opuoinya.

Hah

Ine Ine

Iku
Iku

kah kkwd-kkwa
jkho
a
tss'i,

jkuiten

au !kh9agen ha
tatti, ti-g Ine

au

jkhoagen

kkuerre.
ui,

Hah
(7446) Ine Iku
llhaiten

Ine Iku
ttai

kkoah
lla

haii Ine Iku ttai ui

;

haii
e,

Ikam
hi;

(

)

!kh9a-ttu-llkai, e
+i,

ddda

ha

Ihih

au haii ka hah

jkuil^ jkanha,

ha

llkou ss'o ha.
lla

Hah

Ine Iku

lii,

hah
Ife,

Ine Iku ttai

Ikam
(7447)
(7442') (7443')
( )

jkhoa.
lla,

Haii Ine Iku

llah

au jkuildken
;

Iku

hah

Ine Iku llah like Ikilki ssa

au hah

*

Qht

a jkuiya ha llkuai

e.

t llkuaii

Iguguobbo

ha.
hi.

Au

tchuen llkowa, hin Iku jguru
i.

He

ti

hin

e,

hi Ine ta, hi

Iguru hi,

Au

tchuen ya

||ka, hi

koa

Ine ta, hi !gwl hi.

WOMAN AND RAIN
set

BULL.

197

me down

at it."

Therefore, the Eain trotted,

(

)

(7442)

taking her straight to the \IcuSrnten-\kuirriten*

And
the

he trotted up

to the \kuSrriten-\kuirrifen.

And

young woman
close to the

Thou must go underneath, Therefore, he went underneath, close ( ) to the stem of the tree. The (7443) young woman looked at him; the yoimg woman took out buchu, she rubbed him (with it).f Then
said
:

"

stem of the tree."

the Eain went to sleep, on account of
Therefore,
( )

it.

when

she saw that the Eain slept, she

climbed up, she stole softly away, she climbed (7444)
she climbed along
(?)

up,

the

\ku^rriten-\kuirriten.

And

she descended at a distance, she in this manner

stole softly alongj

while the Eain

(

)

continued to (7445)
;

sleep.

She, afar, softly returned

Eain awoke behind her back, felt was becoming cool. He arose, he walked away; he went away to ( )(7446) the middle of the spring (?) from which he had courting (?) gone out, while he believed that the young woman was still sitting upon his back. He went away, he went away to the water. He went into (it), while the young woman ( ) went along, she (7447) went to burn buchu while she was " greea ", while
that the place
;

home while when the Rain

the

* It

is

a large tree, which

is

found in kloofs.
is,

(^

<

4:44

)

The
a
'

singular form of \huirriten\kifirriten

{hah^kass'a says,

\lcui\h'uirri.

red

'

It is the name of a bush found in the ravines of mountain, on this side of Kenhardt, called Kooiberg by

the white men.
t

(YIII.— 21, p. 7835.) Eubbed his neck (with buchu). With dry things they rub. Therefore, they

/"r^^on

(7445
are

)

wont

to say

that they rub with them.
If

things are wet, they are wont to say that they anoint

with them.

198

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE,
Ine Ikdinya,*

ha Iku-g

au han ha ka +ka f au llkhou

Iwkwai, han Ine Iku Iguru Ikilkl ha, au

han

jgiiru

Ikam

ui llkhou

l!:/kwai, aii

ha.

(7448)

Indlnutatten ( } e ssin Iwkua, hin e Ine ssan llkei
llkoro,

au hin

ta, llkoro liikwai sse Man,

Ikhoa sse ^auki

lua'iten hi.t

Y.— 41.
JB.

IKUIIA-GA
(^Related,

KKUMM;

jGA-KA KKUMM.
it

in December,

1874, by Ikwe'iten ta liken, who heard
her mother, 4:kamme-an.)

from

(3942)

Ikuila,

ha 6a

jko'uken tta

;

han

tta.

Han

^auki ta
tta.

hhi ha, ha j(^(5aken-ggu a a ha ^

hi.
;

Hah
hin
e,

jkouken

Han
(3943)
(

Ikii

Iki

jkwaka jkauken

ha hi ha
iya,

hi.

)

Ha

^oaken-ggiiken yauki +enna,
i
;

ti e,

ha

Iki

jkwaka jkauken,

hin

e,

ha hi hi
hi.
ll^e.
(

;

han

^aiiki

ta hi

ha jj^oaken-ggd ta a ha a

(3944)

Ha

^o^ken

Una.

Hin

Ikua

)

Hin

kui,

* The word \kainya can mean 'yellow', 'green',
'bright', or 'shining'.

'light blue',

(7447')

t

iiaa.

Ha-ha

lv:^kwai

Iku

t,

e tan llkhou.

llkhou llku^n |ku e jkhoa-

ka tchuei.

(7448')

X

Ha-ka llkuakkaken
Ine

e

ha ddi akken Ikhoa,
!
;

i,

h6
la

e,

Ik'e-ta

ku Iku-g ku
ddi jga.

llkoiiken

jkdujkoiiuken,

he 6a

sse

jkhe,

ka

; ;

THE girl's stoey; the frogs' story.
she smelt strongly * of the scent of the Wkhou

199

;

she

was rubbing

herself,

while she rubbed, taking away

the smell of the Wkhou from herself.

The

old

women

(

)

who had been out seeking food (7448)
to

were those who came
that the

burn horns, while they

desired that the smell of the horns should go up, so

Rain should not be angry with them.f

Y.— 41.

THE

GIEL'S STORY;
girl

THE FROGS' STORY.
ill
;

she was lying down. (3942) She did not eat the food which her mothers % gave

A

formerly lay

She lay ill. She killed the children of the Water § they were what she ate. ( ) Her mothers did not know that (3943) she did thus, (that) she killed the Water's children (that) they were what she ate she would not eat what her mothers were giving to her. Her mother was there. They went out to seek Bushman rice. ( ) They spoke, they ordered a (3944)
her.
;

;

||

(7447') Her own scent it was which, resembled (that of) the Wkhou. The Wkhou (possibly a fungus ?) is a thing belonging to the Raia. ( Her (the young woman's) intelligence was that with which ('7448')
she acted wisely towards the Eain hence they would (otherwise) have been killed; have become frogs.
;

* To smell strongly.

all

the people lived

all (of

them) would

\ That is to say, her mother and the other women. § \kweiten ta Wken has not seen these things herself, but she

(3942')

heard that they were beautiful, and striped like a

\hdl)la, i.e.

zebra.

The Water was
II

as large as a bull, and the "Water's children were the size of calves, being the children of great things. All the women, and all the children but one.

(3943')

;;

200

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
llnallna
llnSft,
kiii,
i

Mil l«ke, jkhwa

;

Ikullaken
llii^koeri,

yauki
tchuen

+enna Ikhwa.
e, lia

He
.

Inutarra

M

llka^ai hi hf
Ikua,
e,
i.

He,

lie

a jkhwa llneillnS llnein
(
)

(3945) he

he

HiA

kfe,

jkhwa

sse

ll»koen,

tchuen

ha

llka^ai hi hi.
i,

Ilka;^ai Ihin,

au jkaukenka

llnSii,

jk'ai

;^hwarra,

au hail ka, ha
(3946)
lineiii
;

sse Ika

!kwa-0pua,
(

ll^a.

jkhwaii leta

aii haii

ya'uki +eiina

)

jkhwa.
ssa
\j(SxL3i

He, ha

llah

Iki

jkwa-Opua, ha

Ikatnmain-ti
;

jkwa-Opua 6 !kwa-Opuaka
ll;^a,

llnSri.
eii

jkhwaii llwkoen
hi,
i
;

h^ ha
;

;

he ha
)

hd ha

tteii, i

he ha
tten,
;

Mail tteii
tatti,

(3947) au

(

haii lli/ko'enya.

He, ha

llaii

i,

au haii
tten,
i.

ha ha kkuita.
He, ha ^oa
(3948)
i
;

Ikhwaii liykoenya
jkiiiten ssa,
Iki
i.

he ha

jkhwa +kakka ha
( )

;^oa,

ta,

ha llkd^ai Han
kiii:
i

tcha a aken o [kwa.
^."

He,

ha ^oa
tkakken,

"jkwa-Opua
ll;^a,

He, ha
6
ll;i^e.

;^oa

yauki

;

han

ha Ikua

ttai,

He

jkhwa Iku-g
ssa.

llnau,

haii

Ikua
haii

ttiii,

Ikudkaken
:

(3949) iku IhiA
e yauki

He, ha

ku-kiii,
;

l«ke

(

)"Tf
Ine
Iki

aken 6-g

llnein
i.

ta,

llgollgo
tf

Ikii-g

Ikam
llnein.

ssa,

6 j^hwarra,
ti

Ta,

yaiiki ddi
line

dkka o-g
Ikam
lla

H^

hin
(

e,

llgollgo

Iku-g

Iki Iki

(3950) o xhwirvsL,

i."

)

Tati,

ha 0pua;^ai

jkwaka

THE

girl's story;

the progs' story.

201

child * to remain at home.

The

girl did not

know
that

(about) the

child.

And

the old

woman
;

said

she must look at the things which her elder sister
ate.

And
out

they
to
(

left

the child at

went

seek
)

food

home f and they (Bushman rice). They
should look at the (3945)
of illness,

intended

(?)

that the

child

things which her elder sister ate.

The
to kill

elder sister

went out from the house

(and) descended to the spring, as she iatended again a Water-child.
hut,:J:

The (Bushman)
girl)

child

was

in

the

while she (the

did

not

know

(about)

(

)

the child.
child

And

she went (and) killed (3946)

a Water-child, she carried the Water-child home.

was looking and she (the girl) boiled the Water-child's flesh; and she ate it; and she lay down; and she again went to lie down, while ( ) she (the child) beheld her. And she went (3947) to lie down, when she felt that she had finished eating. The child looked at her and she lay down. And her mother returned. The child told her mother about it; for her elder sister had gone to kill a handsome thing at the water. And her (3948) ( ) mother said: "It is a Water- child " And her mother did not speak about it; she again went out
;
;
!

The (Bushman)

to seek for

Bushman

rice.

And when
"Something
is is

she was seeking about for food, the

clouds came up.
is

And

she spoke,

she said

:

(

)

(3949)

not right at home; for a whirlwind

bringing (things) to the spring.
not going on well at home.
is

For something
)(3950)
(3944') (3945')

Therefore, the whirl(

wind

taking (things) away to the spring."

*

A little girl,

as big as a

f Literally,

"allowed" her

European child of to remain there.

11.

t In her mother's hut.

;

202
jkauken.

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Tiken
i.

e,

llgollgo
e,

Ikii-g Ine

Iki

Ikam

lla

hi

6 ^hwarra,
llnSn,
i,

Ti

tti

yauki ddi +hannuwa, au

ta,

ha Opua^ai
llgollg5
Iki

Ikwe'iten Iki

jkwaka
aii

jkaiiken.
i.

(3951)

(

)

Tiken
tatti,

6,

Ikam

lla

he

;^hwdrra,

Hiii

ha Opua^ai
Iki
) Iki

Iki

jkwaka jkaiiken; tiken
i;

4,

llgollgo

Ine
(

Ikam

lla

he au ^hwdrra,

au hail

(3952)

tatti,

ha

jkwaka
le

ikaiiken.

jkuild,

a mmaii, ha
i.

^hwdrra; he

e,

ha
le

ikii-g Ine

ddi

!ga,

Ha

;^9aken-ggii, hih Ihoii, hiii
;

;^hwarra
)

(3953)

llgollgo

Ikii-g Ine Iki ssa he, i

aii haii (

Ikweiten
;^oaken6,

Iku leta ^hwdrra.
ggii ssan Wx^ra a
Iki ssa he,

Han
ke ddi

Ikii-g Ine e !ga.

Ha

jga, i

;

o llgollgo Iku-g Ine
llgollgo

au hin Una
o j^hwdrra,

!kaii;^ii;
aii

Iku-g Ine

Iki

(3954) ssa he
Ine

(

)

ha 0pua;^ai
Ikii-g

Ikwe'iten Ikii
jga.

leta

^hwarra.

Haii

Ine
;

e

He ha

;^oaken-ggii Ikii-g Ine jhou, hin ssa

llgollgogen Ikii-g

(3955) Ine

^,

Iki

ssa he, i;

aii
Ikii

hin
leta

Ikii

Una Ikau^ii.
;

(

)

Au

ha 0pud,;^aiten

^hwarra

han Iku-g

Ine i !ga.

Ha

(5aken

llj^ain

Ikii-g
i,

Ine

ssaii

ddi

jga

;

tdti,

llgollgo Iki ssa

ha

oa,

au

haii kaii Una |kau;^ii, aii
hi.
( )

(3956) ^hwdrra,

ti

e,

ha 0pud;^ai Una

Ha

oaka

jnwa, he Ikii-g
i
;

Ine Ilk6a-ken Ik'agen Ihiii
Ikii-g

^hwdrra,

au

llgollgo jkdrri

Ine Iki ssa

he o ^hwdrra.
;

Hail
(3957) hail
Iki

Ikii-g ine Hxaiii
(

ddi jga llk(5a-ken

hd

taii laityi,

)

llx^m Ikii-g Ine ddi jga; 6 han tati

llgollgo

ssa he, o

^hwdrxa.

Hi-ta tchwi-tchwi

Ikii

leya

THE girl's story; the frogs' story.

203

Because her daughter killed the Water's children, therefore the whirlwind took them away to the spring. Something had not gone well at home, for her daughter had heen killing the Water's children. That was why the whirlwind took them away (3951) ( ) to the spring. Because her daughter killed the Water's children, therefore the whirlwind took them away to the spring because she ( ) had killed the (3952) Water's children. The girl was the one who first went into the spring, and then she became a frog. Her mothers afterwards went into the spring the whirlwind brought them She (3953) to it, when she ( ) was already in the spring. was a frog. Her mothers also became frogs while the whirlwind was that which brought them, when they were on the hunting ground; the whirlwind brought them ( ) to the spring, when her daughter (3954) was already in the spring. She was a frog. And the whirlwind was her mothers afterwards came that which brought them to it, when they were on the hunting ground. ( ) Meanwhile their daughter (3955)
;
;

;

;

was

in the spring

;

she was a frog.

Her

father also

came

to

become a frog

;

for the

whirlwind brought her father when he was yonder on the hunting ground to the spring, (to) the place Her father's arrows * (3956) where his daughter was. ( )

altogether

grew out by the spring;
;

for the great

whirlwind had brought them to the spring.
altogether
also

He

also

became a frog likewise his wife, she ( ) (3957) became a frog while she felt that the whirlwind had brought them to the spring. Their things The entered that spring (in which) they were.
;

* All the family and tteir mats were carried into the spring, by (3956')
the whirlwind, and
all their things.

;

204

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
jf^hwarra,
tdti,
le

ha
(3958) hin

he

leta.

Tehuen
( )

Ikii

leya

ha j^hwarra,
Ine e, he-ta Ine f jga.

he Iku e
xhwarva,,

jga.
i
;

Hd

ti

hii

tchueh

au hin

tati,

he !ku-g
;

Ilkagen Ihih ^hwarra, llkellkeya jnwa
Ine Ik'agen

h^-ta tchuenyah

Ihm ^hwdrra,

I.

v.— 55.
z.

THE MAN
{Dictated, in

WHO ORDERED
Ixabbi-an.*)

HIS WIPE TO CUT OFF HIS EAES.
it

1878, Jy ihan+kass'o, who heard

from

his mother,

(7095)
ta,

Haf

llkuan

ha da

ka,

laiti Ikaiilkaii

ho,

ha jnujuuhtu,
Iha
;

ha llka-0pua
I

Ina ;^d,rra
i )

Iku

jyao

J

au ha

llka-0pua hah Iku

Ij^uh-a
laiti

ha Ilka-Opua
Ine

Ina.

(7096)

H^

ti

hin
;

e,

(

ha

Ika'ulka'u

hd
sse
i

lii
;

ha

jnujnuntii

au

la'itiken ta

ha

kkii,

ha ^auki

hah

a, Ine Ilka ssih.

H^
a,

ti

hin

e,

laiti

Ine

Ikaulkau ho, ha Inutauhtu
(
)

(7097) he, ha ha Ine

llkerri-i,

au ha

ttii

;

au ha-ha, ha au laitiken

ka

laiti i

;

ta,

ha Ilka-Opua
i

Ina ^arra Iku l^ao Iha Ina
;

au ha llka-0pudken Iku
^Xuii,

I^M-a, ha

ho

lii

Ikuken tssdroken.
this story

(7095')

* '^^^ narrator thinks that his mother had
father, Tsatsi
;

from her

and he probably from his own mother, Dderruken.
a,

f

N

llkuan

yaiiki +en-na
;

ha Ike;

ta,

[k'e
;

\ke

e,

ya'uki
e,

.'kwlya

ka ha

Ike

ta,
i.

Jxwe-ilna-ss'o-jke, ike Iku e

he tfkgn

hi

Bsin ddi llkan-ddi,
J

Hah

Iku

i

+i,

ti

e,

ha llkd-0pua Ina-ka ttd
e

e

6a; au ha

Ilka-Opua Ina-ka |kukak|n Iku

I^Oh

oii.

;

MAN WHOSE EARS WERE CUT

OFF.

205

things entered that spring, because they (the people)

were frogs. ( ) Therefore it was that their things (3958) went into the spring, because they were frogs. The mats * (grew) out by the spring, like the arrows their things grew outf by the spring.

THE MAN
He X

WHO

v.— 35. L. ORDEEED HIS WIFE TO
off

CUT OFF HIS EARS.
formerly wished (his) wife to cut
his (7095)

younger brother's head had surely been skinned § whereas his younger brother's wife had only shaved his younger brother's head.
ears, for his
;

Therefore,

(

)

(his)

wife

cut

away

his

ears

;

(7096)

although (his) wife had said that she would not do he was the one who insisted (upon it). so
;

and he was on account of his ( ) skin, while he (7097) himself had been the one who wished the wife to do so for his younger brother's head had surely been skinned whereas his younger brother had merely had his head shaved while (his) wife shaved, removing the old hair.
Therefore, (his) wife cut off his ears
;

screaming,

;

;

;

* Mats of -which the Bushmen make their huts (made from (3958')
a thick grass or reed?).

f These things that grow by the springs belonged to the first Bushmen, who preceded the present race, \kwe'iten ta When says. Her mother told her this.
\x'ivB-\na-ssi-\Ve is the

name

of the

Bushmen who

lived first in

the land.

were those who did not utter
;

name, because the people (7095') me for, they were men therefore, they did foolish things on account of it. of the early race § He really thought that the skin of his younger brother's head was off, while it was his younger brother's head's hair which had been shaved away.
J I

am

one

who

does not

know

his

his

name

to

;

;

206

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAJf FOLKLORE.

Y.— 70.
L.

THE +NEERU AND HER HUSBAND.
{Dictated,
in June, 1879, hy |han+kass'o,

who heard

it

from

hit

mother, Ixabbi-an.*)

(8507)

l^wfe-llna-ss'o-jkuf

llkuari
le

M
Ine

da

ihaA-a
ll^e,

+nfeiTU.t
III16,

+nerru lae Iku ikojkSJ
(8508) gwaiya Ikhd
hi Ine Ikuiten.
ll;^e.

llkho
lid

an

au
(
)

Ha kd

lliaiten

ll;^e

;

Hi
au

Ine jkdgen kaii liikua,

au

jga'ue,

hin kda gwai
a llkhudten.§
tfken
e,

lian tdtti,

ha Iku

1

Una hi gwai.

Ha H^

H^

tiken

e,

hd
(

Ine Una hi gwai.
)
1,

ha

(8509) ha Ine IWkua,

au

jgaiie.

Gwai

Ine Ikhi llj^e; Ine
li;^a,

ha

Ine

le

llkho

W-jfe

au
Ine

Ilh6.||

He

gwai

han

IkM
(8510) llkho

ll;^e-ko.
ll^e,

Ha

le

IlkhSu llkho ha,

le

llkhou

au

jga'ueta

ll;^e.

Ha
Ine

(

)

Ine ll^a,

hd

lii",

ha
ko,

Ine llgaiie ll;^e-ko.

Hd

ll;^a,

ha

Ine Ini

ll;^e-

ha

Ine llkhudten ha.
ti e,

He, ha

Ine ll^a,

hd

Ikhi ha.

(8524')

Ixabbi-an Ikoite, Ikoi'te, !k6ite-ko xqi ss'o e, 6a +kakka ba. (8507') t +iierru llkiiaa ba 6a e jkui; he ti bine, ( ) Jxwe-llna-ss'o-lkui (8508')lkua|hafi-aha? (8507') X Hin tatti, bi lele llkbo li;^e, au ll^eten Ikl !k'^, bin jne ta,
4:1,

*

N

|ku6i ku, bin.

hi !ko

11,^6.

(8508')

§ Ilkbu6ten
II

=

liken.
;

(8509')

au !kui laitiken Ine a, ^^i^ gwaViten a |e|e llkbo Hxe au llho Ikajkanna au llbb, ba a ka, ha ssin x^itten ti le |lxe. Ha llkuaii
Iku llkhoe ss'o Ilkb2-tu, au !kui laitikgn Ine ilkou
ss'o.

..>><»s«^:^A>?i^>'».^

\-)^S

gwat, male porcupine.
|Adrt+A;M»V, Jan. 26th, 1879.

iT

IxdQpicii,

young porcupine,

^nirru, birds.

IAdB4;ia»j'o,

Mowbray, June 26<A, 1879.

'iii

\kuken-U \atU, female anteater.
I*(in+i«»»'p, Oet., 1878.

THE +NERRU AND HER HUSBAND.

207

v.— 70. L.

THE +NEERU AND HEK HUSBAND.*

A

man

of

the

early

race

formerly

married aCgSO?)
(i.e.

^n^rru.'\

The ^nirru put J the dusty

earthy)

Bushman

rice into a bag, when her husband had dug out (literally, " had killed ") Bushman rice. She went to wash the Bushman rice ( ) they (8508)
;

returned home.

went out to seek for food on the for she was and (her) husband He was the one who alone (?) with her husband. dug § out (Bushman rice). Therefore she was with her husband. Thus she went out to seek for food, on the morrow. The husband dug out Bushman (8509) ( )
early

They

morrow,

she

;

rice; he put the

Bushman

rice into the bag.||

And
rice.

the husband again

dug out other Bushman

He

the top

Bushman rice on Bushman rice. He ( ) (8510) again arose, he sought for other Bushman rice. He again found other Bushman rice he dug out
put
it

in

above, put in the

of

the morning's

;

* I think that \xabii-ah's grandmother's grandmother's other (8524') it must have been who formerly, in this manner, spoke to her.
grandmother's mother
f
( )

The ^nerru (now
a

a bird)

man

of the early race

was formerly a person; therefore, ("8507') was the one who married her. ('8508'^
'

J

When

Bushman Bushman rice.
the
§
II

they are putting Bushman rice into (a bag), when/ocAirn rice has finth with it, they say that they \ho ^

" To dig with a stick " is here meant. (8508') The man was the one who was putting Bushman rice into (^8509'^ the bag, while the woman was the one who was holding the bag she was the one who intended to shake in the Bushman rice. He stood inside the mouth of the hole, while the wife
;

stood above.

:

208

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine
)
le

Ha
(8611) he
(

jk'aun llkho ha.

Ha

Ine

le

Ik'aun llkho ha,

Ilh6-g* Ine Ik'Suh.
Ine ui,

He, ha
11^^

ha

Ine llga'ue

ll;^e

ko.

Ha

Ine Ini

ko

;

ha

Ine llkhu^ten ha.

Ha

Ine Ikhi ha.

He
llkho

(8512) ha hd Ine
ll^e

kiii:

" Indki

!k'oussi,t
Ine

n

(

)

juhi

a."

He
Iko,

la'iti

M

kiiiij
ssi

" Ssi tan yauki
llnSii." 8

Ikweiten

ssi

tssi

Inuin,

e tnerru

He, ha ha
(8513) llkho
Ikii

Ine ku'i:

"Akki, dkki a
ha
lie

Ik'oussi,

n
)

luhf

ll^e."

He

laiti

Ine
llj^e

kui

:

"

A

kaii (
ta,
ssi

ddda
^aiiki

sse Ilkh6e llkho
ssi

au jk'au;

Ikweiten Iko

tssi

Inuin."

He, ha hd

Ine

kui
laiti

"Akki dkki a
(8514) ha
(
)

jk'oussi,

n

juhi llkho ll^e."

He

Ine kiii:

"A kaii

ddda Iku
il^e."

sse llkhde llkho

lie

ll^e,

au

jk'au, a sse

ttumm

He
(8515)
ll^e
laiti
!

ha hd

Ine kui:

"Akke

a Inuin,

ii

luhi llkho
)

" au haii

hd jkarro
ssiii

tsiitten hh(5

ssa

(

Inuin.

Ikuinlkuiii e

luhi ss'o Ik'oussi,!! hih

ha

Ine

(oOll

j

*

jf iituaii +1, ti e,

waita

llhb ilkuaii ss'o
6.

6a

e.

\ Inuin-Opuorini haii Iku

Ttu a ikwai,

tifi Ine

ta Ik'oussi

a.

(8512')

\

Han +ka+kakkgn.

§

N

llkuan +i,

ti

e,

hi-ta
ta,

llneii. Ilkuaii ss'o

6a l^kwaiya;

ta,
hiii

hi llknan Ine

j^kwSya;

hi Ukuaii llnau, hi jne 4

yeyenn,

yauki ttamOpua liikwaiya.

(8615')

II

N yauki

+efin akka; ta, !k'e e

tl

jki hi, hi jkii e

Ikueida; bin

ta,

+nerru Ikuiiilkuin hd 6a luhi-ss'o

Ik'oussi.

: :

THE +NERRU AND HEK HUSBAND.
(the earth from
out.
it
it).

209

And he

again dug

it

(the rice)

He

put
;

it

on the top

(of the other).

He

put
(8511)
rice.

on the top and ( ) the bag * became full. And he arose, he sought for other Bushman

He

found other Bushman rice; he dug out (the
it.

earth from)

He dug

it out.

And he

exclaimed

the

"Give me (thy) little karosSj-f that I ( ) may put (8512) Bushman rice upon it." And the wife said J "We are not accustomed to put Bushman rice, having earth with it, into our back's kaross, we who
:

are of the house of ^nSrru." §

And he
kaross,
(it)."

exclaimed
that I

" Give me, give

me
)

the

little

may
rice

put the Bushman rice upon
said:

And

the wife

"Thou
rice,

(

shouldst put the

Bushman

(8513)

into the ground; for

we

are not accustomed to put
it,

Bushman
kaross."

having earth with he exclaimed
:

into our back's

And

" Give me, give
put the
)

me
rice

the

little

kaross, that I

may
(

Bushman

upon

(it)."

And

the wife

exclaimed:

"Thou (8514)

shouldst put the

Bushman
:

rice into the ground, that
||

thou mayst cover over the Bushman rice." And he exclaimed " Give me the kaross, that
I

may

put the Bushman rice upon
(

(it)

!

" while he

snatched away
* I tHiik that
it

)

the kaross.

The

wife's entrails, (8515)
(i.e.

seems to have been a springbok sack

a bag ('8511'^

made
they

of springbok skin).

f It is a little kaross.
call

One

skin (that

is,

the skin of one animal)

Woussi,

X She spoke gently {i.e. did not sing here). § I think that their houses must have been numerous for they were numerous for, -when they are little birds, they are not a little
; ;

(8512')

numerous.
II

With

other earth.

(8514')

f


BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine kiii:

:

210

SPECIITENS OF

tdrro !kli6.*

He, ha hd

"IT wwe! n
au
laitiken

Iha,
(
)

(8516)

ww^
m,

hi

I

N kod
ha

sse Ine te Iki ? "

h^

laitiken

In^ ta
r

" Ssi e +nefru
Ssi tail

llneia,

ydvid jkweitfn

jkgo,

Ssi tssi jnuifi.

Ssf e 4:ne?ru llnein,
Ssi tan

yauki
: •

Ikwe'iten jkoo,

Ssi tss( Inuin
o

"

(8517) au hail

(

)

ha

Ine ttai tau

dda a Ikuinlkuin.

Hah

hd

Ine ta


"
Ssi e 4:nSfru llnein, Ssi tail

^auki Ikweiten !k§g

Ssi tssi jnuin."

(8518)

He
hd
Ine

tikene, ha ;^da ha Ine
kiiii
:

llnau,

hah

ss'o,J ( )

hah

"

llii/koenya tl e, llka;^ai ssih

l^kud jkhe

ta hi, au jkhw^ jkaueten e

j^wah

jkiu

;

§ ta, llkd^uken
( )

(8519) iho'uken yauki
ti e,

^wa thahnuwa.

A
Ine

kuh

ll^koen,

jkhwe jkaiieten e

jjf^wah jkui

jkeya Ik'auh Una

Ikhwe."

Hd, ha Opua^ai hd

jkwai

jkhe
Ine

;

ha

0pud;^aiten

hd
( )

Ine

ll«ko'en.

Hah hd
kau jkh^ya

kui

(8520) "0pu4;^ai
tfken
e,

llkuah a, Igua

ssk."

H^

ha

j^oa,

ha

Ine kiii

:

"

N

llkuah ka,

u

sse Ine

lliiko'en;

llka^uken lhoiiken|| llkuah ddoa ddf Ikou,
Iku
ss'o.
lla,

*

(8517')

t

Han Han

jkutta

au ha Ikam
ss'o llnSn..
a,

||a llnein.

%

(8518') (8520'}

§
II

Ha Ha

llkuaii

Iku

Opuaxaiten

ha |«ke ha, ha-ka Ikuttenjkutten.
li:;ke

N

llkuai +1,

ti e,

ha Iku

ha Opurf;itai°lhl

;

THE +NBRRD AND HER HUSBAND.
which were upon the
little
:

211

kaross,* poured

down.f
!

Oh dear my wife And he, crying, exclaimed What shaU I do ? " while the wife ( ) arose, the wife (8516)
"
!

said

{i.e.

sang)
of the

" We, who are

house of +«^rM,

We

are not used to put earthy
are of the house of

Bushman

rice

(Into) our back's kaross

We, who

+»^r«.

We
while she
(

are not used to put earthy

Eushman

rice

(Into) our back's kaross
)

"
:

walked on replacing her
of the

entrails.

She (8517)

sang

%
" We, who are
house of
-i^nirru,

We

are not used to put earthy

Bushman

rice

(Into) our back's kaross."

Therefore, her mother, when sitting, § ( ) exclaimed: (8518) " Look at the place to which (thy) elder sister went to seek food, for the noise of the wind is that which
for, (thy) elder sisters' sounds like a person husbands do not act rightly. Thou dost ( ) see that (8519) the noise of the wind is that which sounds like And her daughter a person, singing to windward." stood up her daughter looked. She (the daughter) exclaimed: "(Thy) daughter ( ) is the one who (8520) Then her mother said falling comes." "I wish that ye may see; (thy) elder sisters' husbands^ do
;
||

;

:

* I do not know well (about
spoke thus
;

it),

for

my

people were those

who ('8515')

they said that the ^nkrru's entrails were formerly

upon the little kaross. ^ She was sitting down. \ She went along singing,
mother's home).
§
II

as

she

went away home

(to

her

(8617')

She was sitting at home. Her daughter was the one
I think that she

of

whom

she spoke,

(of)

her

(8518')
(8520')

singing.

^

was speaking

of her daughter's husband.

;

212

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ilka,

(8521) u hi yau e

hi llkuakka;

(

)

hin ihanlhafi

le i,

u hi llkudkka."
B.6 tlken
e,

ha ha

Ine

jku^e

jkfen

Ha

ha Opua;^ai

han

Ine Nan jkaiin
( )

jiiwa

ha Opua^ai jk'dussi ; * han
jk'oussi,

(8522) ikanh juhi llkho

ha 0pu4;^ai Ikuinlkuin, au

he ha
jkhe
lla

Ine

llhin

jkwe ha Opua^ai, han Ine jkou ki
llnein
;

ha ©pua^ai au
llnein.

han

Ine Nan Iki

le

ha

©pua^ai au ha-ka
(8523)

Hd
han

tiken
;

(

)

e,

ha ha Iku-g

Ine Ine

!g4raka,f au ha
ta,
e,

Q-pui^ai
hd,

au ha Opua;^ai Iha

ha

sse

laiti,

Iku-g Ine jgaraka.
( )

He
Ikarh

tiken
lla

ha Opua^ai
.Ik'e,

(8524) Ihdn Iku-g Ine jkuiten

ha-ka

au ha
;

hd Iku-g

Ine ta,

ha Opua;^ai iha Iku

sse jkiiiten

ta,

hi yauki llkuikka.

He
)

tfken

e,

ha Opua;^ai

Iha

hd

(8525) Iku-g Ine jkuiten,

(

au hinj Iku-g Ine

llehn ss'o.

The

+NEERtr, as

a Bird.

{Described hy Ihan^ikass'o.)

(8525)

+nferru

Inunu kan Iku lu^rri-Opua.
Iku
llkhda
toi
;

+nferru gwai-

yaken

a,

hin Ihdaka u tdi gwai.
(

(8525|')+nferru laitiken a Iku jkuita,

)

u

tdi

laiti.

H^
ha

tiken
|ku

(8521

)

*

Ha
hi.

xoaka

Ik'oussi

llkan,

e ssin

Iku

ss'o,

he,

ssin

Ikuwa

(8523M
(8525')

t !garaka=!kw|S, "angry."
X +nerru; ^nefru e li^kwSya.

;

THE +NBERU, AS A BIRD.

213

mad
(
)

things, as

if

they do not seem to understand
(literally,
'

they marry among us
to

into us') as il(8521)

they understood."

put the

meet her daughter; she went to upon her daughter she, (8522) holding, put ( ) her daughter's entrails upon the little kaross and she hound up her daughter f she slowly conducted her daughter home she went to
little

Then she ran

kaross *

;

;

;

;

take her daughter into her (the mother's) hut.
Therefore,
( )

she was angry about her daughter; (852.3)

when her
wife,

daughter's husband wanted to come to his

was angry. Therefore, her daughter's husband went back ( ) to his own people, when (8524) she had said that her daughter's husband should go
she

back;

for,

they did not understand.
;

Therefore, her
)

daughter's husband went back

(

while they J (8526)

continued to dwell (there).

The +NEEEU,
The
is

AS A Bird.

+nSrru's bill

is

very short.

The male ^nirru (8525)
The female
(
)

the one whose plumage resembles (that of) the
;

ostrich

it is

black like the male ostrich.
is

+nSrru

is

the one whose plumage

white

like(8525^')

(that of) the female ostrich.

the ostriches

;

Thus, they resemble because the male ^nSrru are black, the
eat,

female +nerru white.

They eat the things which little birds usually which they pick up on the ground.
(lit.

* Her mother's new little kaross, which " sitting "), and which she had put away.
f

had

been

unused (8521')

With
i.e.,

the four straps of the

Vk'oussi,

formed by the four legs of (8522')

the springbok's skin.
J

the ^nhru,

many

^nerru.

(8525')

214
e,

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
ta
llkhda
toi;

M
Hi

au

hm

tdtti,

+nfernika tdken

Ihoaka, 4=n^rruka Ikakaken

Iktiita.

llkuai Iku hi tchuefi e

hi hi, he,

>eyenn Ikweiten Iku hi Iku ttammttamm hi, au jk'au.

v.— 72. L.

THE DEATH OF THE
{Dictated, in July, 1878, ly Ihan^^l^ass'o,

iKRAxJ.
it

who heard

from

hit

mother, Ixabbi-an.)

(7206)

jkhaii llkuai

hd 6a

ka—
"Ta,
tan kafi
||a,

N

kwan

Ik'au Ihin,

jguru-lna ka fkao.

K
(7207)
( )

"Hd, kwan tan kan
Ik'au Ihin,

lla,

lxe-!khwM ta

!kao.

"Ta,

N

kwan

tan kan
Ihiii,

lla,

jk'au

jguru-lna ka !kao.

"Ta,
fT

kwan

tan kan

||a,

jk'au Ihin,

lxi-!khwai ta jkao."

(7208)

He, ha hd

llnau,

au han jk'au au
haii

Ihiii,

(

)

Ikaugen Ine

kdi, ll>abbu likhd ha,
hail llkuan sso da ka,

ka ha jk'au IhiA; au
jk'au
Ihifi,

ha ssdken

jkau ka

.^,'

/^-i:?^,^"

*
The porcupine's

1^
|Aaiit&<M«'o, Sept. \ih, 1878.

footprints at one of the entrances to its hole.

f^^^^S^
rf^-;«^'

*

ifeli^^^^
1.

liountains into which the VihAa (a lizard of the Genus was changed when cut into two pieces.
1.

Agama)
O-O^wti'.

\gwrun\na.

2.

\xi \hhwAi.

3.

I;^« jMtixft ^a jittiu

)!;«

IkaA^hoMt'o. 1R78.

Lizards of the Oenus Agama.
I.

WA^a^«.«-, male.

2.

\khdU

xlutyi,

hmt^e.

DidXkw^in, JUaroh, 1876.

1.

2.

\Mgg»n

ykdggen gwai, male mantis. laityl, female mantis.
ViiLVkw^in, Starch, 1875.

THE DEATH OF THE LIZARD.

215

They make
of a bush.

grass nests on the ground,

by the root
in
large

When
numbers.

not

breeding,

they are

found

v.— 72.
L.

THE DEATH OF THE LIZAED.
The Lizard* formerly sang—
"For,
I therefore intend to go, Passing through,
\g'liru-\na' s pass.

(7206)

"And,
I therefore intend to go.

Passing through,
( )

\xi-\hhwai's pass.

(7207)

" Por,
I therefore intend to go,

Passing through,
\giiru-\na' s pass.

" Por,
I therefore intend to go.

Passing through,

[^-[khwaVs pass."

And, when he was passing through, ( ) the (7208) mountains t squeezing broke him, when he had intended to pass through for, he seems to have thought that he would spring through the mountain
;

pass,

which was

like this (the narrator here

showed

* The \hhau was a man of the early race. He is now a lizard ('7206') Aguma. " Chiefly found in rocky and sandy places. Many species distrihuted all through South Africa." jThese mountains are large ones, near \Uten\Mn.
of the genus

;

216

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
u.

jkao, e

1

He

tlken
(

e,

jkaugen Ine

i iki

a,

jkatigen

(7209) Ine

tssi kiii ll^app

)

a.

Hd
lla,

tiken

e,

ha llnwamtu

Ine kukkiii,*

Mn

llkoo, jkhe

lim Ine ddi !giiru-lna
jkhe
lla,

au

lia

jkhwi-luken Ine kukiii,

hiii llkoo,

h.^ e,

Ine ddf l;^e-!khwai.

Kemares on the preceding Story by the
Narrator.
(7210)

N

Iku

+i, ti e,

ha

ss'o

6a ggauwa
+i, ti e,

jhu,

ha

sse ssd

llnallna jhu.

Ta, n llkuan
e
llkdeta

Ikhwa'itenlkhwa'iten
e,

tettenni-an

Ihii,

hi llkuan ss'o

ha 6a

(7211) ggauwa

hi, ( )

ha

sse ssd llenn hi.

Han
ssa

llkuan ss'o

6a ggauwa
Ileim ha).

jkaugen- Ikalka, ha sse

llehwa

(i.e.

Ta,

n

+i, ti e,

[ka'ugen- Ikalka a jhin
Ihin
llj^i

au he
Ine

(7212)

ti.

Ha

a,

ha

llnau,

au ha jk'au
sse llka'iten
;

(

)

ssa,

han

juhi \kh6 ssa jkou,

ha

jkhe Ikua H^^;^,

he ha llkdaken
(7213) tktten llkde
a,
a,
lla

\ea

llna-llkuarra

he,
)

ha llkdaken

kaii

ikaugen- Ikalka;

(

jkaugen-lkdlkdgen

ha

Ine

lal lid

ha; hd
ss'o

a,

ha

Ine Mail llenna;

ha ddda
jkwa,

n

+i, ti e,

ha

6a ddda ggauwa ha.

Han

au han
(7209')

ss'o

6a ggauwa ha.
* Hia Iku
Ikabbukfin ttfi.

1

REMARKS ON PRECEDING STORY.
the
first

217

and second fingers
caught

of

his

left

hand

in

a forked and almost upright position).

Then, the
his

mountains
close

him thus (putting
mountains
bit,

fingers
(
)

together),

the

breaking

(7209)

him.

Therefore, his forepart fell over* (and) stood

stUl, it

became

\ffuru-\nd;
still;
it

while his hinder part

fell

over (and) stood
\j(e-\khwai.

was that which became

Remarks on the preceding Story by the
Narrator.

he seems to have been going to the (7210) that he might come (and) dwell at them. Por, I think that the (shallow) pools, which lie among the red sand hills, seem to have been those towards which he was going, ( ) that he (7211) might come (and) live at them. He seems to have been going towards \kauffen-\ka\ka (a certain pool), that he might come (and) live at it. For, I think
I think that
hills,

red sand

that

He is the \kauffen-\kq\k& is near this place. one who, when he came passing ( ) through, would (7212) come along the vlei ', that he might ascend, passing along the side of the hiU; and he would altogether
'

descend into Wna-Wkudrra (a certain would go quite down, along (the
\kauffen-\kq\kq.
(
)

river),

and he

\kuugfen-\kd\ka
it

bed) to would be the (7213)
river

place

where he descended;

was where he was

going to dwell; it must, I think, be the place towards which he appears to have been going. He broke (in twain) when he seems to have been going towards it.
* It verily
(?)

turning over went.

^l^\)i)

)

A GRASS BUSHMAN.
Photographed
at

Cape Town

in

1880.

YI.

Poetry.

220

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

VI.— 42.
B.

llGWATTEN-TA iKUTTENlKUTTEN.
(3237)

HA ha ha, Ha ha,
N" a Ikujiiiim
iS"

+no

ii,

a hh|

j(Wi !ku;^e;

Ta, Ikujnuin Iku a !ku;^e,

Ha ha ha, Ha ha.

N
(3238)

a Iku-glnuin +nd
( )

ii.

ya ya ya, yk yg,

N N N

a Ikujnuin +n6 n,
a,

hha

;^au

ddda

!kuj[;e,

yk yg yg, yi yg,

kkumuin +n6 n, Gwattau* hha ;^au ddoa ^u^e.
a

yk ya ya,

yh yg,
(3239)
( )

llgwatten a Ikujnum +n6 ha,

Ha

a,

hha ^au ddga !ku;^;e, ya ya ya,
yd yg,
;i^au

GwAtten a hha

ddoa yu^e,

Hg
(3238
)

yauki ddoa khwlya.
viz.,

* The Cat tas three names,

Wgwqtten, Wgwqttaii, and yiten.
its

Here
Aii
is

it

"sings with the upper part of
tatti,

mouth." (making y).
that
its

Mn

hd

\]c?-kko e

yUen,

" For,

it feels

other

name

yUen."

THE

cat's song.

!

;

!

222

SPECIMENS

01''

BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ha
(3240)
(

ddoa g^bbitengebbiten

)

Ka, kkd-gmuih kku a kwakka,

Gwatta-ken yauki kwakka.
Gwatta-ken kkwan* khwiya.

y&

ya. ya,
ya,.

>a

Gwltten a kku-gmuin kkdkken
(3241)
(

ha.

)

Hd

a hb| ;^au ddoa
SBin

Iku;^^)

Ha

ddda khwiya.

Ka, kku-gmuin kku a khwfya.

Haggla hdggla haggla
Haggla haggla,
(32411)
(

)

Haggle heggle heggle,
Heggli,

H^ggli heggli heggli

Hdggli h

VI.— 44.

THE SONG or THE
(2158)
Ika'uogen,
Ika'uogen,

iGUITEN.f

Ikauogen,

Ikauogen

(•3240')

* kkwah stands for Whuah here.
t Singular \guiten, plural \gu'i\gui, Vulpes

(2158')

Caama, the Caama fox.

!

!

THE SONG OF THE CA.AMA FOX.
It did foolisli things;
( )

223

Por, the

Lynx

is

one

who

understands,

(3240)

The Cat does not understand." The Cat (nevertheless) is cunning. >a >a ya,
ya >a.

The Cat
( )

is

the one about

whom

the

Lynx

talked.

"It
It

is

the one
to

who

could not run

fast."

(3241)

had

be cunning.*

For, the

Lynx is one who is cunning. Hagglaf haggla haggla
Haggla haggla,
Heggle haggle haggle,
Heggli,

(

)

(3241^)

H4ggli heggli heggli

Heggli n

VI.— 44.

THE SONG OF THE CAAMA FOX.
Grosser of the Spoor, Crosser of the Spoor,J

(2158')

Grosser of the Spoor, Grosser of the Spoor
* Keferenoe
pursued.
f
is

here

made

to the Cat's

way
Cat

of doubling

when /q oil n
its

The

narrator here explains

that the

" talks with

tongue
it

", assenting to

what

it

has been saying.
'")

{ The Caama Fox is called "Crosser of the Spoor", because ('2158 avoids the dog nicely when the dog chases it, and, turning
it),

suddenly, runs back, crossing the dog's spoor (behind

while

the dog

is

racing on in front, thinking to catch the

Caama Fox

by

so doing.

!


,

224

SPECIMENS OE BUSHMAN POLKLOEB.
Ikatiwa Iguiten,*

Ikauwa jgulten f
!

Ikauwa

jgultti,

Ikauwa

Iguitti

VI.— 45.

THE SONGS OF THE BLUE CRANE.J
(2155)
!k'6ka

kkumm

e

ha

jkiitten hi;
llkiilna
;

han han

jkiitten
jkiitta lla

ha

llkulna, ti e Igara

swenya ha

" Igara Iku swenya
Igara
Igara

n

llkiilna,

kan swenya n
han
||

llkulna,
llkulna,

swenya n
it is

(2158)

* '^^^ narrator explains
\juiten's

as if it said:

"I

cross another

spoor"

{i.e.,

one

who had been
ssho +i
;

there,

and has gone away

hunting).

(2159')

t Hail jkutten

ti

e,

jkum
|ka ha,
Ikii

ti

e,

jkuin sse Ik^ ha, au

Ikuinyan

yaliki

sse

ta,

ha a Ikauwa jguiten jnwa
jkuiii

(jguiten-kko jnwa).

Ha

a,
;

ha

yauki ta Ika ha
lla

;

ta,

jkuih Iku
4:g(e)ou,

a,

ka Ikuken au

llku

au ha Iku-g Ine

llga'ua tta

au ha ^auki ttan llku; au jkuinyS Ine ddurru j^uonni,
jkui.

au jkuinta
t

The Blue Crane {Anthropoides Stanhyanus) was formerly
blue
cranes (both male and female) are
said to

a person of the early race.
§ All sing

this song.

(2156')

II

Ha

Iken jkwai, hin l^^kwMya
Igara
e

;

ha

Ikeii

Iku jkwai.

Igara

tsa;^aitaken li^kwaiya,

Iken jkwSl.

Tfken llkellkeya ha
i.

tsaxau Ikwai, ha tsa^aiten

liikwaiya, hin

w
%
>

\k'6 \(nti,

blue crane, female.

\k'6

gwat, blue crane, male.

\hdA^httu'o,

March 2nd,

1879.

T6i

\aiti,

female

ostrich..

ihan^katt'd, Jan. iOth, 1879.

C C
^

^
si

§

13
si

Q c
c

c

a

Mhwat

gteax,

male gemsbok.

\khtva% \mty\, female

gemsbok.
IHa\ku>^in, Apnl, 1875.

!


225

THE SONGS
Cross the

01"

THE BLUE CRANE.
spoor,

Cross the
Cross the

Caama Fox's Caama Fox's Caama Fox's Caama Fox's

spoor
spoor,

!

*

Cross the

spoor

VI.— 45.
B.

THE SONGS OF THE BLUE CRANE.
It is the

Blue Crane's story which
it

it

sings;

it

(2155)

sings (ahout) its shoulder, namely, that the "krieboom "
berries are

upon its shoulder ; " The berries are upon

goes along singing
shoulder,

my

The berries are upon my shoulder, The berry it f is upon my shoulder,
* It sings that the dog appears
but the dog will not
spoor of (another)
kill it
;

to thiak that
it

he

-will kill it;

(2159')

for

is is

the one

who

crosses the

Caama Pox.
is

It

the one which that dog

will not kill; for the dog
fatigue,

the one

who
;

when
;

it

(the
it

Caama Fox) has gone

will nearly (?) die of to lie peacefully in

the shade

while

does not feel tired

while the dog painfully

goes back to his master.
t Its name is one they (the berries) are numerous; its aame is one. The "krieboom" berries are many; the name of the
;

(2156')

(still)

berries is one.

It appears as

if its

berry were one, (but) they
viz.,

are

many. The word

\ffdra is

the same in the singular and plural,

\gdra (or \ffdra ta&x^u) a \hwm,
(or \gdra tsdxaiten)
is
e \\iktoaiya,

"one

\gdra berry,"

and

\gdra \gdra

" many \gdra berries."
it,

The

a part of the Wna, or " krieboom ", the berries of

as far as

I can understand.
{i.e.,

They are said to be round, white, and "hard" they have something hard inside them). The outside flesh is sweet. They are eaten by the Koranna and the £ushmen. The women go to the "krieboom", pick the berries, put them into a bag and take them home to eat, first mixing them with other
berries.

They do not eat them unmixed, on account of their teeth, they fear that the sweetness of the berries might otherwise render their teeth unfit to chew meat well.
as

! ;

!

)

226

SPECIMENS OP BtrSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Igara

kan swenya h
kan kdn

llkulna.

(2156)

(

)

Igara

Ike hh6,
;

yird kan Ike hh.6
Igara
rrrii

kan kan kan

Ike hh.6,

Ike hh.6,

kan

kail Ik^

Kho

Igara rru

kan Iku ha."
2.

{Wihen running

away from a man.)
a
jkiiita,

(2157)

llkiirru

llkumi a
llkiirru

jku'ita,

a jkuita!
3.

(

When toalking slowly,

leaving the place [walk of peace].

llkiirru jkuita,
llkiirru jkuita

4.
(

When

it flaps its

wings.)

Ilgou
llgou

ji,

ji,

Errru 333 3

rrra, 7 rrra, '

Erru 3 3 3 o

Rru

rra

;

f

THE SONGS OF THE BLUE CRANE.

227

(

)

The The

berries are berries are

upon my shoulder. up here (on its shoulder),*

(2156)

Errii are

The

up here; up here, are up here, ]§,^u Are up here The berries rrd are put away (upon)it(its shoulder)."
berries are
2.

When running away from a man.) ( A splinter of stone which is white, A splinter of stone which is white, A splinter of stone which is white.
3.
(

(2157)

When walking slowly^

leaving the place

[walk of peace].)

A
A

white stone splinter, white stone splinter.
4.

(When

it

flaps its wings.)

Scrape (the springbok skin J for) the bed. Scrape (the springbok skin for) the bed.

Rrrru 3 3 3 3 o

rrra, » rrra, 7

Rrru 3 3 3
o

Rru D 3
o

rra!

* WMhlo cannot explain why the berries do not roll off; he says ('2156') that he does not know. This is a song of the very old people, the " first " old people, which was in his thoughts. jWkdhho explains that the bird sings about its head, which is (2157') something of the shape of a stone knife or splinter, and has white He says that Bushmen, when without a knife, use feathers. a stone knife for cutting up game. They break a stone, knocking off a flat splinter from it, and out up the game with that. The Grass Bushmen, WMbho says, make arrowheads of white quartz
'''''

points (crystal points, as far as could be understood).
\

The Bushmen make beds

{i.e.,

skins to sleep on) from the

skins of springbok and goats.

;

;

228

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

VI.— 46.

THE OLD WOMAN'S SONG.
First Version.
{Dictated, in September, 1871, ly lajkuita.)

(158)

Iniitarraken jkutten;

jkut-ta

lla,

tta kaii jkutten;

Indtarraken tta kau.

Ikiit-ta lla

au jgwai

" Igwaitarra,
Igwaitarra,

Ikammamlkammam ho
inutarra
i

Indtarra au llkau

kukui,

Han

+ko shin sha
Ihin,

Han kkoan
Han
jgwai

jkuarre Igwai,
lie,

Igwain

Iki

Igwai."

Second Version.

(2160)

jgwaitara, Igwaitara,

Ikdmmenlkdmmen hhd

Inutara,

Au

Inutara luhltta llkau.


THE OLD woman's SONG.

;

229

YL— 46.
B.

THE OLD WOMAN'S SONG.
First Version.

The

old

Woman
;

sings; goes singing along; sings

(158)

as she goes

the old

Woman

sings as she goes along

ahout the Hyena " The old she Hyena,

The

old she Hyena,
off

Was

carrying

the old

The

old

Woman from the Woman in this manner,

old hut

She sprang aside. She arose. She heat the Hyena. The Hyena, herself.

The Hyena killed* the Hyena."
Second Version.

The old she Hyena, The old she Hyena,

(2160)

Was
As
* She killed

carrying off the old

Woman,

the old
herself,

Woman
by
;

lay in the old hut.t
violently

casting herself

upon the

(158')

pointed rook on which she had intended to cast the old

Woman

who was upon
saved herself.
j-

her back

but the old

Woman

sprang aside and
old,

The

old

Woman, who was

unable to walk, lay in an

f2160')

deserted hut.

Before her sons left her, they had closed the circle

[sides] of the hut, as well as the door-opening,

with sticks from

the other huts, leaving the top of the hut open, so that she should
feel the sun's

warmth.

fetched more dry wood.
as they

were

all starving,

They had left a fire for her, and had They were obliged to leave her behind, and she was too weak to go with them to

seek food at some other place.


230

!

!

!

SPECIMENS OE BUSHMAN EOLKLOEE.

yi.— 82.

A SONG SUNG BY THE STAE IGAUNU, AND ESPECIALLY BY BUSHMAN WOMEN.
{Dictated, in Lecemler, 1875, ly Dia!kw|in,

who heard

it

from

hii

paternal grandmother, Ttu6bb5-kgn jkaiikn.)

(5668)

llgdrraken *-!kwaitenttu

^a

llkliou

bbdrri-ssin?

+ku->'amt kan
(5669)
( )

llkuari a llkhou bberri-ssin.

A

;^a llkbou bbirri-ssin?

+ku->'ain kail llkuan a llkhou bb^rri-ssin.

YI.— 83.
L.

SIRIUS
(8468)

AND CANOPUS.
1879, ly ihan+kass'o.)

{^Given, in June,

N

Ikoite Ttuai-an llkuan Iku a,

ka

ssin jkeya Iki

lliikdagu.

Ha

In^ ta

" !kutten-!kbou
Ikutten-lkbou

E!au dabba
llwkoa-gu

Ilka

(8469)

(

)

||«koa-gu
llkd

Kan dabba

Ikiitten-jkbou
Il»k6a-gii

Xan dabba
(5661') (8729')
* Ilg4raken
t

Ilka

!kiitten-!khou
Ikii

e

"iiintjeB"; lxarii-ka-!k'6teii liken hf.
in the singular

The word ^ku-yam has the same form

and

plural.

! !

!


231

STAR SONGS.

VI.— 82.
L.

A SONG SUNG BY THE STAE jGAUNU, AND ESPECIALLY BY BUSHMAN WOMEN.
Does the Wgdrraken* flower open? The ^M-yqm^ is the one which opens.
(

(5668)

)

Dost thou open?

(5669)
the one which opens.

The ^hii-yam

is

VI.— 83.
L.

SIEIUS

AND CANOPUS.
TtiM-ah, was the one

My (step)grandm other,

who (8468)

used to rejoice about Canopus.
" Sirius
Sirius

She said

Winks

like

Canopus
(

)

Canopus
like

(8469)

Winks

Sirius

Canopus

Winks

like

Sirius
* The Wgdrraken are bulbs;
f Bimorphotheoa
annua,

the

Bushmen

dig them out.
in

a

daisy-like

flower,

blossom

(5661') at/'3729M
^

Mowbray

in August, 1879.

'

"

232

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
jkiitten-jkhou

Kan ddbba
Il«k6a-gu

Ilka
!

(8470) au n

Ikd'ite

a

tatti, (

)

\xpi*

wa

e.

YI.— 91.
L.

THE SONG OF THE KWA-KWARA-f
{Rglatei, in March, 1879, by Ihaii+kass'o.)

(6139')

N
N N

jkwi-Opua,

Ilka jlida

n

Ina.

Ikwi-Opua,
jkwi-Opua,
jhoa

Ilka

n

'Ina.

(6139)

6

SSI

Iku-g Ine jkhw^ten hho ha, ha Iku-g Ine

llkhou

!kui;

ha Iku-g

Ine:

"Wara
llkhau,

llkhau,
(

wara

(6140) llkhau, wara llkhau, llkhau llkhau, llkhau,
llkhau,

)

wara
"
!

wara

llkhau,

llkhau,

llkhau,

llkhau

Han

llnau,

o ha jkhe jk'au,
!

hah ka:

"A

wa, a wa,

a wa, a

wa

" 6 ha Ikhe Ik'au.

(8469')

* Ssi llkuan k^ ka

\xii,

au ha 5 l«kwaiya.

\ Eupodotia afra, Black Koran,

Knorhaan (Brandkop)^

!

"

THE SONG OP THE BUSTARD.
Sirius

233

Winks

like
!

Canopus

While

my

grandmother

felt

that

(

)

food was (8470)

abundant.*

VI.— 91.
L.

THE SONG OF THE BUSTAED.
My
Put
younger brother-in-law,
(6139')

my

head in the

fire.f

My My
Put

younger brother-in-law,
younger brother-in-law.

my

head in the

fire.

When we
"

startle it up, it flies

away;

it

(cries)

:

(6139)

Wdra

Wkhau,
)

wdra Wkhau, wdra Wkhau, Wkhcm Wkhau,
"

Wkhau, ( Wkhau,
it

wdra Wkhau, wdra Wkhau, Wkhau, Wkhau, (6140)

Wkhau

When

it

stands on the ground,

says: ''A wa, a wa, a wa, a

wa!" when

it

stands

on the ground.

*
f

We
for

are

When

wont to say j^u, when food is abundant. the " Knorhaan Brandkop" was still a man, his head
fire

(8469')

was him

thrust into the

by

his brother-in-law, in order to punish
sister.

having surreptitiously married a

Since then he

is

only a bustard.

234

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

YI.— 101. L.

THE SONG OF THE SPKINGBOK
MOTHERS.*
{Dictated, in June,

1879, hy Ihan+kass'o, who heard

it

from

his

mother, Ixabbi-an, from her mother, +kanimi, and from his

stepgrandmother, Ttuai-an.)

(8561')

Wax

llualluarraken

hd

ka—
'

"A-a Im, 3 3 Wai-Opua wwe,
Opuoiiiya ki.

A-a hn,

Wai-Opua wwe,
Opuoinya
ki."

VI.— 106.
IIKABBO'S

SONG ON THE LOSS OF HIS TOBACCO POUCH.
l;^{iru e,

{Dictated, in January, 1878, ly Ihani^kasB'o.)

(6138')

l;^{iru

kan
e,

Ike u.

Ijjjiiru

Ijj^uru

e u,

Ij^tiru

kan

Ike u.

(6138)

l^uru, hail yauki Ine luM, 6 Ikuin Iku-g ine ssaii

hoa ha

a,

ha-ka

llho,

au

llga.

H^

e,

ha

Ikii-g

Ine

* This song occurs in the fable of the Anteater,
Springbok, the Lynx, and the Partridge (IV.

the young

— 42.

z.).


THE SONG OF THE SPRINGBOK MOTHERS.
235

VI.— 101. L.

THE SONG OF THE SPRmOBOK MOTHERS.
The
Springbok
mothers
sang
(soothing
their (8561')

children)

" A-a hi, 3 3
'

O

Springbok Child!

Sleep for me.

A-a hn,
Springbok Child!
Sleep for me."

VI.— 106.
L.

IIKABBO'S

SONG ON THE LOSS OF HIS TOBACCO POUCH.*
Famine
Famine
it is, it is, is

(6138')

Famine
Famine Famine

here.
is,

it

it is, is

Famine

here.
is

Famine ["tobacco-hunger"
did not smoke,

meant here]

—he (6138)
the

because a dog had

come

in

* It was stolen by a hungry dog, named " Blom ", which belonged
to j^oMbiiz'.

236
kkdaii

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

liii

au

llga, i;

hail Ikii-g Ine

He,

ssi-g

Ine

han Ikii-g Ine jko llho. He e, llj^l, han tten, o han yaiiki Ine luhi. Ssiten jkagen kau llgaue IkilM Mho.

yavki Ine

Ini llho.

(5101)

(5102)

(5103)

THE BROKEN STRING.
niglit (and)

237

carried off from

him

his pouch.

he arose in the night, he missed his pouch.

And And
did

then he again lay down, while he did not smoke.

And we were

early seeking for the pouch.

We

not find the pouch.

VI.— 108.
L.

THE BROKEN STEING.
People were those

who
string.

(5101)

Broke for me the
Therefore,

The

place

(

)

became

like this to
it.

me,

(5102)

On

account of

Because the string was that which broke for me.*
Therefore,

The place does not feel to me, As the place used to feel to me,

On
The
(

account of
For,

it.

place feels as
)

if

it

stood open before me,

Because the string has broken for me.
Therefore,
place does not feel pleasant to me.

(5103)

The

On

account of

it.

* Now that "the string is hroken", the former " ringing sound in the sky " is no longer heard hy the singer, as it had been in the
magician's lifetime.


238

SPECIMENS OF BTTSHMAN FOLKLORE.

VI.— 109. L.

THE SONG OF jNUlNUMMA-lKWITEN.
[Dictated, in June,

1879, hy jhaii+kass'o, who heard

it

from

his

maternal grandfather, Ts'|tst.)

(8555)

Inujnumma-jkwiten,* llkuan ha da ka
"Hi-ii, hi;

N N
(8556)
^

Ikhf Ikouken e
^
J.

^wa;
^wa;
^wa."
ssin
Ikii

Hn-n, hn.
Ikhi Ikouken e
( )

Hi-n, hi;

if Ikhi Ikouken e
llkhellkheten
Ikii e.

N
ka

|k6myan ka

ka,

!nu|numma-|kTvita

h|,

"Hiin, hn;

N
(8557)
^

Ikhi Ikouken e
( )

^wa;

hU,

k,
\

N
Au n
ta,

Ikhi Ikouken e ywa."*
ssi sse ^ti ii

Ikomyk ka,

lkaulkauru,t hd Ine

Inulnumma-lkwiten ha ka ka

"Hi-n, hi;
(8558)

()

if Ikhi |kouken e

>wa;
>wa."
Ikam
h6
hi,
tt

Hn-n, hn;

N
(8555')
ha
hin

Ikhi Ikouken e

* Ikui a

M

en

e Ikutlkufta,

M

Ine |ku Ikhaulkhau
ti e,

Ine Iku |nu!nuiil |ho hi.
e,

N

4:1,

|kwften

|kitita;

n

+1, tt e,

ha

Iks'ss'o e

" Wit-mond ".
Ikuften Iku a Inujnuinm
e,

Inujnuiima-lkwitaken Iku e llkhellkhe.

(8566') (8557')

jkwften,

kok^nn |kwiten.

(

)

He
au

tiken
ssi

ha

e |kotta-kk6e.

t Ssi |kwi-l, Ikaulkairu Una,

llgwftgn Una.

— —


YI.— 109.
L.


239

THE SONG OF iN&lNUMMA-lKWiTEN.

THE SONG OF iNUlNUMMA-lKWITEN.
\nu\numma-\kwiten* formerly said (sang)

(8555)

<«Hn-n, hn;
I kill children wlio cry;

Hn-n, hn.
I kill children
(
)

who
who

cry;

Hn-n, hi;
cry."
is.

(8556)

I kill children

A

beast of prey (he, \nu\numma-\kwUen)

My

grandfather

used

to

say

(that)

\nu\numma-\kwUen

formerly said

I

"Hn-h, hn; kill children who
(
)

cry;

Hn-n, hn,

(8557)
cry."

I kill children

who

When my
ofE

grandfather wished that

we

should leave

making a

noise,t he said that \nu\numma-\kwitm

formerly used to say

"Hn-n, hn;
(
)

I kill children I kill children

who
who

cry;
cry."
of \nii[numma-

(8558)

Hn-n, hn;
* The narrator gave the following explanation
yjcwiten's
:

name "A man who eats great (pieces of) meat, he outs them off, he ('8555') puts them into his mouth. I think that eggs are white therefore, I think that his name seems to be White-Mouth '." " \n'ii\numma-\ktaHen is a beast of prey. A man was the one who gobbled eggs, swallowed down eggs. ( ) Therefore, he 'w^sfe/'ggggn Eeference is here made to a man [his name was] \k6fta-kkde."
;
'

of the early race,

who swallowed

ostrich eggs whole,

and

is

the

chief figure in a legend related

f

We were

calling out,

by [hdk+kass'd (V. 56. l.). making a noise there, as we played.

(8557')

240

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine
tiii

jkhwa-Opuk ^wa llni, ha Ine llkou ha, au !khw^-0ptik >Va Una, ha Ine llkou Ikam Ha
He, ha
ha,

(8659)

(

)

llkho

Ijc^erri

ha,

Ixuerrl

jkhe

lla

lln^in,

a !khwa-0puk
ssiiken
le

^wa

llnd ha.

H^
Ine

Iku-g Ine ssiken,

llnein.

Ha
kkonh
is

Iku-g

kui llnip(p),* au
(

(8560) !khwa-0pua, hd Iku-g Ine ssuken ki

) Ihih lla ha.
ttai'.

Ha

Iku-g Ine

lla,

te ha.

Ha

Iku-g Ine

* The second p

almost whispered here.

iNUJNUMMA-JKWfTEN.

241

And (when)

lie

hears a
to

little

child crying there,
little

he follows the sound
it,

it,

while the

child

is

crying there, he, following the sound, goes to

approaches

it

stealthily,

)(8559) ( approaching stealthily,
little

reaches the hut, in which the

child

is

crying.

He
He

springs, springs into the hut.

He

catches hold
)

of the little child,

goes to

he springs, taking ( swallow it down. He departs.

it

away. (8560)

A

BUSHMAN FAMILY.
at

Photographed

Salt River in i8

B.

HISTORY (NATURAL AND
PERSONAL).
Habits —Adventures —and Hunting. them
their

VII,

Animals and

with

244

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

VII.— 66.

THE LEOPARD AND THE JACKAL.
{Dictated in 1871.)

Edroken II;fau Iki llkaiie, au llka'ueten Ika wai. Kdroken Ine ll;^eill;^S, hail Ine tan-i llkaiie au waita (354') a, ) Han b6ro, ban tan-i, au hail tatti e kdro (
(354)
Iku
e.

Hd

ti

Mil
Ikii

e,

ha Iku boro, bail

llkwaii tdii-i,

bail tatti

kdro

e.

He
kd

ti

bin

ba
si

tdii-i,

bail llkwaii

llka'ue

ba Iku boro au a ba a, ba si ba, ha
e,

ll;^am ba.
( )

(354)

He

ti hiii

e,

llkaueten Ine jkoeiii
ts'i

i,

llka'ueten

Ine ikI ba,

llkaueten Ine
Ikf
le

Ikuken ba, ban Ine ho
(

(355) ha, hail Ine Han

ba au Ikubbi;

)

be

ti

bin

e hail Ine Inaii ti ha.

YII.— 121.
L.

DOINGS OF THE SPEINGBOK
{Dictated in July, 1878, by Ihan+kass'o.)

(7236)

Wa'i lluara
Iki

llkuaii

ka

llnau,

au ha llkua

Ilk,

au ha
Ilk;

wai-Opua a +enni, ba jguonna,* au ha
|,

llkua

(7237) hail In^ ta: "a,
e,

|,"

(
i,

)

au ba

llkua Ilk;

b^ tfken

hi ta,

!^oa tss'ain,

au hi

tdtti,

hi liikwaiya;

au waita jka'uka

il;^amki >'wa,

au hi ;^(5aken-gguwa
:

ywa.
(7236')
*

Hi ^daken-ggii
tatti,

In^

ta
lla

"a,

a,

a,"

wa'ita

Au ha
e,

ta ^iiiemmi ki
au wai,

jktwa; ha

Ine Iguonna, au

IkhwS llgwiten.

(7240')

Ti

n

ilkellke ss'o

f,

hin

e,

n

lluhgi,

i.


THE LEOPARD AND THE JACKAL.
245

YII.— 66.
B.

THE LEOPAED AND THE JACKAL.
The
jackal watclies the leopard,

when

the leopard

(354)

has killed a springbok.
flesh.

The

jackal whines (with

uplifted tongue), he begs the leopard for springbok
(
)

He

howls, he begs, for he

is

a jackal.

(354')

Thus he
a jackal.

howls,

he indeed

begs,

because

he

is

Therefore he howls

indeed wants the leopard to

when he begs, he give him flesh, that he
(354)

may
(

eat, that
)

he

also

may
is

eat.

Then the leopard

angry, the leopard kills

him, the leopard bites him dead, he lifts him up, he goes to put him into the bushes; ( ) thus he
hides him.

(355)

VII.— 121.
L.

DOINGS OF THE SPRINGBOK.
The mother springbok is wont to do thus, as she (7236) trots along, when she has a springbok kid which
is little,

she grunts,* as she trots along; she says
( )

Therefore they (7237) (the springbok) make a resounding noise (?), because

"a,

a,

a,"t

as she trots along.

they are numerous while the springbok kids also Their cry (bleat), while their mothers cry (grunt). mothers say "a, a, a," the springbok kids say
;

* Because she proteotingly takes along the child, she grunts, as /•'rogg'')
the child plays.
f Here the narrator made a grunting noise which, he said, was " in his throat " and about which he remarked — ( ) " When (7240')
;

I

sit

imitating the springbok, then I cough, on account of

it."

246

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(7238) Ikauka In^ ta: "me, me,
\n6 ta: In^ ta:

(

)

me," au hi ^6aken-ggu

"a,

a,

a," au hi leuonna.

Waita Ikauka
Ind

"me, me, me, me," au hi ;^6aken-ggu
a, a,"

ta:

"a,

au hi jguohna

lie

to'uken.
llkelike

(7239)

He
a tui,
e,

Wen
ka,
ta,
ii
;

e,* f ta

kd:

(

)

"'

we! ^ken Iku

tf e llnun,
Ikii

hi

e, hiii

Iku !^wa tss'ain.
e.

He

tfken

h

n

ssin ssu^h ti
e,

Ta,

hh

wa'ita gwa'i
(
)

(7240) e

\kh.6

hi

ssa Iku Ine ttai, !kou ttih sse
tdtti,

to'uken

au hi
Ini
ii,

n

Ikii-g

Ine

tta

;

he,

hi

yauki
sse

Ine

h; hi koa Iku-g

Ine

ttai,

jkou ttin

touken

au

li-g Ine llniih lid ii;

hi koa Iku-g

Ine ttaf, Ikoii ttin sse to'uken ii."

VII.— [70a.

HABITS OF THE BAT AND THE PORCUPINE.
{Related in March, 1875, in the Katkop dialect, hy Dia|kw|,iii, who

heard

it from his father, p^aa-ttiii,

and

his mother, ^ikamme-an..)

(4378)

Mdmah

+kakka

ke, ti e, ll^ettenf

llnau o llgau-

;^;ukenj llnau

ha kan
Ti

Una, ti

e,

ha Iwkua-a
Ikii

ttin he,

li^ettaken ^auki ssa,

ta
e,

\\-)(eiten

Una ha, o ha
i,

(4379) lakua-a

ttin.

(

)

ha-g Ine jkuiten,
i
;

hih

e,

ll^etten Ine jke ssa
ti e, llgau^ii

ha

jkoa,

hih

e,

h

Ine +en-na,

da
e,

ss'o jkuityi.
l;;^am-ka-!k'6
ta,

(7238')

*

He

ti'ken

tk

ka

:

" llkelike

we ya
jkauken.

!

hail

llkhda sse

Iku ppq;

a

Ikii

a lli^koen waita
asi

Ta,

a Iku a lli/koen, waita jkaukaken ilkhoa °

Iku ppo.

(4378')

t llxStten

Ike"

kko

e Igogen.

X Wgaux^, !xo, and \hhogen are three

names

for the porcupine.

The

last of the three is the

one to be used by

girls.


DOINGS OF THE SPRINGBOK.
247

"me, me,
"a, say
a,

(

)

me,"

wtile

their

mothers

say

— (7238)

me, me," while their mothers say "a, a, a," as they grunting go forward. Therefore,* we are wont to say ( ) "0 beast of (7239) prey ! thou art the one who hearest the place behind, it is resonant with sound. Therefore, I said that

— "me, me,

a," as they grunt.

The springbok

children

I

would

sit here.

For these male springbok which

stand around, are those which will go along, passing

behind ( ) you; because I am lying down, and (7240) they do not perceive me; they will have to(?) go along, passing behind you, when ye have gone behind (the hill); they will have to(?) go along, passing behind you."

VII.— 70a.
B.

HABITS OF THE BAT AND THE POECUPINE.

Mamma
porcupine

said
is

to

me

that

the

bat,t
it

when
is

the (4378)

still

at the place

where

seeking

about for food, does not come, for the bat remains with it, while it is seeking about for food. ( ) "When (4379) it (the porcupine) returns home, then it is that the
bat

comes

to

its

hole

;

%

then I

know

that

the

porcupine appears to have returned.
* Therefore, the Bushmen are 'wont to say " beast of prey! (7238') (the herd of springbok) seems as if it will arise for thou art the one who seest the springbok's children. For thou art the one who seest (that) the springbok's children seem as if (they) would arise." (They had been lying down, or, as the narrator expressed
:

it

;

it,

"sitting.")

f
J

The bat's other name is \\gogen. The bat inhabits the same hole

as the porcupine.

(4378') (4379)

248

SPECIMENS OE BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(4380)

Maman
llga^;i|^u,

l«keya ke

a,

ti
;

e,

fi

Ine ssin

jkoasse

(

)

6 ka Ina

llj^etten

hin

e,

n
;

llkiian Ine

+en-na,

ti e,

llgmi^u llkuan llklida Ine ssa

ta, ll^etten llku|n
i
;

Ine ssa.

He-g n
llkhali

Ind sse yauki

Opuom,

ta-g

n

Ine Ine

(4381) sse

(

)

a

llgau^ii; ta, llgauxu llnaii,

ha-g

Ikg ssa,

n

Ine ddf kiii ta Opiioin,
ta, llgau;i^u
Iki e tss'a
)

n

Ine

ll;^(5ro

llumm
o
i

llgau^u;

a, ha,

ka

llnaii,

ha.

(4382) Iko
sse
le

ssa,

ha-g
lliike

Ine
a,

(

ttai

Ikotten i;

o hd,

ka

^a

+enn

ha ssa a; o ha ka ha
leta
i-i,

sse Ikii ssa
e,

jkoa, 6 i Iku

Opuoin.
i;

H^

tlken

ha
)

ttai

(4383)

kiii
sse,

tta

Opuoin o
leta

6 hah ka ha
ti
e,

sse (
la

Iku

o

i

Opuoin, ha sse Ikhoii
o
jkda,
ti
e,

^

ddoa

!ka

Iki

ha,

jkui
llnaii,

ddda a llkuitya ha
jkuiten leta Opuoin,
Ihin,
Ikii

6

!k(5a.
)

He

ha-g Ind

Ikii

(4384)

(

hah Iku kwakkenkkwakki

o ha jkhouwa a
hi,
e, i

Ikui Ikw'ai.

H^

tiken

e,

ha ka

ddi ku

ta
Inu

Opuoin,
e, i.
)

6 ha ka ha ssS

jkhou,

ti

+goiiwa

(4385)

(

H^

tiken

e,

mama kan +kakka
h
sse
ttai

ke,

n

sse
ti

llnaii
e,

6 ka ki-ssa ttah Opuoin,
a,
)

Ine

+enn,

llgau^u llkuan

Ikotten

h; hah llkuan

a,

(4386)

ttai

Opuoih

h.

(

h kah Opuoih, h ssa, 6 ka Opuoih Una. (4387) kkw^kken Ihih, i 6 ka
;

N k^

sse llnaii,

6 ka kki-ssa ttan
ta,

^aiiki

Opuoin;
Ikii

llgau^ii

He

llgau^ii

kkwakken( )

Ikii l^ta

Opuoih.
a; o

N

^auki

Ine

+eh-na llwke a llgau^ii
+i,

ssa,
ssa,

h

Iku-g Ine ka

h
(4388)

llgauj^ii
;

^aiiki

ddda

llgaiij|;ii

wa
sse

Iku

Ike-ko ssa
(
)

hah
e,

Ikii-g Ine

ssah

ttai,

6 ka leta
i,

Opuoih.

He

tiken

h ^auki

sse Opuoih,

n

+enh

HABITS OF BAT AND PORCUPINE.

249

it, that I should watch for saw the bat; then I know, (4380) ( that the porcupine appears to come; for the bat comes. And I must not sleep; for I must )(4381) ( watch for the porcupine; for, when the porcupine approaches, I feel sleepy, I become sleepy (on account of) the porcupine for the porcupine is a thing which is used, when it draws near, to go along making (4382) ( )

Mamma

told

me

about
I

)

the porcupine,

if

;

not

it wishes that we may know the time at which it comes; as it wishes that it may come into the hole while we are asleep.

us sleep against our will, as

Therefore,
it

it

goes along making us sleep
it

;

while
at the

wishes that
it

may

(

)

come, while

we

are asleep, (4383)
it

that
hole,
hole.

may

smell whether

harm awaits
wait for
(

whether a

And

if

man is lying in the man is asleep
quills that

it at

the

)

it steals

softly (4384)

they may not rattle], it has smelt the man's scent. Therefore it is used to cause us to become sleepy, when it wishes to smell whether peace it be. Therefore mamma used to tell me that I should (4385) ( ) do thus, even if I felt sleepy, I should know that the porcupine was the one who went along making me

away when

[lifting

its

sleepy against

my
me

will;

it

was the one who went
(

along causing

to sleep.

)

I should do thus, (4386)

even
there.

if

I felt that I wanted to sleep, I should not
for

sleep;

the porcupine

would come,

if

I

slept

And

the porcupine would steal gently away,
(

while I slept.

)

I should not
;

know

the time at (4387)

which the porcupine came I should think that the porcupine had not come, while the porcupine had long come; it had come (and) gone away, while
T
slept.
(
)

Therefore,

I

should not sleep,

that (4388)

I might

know when

the porcupine came.

For, I

250

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMiN FOLKLORE.
llgau^ii.

Ikf sse

Ta-g

h.

Ilnau,

o ka Opuoinya,

n

yaiiki sse +enii Iki sse ya.

(4389)

He

tiken

e, fi

ka

Ilnau,

o ka llkuitya
iki

llgau;i(;u,

n

(

)

yauki Opuoin,
llkwa Ine
jkuiitya,
sse,

o ka

jkoasse

llgaujj^u;

llgau^u

(4390) Ta,
sse
ti

Iki ya; n Ine Ini Iki n a ^auki Opuoinya. mama Iki a Ikweiddaken, ( ) +kakka ke, n yauki Opuoin, 6 kd ki-ssa ttan Opuoin; n sse Ikelike

o ka jkoasse
Ilka
ti
e,

o

ka

ta

I

e,

tata
i. i,

ka ddi

lie,

he
e,

tata

Ine

jkoasse
( )

akken
Iki sse

(4391)

llgau^ii, llgau^ii,

He
o
e,
f

tiken

tata
ti
e,

ka +enn,

liari

ta Ilka
f

ka jkoasse llgau^u.
llgau^u, i;
r

He
(4392) ta

tfken

ha ka +eun

Iki

sse

6 ha

kki-ssa ttan ©puoin,
Ilka
ti
e,

han
(

yaiiki ta
)

Opuoin; o hah
lliike

ha ka ha
Iki

+ehii

a llgau^u

Ta, hd

ti

he

e,

mdma-ggu tkakka ke
ha
Ikii

i,

ti

e,

n
(4393)

Inu yau llwkoen,

ti e,

llgau^ii Ikii e ttss'a a ya'uki
ttai

tta'i

6 llkuanna;
ya'uki
Ini

ta,

6 llga;
tiken
Iki
a,

ta,
e,

ha

(

)

Iki

6

llkuanna.
ti e,

He

ha
Ini

ttai

o

llga, i;

6 hah ta Ilka

llga

ha

a;
l4le

hah

Ikii-g Ilnau,

o ha ttai o llkuanna, hah
Ilka
ti e,
( )

Ikii

(4394) ohoki, o hah ta
ta
i,

ha tsa^alten yauki
Ine
iele

+hahniiwa.
o

Hd
ti e,

tfken

e,

ha

Ohoken,

hah

ta Ilka

ha

tsa;it;aiten

ya'uki ta
(
)

+hannuwa.
a,

(4395) Ta, ha

tsa;i^a'iten

Ind ta jkuitya.

llgagen
ti
e,

ha

llwkoen akken a.

Ta, ha

Iki

+eh-na,

ha

ll«ke,

ha
o

Iki a,
i.

ha

Ini

a;

ti e,

ha
ke,

ttai he, haii InT

Ohoken,

llga,

(4396)

Tataken kah tkakka
llkuitya llgau;^ii,

h

sse

(

)

Ilnau,

o

ka

h

sse Ilnau ll^ke a jkogen Ine tten

HABITS OF BAT AND PORCUPINE.

251

it

should do thus, came.
Therefore, I

if I slept,

I should not

know when

used to do thus, when I lie in wait for a porcupine, I ( ) do not sleep, when (4389) I am watching for the porcupine the porcupine comes, while I am watching for it; I see it return, while I feel that I am the one who did not sleep. For mamma was the one who thus ( ) told me, (4390) that I must not sleep, even if I felt sleepy; I must do as father used to do, when father watched well
;

am

for the porcupine.

Therefore, father used to

know

) when the porcupine came, while he felt that (4391) ( he watched for the porcupine. Therefore, he used to know when the porcupine came; even if he felt sleepy, he did not sleep, because he felt that he wanted to ( ) know the time at which the (4392)

porcupine came.
For, these things are those about which my mother and the others told me, namely, did I not see that the porcupine is a thing which does not go (about) at noon; for it goes (about) by night;
for
it (
)

cannot see at noon.
night,
it

Therefore,

it

goes (4393)

(about)
at noon,

by
it

whUe

it

feels that night is (the

went (about) would be going into the bushes, while it felt that ( its eyes were not comfortable. (4394) ) Therefore, it would be going into the bushes, while For its it felt that its eyes were not comfortable. eyes would feel dazzled. ( ) Night is (the time) (4395) when it sees well. For, it knows that this is the time, at which it perceives; on the place where it
time) at which
sees; it woidd, if it

goes

it

sees the bushes at night.
tell

Father used to

me

that, (

)

when

lying in wait (4396)

for a porcupine, at the time at which the Milky

252

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

!;^uoiiiii a,

han
a,
;

a,

n

Ine tenna, ti e,
e.

W^ke a
(
)

llgaujjjuken

(4397) Ine jkuiten
Ikualkuatten

llkuam

Tdtaken

kkisse

h o

n

sse llnau, 6

ka

llkuiten ss'o llgaii^u
;

ka

lk(5a, 5
"

n

ssiii
e,

Ikoasse Ikualkuatten

03030-'

ti e,

Ikualkuatten /ODOSO
he.
(
)

(4398) ikouki, hin

n

Ikoasse

kwokkwoii

Ta,

h^

ti

lie

ttiiko e,

llgau;^u Una lie; lie Ikualkuatten

Ikouki.

N ssih
he, ti
e,
)

\\j(am tta-i jkliwe.

Tchuen

e,
i

n
;

ssin jkoasse

tata Ikwei-ddaken, kkisse

ix,

tchuen e h
a,
ti
e,

>

(4399) ssin

(

jkoasse he.

Tataken +kakka ke
;

n
a

sse

^auki jkoasse jkhwe
sse
jkiiiten

ta, llgau;i^u

yauki e

tssa

ka ha

jkau Ihin jkhwe.

Ta, ha ka

(4400)

Ikii

Ikiii'ten
e,

Ikaa ssa,

jkhwe

(

)

llhattenttu,

o ha
e,

ta Ilka ti

ha ka ha

ssin jkhou.

He

tfken

ha

ka

ttai ll^w^tten llkhoa
;

jkhwe,

i,

6 han ta

Ilka ti e,

ha ka ha ssin jkhou
(4401)
(

ta

ha Inulnutu
ti.

Iki Ikii e,

tkdkka

)

ha

a, ti e, la

Una he

Tataken kan +kakka ke, n

sse ya'uki ttu llwei, o

ka
e.

llkuitya llgaujj^u; ta, tssa a >'auki ttamsse ttui,*

ha
(

(4402)

N

yaiiki ssin

ll;^aih

ikdroken ilwei;
tttii,

ta,

llgaujj^ii

)

e tss'a a ^auki ttamsse

ha
i
;

6.

He
I,

tlken

e, i

ka
e,

Iku ttamssg
i

ssuen >wanni,
e, i

6

ta

Ilka

ti

Ihammi,

ti

ssan do llnau, ha 6a ttai

ssa,

ha

k6a
(4403)
i

Ine 6a ttu.
|ki |kya,
;

* Tss'a a jnuflttu yauki

ha kan |ku
ti

e.

He

tiken

e,

yaukt ta jkoroken
i

llwi, T

6 ften ta Ilka
ti e, i

e,

tss'a a,

ka

lia

sse Iku llnau, o

kki-ssa +i,

yaiiki Ikoroken llwei-ya, han

Iku-g Ine sse ttu.

;

HABITS OP BAT ANB POECUPINE.

253
the time

Way
at

turns back, I should

know

that

it is

which the porcupine

me

Father ( ) taught (4397) about the stars; that I should do thus when
returns.
it

lying in wait at a porcupine's hole, I must watch
the stars; the place where the stars fall,*
is

the

one which T must thoroughly watch. place it really is which the porcupine
the stars
fall.

For this (4398) ( ) is at, where

Things I must also be feeling (trying) the wind. which I should watch, father in this manner taught me about, things which I should ( ) watch. Father (4399) said to me about it, that I should not watch the wind (i.e. to windward), for the porcupine is not a thing which will return coming right out of the wind. For, it is used to return crossing the wind
in a
( )

slanting direction, because
it

it

wants to smell. (4400)
in

Therefore,

goes

across

the

wind
it,

a

slanting

direction, because it

wants
(
) it

to smell; for its nostrils

are those which tell
is

about

whether harm (4401)

at this place.

Father used to
strongly
a thing
also

tell

me, that I must not breathe
for,
it is.

when

lying in wait for a porcupine;

which

does not a little hear,t

I should

not rustle strongly; for, a porcupine ( ) is (4402) Therefore, a thing which does not a little hear. we are used gently to turn ourselves when sitting

because
it

we
it

came,

fear that had we done would have heard.J

so (noisily), as

* The porcupine -will come from the place at which the star (4397) seemed to fall. Therefore, (4403) ears hear finely it indeed (?) is. t A thing whose we do not rustle much on account of it; because (it is) a thing which even if we thought that we had not rustled much,

would hear.
} If the porcupine

had heard,

it

would have turned back.

(4402')

254

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

YI[.— 127.
L.

THE IKA-KAU AND THE WILD
{Dictated, in January, 1878, hy Ihaii+kass'o.)

CAT.
au ha

(6085')

Ha

llkuan

ka ka: <'Tcha, tcM,
;

tcha, teha,"

ywei llgudtten

au

lia

Ina llgudtten,
llguatten,

au
i.

llguatta ta,

Opuoin ta
Ilgu4tten.

;

he,

ha

Ine

ywei

y&yeim kkuita

Ine llkou ha, hi-ta

kuwk-g

Ine

>Vei

VII.— 148.
L.

THE BABOONS AND
who heard
it from

llj^ABBITENll;t^BBITEN.
Hxabbitfnll^abbiten.*)

{Dictated, in Februwry, 1876, in the Katlcop dialect, hy Dfajkwain,

(5930)

Ihiilhii

ktah ha

Ini ll;^dbbitenll;^dbhiten,
lla

6

han

Ihih

Ihu e

ha ssiii ^annugii Ikam

he.

(5931) ttamberre, he Ihu a ha d hg. " Ikorn llj{;dbbitenll;^abbiten kkah Ike llkhoa
Ha
;

Hah ha Ikammainya Hg Ihiilhii ha ( ) kui:
Ikiiiten

ften

sse llkam

Iho

ha,

i

sse

Ikauken ttatten

Ikaim ha."

Ihulhuken ha Iku

llnau, lijj^abbitenlij^abbitah

ka ha
Ino tte

(5932)

li/ke he, (

)

hah

llkuah

ha

ttuttii he, ti e,

he

dda.

He
(

ll;^dbbitenll^abbiten

ha

l^ke,
Ikii
;

he ^uxu ka

luhaluhahn, i.t

He

Ihiilhii

ha

Ikdaken llkhde

(5933) ikam ssa
(5930') (5932')

)

llj^abbitenll;^dbbiten
this

hih ha Ikwalkwa

* Wx'^mtenWxdlliten told
\huru ggau (a cousin),
t
\nilru,

himself to Dia\kwqin, y6-hld,

and

\kioa\hv,,
;

when they were

children.

"^ ^^i^

4:kakken n, uken jxwenya

Ihulhuken
ti e,
i
;

Ikii-g jng

jywain ha,

ti e,

u xux'^gfn Mkho Ikou." ha kkugrriten he hah l^jke,
;

he x^x" llkho Ikou. H^, he Ikii Ikwalkwa Ikam Hkhaiten, hm Iku llkam Iho ||a llxabbitenllxabbiten.

;

SAXICOLA. CASTOR

AND WILD

CAT.

255

YII.— 127.
L.

THE SAXICOLA CASTOR* AND THE WILD
CAT.
It (the Saxicola Castor) says:

"Tch|,

tcha, tcha,

(6085)

laughing at the wUd cat, when it has espied the cat, while the cat is lying down, lying asleep and it is laughing at the cat, on account of it.
tcha,"
it is
;

when

The other
all

little

birds (hearing
cat.

it)

go to

it,

they are

laughing at the

YIL— 148.
L.

THE BABOONS AND

ll;^A^BITENll;^ABBITEN.

The baboons espied \\j(dbhiten\\j(abbiten^ as he was (5930) coming away from the white men whom he had been to visit. He was carrying flour, which the white men gave him. And the baboons ( ) said "Uncle (5931) \\j(abhiten\\j(abbiten seems to be returning yonder; let us cross his path (?), that we may knock him down." The baboons did so \\-)(abbiten\\j(dbbiten thought he would speak to them, ( ) he asked them what they (5932) were saying. And \\j(abbiten\\-j(abbiten remarked upon And the baboons their foreheads' steepness (?).t
:

;

angrily (?)

came down

to

(

)

\\j(abbiten\\j(abbiten

;

they (5933)

* The \ha-him or Saxicola Castor

is

a little bird found in BuBh.about. It
is

manland.

It lives in trees and

flies

not eaten by

Bushmen.
ugly! your foreheads resemble ('5932') f "Ye speak to me! ye are The baboons became angry with him, overhanging cliffs " because he derided them he said that their foreheads resembled overhanging cliffs. And they broke off sticks, on account of it
!
;

they went towards \\^dhhiten\\j(alUten.

256

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ikam llkhaiten
llj(;abbiten,
i.

e,

he kie

sse ss4, jkauken-a ll^j^dbbiten-

Ihiillnika Ika'ukan Wx^^ai ssa;

Mn

ha ttauko kkan
!

(5934) l«keya

(

)

he oken-ggu, a

:

" Tata-ggu-wwe

u kkdp

sse a ssi a, llj^dbbitenlljj^dbbiten Ina, ssi sse llgwlten i."
Il;^d,bbitenll;^abbityan

ha

llnau,

ha

tui, ti e, Ihiilhiika
+i,
'

(5935) jkaiiken Ikweidda,
tte
Iki,

i,

han

( )

ha ka han

N

x&

sse

n

ddi ?

o

Ihiilhii
4=i,
'

ya'uki ttamsse

Ivi/kwaiya.'

Han ha
(5936) sse
llkaii

ku-kkiiiten

N

kkaii sse llkaiten Una,
(

n

ssin Una; Ihiilhu sse llkua iku
Una.'

)

!;^ai

Iki

llkhde

n o

He
Una;

Ihiilhii

llkuan

ha

Ike

lla

ha, o

han

llkau ss'6
a,

Ihiilhiika
:

jkaukan ha li/keya he Ikagen

hin

(5937) ha ka

"

Amm

llWk^nyyu

(

)

lix^bbitenllj^dbblten
I

Ina gwai; iten

^

ssan +umin o
;

llgwiten Una, o
llwkoen, ti
e,

ll;^abbitenll;^d,bbiten Ina

ta,
;

u

Ikii e,

he

Ikwei u,

i,

hd-ta Ikwilkwi

hin
a

llkho,

he ya'uki ssan

(5938)

(

)

oroko Ikiirru."
;

Ihiilhii

h|

e jkerri, haii

ha l«ke

Ihiilhuka Ikaiiken

han ha

kii-kkiii,
( )

han

ttiittu Ihuti

(5939)

ihiika jka'uken, Ihiilhuka jkaiiken
e,

In8

^au lliikoen,

li;^abbitenil^dbbiten e jkerri, ha,

he e jkauken, he

Ikii e,

ka he ha

llei

ll^dbbitenll;^abbitenka tlkentfken ?

(5940)

Hin +kakken
kie Iku
ti e,
e, llei

kiii

l^wan he Ike-Opua

e

;

ha

(

)

he

ha-ka tfkentiken.

Hin

Ino

^au

lli:!koen,

he e jkelkerriten llkuan

Ikii e,

sse Ikilki ll;^abbiten-

ll;^d,bbitenta ti'kentfken;

he e Ikejkerriten,"

(5941)

(

)

He

ll^abbitenll^abbiten

ha

ku-kkiii,

han
ta,

+i,

'N ka

sse tte Iki,

n

ddi, Ihiilhii sse yvXixi

n?

he

;

THE BABOONS AND
broke
off sticks,

1I;^1bBITENII;^j(BBITEN.

257

with whicli they intended to come

to beat \\j(abhiten\\j(dbhiten.

The baboons'
called out
( )

children also

came

;

going along, they
it
:

to their parents

about

"0

fathers

!

(5934)

ye must give us \\j(dhbiten\\j(abhiienh head, that we may play with it."
\\-)(abbiten\\j(abbiten

did as follows,

when he heard
'

that

the

baboons' children were speaking in this

manner, he ( ) thought to himself, What shall I (5935) do ? for the baboons are not a little numerous.' He thought, 'I will climb a krieboom, that I may sit above iu the krieboom the baboons will have (?) to drag me down from the krieboom.' ( ) (5936) And the baboons went up to him, as he sat above in the krieboom the baboons' children spoke to each " First look ye at other about it, they said (5937)
;

;

:

(

)

\\j(abbiten\\j(ahbiten''s

big head;

we

should be a long
is like

while playing there, with Wj^abbitenWj^dbbiten's head
for ye are those
it

who

see that its bigness

this

seems as if it would not ( ) quickly break." A (5938) haboon, who was grown up,* spoke to the baboons'
children
;

he questioned the baboons' children
children
(
)

:

Did
(5939)

not the baboons'
\\j(abbiten

was grown up

—that they who were children
as if he

see

that

W-j^abbiten-

should think that they could possess the pieces of
\\j^dbbiten\\-j(dbbiten ?
little

They spoke
)

were

their

cousin

;

that

(

they should possess his pieces. (5940)

Did they not
those
(

see that those

who

are

grown up would

be the ones to get the

pieces of \\j(abbiten\\j(abbUen',
?

who

are

grown up

)

And

\\j(abbiten\\j(abhiten

thought

to

himself

:

(5941)

'What

shall I do, (in order) that the baboons
of tte

may

* The name

after the rest, is \uhai \h6 \kw&, or

head baboon, the big, old one, which goes (5932') " Schildwacht ".

;

258

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN EOLKLORE.

(5942)

Ikii

+kakken luha o
llou,

n.
A.'

Tlken

Ikii

l^wSn,

(

)

he

sse

!kei

lie

ddiS
+i,

He
)

ll^dbbitenll^abbiten
sse

kii-kkui,

han
Ihu.

'+kam0pua, h kan
Ta,
(

ha amin l«keya
sse

(5943)

ihiilhii

§,,

Ihiilhu llkuaii

^auki ttamsse

Ihammi jkabbu; n
jhammi, 6 he tt6a,
(5944)

sse llWkoen, ti e,
ti e,

he Ino ^au

h

li/keya
)

he

a, Ihu.'

He

ll;^iibbitenll;^abbiteii (

h|

kii-kkui, hail l«ke,-6

ban ddauddau
kkaii dd6a e
a,

he, -han

ha
ii,

kiii:

"Ihu

wwe

!

Ihiilhu

he Una
)

u kkoo
ti
i.

dd(5a ll^auwi he."

(5945)

He

Ihulhii

ll^d,bbiten

h| llnau, ( +kakka he
Ikii

hiri kig ttu, ti e, ll;^dbbitena,
e,

Ibu

sse

ll;^auwi he,
!ku;^e

Ihiilhugen ha

Ikaiiru-i,

H^, Ihulhu ha
he,
( )

(5946)

-j^dtui

Il;^abbitenll;^abbiten,

i;

ha ha

bbai,

o

\\^k.e

a Ihulhu jbammi
Ihiii,
(

lla a,

bail or6ko llkhde, 6 Una.
;

Hail Ikuj^e

o ha bbai Ihulhu

o he jku^e Ikatn

(5947) Ha Ikou, hari

) !kii;^e Ihiii.

VII.— 75a.
IIEHA
liken,

EA KKUMM.
Katkop
dialect,

[Dictated, in January, 1876, in the

hy jkweitfn ta

who heard

it

from

her mother, 4=kamme-an.)

(4004)

Ikhwaii ^w'a Una, o

ll;^e;

llkbaii

llkauwa,* o haii

yw'a Una; ha ^oagguken Opuoin
3s'6 he, ss'6

tta; bail Ine llkau

ko ^w'a.
ttui,

He
ssa

llkha
i.

6

ha ^w'a
Ikhe,
lafu

Una.

He

llkha

Ikam

ha
(
7
;

(4005)

He
ttd

)

ha

Iki

Ibiri
7

he ha ^dakenggii jkhwi
llkha 3
Ine
;

he

6 hail ka, ha
;

7

llkhaii 3

ka ha
llkha,

Ika
i

hhoa ha ^dakenggu

ha-g

bbii

le

* Probably a contraction

of IIAom h&.

A lion's story.
leave

259

sounds as

they speak angrily about me. It if they would really attack me.' And (5942) ( ) \\j(abbtten\\xd,bhiten thought to himself Wait, I will first tell about the baboons to the white men. For baboons are not a little afraid of a gun ; I shall (5943) ( )
for,
:

me?

'

see whether they will not be afraid,

if

they hear that

I

am talking about them to the white And \\x^d,bbiten\\j(^dbbiten ( ) called
them,

men.'
out,

deceived

— he

—while
men!

he (5944)
the

said:

"0

white

baboons are here, they are with me, ye must drive them away " (?). And the baboons did thus, when they heard that \\^dbbtien\\j(abbiten spoke about (5945) ( ) them, that the white men should drive them away (?), the baboons looked about, on account of it. And the baboons ran, leaving \\j(abbiten\\j(abbiten and ( ) he (5946) escaped, at the time when the baboons went away in fear, he quickly descended from the krieboom. He ran away, as he escaped from the baboons; while they ran to the cliffs he ( ) ran away. (5947)
;

VII.— 75a.
B.

A
The

LION'S STORY.
Bushman
rice "

child cried there for "

hearing came to her,
parents lay asleep
;

while she cried

a lion (4004) there her
;
;

she sat by them, sat crying.

And
lion

the lion heard, as she cried there.
to her,

And

the

came

on account of

it.

she took out (some of) the grass* upon (4005) ( ) which her parents were lying ; because she had perceived the lion ; the lion intended to kiU (and) carry
* The narrator explained that the Bushmen sleep upon grass, which, in course of time, becomes dry.

And

(4007')

260

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE,

llkli|n Ine !ku;^e iMfi, i

;

Olidkaken

Ine ttuko
f.

bbiibbu

(4006)

le.

Hin

tati,

jkhwa

(

)

bbu

leya llkba,

He jkhwa ^6a
o Ikbe.

Ine jliau,

ban a ba
;^a ssin

ll^e

;

ban

tdti,

llkha ssin sse Ika be, o

jkbwa

bbu

leya llkba,

(4007)
li

He

llkba Iku-g Ine Mai, Ikiiken o

li.

Hm

tdti, (

)

Ikii-g Ine ilka Ikbi ya.

He jkbwa
Ikuei
Iki,

;^6a

kui: " I

n

ta Ikbwa, o a

^a

ssin

a bbu leya llkba, ssiten ssin sse Ikuken.
Ine

(4008) Ta,

a-g

bbu

leya

ssi

llkba,

ta,

(

)

ssiten sse
ti

Ikuken, o a
e,

^a bbu
ha
a,

l^ya ssi a llkba.
Wj^e ta

H^
ta,

bin

Ine
Iki

SSI

sse
;

Ika

jkauwi;
;

a-g Ine

jk'a'ui ssi

ssi ssin sse

Ikuki

ssiten ssin sse Ikuken,

(4009) o a ^a

(

)

bbu

leya ssi a llkba; a

^a

Ikuei

Iki,

a bbu

leya ssi llkba, ssften ssin sse Ikuken, i."

VII.— 151.
L.

THE MAN WHO FOUND A LION IN A CAVE.
{Belated, in July, 187S, in the

Kathop

dialect,

hy Diajkw|m, who

heard

it

from

his paternal grandfather, Jxugen-ddi.)

(4890)
ti

N
e,

Ikoin
jkui

!j(;ugen-ddi,

ba kan oa kan +kakka
jkbwa kkauwa, ba
+i,
ti

ke,
e,

ba oa
( ) 11a

llnau,

(4891) ba kd ba

lun jkauka llnein; 6 llkb|n da a
sse +enn,
ti
e,

dda ha
ss'o ssbQ

a,

jkbwa; ha yauki
llgii

llnem
ti

be; ba sse

jk'u,

ha

sse

Ikam

lie

e

l^drra,

llkba sse Ini ba.

MAN WHO FOUND LION
o£E h.er

IN CAVE.

261

on fire witli it * the lion ran away the bushes took fire.t Because the child ( ) had set the lion on fire. (4006) And the child's mother afterwards gave her
parents
;

she set
;

tlie lion

;

"Bushman
the lion on

rice" (because) she

felt

that the

lion

would have killed them, if the child had not set fire with grass. And the lion went to die on account of the fire. (4007) Because ( ) the fire had burned, killing it. And the child's mother said " Yes, my child, hadst thou, not ia this manner set the lion on fire we should have died. Por thou didst set the lion on fire
:

for us, for

should have died, hadst thou not (4008) Therefore it is, that we set the lion on fire for us. will break for thee an ostrich eggshell of " Bushman
( )

we

rice "

thou hast made us to live we should have been dead, we should have died, hadst thou not hadst thou not, in (4009) set the lion on fire for us ( ) this manner, set the lion on fire for us, we should
;

for,

;

;

have died."

VII.— 151.
L.

THE MAN WHO FOUND A LION IN A CAVE. My grandfather, \j(ugen-ddi, formerly told me, that (4890)
long ago did thus: when the rain fell he thought that he would ( ) go (and) sleep in a cave ; (4891)
a

man

when a
for him,

lion

had been the one who had made rain

he should not know the place at which (his) home seemed to be, that he might pass (it) by (in the darkness), so that he might go to a different place, that the lion might get hold of him.
so that
* Ste set tte lion's hair oa fire. As lie ran througli the bushes, they caught •f

(4005')
fire also.

;;

262

SPECIMENS OE BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(4892)

(

)

Tikea

ya'uki ttaffiOpua e llga, ta, lia Iku lele
Inl,

Ohoken;

haii ^auki
Ine

ti

e,

lia ttai,

Ika-a

lla

he. he.
sse

Han
(4893) He,
(

yauki
)

+en-na,

ti

e,

llnSii
'

ss'o

sslio

ha kii-kkui, han
llga'ue
;

+1,

N

kan ddoa

Ikagen
he, 6

IlirJkoen

jkauka llnein;

n

sse

lla

lun
sse

ka

Ina

he

n ssan !haug-n
( )

llnau,

IgAue,
n.'

n

(4894)

Ikiiitye; ta

jkhwa

yauki ttamsse kkau
ssa,

HS
(4895)

llkha da mmaii, han
Ikiii,

Ikauka llnein: han

ssan Ika Ikilki

o Ikauka llnSn.

He

ha

tta, Ilka ti e,

ha llkuan
i

ll;^am llkk; (

)

han han

Ine Iku llnau,
Ine llhoa,

han kd ha

llkhde ssin jkauka llnein,
;

hd ha Iku OpuSn,
+i, ti e,

o

han ka ha
jk'oasse
(
)

llhoa

(4896) 6 han ssin

ha ka ha ss'6-ko

jkui;

ha ha

sse llnau, jkui
Ili:/k6en, ti e,

ya le ssa, o jkui ya kd, ha ha ka ha tte ha-ka tchuen,
llkuan ssin Ikweidaken, +!
ttai.

+i,
i,
;

ha kd ha
sse
(
)

(4897) Ikaa jkui.
Ikii-g Ine

Han
Opuoin

han

He
ha
(4898)

!kui Iku ssa, o

hah
le

ss'6-ko Opuoin.
lie

He

jkui

llnau, o haii

ka ha

Ikauka llnSn, hah ha

ttui, tss'a a,

ha l^wah ha ttu; he jkui ha ( ) kukkui, han +i, jk'e ^a ddoa ssa, jkalika llnein, hih
'

Ika Una,
ku-kkui",

jkauka

llnein,
'

e ttu o ti e ?

'

Hd
Iku

ha.

ha
Ine

hah
(

+1,

Tss'a

dde

;^a
jk'e

a

jk'e
;i^a

^auki

(4899) +kakken,

)

o

jk'e

ya e?
yauki
*

ya

dd6a

Opuoin ha ha

tt|iya,

he

jk'e
+i, (

Ine

Iwkeya ke?'

He
sse

kii-kkui,

hah

N
h

kah
e,

ya'uki sse jkwi jk'e
ln§ e; ta,
ti
e,

(4900) ta-g h ya'uki +eh-na,

) ti

jk'e

h

amm

ttamOpua

jkah-a,

sse tta,

jk'e

kwo-

kkwah Ino e. ha e, h kkdo

Ta,

h

ssan da

Ikii ilnaii, tss'a

a

l;^drra,

jkwi jkwdta.'

;'

MAN WHO FOUND LION
( )

IN CAVE.

263

The

place

was not a

little
;

tinned to go into the bushes
place

dark, for, he con- (4892) he did not see the

along which he was walking.
the place at which (his)
( )

He

did not
to be.

know

home seemed

And
if

he thought,
it

'

I

must go along

in the dark- (4893)
to sleep in
it,

ness seeking for a cave, that I
I find
;
;

may go

I can afterwards in the morning return
( )

home

for,

the rain

does not a

little fall

And
And

the lion had come

first to

upon me.' (4894) the cave it came
;

to wait for the
it felt

man
that

in the cave.
it

was

also

wet
the

;

(

)

when
it

sat (for a little while) inside

cave,

it had (4895) became

warm, and it slept, when it had become warm while it had thought that it would sit watching for the man, that it might do thus, if the man came (4896) ( ) in, while the man thought he would look for a place where he could lay down his things, it might catch hold of the man. It had thought so (but) it ( ) fell (4897)


;

fast asleep.

And

the

man

came, while

it

sat asleep.

And

the

man, when he had entered the cave, heard a thing which seemed to breathe and the man ( ) thought (4898) Can people have come to the cave ? Do they wait And he at the cave, those who breathe here ?
;
:

'

'

thought,
if

'

How

is it

that the people do not talk,
?

(

)

(4899)

people (they) be

Can the people have

fallen

fast asleep,

that the people do not speak to
:

me ?
;

I will not call out to the people, thought for, (4900) for I do not know, ( ) whether they are people I will first feel gently about (with my hands), that
'

And he

I

may

feel
if

should,

For, I whether real people (they) be. it were a different thing, I should call
it.'

awakening

264

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(4901)

(

)

He, ha jkan,

i

;

he ha
a.

tta, ti e, tss'a

a Iku ttan
lla,

ha
i;

Iki Ikiiki,

ha

ikii

a

He ha

Ika sse jkhe Iko
tta,
ti
e,

he ha
a, (

IkSii
)

akken, I; he ha

llkha

Ikii

(4902) ddda

Opuoiii llkhde ssho jkauka

llnein.

He ha

Iku ttamsse

kkwa
L

l^uSnni,

i

;

he ha Iku ha kwakken-

kwakki

Ihin,

H^, ha ha
(4903) Ine
( )

llnau,
llwei,

han ka ha
o

lie

llkhwe-ten,

han ha

jku^e
e,

hah ha

+i, ti e,

llkha ssah Ikhou
;

ha Ikw'ai

ha ssih Hah jkah

llkha,

i

llkha

kkoo

sse

jku^e llgaue ha.

(4904)

He, ha ha

llnau,
^,

hah ka ha hah ha

lie

llkh-wdten, o

(

)

au-

Opuaka ssudh
ha jkhou ha
(4905) llkha
Ikii

ttui llkha, i; o llkhah

ka

Ikw'ai, o llkhah Iku leta

Opuoih.

Hd
(

llnau,

hah Ikwei Ikuah,
le

ss'6-ko

Opuom,
Ikii

)

Ikui Ikw'ain

Ikii

ha

Iniinu

;

he ha ha

llnau,

jkui Ikw'ai e ttah jkui jkhe hi ha,

hah

Ikii kiii

jgoo
(
)

(4906)

ii

!khe;

o !kui Ikw'^ e ha jkhou he, he ttah

jkui !khe hi

ha

;

hih

Ikii

e,

ha

Ika-i, ti e, ttah,

jkui

Una ha.

He
ti
e,

Ikui

ha

ttiii

ha,
;

i

;

he ikui ha
a llkuah
( i
)
;

kkiii

'
:

'

Ha
a

kah
ttui,

(4907) l^wa Ina h Ikw'ai

ta,

Ikii-g Ine
ta,
llklia

Ikauka llnSii Ine Ikweidda,
!;^wa

llkuaii
Ikii-g

Ine

jkabbe Ihih, o-g
tssi-a

h
h,
(

Ikw'ai;
)

ta,

ha

(4908) 'ne !;^wa

iig^e

iki

o jkauka llnSh."
sse
;

He

Ikui
;

ha
ta,
ti

kii-kkiii,

hah

+i,

ha yauki
ti

Ikam He
ta,

ilnSh

ha Iku
e,

sse

!kii;^e,

e

Ibarra

ha

(4909) +eh-na,
ssah
Ikii

llkha

kd ha

sse Ika-a

ha

(

)

jnwa; ha

jhau ha llnau, jgaue

ya jkhwaiya,

—6

llkha

:

MAN WHO FOUND LION
(

IN CAVE.

265

which seemed

about and lie felt that a thing (4901) have hair was there. And he gently approached a little nearer to it and he felt well about, and he felt that a lion was the one which ( ) (4902) And he gently stepped slept sitting inside the cave. backwards (and) turned round and he went out on
)

And

he

felt

;

to

;

;

tiptoe.

And, when he had gone to a little distance, he ( ) (4903) ran swiftly, because he thought that the lion would smell his scent (where) he had gone to feel about for the lion the lion would run to seek him. And when he had gone to a little distance, when a little time had passed, he heard the lion, because (4904) ( ) the lion had smelt his scent, while the lion slept. And as the lion had in this manner sat sleeping, ( ) (4905) the man's scent had entered its nose, and, because of the man's scent, which seemed as if the man were standing beside it, it had growling arisen; because the man's scent which it smelt, seemed as if ( ) the (4906) man were standing beside it that was why it snatched at the place at which the man seemed to be. And the man heard it and the man exclaimed " It sounds as if it had perceived my scent for thou
;
; ; ;

(addressing himself)

(

)

art the one

who
;

hearest that (4907)

the cave sounds thus; for the lion sounds as if (it) had been startled awake by my scent for it sounds

were biting about, seeking * for me ( ) in (4908) the cave." And the man thought, that he would not go home; for, he would run to a different place; for, he knew that the lion would find his ( ) spoor (4909) he would afterwards do as follows, when the day
as
if

(it)

;

* The narrator explained that the lion was smelling and (4907') growling about, in order to find the person (or persons) whom
it

had smelt.

266

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ikha ha,

j(si

—ha ssan

Ikii

jhau ha

llSr^koen

llg^e

llnein

jga'ue.

(4910)

He
llgaiie

Iga'ue

h| Iku Ikhwai, 6
ti
e,

(

)

Ikulten ttaiiko \kaxe,
i,

o ha ha ttui llkha,
Iki ha.

llkha Ikweidda,
llnau,

6 llkha

H^, ha ha
he ta
li,

han
)

Ikujj^e lla,

han

(4911)

In!

!k'e
i.

e

I;^d,rra,

e

(

he

like

kkufi. ikl

he,
li

He ha

ha

kii-kkiii,

han

+i,

'N

kaii sse jku^e

a kkie jkhe,
lun he.'
+1,

n

sse

He jk'e e kkfe like Una,
(
)

n
'

sse
;^a

(4912)

lid

He ha h|

ku-kkui, han «,
ssiii

A

kah
ti
e,

Ibbo-ken-ggu ya'uki

ll^Sm tkakka ke,
llnau,
li

llkh| tsa;^au,
li

ha ka Wy^y^
(

llwke ko,

he

(4913) llkho

o llga?

n

sse

)

liwkoen, ti e,

kwo-kkwan
Iko
ti
e,

Ino e, a kki'e

Ilka

Una.'

He, ha ha

jkii^e

Ha,

6

li,

i;

han ha

llvikoen;

he ha ha llwkoen,
( )

jk'e
kii-

(4914)

iikuSii !khe Ik'au ta

li-ttu-jjcau.

He
;

ha h|

kiii-ten +i,

'

N
lla

kah
e.'

llkuan sse

lie

ik'e

ta, ti

Ilkuah

llkho Ik'e Ilkuah

He ha ha
(4915)
Ik'e, i
:

jk'e,
)

I.

He, ha ha ku-kdi-ten Iwkeya
+i,

"

U
ti
e,

kka
e.

(

kah

h ^au
ti
e,

ttai leya

Ikuken,

6

llga

ka

N
ssih
Ikii

Iku llnau
i.

llkha

OpuSinya;

he tiken
(4916) g
iiitiia

u

Ini h,

Ta,

u ^auki
(
)

ssih sse Ini h,
ta,
ti
;

yaiiki
i,

Opuoinya;
e,

e,

ha
jke-

Opuoinya,
ssa u.

he

ti

llkhoa,
+i, ti e,

u

Ini h, i
lla

h

Ta,

h

Ilkuah ssih

h kah
(

Ika llnaiki

(4917) Una, Ikauka
h,
llkoe

llneih,

o llkhah

^

ikii

)

ssah jka
e,

jkaiika llnSh.

N

ya'uki +eh-na, ti
;

llkha da

ssho

Ikauka llneih
ti
e,

h

Ilkuah

+i,

ti

e,

h kah
( )

(4918) !kah-a

llgaue,

kkie llkowa, h sse tte h-ka

MAN WHO FOUND LION

IN CAVE.

267

had broken, if the lion had not killed him, he would afterwards look seeking for (his) home in the
morning.
the man was (still) (4910) ( ) because he had heard the lion, namely, running, the noise that the lion made, while the lion sought the day broke, while
to get him.
fire

And

And,

as he ran along, he espied the

to

) they kindled (4911) ( he thought I will run to the fire which stands yonder (?), that I may go to the people who are making fire there, that I may go And he ( ) thought Dost (4912) to sleep (among) them.' thou not think (that) our fathers also said to me, that the lion's eye can also sometimes resemble a fire by night? I will ( ) look whether it be a real (4913) And he ran nearer to the fire which burns there.' fire; he looked, and he saw that people were lying round (?) in front of the fire. ( ) And he thought (4914) for the thing seems as if I will go to the people

of

some other people, which
themselves.

warm

And

;

'

:

'

:

'

;

they are people.'

And he went
people

to

the people.

And he
think,
?

told the

about

it:

"Do
;

ye

(

)

that I have (4915)

not walked into death this night

It

happened

to

me

that the lion slept

therefore ye see

me

!

For,

ye would not have seen me, had the lion not slept; because it slept, hence it is that the thing seems (4916) ( ) For, I had that ye see me; I have come to you. wait there (in) the cave, thought that I would go to but, the lion had ( ) come to wait for me in the (4917) I did not know that the lion was sitting iaside cave.
the cave
;

I thought that I

would

feel about, seeking

I might lay down Then, when I walked into the (4918) my ( ) cave, I heard a thing which sounded as if it breathed;
for a place

which was dry, that

tilings there.

268
tchueii,

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

!.

He
e,

tiken

e, £i

llnau,

n ttS
e

le-ssa

jkaaka
llkuan
(
)

llnan,

h
ti

ttui tss'a a l^wSii
\k'e
llkuafi

ha ttu;

lie-g

n

(4919)

Ine +!,

ss'o

Wxam
ti e,

Ika

Una,

Ikauka

llnein.

^
£l

llkuan ttui,

tss'aka ttu yauki

IvwSi
(4920) o
ii

Ikui;

Ine ku-kkiii,

n

+i,

n

sse

amm
o

jkan,
(
)

yaiiki tte ii-ka tchuen.
;

N
e,

Ine

jkan,

kail Iku Iki ii-ka tcliueii
jkSii,
i.
;

he-g h llkuan Ine ttamsse
ti
e,

^
he-g

ikii-g
ii

Ine

tta,
ti

h

Ikii-g

Ine
a,

jkaii
( )

(4921) ikuki

Iku tta,

llkka

^
jk'e

ddda

Opuoin,

ilkoe ssko.

N

Ikii-g Ine

kkwa
e."
a,

l^uonni, o kaii

kail, tta, ti e, llkha (5a Iku

ddoa

(4922)

Hail Ine li;keya
Ino

jk'e

kkulten

kkulten
e,

(

)

yau

dd(5a ttui, ha-ka llgaue;
;

he tlken

jk'e sse,
( )

kkuiten sse Ik'oasse llkha

ta,

ilkha

kd ha

sse

(4923) o llkha

Ika-a,

ha jnwa.
dd6a
ti

He, he ttui

llkha, i;

o

llkhaii ttiittu llgaue Iki ha.

llkh|ri ttuttu, ti e, jkui

a
(4924) ha

llkuaii ssiii llkuaii

ike ssa ha,
e,

ha

Ino dde, o ti
(

e,

jkhou,
llnSii
;

Ikui

jnwa Ikw'ai
llkuaii

)

llkuaii

llgwi-ssiii
llneiii

A

a.

Tiken

ttaii,

ha Una

a a

haii

ka

Ikui llkhou +ka,

ha

a,

ha

sse

Ini

Ikui.

(4925)

!g^ii^y%6n Iku jkhwai, 6
he.

llkhaii
i,

dd^
hiii

ll;^e

(

)

Iki
e,

Ti

e,

jga'ue

Ine

jkhwai,

Ikii-g

Ine

llkha Ine ttai,

^u

ttiii jk'e, i;

6 haii llkuaii
e,

tta,
ttai,

Ilka
(

(4926)

ti
j(Vi

e,

llkoiii

Ikii-g

Ine

Ihiii;

he tiken

ha

)

ttui jk'e, i;
Ik'e ssaii Ini

o haii

tta.

Ilka ti e, llkoiii Ikii Ihiii.
Iki e, tss'a a,

Ta,

ha

;

ta llkha

ya'uki

ka

ha

sse sse

i,

6

llkoiii

ya

jkhe.

MAN WHO FOUNB

LION IN CAVE.
also to

269

and I thought that people seemed
there
(

be waiting

(in) the cave. )

I heard that the breathing (4919)

of the thing did not

sound like a man; I thought

that I would first feel about, while I did not lay

down

my

things.

I felt about, while

(

)

I

(still)

had

my (4920)
was

things; and I felt gently about.

I felt that I
(it)

touching hair; and I became aware that

must
cave). (4921)
it

be a lion which

(

)

slept,

sitting

in

(the

I turned softly back,

when

I became aware that

was a

lion."

He

told the other people about
its

it

:

(

)

Did not the (4922)

other people hear

seeking?

Therefore, the other
;

people must watch for the lion

for the lion

would
they

come,

when

the lion had found his spoor.
)

And

heard the
get him.

lion, as (

the lion questioned, seeking to (4923)

The
to it

lion asked,

where was the man who
smelt that the scent of
at this house ?
it

had come

—because
(
)

it

the man's spoor

had ceased

thing seemed, as
the

if

he were at this house;
visible,

The (4924) wanted

man

to

become

that

it

might get hold

of the

man.
broke, while the lion was
(still)
it

Day
them.
lion

threatening

(

)

(4925)

When
;

the day broke, then
;

was, that the

went away, leaving the people
rising
therefore,
it

because the sun
(

was

it

went away,

)

leaving the (4926)

people, while

felt that

the sun rose.
it
;

Tor (other-

wise), the people would perceive

for the lion is

a thing which

is

not willing to come to us,

when

the

sun stands

(in the sky).

;

270

SPECIMENS or BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

VII.— 161.
L.

CERTAIN HUNTING OBSERVANCES, CALLED INANNA-SSE.
{Dictated, in September, 1875, in the

Kathop

dialect,

hy Dia!kw|in,

who heard

it

from

his mother,

+kamine-an.)

(5301)

O

1

!nanna-sse

©puai,

Iten

Ikwei yo-ken,

ddi

6 iten ka, Opuai sse Ikuken.
Ikuken, o
i

Ta, Opuai yaiiki sse

;^a

jnanna-sse ha.

Iten
i

llnau, tss'a a

yauki

ll^u^rrita, hail a,

i

hi ha,

l;^a
ti

©puai; o ften ka, Opuai ya
e,

ssiii

H^am
llnau,

ywaii (5302)
( ) i

ha Ikwei ^o,
haii
a.
)
1

i.

Ta,

Opuai
a,

Iki

hi

tss'a

a jnerritya, ha-ka
Iku-g
Ine

tss'a-ken
ti e,

Iku
a,

kkoan
1

Ihin;

^wan,
li;^afa

tss'a

ssih
e,

ha ha-ka
tss'a
a,
i.

Tss'a-ken
ssih ha,

Iku-g Ine ^wan,
a,
ti
e,

(5303)

ti

(

ha-ka

ha ka
a ya'uki
;

Ikwei yq,

He
(5304)
( )

tiken

e, jk'e

Ikejkerriten

ka a hi

a, tss'a

jnerritya,

ha-ka ha.
i

He
ha
l;^a

ya'uki a hi
e,

haka-kku
ti

ta,

he

Ikii

a hi

a,

he +en-na he,

e,

he

kie sse

Iki Igilgi

jgauoken, Igaiioken sse Ikha Opuai.
i

!k'e-ten llnau, o

jkhwai, hin ^auki a hi a,
e,

(5305)

(

)

"whaita a, o hih tta, Ilka ti

whai

^a'uki ttam-

sse ttai.
Ikii

Ta, ha ka

Ikii llnau,

llga ki-ssa e,

ttalya ttih;

jgaiie

Ikii

jkhwai, o

hah ka ha tt^-a ttih.
a,

(5306)

He
a
;

tiken

e,

(

)

jk'ejkerriten

^auki ta a hi

whaita
i

6 hih
a,

tta,

Ilka ti e,

Opuai ka ha

sse llnau,

ha

whaita

ha kko

ll^ain
;

ywah whai

;

ha kdo yauki

(5307) Ikam lie ti Opuorru-e 6 ( ) ha tta, Ilka ti"~e, i ha whai a yauki Opuoin, o llgdgen ki-ssah e. Hail

INANNA-SSE.

271

VII.— 161.
L.

CERTAIN HUNTING OBSEEVANCES, CALLED [NAI^I^A-SSK
When we
this
die.

show respect

to the

game, we act in (5301)

manner; because we wish that the game mayFor the game would not die if we did not show
it.

respect to

We
is
it

do as follows

:

a thing which does not run fast

that which

we

because
does.

we

desire that the

For the

when we have shot game; game should also do as game is used to do thus, if ( ) we (5302)
eat,

eat the flesh of a thing
{i.e.

which

is

fleet,

the thing
acts like

the

game)

arises;

it

does like

that thing of
also

whose
that

flesh

we

did eat.

The thiag
(
)

that thing the flesh of

which

we had

eaten, (doing) (5303)

which

it

does.

Therefore, the old people are accustomed to give us
the flesh of a thing which
is

not

fleet.
)

They do not

give us

all (kinds of) food ; for ( us food (of) which they know that

it

they only give (5304) will strengthen

the poison, that the poison

The people do thus, they do not give us ( ) springbok flesh, for they feel (5305) that the springbok does not a little go. For it is used to act thus, even if it be night, it is used to walk about; day breaks, while it is (still) walking about. Therefore ( ) the old people do not give us springbok (5306) meat ; while they feel that the game, if we ate springbok meat, would also do like the springbok;
it

may kill the game. when we have shot a gemsbok,

would not go
that

to a place near at hand, while

(

)

(5307)

it felt

we
it

ate springbok

even though

be night

It

which does not sleep, (the game) would also

272

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
llkelike ti
e,

Il^am Ine

wliai

dda he; he whai ta
\x^6e

(5308)

iinau,

6 llk'5ii
Ikii

ya leya ha, 6

a

(

)

Ijj^arra,

llk'oin
ti
e,

Ihin ha,

o \x^6e a Ibarra, o

ha

tta,

Ilka

ha
6

ya'uki

ssm ©puoinya.
tlken o hih
e,

Ta, ha

Iku tt^-a

(5309)

ttiii,

llga.

He
a,

Ikelk^rriten

jhammi

(

)

he a hi whaita

tta, Ilka ti e,
e.

Ikhwai ya'uki
Ta, ha ka
( )

ka ha

sse Opuoin-ssin, o llga ki-ssa
Iki

(5310) ha sse [kagen
©puoin.

jkhwai

Igaiie,

6

ha

yauki

He
(5311)
i

tiken

e,

jk'e Ikelkdrriten yaiiki ka, i sse
i

Hxam
ti
e,

Ika-a whaita a, o
li/kali/ka e,
i

lwkal!:yka,

o hin
(
)

tta,

Ilka

ssih jkanna
a,

Ihou,
i;
i

he ko !nwa,
i

I;

he

e,

1

Ika-i tss'aka

ssin l^i tss'a, he
i

IfeJkali/kaken

e

H^am
tta
Ilka

llkellkeya,
ti
e,
i

jkhouwa
Ikl
e,

whai
ssih
i-g

Ikw'ai

;

6

hiii

li/kalwka

(5312)

(

)

jkanna 6 jnwa, iten
I i

\j^i

tss'a.

He
i

tiken
i

e,

llnaii,

Ika-a

whaita

a,

tiken ywan,
e,

ha whaika ha whaita
i

a,

6
i.

lwkali:!ka-ken

Iku

ti

ywah,

(5318)

a,

Iten

(

)

ya'uki

ha whaita
'

a, ta,
a,

liikaliiika

Iku
ssih

e.

Iten Ine kan

+i,
e,

Tss'a

ka

n

Ilkuah yauki
jku-

jkhouwa tchueh

h

kaii Ine jkhoii he.'
Ine

(5314) kko a ha llkuakka, ha-g

ku-kku, ha

(

)

l«ke:

"A

kah ddda
;

ssih Ika-a, whaita a, hih ss'o e Ikwei

Ikuah, ddl
llkhoa

ta,

h

Ilkuah tta Ilka

ti e,

a ^auki Ilkuah

jkhouwa tchueh e l^drra."
tfken
e,

(5315)

He
tss'a,
Ikii

jk'e

ka

(

)

Iku

llnaii,

jkui a,

hd l^a
a,

he yaiiki a ha Ikammalh whai; he Iku
ssueh, o

ha

kah

ha ^auki jhihya, o

ti

e,

jk'eya

INANNA-SSE.

273

do that wMch. the springbok does and the springbok wont to do thus, when the sun has set for it in one ( ) place, the sun arises for it in a different place, (5308) while it feels that it has not slept. For it was walking about in the night. Therefore, the old
;

is

people fear ( ) to give us springbok's meat, because (5309) they feel that the gemsbok would not be willing to go to sleep, even at night. For it would, travelling in the darkness, let the day break, while it did (5310) ( )

not sleep.
take
Therefore, the old people also do not allow us to hold of springbok's meat with our hands,

with which we held the bow ( ) and the arrows, are those with which we are (6311) taking hold of the thing's flesh we shot the thing, and our hands also are as if we had smelt the because our hands are those springbok's scent which ( ) held the arrows (when) we shot the thing. (5312)
because our hands,
;

;

Therefore,

if

we
we

take hold of springbok's meat, the
ate springbok's meat, because our

thing

is

as if

hands are those which (make) the thing seem as if we had eaten springbok's meat with them. "We ( ) (5313) have not eaten springbok's meat for it is our hands. We think, How can it be ? I have not smelt the Another man, things which I am (now) smelling ? who is clever, he thus ( ) speaks: " Thou must have (5314) taken hold of springbok's flesh, it must be that which has acted in this manner; for, I feel that thou dost not seem to have smelt other things." Therefore, the people are used ( ) to act thus with (5315)
; ' '

regard to the

man who

shot the

thing, they

do
let

not allow him to

carry the

springbok;

they

him

sit

down

at a little distance, while

he

is

not

near to the place where the people are cutting up

; ;

274

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Iki

(5316)

la

whai,
ti
e,

i.

Ta,

ha Iku kan

ss'o,

(

)

6

M

Ihammi
Mil
e,

ha ssan Ikhou whaika Ikarra
ss'o,

Ik-w'ai;

ha kan

i;

o han ka, ha ^a sse jkhou

Ikarra Ikw'S.

INANNA-SSE.
Second Part.

FURTHER INFORMATION; PARTICULARLY WITH REGARD TO THE TREATMENT
OF BONES.
{Given, in 1878, hy Ihan^ikass'o.)

(7258')

Hin Hin
he hi
e,

Iku
i.

Ikii

dkken tchuenta jkwagen, au

hiii ya'uki

hdrru-i,

luhi llkhda jkwdgen, au lln^in j^u jkha (ti e

llnein ttu jke-ss'o hi,
llelle,

hin Ind

ta,

llnein

jfu.
i.

jkha,

i)

hin torotoro llkho jkwAgen,
ti

He
e,

ti'ken
llelle,

hi Ind ta, Ika, i; au hih tatti, hd
llkho

hi

hi

(7260)

hin. totoro

jkwagen, i;

(

)

hiii totgro
tf
e,

ja

jho

jkwagen au 0h6 (jnabba-Opua); au
hin llkhollkho Ikwagen,
i.

hi

llelle,

He, jkukko
au
llgoro
;

Ine

kk-wArreten
llnau,

juhi

llkho

!kw4gen

*

ha
(

Ine
)

ha kkw4rreten llgwlya
Ine
lla

(7261) jkwagen, ha Ine
jho
('7260')
*

Ikam jkwdgen, ha

tdro

Ikwdgen au he
llgoro a

ti.f

jkwS

" one breastbone "

;

pi. Ilgottenllgotten.

f7261') t "nSn a jkwai, ban Iku Iki ha-ha-ka Ika; jkukkoken llxaniki jkdkko, ban llxamki Iku Iki, ha-ba-ka IkS Iki Ikukkoka Ika
;

wai

e

ha Ikhi

hi,

bi-ta Ikwagen.

;

InInna-sse.

275

the springbok.

For he sits at a little distance, ( )(5316) because he fears lest he should smell the scent oi the springbok's viscera (?) that is why he sits at
;

a

because he wishes that he smell the scent of the springbok's viscera (?).
little distance,

may

not

\NANNA-SSK
Second Part.

FURTHER INFORMATION; PAETICULAELY WITH REGARD TO THE TREATMENT
OF BONES.
aside, while

Bushmen) put the things' bones nicely (7258') they do not throw them (about). They put down the bones opposite to the entrance
They
(the
;

to the

hut (the place which the hut's mouth faces and they it "the hut face's opposite "(?)) Therefore, they go, they pour down the bones at it. call it, " The heap of meat bones " * while they feel that this is the place to which they go, at which they pour down the bones; ( ) they pour down the bones (7260) by the side of a bush (a little thorn bush), at the place
they call
;

to

which tbey go

to put

down

the bones.

And another person [who lives opposite] gnaws, putting the bones upon an (ostrich) breastbone ; f he does as follows, when he has finished gnawiag the
bones, he
(
)

takes

up the bones, he goes

to

pour (7261)
(7270')

down
is

the bones at this place.J

* This heap of bones (springbok, gemsbok, hare, porcupine, etc.)
called {Hhalten as well as \M.
f +

The breastbone of an ostrich, used as a dish. (7260') One hut has its own heap of bones; the other man also has (7261') the other man's heap of bones; another man also has his own heap
of bones, the bones of the springbok

which he

kills.

276

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

He,
hi Ine

M lae
\\j(k,

ll^a,

hi llnau, hi j^aua jkwagen kkulten,
juhi llkho hi.

hi

kkwdrreten*

Hiii Ine
)

(7262)

llnau,

hi kkwarreten
t(5i

llgwlya

Ikwagen,
ss'o
hi,

(

hi

Ine
114,

Ikam
toro

llgoro,

e

jkwdka

jixhi

hi Ine
jkiikko

!ho

!kw4gen au jkukko
llnau,

;^u

jkha,
llnau,

Ine
e,

ll^amki

ha \xS(m, ha
hi,

Ine

jkwagen
Iho
Ine
llnau,

ha kkwarreten
(7263) jkukko
jho

ha

Ine

lla,

toro

luhi

hi,
lid,

au
tore

^u

(

)

jkha,
i.

jkukkoka lka,t ha

jkwagen,

jkukko Ine ll^amki
Ine ll^amki
lla,

au ha
juhi jho

kw^rreta jkwagen, ha

toro
Ika.

jkwagen, au jkiikko ^ii jkha, jkukkoka

(7264)

He, hi J
*
j-

Ine

(

)

Wjc^mki, jkukko a l^ara,

ha

llnau,

Tssitssi

ho

en,

au jkwagen.
Ika.

jkukko a Ikha wai, ha-ka Ikukko
llkuaii e;

(7263')

+

i

llkuan. tatti, lia llkuaii Iki laiti,
lie
e,

Mri koa
Haii

Ikauken.
Ikau
a
;

He
a,

Ika'uken,

ha

llkuaii
a,

Ikelkamma
ti

hi.

han Ikamma jkhwa. a ha

aka

e

;

hai Ikarhma

jkhwa a

ha

a,

aka

ti

6

;

au jkui

la'itiken

Ine

Ikamma jkhwa
au hii jnannaIkhi.

latti-0pua.

(7264')

(

)

jk'eta

Ikagen yaiiki hi

wa'i

llgaillg^iten,
ssiii

aseya jk'eta tuken jnwa, jk'eta tuka
llnati,
i

kwe,

Ta,

i

Ike

ttan-i,
;

tiksn yaiiki aken;
i

ta, i ta
i

Iku-g Ine
ttan-ttan.

ttaii-ttaii,

au
e,
i

1

ttan-i

au

I^I
I.

i

jyauoken, au

sse

He

tiken

Ine ttaii-ttan,
Iki

Wa'i Ike

Ikoken-dde.

He

tiken

e,

i

ta ttan-ttaii, au wai.
)
i

(7265') He
au

tiken

e,

jka'ukgn e +e55te, ssi

yauki
i,

(

ta ka, hi llgwiten,
Ine ttafi-ttari.

wa'i ttu.

Ta, wa'i Ike ta Igwain
i,

he,
i.

He

wai Ine ||kh6e jkhe

he

i

Ine ttaii-ttan,

He

tfken

e,

i

ya'uki

INANNA-SSE.

277

And -when they have boiled other bones, they again gnaw,* putting them upon (the ostrich breastbone dish). When they have finished gnawing the bones, they take up the ostrich breastbone upon which (7262) ( )
the bones are, they go to pour
to the entrance to

down

the bones opposite

the other one's hut.

one
to

(i.e.

the neighbour living opposite) also

The other when he

has boiled, takes the bones which he gnaws, he goes

pour them down, opposite to the entrance of the ) hut, (upon) the other one's heap of (7263) ( bones, t he goes to pour down the bones upon it. Another man also does thus, when he has gnawed the bones, he also goes to pour down the bones opposite
other one's
to

the entrance of the other one's hut, (upon) the

other one's heap of bones.

And, they J

(

)

also (do it), a different

man

does (7264)

* Biting off the flesh from the bones. f The heap of bones belonging to the other
springbok.

man who

killed the

(7263')

I think that he has a wife and children. I Another man (it) is. These children are those for whom he cuts off meat. He cuts meat he cuts off for this child (a boy) this piece of meat he cuts off for this (other) child (also a boy) this (other) piece of
;
;

meat
( )

;

while the

woman

cuts off

meat

for the little girl.

The women do not eat (the meat of) the springbok's shoulder (7264') blades, because they show respect for the men's arrows, so that the men may quietly kill. For, when we miss our aim, the place is when not nice for we are wont to be ill when we miss our aim
;
;

we

shoot destruction to ourselves,

when we

are going to be

ill.

Therefore
Therefore,

we become

ill.

The springbok

are in possession of (invisible) magic arrows
ill

(?).

on account of the springbok. Therefore, we do not ( ) allowthe little children to play upon the springbok skin. (7265') Eor the springbok is wont to get into our flesh, and we become ill. And the springbok is inside of us and we become ill on account of Therefore, we do not play tricks with springbok's bones for it.

we

are

;

we put

the springbok's bones nicely away, while

we

feel that the

278

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
ll;^;amki !;^a)ua,

ha

ha
toi

Ine

llxf-^iiki

kkw^rreten juhi
Ine

llkho

Ikwdgen,

au

llgoro;

ha

ll^amki ssa,
jkha,
)

toro !uhi Iho Ikwagen,

au jkukko ^u
li

(7265)

Hill ll^amki llnau,
Ihin
Ikoa,

hi

wa'i,

hin ll;^amki
Ikda
;

(

Iki
llan,

au

hi

llkaueten
lla,

Ihin
;^ii

hin
hin

;^utten juhi llkho

au jkiikko

jkha;
le

llan

^utten juhi llkho

lla, i.

Hih

ssan Ikueh
(

lljj^auken,

(7266) au Ikoa, hin Ikuen
Ikueh ki
le

ll^a'uken,

)

au hi Iwka,* hih
li/ka,

ll^auken au Ikoa, au hi
liika
;

au hih
liika.

k6-k6a, au hi

hih jkahn ddk jgoe au hi

Hin
(7267)

llnati,

ll^a'uken e lkhuru,t
;

he ssueh

Ik'au,

hih

li;^aihki

hho hi

hin

(

)

kda

0h(5ken,:{: e ll;^auken Una
J(Vl

hi

;

hin

llah juhi llkho hi,

au jkukko

jkha.

Hih
Ion hi,

ll^amki

llnau,

Ikaokenka § jkwdgen, e jkauken
;

hih ll^amki, jkarinjkanh llwkd hi

hih

llah juhi

(7268) llkho

hi,

au jkukko x^
llnau,

(

)

jkha.

Hih

llgaitenta

jkwagen,
hi,

hih
llneih
;

llnau,

au hi
ta,

kkwArreten
yenyen
lt§ii tatti

hi,

hih

Iku

au

au hih
jkwagen,

wa'ita
e,

jk-wagen

;

ta,

i

Iku akken
i.

-waita

au

wai Ike ta Igwain
;

"Waiten
i,

llxaiiiki

Iki tchueri,

e

jkoken-dde

he ta

llnau, hi

jkheya

i

liken, ttin.

(7266')

* '^ka

e

jkwai.

^
S.

f llxauken e ssuen jk'au, hi llkuan

(7267) (7267')

t
§

Hin Iku-g Ine llkau Waika Ikwagen.

ta

wai au ©hoken.

;

Inanna-sse.

279

as follows, lie also boils, lie also gnaws, putting the bones upon an ostrich breastbone he also comes to pour down the bones opposite to the entrance of the
;

other one's hut.

They

also do thus

when they

cut up a springbok,

they also ( ) take out the stomach, as they, cutting (7266) open (the springbok), take out the stomach; they go to shake out the contents of the stomach opposite to the entrance of the other one's hut they go to shake out the contents of the stomach there (upon the other one's heap of bones). They [having washed it well] come to lade blood into the stomach, they dip up blood ( ) with their hand,* they lade blood (7266) into the stomach with their hand, while they turn with their hand (holding the right hand like a scoop) they holding, form a tortoise [shell] with their hand.
;

to the blood which has spilt, t that which upon the earth, they also take it up (with the earth on which it lies), ( ) together with the bushes J (7267) upon which there is blood; they go to put them
lies

With regard

down

opposite to the entrance of the other man's hut

(the hut of the

man who

killed the springbok).

With regard
also collect

to the \ka6ken bones, §

from which the

children (breaking them) eat out the marrow, they

them together

;

they go to put them
(
)

down
(7268)

opposite to the entrance of the other one's

hut.

With regard to the shoulder blade bones, when they haye gnawed them, they put them away in the
springlDok: is

possesses things

wont to' get into our flesh.. The springbok also which are magic sticks if they stand in us, we,
;

being pierced, fall dead. * One hand.
t It X

OA«n (//bbj
/T-

blood which lies (Jit. " sits ") upon the ground. They lay the springbok on the bushes.
is

(7267)
(7267')

§ Springbok's bones.

280

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ikuihikuiii ;^aTi sse

yabun hi

;

au

Mn
au
ta,

tdtti,

jkiikko
^

ssan ttan-a. 3 3

(7269)

Hin
"wai.

Iki

lla

jkiikko
lla

jkhkjklia;

(

)

Mn

ta,

jkiikkoka jkhwa, sse

Ion hi;
Iki
lla
;

jkOkkS a Ikha
a,

H^

ti'ken

e,

hi

jkukko

Ikhajkha.

Ilga'itaken e, hi

kkwArreten hi
)

hin

Ikti
I.

hi au llneinta

(7270) llkboullkhou,

(

hii

e,

hi Iki

le hi,

Hin
au
hiii

Ikau Ikam wa'i !^a, hin
ine
!;^aua

Iki

lla

jkukko a hi;

wai

llwkoe,

hin Ine kkwdrreten
laiti

hi-ta jkwagen, hin

koa jkhwiten, he hi ta jkui
la'iti

(7271) sse a

(

)

Iku hi,

jkui
lla

sse Ikuakken,

Ikuakka ha

llhollho,
lla

ha

sse
;

Ike a tchueh,
Ine llan,

au hd kkudbbo
;

Ikam
(7272)
la'iti

jkukko

ha
a,

a jkukko a hi
llhollho.
(

au jkui
laiti

Ikuakka ha

wa'i

ttuka

)

jkui

Ine

Ikuakka ha a hi; han Ine ttuerre

hi,

ha

ine le

te hi,

au

Mho, he,

ha

Ine

Ikam

lla

Ikukko.

Hi
jkoii

Ine Nan,

a Ikiikko hi; he jkiSkko (jkukko Iha)
a, tto,

(7273) Ine ll^amki a ha
lli/ke

he Ikiya;
;

haii Ine

(

)

ll^amki

llhdra,

au

tt6

au jkiikkdken

tatti e,

ha

a jkukko llhollho.

Hd

tlken
( )

e,

jkui

gwa'i

Ine

ll^amki h jkukko
gwa'i,

a,

(7274) ha-hd-ka

llhollho,

ha

a

ha-ka

llhollho.

* In a paper published in the Westminster Review
'No. cvii,

(New

Series,

July, 1878,

ii,

"The Mythology and
it is

Eeligious "Worship

of the

Ancient Japanese"),

stated that the Japanese used the
;

shoulder blade of a deer for the purpose of divination
Pallas found a similar practice

and that

among the

Kirghiz,

by whom the

shoulder blade of a sheep was employed.

[In Staifordshire,
of a sheep

also, sixty

years ago, the shoulder blade bone

was believed

to possess the

power

of foretelling the

future,

Ed.]

;

iNAHNA-SSB.

281

hut;* because they desire that the dogs may not crunch them; while they feel that the other man (who shot the springbok) would miss his aim. They take to the other man (who shot the springbok)
the upper bones of the fore legs, while they (7269) ( ) intend that the other man's child shall go (and) eat out the mari'ow from them for the other man was
;

the one

who

killed the springbok.

Therefore they

take to the other

man

the upper bones of the fore leg.

The shoulder blade bones which they gnaw, they put away in the sticks of the hut, ( ) they are those into (7270) which they put them. They cut off the back of the springbok's neck, they take it to the other man (who killed the springbok)
while they boil the springbok's back, they gnaw its bones, together with the tail, which they wish the wife ( ) to put away, that the wife may, rubbing, (7271) make soft for him bags, that he may go to get things, when he bartering goes to another man; he goes to
give them to another man, when the wife has rubbed, making soft for him, springbok skin bags. ( ) The (7272) wife rubs, making them soft for him; he folds them up, he lays them into (his own) bag, and he goes to
the other man.

They

(the

man and

his wife) go, to give

them
is,

to

the other

man; and the
also
is

other person (that gives
;

the

other man's wife)
wife)
itoj'f

her (the
)

first

man's

which
tid,

Whdra with the

gives some (7273) ( because the other one (the first

red

she

also

man's wife) gave the other bags. Then, the man also gives to the other man his own he who is the man, his own bags. And the (7274) ) bags,

(

f see

For a

little

further

information

regarding

itg

and Whdra

IX.— 237.

282

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ikiikko Ine ll;^amki a ha a, jawa
sse Ikui ha,
a'u

He

;

ban

tatti,

ha ka Ikiikko
(7275) sse IkuI ha
Ine Ikui ha,
a,

au

jnfwa,

jgaojgao, jkukko
e,

au jgaojgao.

H^

tfken

jkukko

(

)

au jgaolgao.

TEEATMENT OF BONES BY THE NAEEATOE'S GEANDFATHER, TSATSI.
(7270')

Hin

e,

n

jkoiiiyah

a,

oa

luhditen

jkhajkhaka
wa'i

jkwagen,

hih tau
;

koa

llgd,iteii,

hih tau kda
Ike
ta

llkhuruken

au hih

tatti,

i

li/ka

llkho ttwi,

au
i

i

l;^a-i,

au jkuihjkuih ya hi wai llkhiillkhuruken,
i

Iwka llkhd ttwi;
i,

^auki

Ine Iki,

ti

e,

i

ta

Ikuei

ywa,
(7271')
( (ttii )

au

i

liikop,
e,

au
i

i

\j(Si-i-

H6

tiken

ta

+umm

le

i

liika
laiti

au ttoa
Ine llkhui
1^
i

a Ikuakka, ha llkuah e); he jkui
ha,
e,

hho

ha
i

Ine

+um-ma, hi
an

hi,
1

i

Ine
i

Iki

Iwka,
leta.

a; h^
I Ine

Ine'liikdo, i;

tatti,
e,

Iwka Ine

\j(a,-i,

au
l^a

i

jga wai.

Hih

i

Iwka ka llkhd
i,

ttwi,

au
)

i

ifeta

llkhuiten,
wa'i
e,
Ilt6

au wai jndeya ta

(7272') au
i

(

waiten

tatti,

yauki jkwaitente, au
a,

jkaka.
e,

H6
ha

tiken

wai gwai
sse
i, i

ha ka Iku

i

ttdi

Ihih ti
jkii;^e
i

lltu ttdi jke

Iku ssa l^a.

Ha

Iku
a,

He,

ha Iku Ha

tt^h,

au

i

Iku leta llkhuiten

ddda dda ha.

;

tsXtsi's

treatment of bones.

283

other man also gives him arrows; because he (the man who brought the bags) wishes that the other man may give him in exchange poisoned arrows, that the other man may give him in exchange poison {i.e. poisoned arrows). Therefore, the other man ( ) (7275)
gives

him

in exchange poison.

TEEATMENT OF BONES BY THE NAREATOR'S GRANDFATHER, TSATSI.
Thus my grandfather {Tsqtsi) was one who put (7270') away (in the sticks of the hut) the upper bones of the
fore leg,

and the shoulder blades, and the springbok's \\khuruken because the first finger (of our right hand)
;

is

apt to get a

wound when we
springboks'
;

are shooting,

if

the
first

dogs eat the
finger has a

WlihuWhhurukqn.,

our

wound we do not know how to manage with it, when we pull the string as we are shooting. Therefore, we sew our first finger into a ( ) cover (?) (it is skin which has been rubbed and made
which the wife cuts out, she sews it for us we put our finger into it ; and then we pull the (bow-)
soft),

(7271')

string, while

are shooting,

we feel that our finger when we lie in wait for

is inside.

We

the springbok.

Then

it

is

that our finger gets a wound,

when we

shoot, lying in the screen of bushes, while the spring-

bok come up

to us as

we

lie,

because

( )

the springbok (7272')

are not a little numerous, when we have gone by night (among them, making a shelter behind which he comes to shoot). Therefore, this male springbok,

shall shoot (him).

out from this place, he walks, coming up to us, He runs away, he goes to
(to die), while

— we
lie

down

we

lie inside

the screen of bushes

which we have made.

28'4

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

HOW THE
(71572')

FATHEE-IN-LAW OF THE NAREATOE TEEATED BONES.
llkuaii

llkhabbo

Iku
e,

a,

6a

luhaiten

term-i au
( )

(7277) jkwdgen; h6 tfken

n

ssih

Iku-g Ine

!ya,

au

n

tdtti,

n

Ihaii

l^ya

M.
Ikwagen,
tatti.

N

Iku-g

Ine

luhaiten

a-a

Ikuinjkuin

llgaitenta

jkwagen, au n

n

Opuaillii llkhabbo

a ssin iya.

H^

tfken

e,

llgdo-ka-jkui Ine iya.

VII.— 164.
L.

TACTICS IN SPEINGBOK HUNTING.
(

Given in December, 1878, ly Ihan+kass'S, from personal observation.')

(8067)

jkui a a [5.],
Ine
llkeii

ban

Iki !;^ni!^iii.

H^
a

tiken
[6.],

e,

ba

jbo l^ui e jkuiya,

au
(

ti e

au ban
Ine

(8068) ka, bi ssin Ine llkbda jkui a

)

Ikbe,

wax ssin

llwkoen jboa bi, au wa'i ggaiiwa jkoaken.

Ta, wai
jk'e-

ssah

!;i^uoiini

jkou ttin ha, au ba Ine jkita,*
ssaii

kkulten wai, wai koa
(8069) au
(8068')
ti
e,
( )

lyuonni Ikou ttin ba,
jkbe bi.

ba

ssin

llkbouken
Iku^e

Han
Han

Ine

* lltuan ssuai wai, wai

sse

|e

jk'e-kuiten.

ya'uki

ttam0pua jku^e

lla,

ta,

ha

baibba'i-i wa'ita j^we-lna,
)

au han ka,

(8069') wai

sse ywHeJi jka

hho

sse jkui a (

ssaii

ta

ti

©piiorru-^.

TACTICS IN SPRINGBOK HUNTING.

285

HOW THE FATHER-IN-LAW
"Dream" was
I

OF THE

NAERATOR TREATED BONES.
the
(

one
)

who threw bones upon
so,

a heap; therefore, I

did

had married into them (i.e. I threw the bones upon a heap, (and) gave the

(7272') while I felt that (7277) into the family).

shoulder blade bones to the dogs, while I felt that my father-in-law, " Dream," was the one who did thus. Therefore, " Smoke's Man " (the son of " Dream ") does the same.

YIL-164.
L.

TACTICS IN SPRINGBOK HUNTING.
This

man [who

upon

sticks.*

stands at 5], he has ostrich feathers (8067) Therefore, he sticks (into the little
it)

bushes) a large stick with ostrich feathers (upon

here [at 6], because he wants it to look like a man who ( ) stands, so that the springbok may see it, (8068) 'when they go towards the (lesser) feather brushes.

would (otherwise), turning back, pass behind him, when he was driving \ the springbok
For, the springbok
for the other people, the springbok would, turning

back, pass behind him, at the place where
* The
\xu'i\j(u'^

(

)

he (8069)

are three in number; of these he sticks two(g()(37') and a shorter) into the ground at 6 and 7 tlie smallest of the three he holds in his hand, waving it over his head to make He had been calling the springbok; the springbok afraid of him. but is now silent because the springbok have come into the curve
(a longer
; ;

of the feather brushes.

that they may run in among the t (He) drives the springbok, He does not a little run along, for, he passes the other people. foremost springbok, while he desires that the springbok may not

(8068')

pass by on one side of the

man who

(

)

came

to lie

on this

side.

(8069')

286

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ikften
i

Ik'iii

M.
Ine
;

Hd
llaii,

tlken

e,

ha

Ine liken

jlio

!;^u],

[6.].

Hai

Hxamki

liken jho !;^ui-0puofLni

e ludrri [7.]

au haix ka, ha
(

sse llnau !^ui-0puoijni
Ine ss'uai wa'i, i
;

(8070) e +enni-0puormi,

)

hin

e,

ha

au

hai

ka,

!;^we-ina sse !ku;^e,

jkou jkhe, Ikii^e jkou
a,

Ikhe !kuf a Ikou ta [9.];

han
tiken

ha ka,

!;^w^-lna
(

(8071) sse jkii^e jkhe ha.*

13.6

e, -wai

Ine llnau,

)

ha
Ine

jkui,
Iki

ha

Ine l^i

wai a jkun

ss'o j^we-lna,

waiiten

akken,

au wa'iten
i

tdtti,

wai a ssin

jkun
ssin
ti
e,

ss'o

jkukko, ha

kkiii,

han
( ) i

Igerri,

au wai a

(8072)

jjiun gg'o

ha-ha, han Ine
Iki,

kkui, au hin ta

hi llkgo

au jkfikko ttu jkgno, hin kda

llgdrre,

ha
(8070')
*
Ina

ya'uki
8.

!^wa jkhelkhe.
;

jkui a ta |gouken

Ikui a ta juhobbaken.

Ha

ta llh|i a

jki'ya.

TACTICS IN SPRINGBOK HUNTING.

287

had

runs forward from it. Therefore, he sticks in a feather brush at it [at 6]. He goes, also to stick in a little feather brush, which
stood, calling them.

He

short [at 7] while he intends, with the little feather brush which is very small ( ) to drive the (8070)
is
;

springbok, as he wishes that the foremost one
run, passing through,

may run
;

passing
is

by

the

may man

who

lies

between [at 9]

he

the one to

whom

he (the

man who
)

drives the springbok) intends the

foremost to run.*

Therefore, the springbok do thus,
shoots the springbok which follows (8071) they divide nicely ; because, the

when

(

this

man
one,

the leading

springbok which was following the other turns aside, it darts aside, while the springbok which had been
following
it
( )

turns aside

[in.

an opposite direction], (8072)

while they, springing aside, divide at the noise of
the arrow on the other one's skin, that and (the noise
of) the feathers,
* [At 8 is] the
leeward.

which went
man who
.

so quickly.
. .

lies

.

;

the

man who

lies to

(8070')

He

lies

.

.

" with a red head".

4.
9.
5.

-

:.

:

f
8.
*
'

7.

*

1.

Row

of sticks

with feathers tied upon them, used in springbok-

hunting, to turn the game. lying in wait for them.
1.

The

lines represent the

Sushmen

From

this direction the

herd of springbok comes.
tied

2.

3.

4.

Here they go towards the row of sticks with feathers upon them. Here stands a woman, who throws up dust into the air. This man, whose sticks they are, lies at their head.
See
I

5x
6
_

Vni.— 23.

pp. 8067-8072.
'^'^

_ ,. ,.„ ,, ... XhaiifkttMd, Dee., 1878.

8

(

VIII.

Personal History.

290

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

YIII.— 88.
B.

IIKABBO'S

CAPTUEE AND JOURNEY TO CAPE TOWN.
First Account.
{Given in May, 1871.)

(242)

N
n ha
iihin

iMn
Iki

ti

e a,

n

ssa,

au n
Ssiten

Ihin n-n-ga !;^oe,
Ine

au
Ine

whai.

llko;^;aitageii
)

ho n-n; han.

(243)

kua,
llhih
llhih,

n llkunllkiih. ( n ©pud^ai Iha;

ssiten

kua h Opuoh, hin Ine Inuanna, au sslten
jkh^'i.

Igwe ui kofohi, au kofohiyaken

Ssftea

Ikam Ma Gau^au; ssiten

Ine

Man +kaka ha;
Ssiten Ine

ssiten Ine llneillnei ha.

Ssiten Ine leta ttoronk-ga
leya ssi Ikwajk-waken

lln^ih.

Iki

au Oho.
l^ta

jkuarraken Ine ssa

(244)

ssi,

au

ssi

Ikwajkwakaken
au Oho.
au

Oho
Ine
Ine

;

(

)

ssiten Ine
Iki
le

Ikui llkdita

jkuarraken Ine ssan
;

hi

Ikwajkwaken

Oho
ha

hin

Opuoin,
leta
leei,

au hi

Ikwajkwakaken
llnein.

leta

Oho.
Iki

Hih

tt;^rein-ta

Au

ssften

Gaiiyau-ka

Ikudrraken

Ine ssan hi hi.

Ssi-ta-kiiken Ine hi hi, ssiten kiia

jkudrra.

(245)

Ssiten Ine ttai;
ssiten

ssiten Ine
;

dago hi
ssi

jgei,

(

)

au

Ikam ssa Totoriya

*

Ihah-gii,

hiii

dago

hi hi-ta IgS, au hiii Ikam ssa Totoriya. Ssiten Ine
ssiten
ssi

ssan herri-i jka'uoken au Totoriya, au
Ssiten
Ine jkai

tabba j^arra.
;

jkauoken,

aii

!kat!katten;^u

ssiten Ine
ll;^a,

herri-i

Ikaiioken jket-

(246) jk^tten.

Ssiten Ine

(

)

ssiten Ine ttabba j'au,

* Vicloria "West.

IlKABBO's

CAPTURE AND JOURNEY TO CAPE TOWN.

29l

YIII.— 88.
B.

IIKABBO'S

CAPTUEE AND JOUENET TO CAPE TOWN.
First Account.
place, I

I

came from that

from

my

place,
;

when
with

I

came (242) was eating a springbok. The came
(here),

when

I

Eafir took
I)

me he bound my
son,

arms.

(

)

"We (that

is,

(243)

and

my

my

daughter's husband,

we were

three,

when we were bound

opposite to (?) the wagon,

while the wagon stood
to the Magistrate;

still.

"We went away bound
to talk

we went
jail.

with him; we

remained with him.

"We were in the
stocks.

We

put our legs into the
to us,

The Korannas came
(

when

our legs

were in the stocks;
the stocks.

)

we were

stretched out(?) in (244)
to

The Korannas came
They were

put their legs

into the stocks; they slept, while their legs were in

the stocks.

in the house of ordure

(?).

While we were eating the Magistrate's
Korannas came to eat
Korannas.
it.

sheep, the

We

all

ate

it,

we and
while

the

We went
on the way,

;

we

ate sheep

on the way,

(

)

we (245)

were coming to Yictoria; our wives ate their sheep
as they
to

came

to Yictoria.

We
worked
chests
;

came
at

roll

stones

at

Yictoria,

while

we

the

road.

We

lifted

stones

with our
( )

we

rolled great stones.

We

again

worked (246)

;

292

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine

Ssften

IkammSn
Sslten
Ine
.I'au
;

j'au,

au

I'auwaken
I'aii;

jiiliisho

Ohoken.*
llkau

Ikammain
ssiten
Ine

ssiten

Ine
jke-

kofohe au
Ine
:

herri-i
herri-i

ha.

kultaken

ttai

lla.

Ssften
Ine

Ine

kofohe
Ikann
ha.

Ikwalkwaken
(247)
(

ssiten
!'au;

herri-i,

ssiten

Ine

)

ttoro

!h6

ssiten
llkaii

Ine
'

herrl-a
ssiten o

ki

llkoi

Ssiten llya, ssiten o o A. '

ha-ha,

kua
(o)

Ikudrra. o

Ikudrra-kuitdken Ikammainya Ohoken.

Ike-kuit^ken
j'au,

Una jknarra;
liihisho

hiii

Nxani
ffin

ikammamya
hin shan

au

I'aun

Ohoken.

ll^a,

llkau-i

Ohoken

au
(248)

!'au.

Ssltesn

Ine

ll;^l,

ssiten Ine

llhiii

(

)

shi ilkiinllkto
lla,

au

kofohe

Ikuinlkuin:

ssiten

ttai

au

ssiten

!kan-na

au kofohe ikuinlkuin, au
llkoenyaii

ssiten

Ikam ssa
Ine
ssaii

"Beaufor",f au

ta

li.

Ssiten

kuarre hi-hi au j^ara.

Ssiten Ine Ikei tabdcca au

Gauyati; ssiten Ine daiiko lahi au !gS-ta jkwagen.
Ssiten Ine

ssan

le
(

Beaiifor-ga
)

ttron.

jkodgen kau

(249)

ssi,

au

ssiten leta

Bea'ufor-ga ttrohk.
;

Ssiten Ine Ikagen ko llhin ssi likuiillkun
Ine
llhiii.

ssiten
Ine
ttai

Ssiten

Ine

Inwoman
au
Ikuefri.

Ikoa

;

ssiten
Ine

Inwomaii
jiihi-ssin

Ikau
!;|;ara,

Ikoa,

Ssiten

au au

ssiten. jkuii

sho

kofohe,

au

kofohin Iha Ivwe.

Ssiten Ine ttai Ikuii sho kofohe,
ssiten llhin Ikain

au
(250)
( )

ss'iten ilhinya,

sha Se-ta-jkoa.

Ssiten ddgo hi

!gei,

au

ssiten

Ikam ssa Se-ta-jkoa

ssi ssi ssa

ttaba hi.

* This

is

explained to be "something like a barrow", carried

by many Bushmen together.
j-

The narrator meant Beaufort West

here.

;;

IlKABBO's

CAPTURE AND JOURNEY TO CAPE TOWN.

293

with earth.

We

carried earth, while the earth

was

upon the handbarrow.
the wagon, with earth
;

We

carried earth
it.

;

we

loaded

we pushed

Other people

walked along.

We were pushing the wagon's wheels
;

we were pushing we poured we pushed it back. We again
Korannas.
barrow.

(

)

down
it,

the earth

;

(247)

loaded

we and

the

Other Korannas were carrying the handOther people
;

{i.e.

Bushmen) were with the
;

Korannas
earth was

they were also carrying earth

while the

upon the handbarrow.
handbarrow with
(

They again came

to load the

earth.

We
chain;
the

again had

)

our arms bound to the wagon (248)

we walked

along, while

we were

fastened to

wagon

chain, as

we came

to Beaufort, while the
set free in the

sun was hot.
road.

They (our arms) were
got

We

tobacco from the

Magistrate;

we we
(249)

smoked, going along, with sheeps' bones.
into Beaufort
jail.

We

came

The
jail.

rain fell upon us, while

were in

( )

Beaufort

Early (the next) morning, our arms were made
fast,

we were bound.

We

splashed into the water

we

splashed, passing through the water in the river

bed.

We walked

upon the road, as we followed the
first.

wagon, while the wagon went

We
On

walked,

following the wagon, being bound, until we, being

bound, came to the Breakwater.

(

)

the way, (250)
;

we

ate

sheep as

we came
at
it.

to

the Breakwater

we

came (and) worked

;

294

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ihu Ine Iki jkeia-na ssi
li-ta
li;

(249')

(

)

kofohe, au
li-ta

llga.

Sslten Ine jkdgen
!ku;^e ti

ko

llkdi ssin

kofohin Ine
le

Ikam ssa

ssi

au Cap.

Ssften Ine ssan

Cap-ga trorik-ga llnem, au sslten llkuwa, sslten kda
jkuarra; sslten Ine Opuoin tten au llkuonna.

Second Account.
{Given in

May
a a

and June, 1871.)
;

(266)

N
Ihan

Ihan e a
e
a,

;

ii-n

n ©puoii a a
jkwA a

;

n Opuon
jkwa
Iku

au han
e
;

jkauwa

+enni-0pua
jkaiiwa
;

n

0pua;^aiten

a,

au han

N^am

a +enni-0pua
Ikuei-u.

n Opua^al
hin
e,

Ihan a a

ssiten

He

ti

llko^aiten

Iku

ho

si,

au
(
)

(267)

ssi'ten

Ikii

Ikuei-ii,

au sslten yauki l^koaiya;
ssi,

Ilk6j(;aitaken

Iku

ho
le

au

sslten
;

yauki Iwkoaiya.
Ikii Ike

Ssiten
ttai

Ikii llaii

ssin kofohi
le

llko^aitaken

ssi-ssi,
le

au ssiten

sho kofoM.
Ine llan

Ssi Ihahgiiken

ll^aih

sho kofohi.
ttai

Hin
;

Ihih

au kofohi;
Han jkhe
ssi

hin Ine
sslten

au hi jnwajnwa. au kofohi
(
)

Kofohin

Ine

Ihin
li.

sslten Ine tten,

au

jh^

(268) bbH

le

Ssiten Ine Ilka liko jgei-Opua-ga a;
Ilka

n Opuon Ihan
!nwa.
Ine

te
liihi
;

-whS, a
sslten
Iki

n
Ine

Ika

ha, a n-ga

Sslten
;

Ine

tten.
li
;

jgaueten
ssiten
Ine

kwai

sslten

Ine

llkei

ikagenko

liihi.

He
(269) l^ara,

ti
;

hin

e,

sslten Ine
Ine

iii

hi,

sslten Ine
lla,

Ikam
jiihi

lla

Gaiiyau

au sslten
ssi

jkii^e
Ine
(

sslten
ttai
lii

sho

au

Ihangiiken
ikii

)

lla,

au hi

jnwalnwd.

Ssiten Ine

jkii^e ^ii

hi,

au ssiten

Ikii-g Ine llkoaken jkiij^e ^ii

ui

hi.

;

IlKABBO'S

CAPTURE AND JOURNEY TO CAPE TOWN,

295

night.

A white man took us to meet the train in the (249') We early sat in the train the train ran, bringing us to the Cape. We came into the Cape
( )
;

prison

house
;

Korannas

when we were tired, we and we lay down to sleep at noon.

the

Second Account.

My
there
;

wife was there; I was there; my son was (266) my son's wife was there, while she carried
;

child (on her back) my daughter was there, while she also carried a little child ; my daughter's

a

little

husband was there

;

we were

like this (in

number).

Therefore, the Kafirs* took

(lit.

"lifted") us,

when
;

we were

like this, while

the Kafirs took us, while

we were we were

not numerous
not numerous.

(

)

(267)

went to sit in the wagon; the Kafirs took us away, as we sat in the wagon. Our wives also sat in the wagon. They got out of the wagon they
;

We

walked upon their
got out of
first

The wagon stood still; we the wagon; we lay down, when we had
feet.
fire.
( )

made

a

We

roasted lamb's flesh

;

iny (268)

son's wife roasted a springbok,

which

I

had

killed

with my arrow. We smoked; we lay down. The day broke; we made a fire; we smoked early in the morning. Then, we left them, we went away to the Magistrate while we (who were in the wagon) ran along, we were upon the road, while our wives ( ) walked
along upon their
feet.

(269^)

We

ran, leaving them, while

we

altogether ran, leaving them.
* Kafir police are probably meant here.

;; ;

296

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
ti

He
SSI
le

Mil
Ine

e,

ssiten
ssi.

Ine

llan

+kika

Gaiiyau:
Ine
Iki
llaii

Gauyauken

+Mka
ati

\\k6j(sataken.
llga,

\\i

au tronk-ga llnein* au
ssi

Ssiten Ine

Iki

Ikwalkwaken
881

Oho; Ihii-kdwaken
(
)

llka'u

te

(270) 0li6-k5 au
au. ssi

Ikwalkwaken.
leta leta

Ssften Ine Opuoin,

jkwalkwakaken
Ikwalkwakaken

Oho.
Oho.

jgaueten Ine kwai,
Ssiten Ine jkagenko,
Ine hi

au

881

Iki lliin sshi

Ikwalkwaken au Oho, ssften
ssiten
Iki
le

en

ssiten

Ine

llya,

ssi

Ikwalkwaken au
leta

Oho
(271) Oho.
ssi

;

ssiten
(
)

Ine

ssuen,
Ine

au

ssi

jkwalkwakaken
Ine

Ssiten

tten,

ssiten

Opuoin, au

Ikwalkwakaken
ssiten
Ine

llkdita

Oho.

Ssiten Ine Ickdan
llkdita

Ihin,

luhi,

au

ssi

Ikwalkwakaken
en,

Oho.

jke-ten
leta

Ine

l^aua

!gei-ta

au

ssi

jkwa-

lkwakaken

Oho.
ssan Iki
Ihiii

Gauyatiken
Oho, au han
ssi ha,

Ine

ssi
ssi

Ikwalkwaken au
sueii dken,
ssi

tdtti e,

ha ga
ha-ga

ssi

ssi hi.

au han

t^tti e,
ssaii

|gei e,

ha

Iki

(272)

(

)

Kattenyah
ssiten ha,

ha hi
;

ssi,

au Gahyau-ga jgS,

au
hiii

Iki

hi

hin koa, |kuk6, Kkahbi-ddau

koa |kwarra-ga-lk(e)owlk(e)ow.
Ine ll^a, hiii Iki le hi

Hih
hifii

|kwa|kwaken au Oho
leleta

Ine

Opuo'm, au hi |kwa|kwakaken
Ine
II

Oho.
le

Ikudrra-kuitaken

yarn

ssa,

hin

Ine

ssaii

llneih-kQ, trronk-ga llnein-ko. * The word " tronk " means in the Dutch language a trunk,

and in Cape Dutch a prison.

IlKABBO'S

CAPTURE AND JOURNEY

TO.

CAPE TOWN.

297

Then we went

to talk with the Magistrate; the

Magistrate talked with us.
to the jail at night.

The

Kafirs took us
to

away

"We went

put our legs into

the stocks

;

another white
legs.
(
)

man

laid another (piece of)
slept,

wood upon our
were in the

We

while our legs (270)
legs

stocks.
stocks.

The day broke, while our

were in the
the stocks,

"We early took out our legs from
meat
sat,
;

we

ate

we

again put our legs

into the stocks;
stocks.
( )

we

while our legs were in the
slept,

"We lay down, we

while our legs (271)

were inside the stocks.

We

arose,

we smoked, while
The people
boiled

our legs were inside the stocks.

sheep's flesh, while our legs were in the stocks.

The Magistrate came
stocks, because

to take

our legs out of the
sit

he wished that we might
eat
;

comfort-

ably, that

we might
( )

for, it

was his sheep that we

were eating.

Katten (" Piet Rooi ") came (and) (272)

ate with us of the Magistrate's sheep, while

we were
;

eating

it

;

also

another

man,

Kkabbi-ddoki,

also

\kwarra-gd-\k{^e)dw\k[e)o'w.

They again put
slept,

their legs into the stocks;

they

while their legs were in the stocks.
also came, they

Other

Korannas

came

into another house,

another "jail's house."

298

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

VIIL— 89. s.
IlKABBO'S

JOURNEY IN THE RAILWAY
TRAIN.
ha,
ti

(365)

N N
ss'o,

sHn +kaka
ss'iten
)

e

li-ta

korohi

toai-i.
llkoi

ss'oen ak'a li-ta

kdrohi.

Ss'iten ss'in

jku

kua kwobbo.
Ike-i

(356)
ki
e

(

Niiiyan ss'in
n,

n-n

llku;

ban

Ine llgweten

le

au ban Mtti e n
le

sbaii jaiten tin,

be

ti

bin

ba llgweten ki
Iboaka.
Ikii

n

i.

N

Ine Ja

ss'm kwobbo;
Iboaka, ta

ba jfuken
bi
Ikii

ssin Iboaka;

ba ttuken

lljj^am

(357)

Ibun
aken.

e ;^u ss'in jkiya,
tatti
i,

(

)

an bin
Ikii

tatti

e bi
ti

Kwobboken
ba ttu
i.

e

ba

lyoi,

be

bin

e

Iboaka

au ban

tatti

e

ba

^li

Iboaka

Kwobbowaken ss'in totto n-n: "Aken Ibiii te de?" N ss'in +kaken kwobbo: "N I'bin ti e a." (358) Kwobbowaken totS k: "Hi Iken te da?" ( ) N +kaka kwobbo: "N-ka !;^oe e ll;;^ara-llkam."
o o

VIII.— 93.
s.

IlKABBO'S

INTENDED RETURN HOME.
ti e,

{Given in July and Auguit, 1873.)

(2874)

Aken
see

+enna,

n

jka ssbo au !;^6e-ssbo-!kui,*
jkiiiten

l^uonniya kke, n sse

n-ka

!;^6e.
is

ISf

sse

(2874')

* The narrator says, that the moon's other name

\x6e-8sh6-\hui,

and

also that the sun's other

name

is

the same.

\x6e-ssh6-\kui

means

{\a\kunta says)

"The man who knows

all

the places."

IlKABBO's

JOURNEY IN THE RAILWAY TRAIN.

299

VIII.— 89.
B.

IIKABBO'S

JOUENEY IN THE EAILWAT
TRAIN.*
wagon)
is

I have said to thee that the train (fire
nice.

(3561

I sat nicely in the train.

We
;

two

sat in (it),

we
(

(I)
)

and a black man.

A woman
in.

did seize

my arm

she drew

me
was

(356)

inside,

because I should have fallen, therefore she
I sat beside a black

drew me

man

;

his face

black; his mouth (was) also black; for they are black.

White men
his

are those whose faces are red,

(

)

for (357)

they are handsome.

The black man he
is
:

is

ugly, thus

mouth

is

black, for his face

black.

The black man then asked me

"

Where

dost thou

come from?"
from
is

I said to the black

man: "I come
:

this place."

The black man asked me
( )

"
:

What

its

name?"
is

I said to the black

man

"My (358)

place

the Bitterpits."

YIIL— 93.
B.

IIKABBO'S

INTENDED EETUEN HOME.
that I
sit

Thou knowest

waiting for the
return to
back.

moon

to

(2874)

turn back for me, that I

may

my

place.

* From Mowbray to Cape

Town and

;

300

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
jke-ta-kii,
fi

ttumm-a
(2875)
iha'ug
ti
e,

ka

kko-kkommi,
(
)

au

ka

Ine

hi;

sse

ttumm-a M-ka

kko-kkommi,
ti-kko-ka

ki Ikue-dda;

Mn
au

ttumm-i
i.

!^<5e-ta

Sswa-ka-!ke-ka kko-kkommi,

H^
ssin

e,

hi Ikue-dda,

bin

ttumm-i,

i;

j^oe-ssho-lkui-kko,
ssiii,

wa-g

Ine

(2876) Ikarra-ka,

n

sse

Ikarra

n

(

)

ssho kko
h.6
e,

ttumm-a,

kko-kkommi
e

e

kkan,

sse

ttan,
e, e,

kko-kkommi

iMn

llkhwe-ten.

He
tatti

n
hi

sse

Ini

kkomm,
(2877)
ihiii

i

(au hi-hi);
;

au ka

Igweten
)

llkhwe-ten

au

jj^oe-ssho-jkui
tatti
e,

ya-g

Ine tta (

Ikalkaiten:
jhaiie
;

au ka
ssin
Ine

n ddoa

Ine

likda-ken
hi,

n

ddda

+kakken+kakken

n

Ikagen ttiiken.
Ta,

n

Ikii

ttabba

I

Ini,

jke-ta-lkagen-ka ttabba-ka
e, (
;

(2878) linSn.

N

Ikagen ttdken

)

ttuinm-i llkhweten-ka

kko-kkommi,

he

jgweten

bin

ttumm-i
Ta,
tatti
ii

j^oeten-

j^oeten-kkuiten-ka kko-kkommi.

Iku

Una

n yauki
au n
Iki

Iki

kko-kkommi
Ine
Iki
(
)

;

au n

e,

n yauki

(2879) jh^e, n ssin
tatti
e,

kko-kkommi
jke
Ikii

e Igweten;

!^<5e-kko-ka

e

a; be yauki

n-ka

kko-kkommi.
;

Hiii
Ikii

^auki tkakken n-ka
jhaiie
(
;

+kdkken+kakken
(2880)
^li^ *t^ ti ^)
Iki

ta,

hi

hi
)

Ikagen;
Ikii

au

ttabba-ka jke

Ikii e,

bd

ttabba

llnSllnel.
;

Hin

Iku ttabba
e

bha
h^
e,

bha bha

sse Ikon-a
llkan.

hi

hi ssan Ini

bha

dken
llelle,

;

Sswa-ka-!kdten

Ikii

hi

Ikagen-ka llnSllnoL;
( )

(2881) hi ssin

liihiliihi

!kauh-ssin hi.

Hd

ti

bin

e,

IIkjCbbo's

intended return home.

301

That I may listen to all the people's stories, when I visit them; that I may listen to their stories, (2875) ( ) that which they tell they listen to the Flat Bushmen's stories from the other side of the place. They are those which they thus tell,* they are listening to them while the other \j(oe'-sshd-\kui (the sun) becomes a little warm, that I may sit in the sun that I may ) sitting, listen to the stories which yonder come (?), (2876) ( which are stories which come from a distance.f Then, I shall get hold of a story from them, because
; ; ;

they (the stories) float out from a distance; while the sun feels ( ) a little warm ; while I feel that (2877) I must altogether visit ; that I may be talking with them, my fellow men.
For, I do

work

here, at

women's household work.

My

fellow

men

are those

who

(

)

are listening to (2878)

stories

from
I

afar,

listening to stories

which float along ; they are from other places. For, I am

here;
visit,

do not obtain stories; because I do not might hear ( ) stories which float (2879) along while I feel that the people of another place they do not possess my stories. They are here do not talk my language; for, they visit their like; while they feel that work's people (they) are, ( ) (2880) They those who work, keeping houses in order. work (at) food; that the food may grow for them; that they should get food which is good, that which
so that I
; ;

is

new

food.
to each other's huts
;

The Flat Bushmen go
they may smoking
Therefore,
* "With the
a
sit

that
(

in

front
at

of

them.

)(2881)

they obtain
stories of their

stories

them;

because
(2875')

own

part of the country too.

f far-off quarter,

WMbbo explains that
and we

a story is "like the wind, it

comes from ('2876')

feel it."

;

302

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Iki

hi

kko-kkommi
tatti e,

i;

au hin

tatti,

hi IkS jh^e,

au hih

luhiliihi-ta jke e,

N" llnau ti e,
!;:^u6niiiya

h
;

Ikii

Ine jka jyde-ssho-lkui Ine sse Ine

kke

h

sse

Ikoalkoa

jke
i

llko.*

jnou n ttukko Ine +i, ti e, j^de-ssho-jkui n sse-g Ine +kakka n-ka Ga'uyau, ti e, n llkuaii Ine ttaii, ha llwke, ha Ine e, n \a.i (2883) sse ddda llkhwellkhw^ ssin, n Ikagen ttuken; ( ) h^ e, ttaitt^ likam jho hi Ikagen. Hin ttumm-i ta, n llkuah Ine +i, jhaujhau f h Ine dd6a hi jhau-a h Ine ddoa tkakken hi h. Ikagen ttuken

(2882)

(
!

)

Ta,

n

ssih Ine Iku

;

;

;

;

(2884) taj"h

Ikii

ttabba TnS, hi k6a !kg-ta Ikagen
hi hi; ta, hi Iku

;

(

)

hd

n yauki +kakken+kakken
ii

i

Iketen

au ttabba.

N

ssin

Ihamm
i,

Ine

ssuen kkuerre
tatti e,

ii

llkunllkun;
Ine ssho.

lik'u Ine sse Ihin, i;

au hi

h Iku-g
a

(2885) ;^ iku-g Ine
ttu

(

)

ttumma
jkajka

llgaue

kkumm, ha n ka
;

ha

;

au ka
le
ii

Ine

ssho,
:{:

ha sse-g

Ine

Igweten

jnunttu.
;

Hd
au ka

e,

h

Ine ttumm-i,
(
)

au

(2886) n jniijnuhttu-ka ku
+g(e)ou.

tatti e,

n
au

Ine ssho

N
juhi

kkoa

Ine

jka

n

ttss'i;

k&
e,

Ine

tumma,
ssih

jhda au !;^arra; au

ka

tatti

h
h h

Iki

Igweten juhi hhoa I^S^ra; hih Igweten Ikam

(2887)

lla

h-ka

|^(5e;

h

sse
lie

lla
;

ssueh

hi;

(

)

ssin ssih

ttummttumm
lla,

ki

lua

au h jnoa
"

|ku,

e

i

;

au ka
'

tatti e,

kkomm
'

llkudh e Ikhwe.
'

Ha
r

f2881M
(2883')

* 1'^?%'^
|k6ro jho.

llnau,

ha

w

sse

|xu6nni, hail |koa |ko jho, han |k6a

t Ihaujh^u a |kwai,

"one

visit."

jh|u|h|u e liikwaiya,

"many

visits."

(2885')

X

lls^e-ta

ko-kkommi.

;

IIkIbbo's

intended rettjen home.
visit;

303

they are used to
are.

for smoking's people they

As regards myself (?) I am waiting that the moon may turn back for me; that I may set my
feet

forward in the path.*

(

)

For,

I
;

think that I must only await the
tell

moon

verily (?) (2882) that I may
is

my

Master
I

{lit.

chief),
sit

that I feel this

the

time when
to to

should

who walking meet
them;
visit;
;

their like.

among my fellow men, ( ) (2883) They are listening

for,

I do think of visits; (that) I ought
I

(that)

ought to talk with
here, together with
for,

my

fellow
;

men
and
send
I

for,

I

work

women

(

)

(2884)

I

do not talk with them;
to work.
first
sit

they merely

me

must

a

little,

cooling

my

arms
story,
it
;

;

that
sit.

the fatigue
I do merely I

may go
(

out of them;

because I

)
;

listen,

watching for a
sit

which (2885)
that
it

want

to

hear

while I

waiting for

may float into my ear.f These I am listening with all my ears
(

are those to which
;

while I feel that

I sit silent. I must wait (listening) behind (2886) ) me, J while I listen along the road; while I feel that my name floats along the road; they (my three

names) §
at
it;
(

float
)

along to
I

my

place

;

I will go to sit

that

may

listening

(with

my

ears) to

my

feet's heels,
is

backwards (2887) on which I went
turn
It (the story)

while I feel that a story

the wind.

*

When
The

a

man

intends to turn back, he steps turning

(?)

round,

(2881') (2885') (2886')

he steps going backwards.
t
people's stories.

explains that, when one has travelled along a road, J Wkablo and goes and sits down, one waits for a story to travel to one,

following one along the same road.
§

" Jantje,"

\ii,M-ddor6,

and Whdhho.

;

304

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ilkudii

ka

!gwee-ten

Ikam

lie

li^dn-kko.
;

Hd

e,

(2888)

i

Iklya iku-g Ine llkog hh8
lla,

he [kg
Ikg

(

)

au hi ^auki
jkliau
tta,
;

Inf Iki
!^(5g

i

eheh.

Ta,

i

Iku e Igweten Ike-a Iku

a

l;^drra,

Ika^kenlk^ka-ken
llnun

jkui

Iken
hd,

Iku

hhdk
lla,
i'.

(2889)

(

)

ha

Ikii'i-ten

a Ikuei

Ika,

han
jke

tta;
tta,

* ik^kenlk^ken Au han tStti e, !;^arra he e, jkui !uW ssho M.
ttssi
aii
)

!;^arra-keii

Ikii

ha-ka \x^e,
jke e
(

!j(;arra-ken
IjJ^de-

(2890)

tStti e, I^Srra Iku

llkam tta.
Iku

llan-na
jlio
lla

kko, hi jnunttuken

ttumm
j^de

llkam

jkiii-

ten-ka jkui Ike;
Ine

h.6,

h&

Ine Ikui-ten

lla, i.

Ha

sse-g

+kerre

!x*^^.

Ta,
(

llkuan

ssho-g
Ine

Ine

ka

(2891) 0h.(5ken aken;

au

) hiii tatti e,

M

dd(e)ouwa
ha.
ssiii

au lyoe-ssho-lkulten ya'uki
Una
hi.

llv^koen hi,

ttai

Ta, ha
\j^6e

Ikii-g

Ine ssan
e.

Una \x6e a l;^arra;
llnaxi,

ha-ha-ka
(2892)
(

yauki

Td, ha ikii-g
!k'e-ta \x^6e,

ti

e,

Iki ssa ha, ) jk'e e

au

ha

sse

Ihamm

ssa

tkamOpua ttabba
ti e,

llnallna hi.

Han

llkuan a +i

!;^6e,

ha llkuan a
i,

sse jkiii-ten.
;

Han

Iku
(

jkd Iki !;^uonni !;^6e-ssho-!kui
sse
tta'i

\x6e-

(2893) ssho-jkui

)

llnwarriten,
ttii;

ha
h.6,

sse

!kui-ten,

ha sse-g
ia.

Ine

+kerre jkhwa
Ine

ha

ssin

^wei

Ha

sse-g

ttabba akken llnSii ttssdrroken,
Ine Ikann llwkeya

au ha

tatti e,
(

ha
)

ha-ka jkauken,
td,

(2894) hi sse-g Ing

ttabba akka ha jkhwa;
;

ha Iku
Ikii
e,

ssih ttai ^ii da j^de
Ine ttai

au

jke e

Ibarra, hin
;

Una j^de.

Hd-ta !^de yauki e

ta llkabbo

(2888')

* In

the

plural,

\&aokenlkabhn

ttss^t-tssl.

In

speaking

of

peoples' backs in tie plural, Wkdbho explains that the

Bushmen

say ttssHt-ttssin-xu.

HkIbbo's intended eetuen home.
is

305

"wont to float along to another place.

Then, our

names do pass through those people;

) while (2888) ( they do not perceive our bodies go along. For, our names are those which, floating, reach a different place. The mountains lie between (the two different

roads).

A man's
)

name

passes behind the mountains'

back;
goes

those (names) with which he returning (2889) ( along. While he (the man) feels that the
that which lies thus; and the

road
it.

is

man

is

upon

The road is around his place, because the road curves. The people who ( ) dwell at another place, (2890)
ear does listening go to meet the returning man's names; those with which he returns.* He will examine the place. For, the trees of the place seem to be handsome; because ( ) they have grown (2891) tall; while the man of the place (WMbbo) has not seen them, that he might walk among them. For, he came to live at a diff'erent place his place it is not. For, it was so with him that ( ) people (2892) were those who brought him to the people's place, that he should first come to work for a little while He is the one who thinks of (his) place, that at it. he must be the one to return.
;

their

He
moon
that

only awaits the return of the

moon
;

;

that the

may go round, ( he may examine
)

that he

may

the

water

return (home), (2893) pits those at

which he drank. He will work, putting the old hut in order, while he feels that he has gathered his children together, that they may ( ) work, (2894) for, he did putting the water in order for him go away, leaving the place, while strangers were Their place it is those who walked at the place.
;

not;

for

Wkdbbo's

father's

father's

place

it

was.

* WMhbo explains that the people

know

all

the man's names.

(2890')

X

; ;

306

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ikii

(2895) oS, oa-ka
Ine lliya

\x6'6

g.

He
M.
e

e,

IlkSbbo oa

(

)

ssin

M;
e,

au IlkSbbo 6a oa-g
Ine
lllya

Ine Ikuka,

llkabbo

da-ken

He
Ine
III

e,

llkabbo
;

oa

Ine

Ikuken, IlkSbbo

llkan
)

!x<5e
III

llkabbo

llkan
e,

(2896)

Ine

Ikuken,

(

llkgbboken Ine
llko

!^6S.*

H^

llkabbo Ine Ihdn Ikerri-ten
!;^<5e,

lla,

Ikuobba-an au

au ban

tatti e,

ha

Ine Ikii Ikwai; h.6 ti
Iha, (
)

Mn

e,

(2897) ba llkudn Ine Ikerriten ssin, hi ha

au

j^oe,

au han
ssho.

tatti

e,

ha-ka

Ikauken

Ikii-g

ine

IhSiha

Ha
Ikii-g

0pu6ndde-ta jkaukaken Iku-g
Ine
III,

Ine

+kakken,
e,

bin
(2898)
(

bin

jkaiui

hi hi, au bin tatti

)

hi Ine
ti

tkSkken ilkuSkken.
e, 7

H^
Ikii-g

bin

hi likuan 3

Ine

Iholhoa hi llneillnei; ^

au bin

tatti e, hi Ikii-g Ine

tabba hi

llneillnei;
;

bin.

Ine

ttabba akken
Ikii-g
ll^i

hi-ka
(

llneillnei

au n-ka
;

(2899) llnSnyan
Ine

Ine

Ikwai,

)

Ikhou jkhe
tatti
e,

ati

bin

llanllafi,

jkhe.

Au

bin

n

llka-ka

Ikhwa, mmaii hi Ihan, bin Ine Ikati Ihdnibdn ssin

hd
(2900) kki

ti
;

bin
^^

e,

hi
,

au ban
a,

ilkd^ai-ta _
e,
( )

jkhwa
'

Ine

mmaii, ban

tatti

ha Ihan
;

ttaiya

au

,_-"'
n-ii
tatti e,

ban
(7216)

Ine

kkan, [kwalkwa ssa n-n
ta,

au ban
e,

* Ik'eten jne

"Blauwputs"
e.
;

a,

au hin tatti

ha-ka jkaugen

Ihoaka, ta, Ikalkagen |ke jku

(7216)

llkabbo-ka jxoeten e llg^bo
hail lliya ki
||a

(

)

he,

ha |ne llkoaken kokoa, koa ha |ne llkoaken

j^oe

;

he tiken
|iie

e,

ha

|ne |ki Ikhui-tten, hin.
;

jlxaii-ka-lkhoa.

Han.
( )

Iki

llxyobbeten

he,

(7217)

lliya

ki

U,

hail

|ne Iki lunn.
i.

4.

He tiken e, He tiken

ha
e,

|ne llkenya llka-ttu,
ttoi

Ha
;

Ine liken tl

0pua
e,
ii

ine

la,

au ha Opua

au

hiii

tatti

Opuailhi-ka

OpuS

Ike ya'uki ta ssin

akken

Ilka hi.

;

IIkIbbo's intended

return home.
did possess
Wkabho's
it;

307

And
the

then Wkabho's father
father's

(

)

when (2895)
was

Wkabho's

father

died,
it.

father

one

who

possessed

And when
brother
Wkabbo's

Wkabbo'^s

father

died,

Wkabbo's

elder
;

was the one
elder

who
died,

possessed
( )

the

place

brother

(then) Wkabbo possessed the

place.*

And (2896)
he

then

Wkabbo
to

married
therefore,

when grown
because he
felt

up,
felt

bringing
that

\ku6bba-dn

the place,

was alone;
( )

he grew old with his wife
that
his

at the

place,

while he

children (2897)
talked,

were
they,

married.

His

children's f

children
;

by

themselves,
)

fed

themselves

while

they
(2898)

felt that (

they talked with understanding.

Therefore, they {Wkabbo's children) placed huts for

while they felt that they made huts for themselves; they made their huts nicely; while my hut stood alone, ( ) in the middle; while they (2899) (my children) dwelt on either side. Because my elder brother's child (Betje) married first, they
themselves;

(my own

children)

their cousiu's child

grew up
)

married afterwards ; therefore, first; while she (the
she married, leaving

cousin) felt that

(

me
;

who, from

afar,

travelling

came

to

me

she (2900) because
;

* \'hah^hass'o (sorL-in-law of WMlho) gave in July, 1878, the following description of Wkablo's place, Wguho, or " Blauwputs." People (that is Bastaards) call it "Blauwputs", while they feel
that

(7215) (7216)

they are slate. and he altogether went round, he, ( ) thus, he possessed \khut-iten possessing, went along at the place and \\xdii-Jea-\Jihga,. He possessed Wjc^ohietm (a certain water pool) and, he, altogether possessing, went along, he possessed [unii. Therefore, he dug out (at) Wkq-ttu [the name of a place near He dug, making a (deep) pitfall (for game), there. Wffubo^.
its

rooks are hlack;
is

for,
;

WMbbo's place

Wguho

;

Therefore, an ostrich was slaughtered at that pitfall, because
father-in-law's pitfalls

my

were surpassingly good ones. QpuonMi here means both Whdhho's son and daughter. f The word

308

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

n-h

a

yaisse

kkiya ha-ha.
Ta,
llai,

Ha

da-ken

yMki
oa

a

yaisseya ha.

ha

<5a

Iku

Ikuken,
(
)

^u

ha.

(2901)

N
a-g

Ikii

a,

Ine

!ko6

Ikam ha,
Ine
Iki

au ha ^oa au n-ka
ikuka ha

Ine

Ikati

Ikuken;
tatti,

n

ssa ha,
Iki

llnan.
oM,,
£i

Au
yauki

ii

n yauki
)

lliikoen

Ine
Ikii
i,

llxani
ll;^a,
(

Il«k6en ti Ikuken

(2902)

ta,

ha ^oa
Iku-g Ine
e,

han Ikuken ^u
au n
tatti e,

ha x^i] lii ha;

n

ttui

kkomm.
n Inaunkko
l;^a-an.
Ini
) Ikii

He
Ikii

n

Ine +;^auinia ha,

e yaiiddofo, h.6

h
e,

Ikii

^erreya au jkii^e
llkuan sse
hi.
(

(2903)

M.6,

n

llkuan

+i,

ti

ha

ha

e Ivitkwaiya,

he n a ha a

Hah
Ikwai.

hi hi.

Hah hd
e,

hi h-ka jkhwd

e* Inaunkko
ii

H^
e,

hi sse
jkii,

Iku

Ikii

kki,

Ihih

h-ii;
(

au
)

hi tatti
tta

hi

hi

(2904)

h

jkhwai.
;

Ta,

h

llkuan

Ik^kkenlkakken au

!ku;^e

h
e,

llkuan ttah

h

ssih jkiijkujje Ikei tchueh.
jkuj^e

Hih
(2903')

n

llkuan

ka

Ikea

loa,

h

llkwa Iki

* To illustrate and explain the e used ^ here, the narrator tells me that one woman says to another W-M \khwa Man e a, Jik
:

\naunhk6 \lcwm.

(2901')

t '^^^

father

was

killed

by some one who was angry with

him, while he himself was not angry; he had been visiting at
another house, and had slept five nights

away from home.

A man

who was

at the place

where

his wife lived, gave the child food,

but it still cried after its own father. The man was angry with the father, because he had stayed away from his wife, Wkdbbo says, and because the child still cried for him. And,

when

the father had returned, and was sleeping by the side of

his wife, in his

own

hut, the

man came behind

the hut in the

very early morning, and stabbed him as he
assegai,

slept,

with a Kafir

which had been bought at Wittberg.

in the hut, the rest (including his wife) left
of the murderer.

As he lay dead him, by the advice

(2902')

t The mother died afterwards of some internal sickness; she was not buried, because, at the time of her death, she only

IIkIbbo's intended

return home.

309

was the one who feeding, brought her up. Her father was not th.e one who had fed her. For, her father died, leaving her. I was the one who went (and) fetched her, ( ) when her mother had just (2901)
I

died
I

;

I brought her to

my

home.

As
too,

I felt that

had not seen her father die,t I her mother die ; for, her mother
leaving her
;

also did not see
(
)

died,J (2902)

I only heard the story.

that I

then I went to fetch her (Betje), while I felt was still a young man, and I was fleet in running to shoot. And I thought that she would
( )

And

get plenty

of

food,

She (would) eat it. And then child, which was still (an only) one. they would both grow, going out from me (to play because they both ate my game near tbe hut) (" shot things"). For, I was ( ) fresh for running; (2904)
;

should give her. (2903) She (would) eat with my (own)
I

which

I felt that I could, running, catch things.

Then, I used to run (and) catch a hare, I brought
had a younger sister witli her, who was suffering from the same illness. The latter went away with difficulty, taking the
dead mother's child to a
the relative's hut, the
at
relative's hut, not near at hand.
fire

From
was

of

Wkdbho's dwelling could he seen

night.

She

proceeded

thither

with

the

child,

and

met by him midway.

Before he got the child, he had seen the

dead mother's bones lying at her hut, her body having just been eaten by jackals. WMhbo had gone off from his home in haste, hearing that the vrile's sister was ill, and fearing that she might die on the way, and the child, yet living and playing He left his own home about, might be devoured by jackals. early one morning, and in the evening reached the spot where He made a hut at a little distance, the mother's bones lay. and slept there one night, and the next ( ) morning went to (2903') but the sister met him fetch the child at the relation's hut
;

with it on the road. he returned with the back to his own home.

He

slept at the

child, for

newly-made hut, to which one more night, and then went

310

SPECIMENS OP BXJSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

sse

M,
(

au n-ka
)

llnSii,
li.

au ha

leta

n-ka Mho
h.
a.

;

au

(2905) iiksin
whai.

na
fi

tta

Au h
15a. llko
le

t^tti e,

^auki Ina

Ta,

Iku

Ina

1^

llkuan

ka lya Kho
au
llnSn.
Ine
(
)

Ikdoken.

N

llkwa

kklsse

ha

(2906)

N

Ihd llkwa ssa tturrii ha,

au

llneiii.

HS

!;j;aua

ha au
loa

jkoa

;

ssl sse

lamina ip^abba.
sse

N

a ssan au
sse

Ihanii

au

jgaue,

n a

hhitta

ttin,

Ohdken-ka Ikami.
hha.
Ta,
)

I^ a sse l^a
ttaiya.
ii

hho ha, jkauka
ti

whaiya
loa,

H^

hin

e,

h

Iku-g
hi,

(2907) Ine

(

lj(;a-i

ssm jkujku^e
llkoe

Ikiiken

au

llkoin,

au hi

Ine

jkuj^eya
Ine
Ilka

ttin

Ilku6nna-ka
llkoin
;

llkoih.

Hi
+i,

Iku-g
ti
e,

Ikuken

au
)

au

(2908) ka-ken

loa

llkuaii

yauki

(

ywe;

ta,

ha

ka
ki

Ikii le

ha

Iki

Ohdken

lli/kdken,

au ha yauki ywa

Ikhwa, au

Ohoken

lli/kdken e

ha >auii

hi.

13.6 ti

Mil

e,

ha ka iku
Menu,
(
)

llkoin

kki Una, au ha ^auki

(2909) y-we.

Ha

Ikii

llkde ssho llkuonua;
ttu,

au ba

tatti e,
\J(vl;

ha ^auki llkuakka jkhwa
Ine
lla

ha

sse-g Ine

ha sse-g

ywa,.

Ta, ha ka Iku jkajka

llkde ssho llkdiii.

(2910)

Hd
Ilka

ti

bin

e,

ii

(

) ii

Iku^e ha, au
ssiii

llkoin,

llkoin sse
llkdiii;
lla,

Ikuka kke ha.
tatti e,
ii

ha ha, Ikuka au

au ka
(2911) au
ii.

a jku^eya ha, au bail Ibaihmi
Ine

Hail Iku-g
ail

Ibarnmi,
e,

Ikuken

tte ha,

(

)

au

llkdiii;
;

bail tatti
tatti,

ha Iku llkowa
n,

llkde ttin

llkoin

au ban

ha llwkden

au

ii

jkun
ssiii

ssiii

ssd ha.

Hail yaiiki Ine jkaajkau jkbe, ha
Ta,

InS

(2912) ddaiten-i.

ha

Ikii

(

)

!kii;^eya

ttin,

au ban

IIkXbbo's intended

return home. was in
hare.
it

311

it

to

my
(

home, while
)

it

my

bag,

while

the sun

was

hot.

I felt that I

had not seen (2905)

a springbok.

For, I

saw a

I used to shoot,

sending up a bustard.

I put

in(to the bag) (and)

brought it home. My wife would come to pluck it, at home. She ( ) boiled it in the pot; that we (2906) might drink soup. On the morrow I would hunt
the hare, I would be
of

peeping about in the shade
it

the bushes.

I

would shoot

up,* that

the

children might eat.

For, the springbok were gone

away. Therefore, I was ( ) shooting hares, that (2907) I might chasing, cause them to die with the sun, when they had run about in the noonday's sun. while They were " burnt dead " by the sun I remembered that the hare does not ( ) drink (2908) for it eats dry bushes, while it does not drink, putting in water upon the dry bushes which it crunches. Therefore, it remains thirsty there, while
; ;

it

does not drink.
(heat),

It

dwells,
it

(

)

sitting

summer
that
it

because
it

does

not

in the (2909) understand

water pans, so that

might go

to

might go to the water, so drink. For it waits, sitting in
chase
it,

the sun.
Therefore, I
(
)

in the

sun,

that

the (2910)

it,

sun may, burning, kill it for me, that I may eat dead from the sun while I feel that I was the one who chased it, while it went along in fear of me. It, in fear, lay down to die ( ) from the sun (2911) because it had become dry (while running about) in the sun; because it saw me when I followed it. It did not stop to walk, that it might look backFor it ( ) had run about, when it was tired. (2912) wards.
;
;

* i.e., make it down dead later.

spring up from

its

form and run away, falling (2906')

;

312
Ilkuwa.

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Han

Ikii

ll^ell;^e,

haii Ikuken;
ti

au ban Iku
Iku-g
Ine

ddda

jku^eya
lla

ttiii.

H^

bin
e,

e,

lia

Ikuken tten

;

au han
(

tatti

llku

Iku Ika ha

(2913) au hail jku^eya
e,

) llk<5e

ttin llkuonna,
ii.

au han

tatti

llkuonna-ka llkoin e,* he tta

jkaun tta

li,

he

llka-i

ha jnwajnwa.
ti

H^
(2914) Ikuken
Hho.

bin

e,
IST

n ka

Ikii-g
le

Ine

lla

hho ha, au ha
)

tta.

Iku-g Ine
tta'i

tte hS, (

au !nwa-ka
loa-kko.
llkoiii,

N
sse

a

sse

ttau

llwkoen

llgaue
likde

Ha
(2915)

u

le

llkoin;
jkuii
Ilka

ha

sse

Ihammi

hho

au ka Iku^e
llkoiii

ssho ha.

N
(

a sse ddaukko
)

jka,
lla

y^
;

sse

Ikuken ha.
Ikii-g

N
ii

a sse Iku

hhd ha
Iku-g

au

hd,

Ine

Ikuken

tta.

N
Ine
llan'n

a
le

sse
tte

Ine

sshd ko jkau ha,

hd

e,

a

ha

i.

N

a ine +i
( )

ti e,

loa-kko

wa

ssho

!gwe

(2916) ssho ha.

N

a

sse

Ihamm

lla

j^au

llneiii

ll;;fall;^a.

Ta, ha llkwa ssho Ihah ssho.
loa
laiti,
ii
•I

S" a sse

^au

llgaue

a sse

^x^^

l^^^^e

ha
(
)

;

au ka-g au i
a sse

Ine Ikua
J.

(2917) tta

llho.

N

a sse Iku;^^ ha,
ii

eiieii.
llkoiii.

N" a

sse IkCi^e ttssau, td,

a

ttaii, ii

N
Ta,

a ssah !^u
ii

llnSii.

Ta, Ikauka ssho Ikwenya.
+i
tta

Iha llkuaii

ka Iketen hi au Ikhwd; au ha
)

(2918)

ti e, ii
li;

a ttaiya
ii

(

llkde ttiii llkoin,

au

llkoiii

ya

au

+1,

ti

e,

Ikui

ssaii

Ika

kke
e a.

jkauken.

(2913')

* Wkdlho explains that this

e is

equal to

IIkabbo's

intended return home.

313

it

seemed as if it were about (?) to die; because had been obliged to run about. Therefore, it went to lie down to die; because fatigue had killed
It
it
;

while

it

had run

(

)

about in the heat
hot.
feet.

;

for,

(2913)

(it)

was the summer sun, which was ground was hot which was burning its

The

Therefore, I used to go to pick it up, as it laydead. I laid it in ( ) the arrows' bag. I must, (2914) goiug along, look for another hare. It would spring up (running) into the sun; it would, being
afraid,
it.

run through the sun, while I ran following going along, wait, so that the sun might, burning, kill it. ( ) I would go to pick it (2915) up, when it lay dead. I would sitting, break its (four) legs, and then I should put it in. I thought that another hare would probably dwell opposite to it. must first go to seek round in the (2916) ( ) I neighbourhood of the form. For it seemed to be
I

must,

married.

I
hare,

must,
that

seeking
I

around,
also

look

for
it,

the

female
I

might
laid

chase

when
I must
fast,

had unloosened (and)
it,

down
I

the bag.

chase

(

)

with

my

body.

must run very

(2917)

feeling that I should

I shall go to
will

become thirsty. drink at home.* For the children

have probably fetched t water. For, my wife (was) used to send them to the water, thinking that I had walked ( ) about in the sun when the sun was (2918) hot; because I thought that \kmX would kill the
* Water which
stomach.
is in an ostrich eggshell. In the ostrich eggshells, and probably f

('2917)
also in a springbok's /•OQl 7'")

which

" gambro" a vegetable food eaten by Bushmen; J Also called is injurious if used as the chief nourishment in winter,
;

causing severe pain in the head and singing in the

ears.

314

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
sse

!khw4
ail

ka !g6a
a
sse

+kamOpua kkau, he e, n ssan Ine !goa-i, llgaiie ttdi a* ka jkuarajkuara, llkde
(

(2919) hho l«ka;
I^

)

ha

sse

ddaukko ywiywi. hho jkhwa.
l^ka.
N" a
sse

juhatten^ jkai
llkaie.

au Iwka
l;^a

N

a

sse !g^ llkoe ttih Iwka;

\x^om n

ha,
ssin

llkde

ttin

l«ka.

Ta,
sse

llgu-ka
(

ttdi
)

(2920) jkuara

lua sse;
llkaii.

ha

ddaukko
ssin
i.

ka jkuara^wa^wa hho
ssho

Ikhwa

Hd
a (2921)
ta,
1.

ti
e,

hin

e,

n
Ine

Iku

Ine

jkajka

au
Iki

Sondag

n Una tif
ha
e,

e hi,

H^ n
jka
( )

lt;^all;^a

N
ha
ha h^
Ilka

ya'uki

jkanna,
&,

n

jkaulkarro-kko,
ssin
Ine

jkaulkdrro,

ha-g n
ssin ka,

+kakka
Ikwei
Ine

ha
Iki;

ha.

Hd
Ine

ti

hin

n

ha
Ta,

sse

sse

j^uonniya kke.

n
Ta,

Ikii-g

ssin Ikalka ssho,

au Ikuiku,

e,

n

ssin Ikuiku ki ttai
(
)

(2922) hi
lla,

;

e,

luerriya,

au
e,

!;^arra.

llkoin
li
;

sse

llwi.

Hd
lla,

jkaii

Ine

ddi kui tta

au

ka Iku Inaunkko
Ine

lla,

au kkamman.
Ine tta
li.

N
( )

kofi

Iku-g

jkurruka

au jkauwa

Ta, j^arra-

(2923)

0pua >auki

a.

Td, !;^arra jkerri e;

ha

!;^owa.
Ine
7

N

ssin Iku-g ine He n-ka !;^6e,

au Ohoka Iku-g

llkowa.

Ta,
7

n

Iku sse

ttai, 7
3

llko
Iki
le

Ohdken
o

Ika'uitenttu,

o

au ka jnaunkko jgauoken
(2924)

lla

j^^drra.

Hd
ssho,

e,

llhaii

sse

arroko
Ta,

ssi

i;

(

)

au ka

Ine

n-ka
e

!;^(5e.

!;^6eten

Ibarra

;

ta,

n yauki sse ttai, n ssin Una, n-ka
a,

!;^o^tenjj^oe
;

he

n jkwiya n-ka Ga'uyau
(2918')
and
wife".

hi Ike
ttdi

;

hah

Ine

+enna
ostrich

* The narrator explained that,
its

a, here,

means "an

Ttdi

e

would,

he

said,

have

meant "many

ostriches ".

(2920')

t

=

ti

«

a,

hi

t

HkIbbo's intended eetuen home.
children for me.

315

The

rain

must

first fall,

and then,

I should be looking around, while I looked around,

seeking for (a pair of) ostriches which are wont to seek the water along the " Har Eivier", ( ) that (2919)

they may, going along, drink the water. I must, going round in front, descend into the " Har Kivier ".
I

must

(in a stooping position) steal

up

to

them

in the

inside of the river bed.

I
;

my
in

body) in the river bed
the river bed.
For,

(on the front of that I might shoot, lying
lie

must

the western ostriches do,
;

seeking water, come back
along,
(

that they

may, going
(2920)

)

drink the

new
sit

water.

waiting for the Sundays on renaain here, on which I continue to teach which I thee. I do not again await another moon, for this moon is the one about which I ( ) told thee. There- (2921) fore, I desired that it should do thus, that it should
Therefore, I must

return for me.
that I

which are strong for burning (2922) the road. ( ) For, the sun will go along, strongly. And then, the earth becomes hot, while I must go together I still am going along halfway. ground is hot. For, with the warm sun, while the
in
;

For I have must put on to walk

sat waiting for the boots,

a little road
it is

it

is not.

For,

it is

a great road

;

(

)

(2923)

long.

I should reach

my

place,

when

the trees

are dry.

For, I shall walk, letting the flowers
still

become

dry while I

follow the path.

* Then, autumn will quickly be (upon) us there ; when I am sitting at my (own) place. For, 1(2924) ( ) shall not go to other places; for, I must remain at

(own) place, the name of which I have told my Master; he knows it; he knows, (having) put it

my

* WTien he

is sitting

at his

own

place.

(2923')

;

316

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine

(2925) hi; han
ssho hi.
e,

+enii
e,

llkoa

M.

B.6

e,

(

)

h

Ikg

+ka

Hin

n

jkalka ssho hi,
lie

au +kabbu; h^

ha

sse

Iketen ki

+kabbu
;

aii
a,

n

i;

au ha
ti
.

Ikii

Iketa

+kdbbu.
i.

au kof ohi

ha
e, ti

jku^e

Ila

kke

+kibbuj

Au
e,

ha

+i,

ti

h yauki
e,
ix

liirruwa;

h
i

ehen ya ssin kkwe

llkoa,
t;^a

ssin

Una ha,
a,

au ka
(2926') llhinya
Igei,
i.

tatti
a,

n

Ine

hhi h.
(

Ta, kkpin
ii

n

au kkqin-ta ha,
ti

)

hd

kko'fe jkuh jkoa

Hd

hin
;

e,

h

ssin
ill

llnilini

ha,
ssin

n
llf

ssin Ini
n,
l;^a,

+kabbu au ha-ha
yaisse n,

h

ssin

ha.

N

au ka
Ta,

tatti e,

n ^auki

Ine hhi,

h

Ikagen-

ka

ha.

n

Iku-g Ine hi

n

jkhwai.
a,
i

Ta, +kabbu a ka jkoasse Iniiyo, hah

ta Ika
llkde

whai e
llnallna

ttai

llkde

hhda
Ine

^ao,
Ika'uih

i-g

Ine

Ila,

ha
ttih

yao.

I-g

ki
Iki

llkde

^ao.

Ha
yao

a luerriya, au jkhwe.
llkaie.

Han

Ikauih jkui, au

VIII.— 166.
L.

HOW
(Related,

IHAN+KASS'O'S PET

LEYERET WAS
to

KILLED.
in July,

1878, hy Ihaii+kass'o,

explain how the story

of

"The Death
Ine

of the jkhaii" was told him.)

(7206')

l;;^d,bbi-ah-an

Ikhd ke loa-Opud, he,

h a

Ine

ssa,

Ikann Ikam ha, au ka ka hi
ta,

kwah

llgaue loa-ka

jka'uken;

hi e

Ikha ka

Ioa-0pu4.

H^, ha

Ine


HOW
down.
iHAN+KASS'o's PET LEVERET

WAS KILLED. 317
plain (beside)
it.

And

thus

(

)

my name
to

is

(2925)

It is there that I sit waiting for the

gnn

he will send the gun
the
;

me

there

;

and then, while he sends
;
;

gun in a cart that which running, takes me the gun. While he thinks, that I have not forgotten that my body may be quiet, as it was when I was with him while I feel that I shoot, feeding myself. For, starvation was that on account of which I was bound, starvation's food, when I starving turned back (2926') ( )
;

from following the sheep. Therefore, I lived with him, that I might get a gun from hinf that I might That I might myself shoot, feeding possess it.
;

,

myself, while
For, I eat
For, a
it

I

my
is

do not eat (own) game.

my

companions' food.

gun

that which takes care of an old

man

;

is

that with which

we

kill
;

the springbok which

we go to eat, ia the cold with food, lie down (in our huts) in the cold (wind). It (the gun) is strong It satisfies a man with food in against the wind. the very middle of the cold.
go through the cold (wind)
(wind).

We

do,

satisfied

VIII.— 166.
L.

HOW

IHA^+KASS'O'S PET

LEVEEET WAS

KILLED.
(my) leveret for me, and I came (7206') crying to her, because I wanted them f therefore to seek for (other) leverets for they were those who had killed (my) leveret for me. And she soothed
\j(abhi-an* killed
;

* The narrator's mother. f i.e. his mother and his maternal grandmother ^hamni.

;

318

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN POLKLOEE.

ddatten n^
Ikhaii

I.

Hd

tiken

e,

lia

Ine

+kdkka

ke,

ti

e,

M

6a ka:

(7207')

N

();'Ta, kwan tan kan
Ik'au Ihin,

1 1

a,

Igiiru-lna-ka jkao.

"Ta,

N

kwan

tan kan
Ihin,

lla,

Ik'au

l;^;e-!khwai-ta jkao."

(7208')

(

)

Tsatsiten
he,

a,

kan
ha.

Ike-a

jkou^u;

ha

Ine

Iki

ssa

Ikamma loa-Opua, au ha, au han jkauwa,
Ine llgwften a;

han
ha.

Ine ssan

kkke

He, n
jku^e;
Ike-T ha,

n

Ine

jholho

ha,

han
Ine
ll^a,

ine
lla,

n
he,

Ine

ll^amki

!kti;^e

He, n a

he,

n

a Ine ssa jho
(

(7209') ha.

Ha

Ine

ha jku^e; ha
;

n

a Ine
lla

)

ll^a,

n

a jkuj^e,

Ike-i

he,
Ine

n a
ll^a,

Ine

Ike-i
;

ha,

n

a Ine ssa jho ha.
Ine
Ike-i
Ii;^a,

Ha

ha

jkuj^e
Ine

he,

n a jku^e

ha.
ll;^a,

He, n a

ll;^a,

n a n a
a Ine

ha; he, n a Ine

n a

Ike-i

ha; he

n

ssa jho ha.
I;^abbi-an-an
ka,

n ^u u loa-0pua-ka
te ha.

llgwften,

(7210')

n

(

)

Ikha ha,

h

Ilka

N N
lla.

yaiiki ta,

n
ri

Ikha

loa-0pua.

n
ha,

Ikha ha,

Han ka, n ^u u n ssin ilkd te ha.
tatti
e,

loa-Opua-ka llgwiten,
yaiiki ta

Ikha

loa-Opua; au n

ha ^auki ywa

twa'iten Ilka

au ha
Ine

tt'oitt'oi,
lla,

tt'ditt'oi

Han

Iku

i

yua,

au ha
he ha

tt'oitt'oi
lla

han ^auki ywsi

ttwa'iten Ilka

ha

ssuen.

:

HOW

iHAN+KASS'o's PET LEVERET "WAS KILLED. 319

me, about it. Therefore, had formerly said
(
)

slie

told

me

that the lizard

"For,

(7207')

I therefore intend to go,

Passing through,
ffuru-lnd's pass.

« For,
I therefore intend to go,

Passing through,
\j(e-lkhwai''s

pass."

( ) Tsdtsi* was the one who caught hold of (and) (7208') took up a leveret on the hunting-ground; and, he

brought it (home) alive, he came (and) gave it to me. And I played with it I set it down, it ran I also ran after it. And I went to catch it, and, I came to set it down. It again ran; and I ( ) again ran to (7209') catch it and I went catching hold of it, I came to set it down. Again, it ran and, I again ran after it. And I again caught hold of it; and again, I caught hold of it and I came to set it down. \^dbbi-an wished that I (should) leave ofE playing with the leveret, that I ( ) (should) kill it, that 1(7210')
;
;

;

;

;

(should) lay
leveret.

it

to roast.

I

was not willing
to leave
kill
it,

to kill the

She wished me
I

ofE

playing with
it

the leveret, that I (should)
to roast.

that I might lay

was not willing

to kill the leveret, because
it

I felt that nothing acted as prettily as
it

did,

when

was gently running, gently running along. It did in this manner (showing the motion of its ears), while it was gently running along, nothing acted as prettily as it did and it went to sit down.
;

* The narrator's maternal grandfather.

320

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(7211')

(

)

Hd

ti

Mil

e,

hi Ine kui,

n

Ikuen, ta,

n a ka

antau Ihin au Ikhoa, au
llnalind

jkhoa.

n yauki 11^ llgwiten Ilkhde H^ ti'ken e, n Ine Ikuen, i au n
;

llhin

jho
Ine

loa-0pua. Ikha
Ine

He,

ri

Ine Ikuen; he tfken

e,

hin
(7212')
( )

ke ioa-Opua,
Ikha ke
Ikii

au kdken
h.6
e,

lln^

jkhoa.

Hin
1;

Ioa-0pu4;
ka,

n

Ine

ssan

ywa.,

au n

Ta, hi yoa, dd<5a ddatten

(7213') hin yda ka, hi

ssi

ddqa

ssin

Iku

ka,

kkweya ke loa-Opud. hin kdi, n Ikuen, au Ine Ikha ke loa-0pua, a n ( ) n ssin Iku kkweya ha, au ha
hi

n

;

kkwe, Ikauwa,

Hin
i.
;

Iku Ikha

ke ha.
ta,
ta,
i

H^

tfken

e,

n
i

Ine
Ini

ssan ^wa,

loa-0pua-kko
( )

Hin au n

\n6 Ind

^auki ta
hi
llga'ueya
ll;^a,
i

llj^a

ke
Inl

(7214') loa-ka jkauken,

hin Ine

ta, i ^aiiki ta

loa-0pua-kko.

Hd
jkhaii;
hi,

ti

hin

e,

hi
ta,

Ine

ddatten jke
ssin
ttu,

te

lla

n,

au

n au ka Ikam 6a n
au
hin

kkwe,

ttuiniha

Ikilki

n

ssin

kkwe, ttumma

Ikiiki hi.*

YIII.— 175.

THE THUNDERSTOEM.
{Melated, in December, 1875, in the

Kathop

dialect,

hy Dfajkwlin.)
ilga,

(5623)

N
*

kail

linaii,

jkhwa kkauwa

ssi

o

n

ilnaii,

o jkhwa kkau,

n

tten

ko

llha,

llkelike

llkunh.

He

(7214)

Han
ta,
;

ka,
i

n

>'a'uki sse llgwiten

au a;

ta,

i

^auki ta llgwitgn
ta

au a;
llkiiwa

ta Ilka ttl a.
ti

Ta,

|oa-0pud ya'uki
i

ttam0pua
i

lie

hin

e,

i

ta

Ikha ha,

Ilka tt6

ya,

au

ya'uki

llgwiten

a.

THE THUNDERSTORM.

321

Tli^ii they told me to fetch, water; for I was (7211') ( ) one who quickly came away from the water, while I did not go to play at the water. Therefore, I went

to fetch water,

when
was

I
;

had

tied

up the
(

leveret.

And
killed (7212')

I

went

to fetch water

then, they killed (my) leveret
)

for me, while I

at the water.
;

They

(my) leveret
;

and then I came (and) cried, about it because I had thought that they would let (my) leveret alone. 'For, they must have been defor

me

ceiving

me

;

they told

me

to fetch water, while they

must have intended that they would kill (my) leveret for me, which I ( ) had meant to let alone, so that (7213') it might live (on) in peace. They had killed it for me. Therefore, I came (and) cried, on account of it.

They
for

said,

that

we

should not again get another

leveret;

when
(
)

I wanted

them

to seek

some

leverets

me,

they

said,

we should

not

again get (7214')

another leveret.
Therefore, they soothing calmed (?) me with the (story of the) lizard while they wished that I might
;

quietly listen to
I

them

;

when

I

had shut

my

mouth,

might quietly

listen to

them.*

VIII.— 175.
L.

THE THUNDERSTOEM.
When
the rain
fell,

fell

while the rain

upon us at night, I did thus, (5623) I lay, playing the " goura ",f like
;

* She (my mother) said (to me), that I should not play with (7214) meat for we do not play with meat for we lay meat to roast. For the leveret is not a little fat therefore, we kill it, we lay
; ;

it

to roast, while

we do

not play with

it.

f
p.

A

description of this musical instrument will he found on

109 of "The Native Kaces of South Africa", by the late Mr. G. "W. Stow (London, 1905), and a picture of it in the
preceding plate
(fig.

8).

Y

322

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
kii-kkui-ten l»keya ke,

(5625)

mama
ti
e,

(

)

h

In8

yau ll»koen,

Ikhwa Ikuii ydken bbaiten-I, i; he n llkelike llkum; n InS ^au +en-na, ti e, llkunh e Ikui a ka (5626) llnaii, jk'^ ya +kwaiya ha, haii ka llnau, ( ) ha
l^wainya
llkhda
Ik'e,
+i,

ha-g

Ine

l»keya
sse

jk'e

a,
;

ti

e,

jk'e

kail

jkhwa ka ha
arnm
)

kkau

ta

jkhwa
kkau.

ka Ikhwa
Iwkeya,

sse
(

Ikhe,

o

Ikhwa

yauki

(5627) jkhwagen ka
ti e,

jkei llou,

jkhwa jkhe; o
sse kkau.

IlkunS.

a

jkhwa yauki
Iwke n,
llha,

N
±L

llnau,

mama
ko
)
(

n

ya'uki ttui

mama,

ta,

Ikii

tten
i;

llkelike

llkunh.

He mama

(5628) +gou,

ywan h
tten

ttui
llha.

mamah lli^koen ti e, n ya'uki mama. He mdma Iku tta, i; h Iku
6
llnau,

ko

He
(5720)

jkhwa Iku

o

h
le

tten ko
ssi

llha,

jkhwagen
(

amm
jkhwa
he
ti

ywah, jkhwa +^i
llnau,
Ikii

tsa;^aiten.

)

He
ssi

sslten

kah

+i,

jkhwa ka jkhwa bbaiten, jkhwa jkanh jhah
ssi

ddi kui ttah-ttah 6 +^i
(

(5721)

tsa;^aiten,

)

ka

le

tsa^aiten e;
tta,
ti

sslten
e,

ttan

ssi

tchuhntchunh
llga,

jkhe,

o ssften

ti

Iku ddi kui ta

a jkahh jhan
ssi

ssi tsa;^aiten.

He
ssi

(5722) jkhwa

(

)

llnau,

o

yauki jkannjkanh
ssi

Ihih,

tsa;^aiten,

jkhwagen a

tchueh

e,

ssi

tsa^aiten

Iku ddi kui ttan, he Ikalnya, i; he jkhwa bbaiten,

(5723)

1,

o ssi tsa^aityah ttan he

(

)

Ikainya.
Ihih
lla,

He jkhwa
jkhwa
(5724)
(5724') bbaiten
Iki

bbaiten

Iki

jkhai

o ssi; he

llnau jkau a juhi jkhe ssi llneih jkha,

jkhwa
tdta

ha,

i.

He mama
*

kkiii:

(

)

"N

h n n h!"*

He

An

exclamation of sufiering or pain.

;

THE THUNDERSTORM.

323

Wkum*
how
did I not

And mamma
know

said to me,
;

(

)

did I not see (5625)

the rain was lightening
that Wkunh

that I did like Wkunh

was a person who used, if people scolded him, he used, (when) he was (5626) ( ) angry with the people, to say to the people, about it, that the people seemed to think that the rain would fall but (on the contrary) the rain would stand still, while the rain did not fall. The rain used ( ) (5627) really to stop when Wkunh had said that the rain would not fall.
; ;

When mamma
for, I lay,

rebuked me, I did not listen to her, playing the " goura ", like Wkunh. And
silent
;

mamma
And
" goura

became

(

)

when

she saw that I did (5628)
lay

not seem as if I heard her. I lay, playing the " goura ".
the rain
",

And mamma
as

down

;

did
first

thus,

I

lay,

playing the

seemed to shine into our eyes. the rain did thus, (when) we were thinking (5720) And ( ) that it was going to lighten and it seemed as if the rain were closing our eyes, when it was the light ( )(5721)
the rain
that entered our eyes
;

we

stood shutting our eyes,

while

we
)

felt as if

darkness kept our eyes closed.
(yet) opened our eyes, the (5722)

And

(

when we had not
as if they

rain gave us things on account of which our eyes

seemed

were green
(

;

and the rain lightened,
(5723)
;

while our eyes

felt

)

green.

And

the rain, lightening, went over us

and the
it.

rain did as follows to a stone which stood outside, in front of our hut, the rain, lightening, shivered

And mamma

exclaimed:

(

)

"I^nhnn!" And (5724)
what was the matter

father questioned

mamma,

as to

* Wkunh or "Coos Groot-Oog " was a rain sorcerer, who lived at \khai \ku (also called " Evvicass Pits", on account of a tree

which stands by the

Pits).

324

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

ttuttu

mama

o

ti e,

ts'a-dde Ino a ddl
Ina
e,
(

hhouitenhliouiteii

In8

ha,
) ti

(5725)

mama
tt;^erri

li^keya tata a, ti

ya jkhwa-ka ha lilm ? He liS ttan, jkhwa Ikan'n
;

ho

ha ttu; he tiken
liike, ssi
e,
(
)

e,

ha

lilin,

I.

He
kwan
yauki

mama
Ihumm

ku-kkuiten

llkuan ka, ssi sse Ikuken
ssi

(5726) ttin; ssf-ka ddiddi
ha, o

ya'uki

ka

ssi

ha liikeya

ssi,

o kkumrn-Opua a +aMi.
Ine llii/koen,
ssi.

Ssiten llkuan ka, ssi sse-g

o

ssi

ddda yw&ii
(5727)
(

ssi ttui,

6 ha liikeya
o

)

N

llkuan

llnau,

mama

Vike n,

llha,

llkelike

llkunn,
ti

n
e,

llkuan

yaiiki

n ka n

j(U

ttu
:

ttu

n

llkuan a llwkoen,
ssi,

Ikhwa llkuan

a,

ka ha Ikha

o h-ka ddiddi.

THE THUNDERSTORM.

325

with her; had tbe rush of the storm* reached her, that she exclaimed as if in pain ? And mamma told father about it, that ( ) the thing seemed as if the (5725) rain were tearing off her skin therefore, she had exclaimed with pain. And mamma said that we had we (5726) wished to fall dead it was our fault that ( ) had not be^n willing to obey her when she rebuked us about a very little thing. "We had wanted to see (what would happen) when we did not appear to hear when she rebuked us. I had acted thus, when mamma told me to (5727) ( ) leave off playing the " goura ", I like Wkunh, would not listen I was the one who saw that the rain had intended to kill us, on account of my doings.
; ;

;

* The narrator compares this to the wiad from, a cannon

ball.

(5724')

A BUSHMAN

WOMAN WITH
at Salt

DIGGING-STICK.
in 1884.

Photographed

River

IX.

Customs and Superstitions.

328

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

IX.— 97.
B.

CUTTING OFE THE TOP OF THE LITTLE FINGEE, AND PIEECING EAES AND
NOSE.
{Given in July, 1871.)

(357)

jkwa gwa'i-Opuaken a Ikauwa ha Iwka e
laitiken a

a.

jkwa

Ikauwa ha

li^ka e a,
e,

au han

tatti e,

ha
e

e

latti-Opua, he ti hiii

ha Ikauwa ha IlkM
tatti
e, e,
(

laiti-ka
a.

ha

lii^ka,

i;

au han

ha
)

l^ka
e

laiti

(358) Ikwa gwai-Opuaken Opua, he ti hin e,
llkuri

tatti

ha

jkwa gwaie
a,

ha Ikauwa ha
li:^ka.

li/ka

ha

gwai, ta hi liika* au ha

jkwa gwai-

koken, ^auki

Ikauwa ha

li/ka;

jkwa laiti-kowakeu

yauki Ikauwa ha Iwka.
(359)
hi
( )

He

ti

hin
"j"

e,
i
;

jkwa gwai Ikauwa ha llkun e

a,

han Ine kokda au ha Iwka, au han Ine jkan-na !nwd, han Ine kokoa au ha Iwka e a, au han Ine jkan-na ihau. !kui gwai-koken llkeinya ha jnuntu e a; han (360) ( ) ll^am llkeinya ha jnuntu e a. jkiii Iaiti-k6ken llkeinya ha Inuntii e a, au han tatti e, ha llkiiri.
ka ha
li:/ka

he

ti

hin

e,

(361)

laiti

e a;

ha

H^affl llkeinya

ha jnuntu
e a;

e a,

(

)

au

han
ha

tatti e,
Iniinii,

ha IlkM gwai

ha ll^am llkeinya au han

jkui laiti-koken

yauki llkeinya ha

Iniinii

;

tatti i jkui laiti-ko l^ohi;

jkui laiti-koken a llkeinya

ha

Iniinii,

ha

aki.

* This word should probahly have been written Ixa here,
f Probably \xa.

; ;

CUTTING OFF TOP OF LITTLE FINGEE, ETC.

329

IX.— 97.
B.

CUTTING OFF THE TOP OF THE LITTLE FINGER, AND PIERCING EARS AND
NOSE.

A

little

boy has

this

hand

cut.*

A
is

female child
a
little

(357)

has this hand

cut,t because

she

girl,

therefore, she has the

hand

of her female

arm cut
boy
feels

because this
that
cut,
(
)

is

her female hand.
little

The

little

he

is

a

boy, therefore, he has this hand

(358)

his

male arm,

for,

they shoot with this hand.
his

Another boy does not have
girl does
( )

hand cut

;

another

not have her hand cut.
(359)

Thus, the boy has this arm cut, with which

they intend him to shoot; therefore, he turns this
(the right) hand,
this (the left)
( )

when he grasps the arrow, he hand, when he grasps the bow.
left)

turns

Another man has
has that (the

this (the right) ear pierced

;

(360)

he

also

ear pierced.

Another

woman

has this (the

left)

ear pierced, because she
is

feels that her female

arm

here

(i.e.

on this side)
( )

she also has this (the right) ear pierced, she feels that her male arm
is

because

(361)

here

;

she also has her

nose pierced.

Another woman does not have her nose pierced,
because the other

woman

is

ugly
is

;

the other

woman

who has had her

nose pierced,

handsome.
(357')

* Showing the top joint
f

of the little finger of the right hand.

Showing the top

joint of the little finger of the left hand.


;

330

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMA.N FOLKLORE.

IX.— 177. L.

CUTTING OFF THE TOP OF THE LITTLE
FINGER.
Second Account.
[Information given, in March, 1884, ly lx;aken-aii.)

(10404)

Ha

(5a

Iwkwaiyau,

a

Ika'u

Ikam

ha

Opua^ai,

Kaueten-an iMna,

N

Ihan

a,

Ika'u

Ikam jkabbe-tu * Iwka.

IX.— 99.
B.

BUSHMAN PRESENTIMENTS.
{Given in February and Ma/rchj 1873.)

(2531)

l;^am-ka-!kd-ta

!gwe,

e

leleta
hiii
Iki

hi

en-en.

Hin
Ikii

+kakken,

hin
hi

dddrraken,
en-en.

ssi

dddrrakenikuften
)

dddrraken
(2532) llkoaken

Hin
han

llvu
e,

hi
(

;

kkwe,

an

tatti

ha
a,

en-en
Ikerru

ddarraken.

Ilkdbbowaken a llkhwaiya, ha
jkei
llau;

Iwkammman a
(10403)
*
\ka,lle-tii,

ha
",

a,

l;^ara-ka-!kui ta Ini
of the informant,

or "

Willem Streep

was a son

\xdken-ak, an old

Bushman woman who was with us

for a short

time in 1884.

(10404')

* lx<i%w-a>J further explained that the joint is cut off with reed. thought to make children live to grow up. It is done before they suck at all.
It is f

The ahove

piece of
:

Bushman

native literature

is

described

Dr. Bleek as follows

"99. Bushman Presentiments.

— They
;

by

feel in

their bodies that certain events are going to happen.

a kind of beating of the flesh,

which

tells

them

things.

who

are stupid, do not understand these teachings

There is Those they disobey
lion, etc.

them, and get into trouble,

— such

as being killed

by a

BUSHMAN PRESENTIMENTS.

331

IX.— 177.
L.

CUTTING OFF THE TOP OF THE LITTLE
FINGEE.
Second Account.

Her father, Y^kwaiymi, was the one who cut off (10404) the upper joint of his daughter Eaueten-an' s little
finger.*

My

husband was the one who cut

off (the

upper

joint of) [kdbbe-tu's

("Willem Streep's")

finger.

IX.— 99.

BUSHMAN PRESENTIMENTS.!
The Bushmen's
(the
letters)

letters J are in their bodies.

They (2531)
their

speak,

they

move, they make

(the Bushmen's) bodies move.

They
;

(the
is

Bushmen)
altogether
is

order the others to be silent
stiU,

a

man

when he

feels

that

(

)

his

body

tapping (2632)

A dream speaks falsely, it is (a thing) which deceives. The presentiment is that which speaks the truth it is that by means of which the
(inside).
;

Bushman

gets (or perceives) meat,
tell

when

it

has tapped.
are

The beatings

those

who understand them, which way they

not to go, and which arrow they had better not use, and also warn

them, when many people are coming to the house on a wagon. They inform people where they can find the person of whom they are in search, i.e., which way they must go to seek him successfully." ("A Brief Account of Bushman Folk-lore and other Texts." By W. H. I. Bleek, Ph.D. Cape Town, 1875. pp. 17 and 18.)
J

The word

\ffwe

letters

and books.

was used by the Bushmen to denote both WMhbo explained that the beatings in their
Bushman's "
letters ",

bodies, here described, are the

and resemble

the letters which take a message or an account of what happens in

another place.

:

332

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

a a* (2533)
Iki
Iki

;

au

h.a

t a dddrraka.
(

IjJ^am-ka-jketen Ini Ini,

ssa

jk'e,

au ha-ha.

)

l^am-ka-lketen liikamma,

ssa jke-ku'iten.

l^am-ka-!kulten
ttwi jkhwaiten,
ssi

llnati

ttwi ttss'dro-ken,
tatti

ban l«kamm
e,

au li^kammman

jkui

ttdi

ddarrakenddd,rrakftn
(
)

ha

en-en.

Ikukogen

Ine

(2534) Iwkamm
" !goa

jkiiko,

a ssa;

han tkakka jkauken:
Ikoin
tta ssa
;

llgaiie

yyii

Ikoin, ta,

hin

e,

n Iwkanim, ha eh-en-ka
Ikaukaken !g6a-i
(2535)
(
)
;

ttwi ttss'6ro-ken Ikhwaiten."
Ini,

jkaukaken
:

jkuiten ssa.

Hin
6aken
sse

+kakka ha oa

" jkui ttah Ike ssa."
Ike

Ha

+kakka hi:
sse ii-h
;

"Ikoin ttah
a,

ssa;

ha ha

ssih
;

ha

h

ssih l^kaiiima Iki ssa ha-ha

au

(2536) ha-ha-ka ttwi ttss'dro-ken Ikhwaiten.
ka,

N

(

)

llkuah

u

ssd-g Ine liwkoen; au

ha llkuah

jkei llau,
;

hah

Ine Ike ssa.

Ta,

li

ka +nwai, h-ka Iwkamm

he ka

iku !kei llau."

(2537)

(

Hah iwkamm ha jkaulkau hah +kakka Iwkamm ) "Whai kkah tta ssa, ta h
;

jkauken
+ha+hain.

Ilkai

tteu Ikao J Ike jkhd,

u

sse !goa-a, tikentlken-ka-

ku.

Td,

h
:

liikamm, whai-ta
"

Iwkamm."
i
;

Ikdkoken
( )

(2538) jhiimm ha
(2532')
* a
•)•

N

kkah

ka,

jkauken

ta,

whai

ha

= au hLha. = ha-ha.
llxa« and \had, the narrator

(2537')

\
says.

The Brinkkop has two names,
But, there appear to be two

mountains, a round-topped

one,

and a high one.

;

BUSHMAN PRESENTIMENTS.

333

The Bushmen perceive people coining by means of it. ) The Bushmen feel a tapping (when) other people (2533) (
are * coming.

an old wound, a Bushman feels a tapping at the wound's place, while the tapping

With regard

to

feels that the

man (who
;

has the old wound) walks,
feels
(
:

moving

his body.

The one man
he says

)

the other (2534)

" Look ye around, for grandfather, for grandfather seems to be

man who comes
;

to the children

coming this is why I feel the place old wound." The children look around
perceive the
father
:

of his body's
;

the children

"A
;

man man
:

coming.
is

They

(

)

say to their (2535)

coming yonder."

Their father
father) comes

them " Grandfather (his own yonder he would come to me he was
says to
;

the one

whose

coming I felt at the place of his old wound. I ( ) (2536) wanted you to see that he is really coming. For ye contradict my presentiment, which speaks truly."

He

feels a
:

children

(

)

tapping (at) his ribs he says to the " The springbok seem to be coming, (2537)
;

for I feel the black hair (on the sides of the spring-

bok).

Climb ye the Brinkkop standing yonder, that ye may look around at all the places. For I feel the springbok sensation." The other man agrees with him "I think (that) the children (should) do so
:

* The
part of

the back of

wten an ostrich is coming and is scratching (2533') neck with its foot, feels the tapping in the lower the back of his own neck; at the same place where the
Busliinaii,
its

ostrich is scratching.

with

The springbok, when coming, scratches itself with its horns, and its foot then the Bushman feels the tapping. When a woman who had gone away is returning to the (2534') ( )
;

house, the

man who

is

sitting there, feels
is

on his shoulders the
;

thong with which the woman's child he feels the sensation there.

slung over her shoulders

;;

334

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

ka

jkuiTuka

ssa

;

td,

ll;^^au

Ike

ikhe,
llko

ha

llkuan

!;^6wa;

M

sse

ll^koen

Igappem
i.

jk'au.

H^

e,

hi

ssin

lli^koen

jk'au-ka-ku,
(
)

Hi

ssin

kkwdh

(2539) ll^koen llndttenllnatten
t&,

Ohdken

llkallkattendde *
llkallkattendde.

whai ta

ttai

damma

llkdeta

Ohoken

Ta,

Ohdka Iwkwaiya.
e,

Ikuirrilkuirriten
le

H^am
(
)

Una.

(2540)

H^
a
hi.

wha'i ta ssa,

ha

ttin hi.

Ta,

jkuirritta,
ii

Ikuirri

llkuan

kk^rruwa.
Ikuelkueeten
;

Td,

h ka

Ikuei
sse

li^kamm
Ta,

n
n

au

ll;^aiika

dderri

n

Ike ta

Ibkamm
(
)

ll^auken;

au ka sse Ika
linuntte

(2541) whai.

Ta,

ssho ko

Iwkammlwkainm

au h ttss'ih^u, h^
luhaiya whai.

llj^auken

ka dderri hi; au ka
ttss'i-

^u."

Whai Ikii Ine llnullnu ttin n Ikukoken jhumm ha: "1 h. Ilka."t

*****
hih
e,
i

(2554)

H^
Ine

ti

ka

(

)

jkejke, i;

au Iwkamm-ma

Ikueita,
tta'i

au

i

liikamma

Iki

ssa tchueh,

au tchuenya
i

Iko ssa,
i

au

llneih.

I-k Ine li^kamin,

Inwa;

(2555) Inwd,

au

ivi^kainm
ttai
i

whai

jnwa

I;;forroken

(

)
i.

h^ wha'iya
I Ikuei ta,
llk^illkdi.

ssi

l;^6rrokenl;^6rroken
i

Ohoken,
lliikaii

lii/kamm
i

Ina

;

au

1

sse

whai

I Iwkamih
i

^u, au wha'i Ikittu-ka Ihoakeni
(

(2556) Ihoaken

;

ii:!kam'm

)

tsa;^aiten,

au

wha'i

tsa^aiten-ta luelue.
*
j-

Ttoiten

a, i

ta

Iwkamm jkam'm

(2539')

Wkmi "inside", WkaWlattendak "insides".
As Section

IX

is

a long

one,

about twelve pages of the

original

MS. have been omitted

here.

They

refer chiefly

to

tactics in hunting,

and habits of the animals hunted.

BUSHMAN PRESENTIMENTS.
for
)

^35

(

the springbok come in the sun

;

for the

Brink- (2538)

kop standing yonder is high; they shall look down upon the ground. And then they can see the whole
ground.
trees
;

therefore (?) look inside ( ) the (2539) for the springbok are wont to go hidden inside

They can

the trees.

For the

trees are

numerous.
are those to

The

little

river beds are also there.

They

which the

springbok are wont, to come (in order) to eat in them. For, ( ) the little river beds have become green.* (2540) For I am wont to feel thus, I feel a sensation in the
calves of
to

my

legs

when the

springbok's blood

is

going

For I always feel blood, when I am about to kill springbok. For I sit ( ) feeling (2541) a sensation behind my back, which the blood is wont The to run down, when I am carrying a springbok. springbok hair lies behind my back." The other " Yes, my brother." agrees with him (saying)

run down them.

*****
:

Therefore,

we
is

are

wont

(

)

to wait (quietly)

;

when (2554)

the sensation

like this,

when we
feet,

are feeling the

things come, while the things come near the house.

We
)

have a sensation in our

as

we

feel

the

rustling of the feet of the springbok with

which the

springbok come, making the bushes rustle. (2555) ( feel in this manner, we have a sensation in our heads, when we are about to chop the springbok's horns. have a sensation in our face, on account of the

We

We
we

blackness of the stripe on the face of the springbok
feel a sensation in our (
)

;

-f

eyes,

on account of the (2556)

black marks on the eyes of the springbok. The ostrich is one, for whom we feel the sensation of
*
f
i.e.,

the grass and the

little

bushes of the river bed.
in the centre of the forehead,

A

black stripe that comes

down

(2540') (2555')

and terminates at the end of the nose.

836

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
tta'i

au ha
lli/koin

ttau Ikuaiiten Ikamin

;

au

llgu

wa
Hi
e, i

e

;

au

ya Ikueita;
( )

M
lie

tta

li.

(2557)

H^
Ine

ti hih. e,

tchuen ka
llnein.

Ine

bbS
ti

i i.

Iku-g

tta'i

!gwe Kho

H^

bin

ka-g
Ine

Ine

jkagen

kkau
hi
Ike

Ikau
lla.

tchuen
Ta,

jnwa;

au
e,

i-g
(
;

(2558) Ikagen

kkau

jlian'n

tchuen
ttai
+i,

)

hi

li/kwaiya,
Ine

ka tkamOpua
;

ssa
ti

au i-g
i

llgaua

ilnSn-ta jk'^'n *

au hi

e,

ssho
Ikei

Opuo'm tten-a au llkuoiina-ka Opuoin.
(2559)
llau,
i ( )

Au

i

Opuoin
e,
i

tteri-a,

au llkuonna-ka Opuoin.

Hd

ti

hin
;

yauki ta
i

OpuoinOpucan
Td.,

ttin

au

llkuonna

au

i

Ikueitta,

li/kamm.
ttai;

i
( )

Ik^ ta-g

(2560) Ine Iwkamm, au tchuehya Ine
Iwkainnia
Iki

au

i-g
tta'i

Ine
ssi

ssa

tchuen
hi

;

au

tchuehya

dddiTakenddarraken
liikamm
i

Ikwalkwagen.

I-g

Ine

llkallkattu;
Ine
i.

he ii;^auken ka ttss'amm-a
lla.

(2561) hi; au i-g
i

IkammSh

(

)

He

ti

hih

e,

Ine li^kainm,

He
llgaiia

ti

hin

e,

Ikauken-Opuonni yauki tta
i;
i;
ti.

llgauallkau
)

leta

llnSh,

hi

Iku

kkan,

llgaua
(

(2562) ssho;

hi sse

jkwan

au hi Ina tchueh,

au

tchuehya ttaiya hhe
i; ta,
i

Hi

sse

Ikwah
hih

mmdmmu
Iki

Ikd ta, ssuehssueh ti kkah,
llkau
)

lliikoeh
e, i

hi;
Ine

au hi kkah
(2563) +kakka
i
(

ssho.
ti

Hd
e,

ti

ta-g

Ikagen,

Ikauka
Ine line
jkei

llkoa

Ina tchueh.

Hih
line,

e,

hi Ine jkwah.
e,

Hi
ttai

ti

tchuehya
hi

tta hi;
(

hhe tif; au hi au Ika6ken)

(2564) Ikaoka Ikuei-u,
(2558') (2563')
*

llkallkaih-ma.

I sse arroko

llnein llkaie-ta !k'|nn,
e

"the shade
place,

of the inside of the hut."

f Ti
explains.

Ikwai, he

ti,

"one

this

place,"

the narrator

BUSHMAN PRESENTIMENTS.
a louse
is
;

337

* as

it

walks, scratching the louse

;

when

it

spring,t

when

the sun feels thus,
(

Then

it is

that

)

warm. the things go from us. They (2557)
it is

go along, passing opposite to the hut.

Therefore,
early go

we

early cross the things' spoor,

when we
(
)

to hunt.

For, the things which

are

numerous (2558)

are used to

come

first,

when we

are lying in the

shade of the hut; because they think that

we

are

probably lying asleep in the noonday's sleep.

For

we

really

(

) lie

down

to sleep the

noonday's sleep. (2550)
feel this
this

But we do not
sensation.

lie

sleeping at noon,

when we
we have

For we are used to the things are walking when (
;

feel like
)

when
(2560)

felt the

things coming, as they walk, moving their legs.
feel a sensation in the hollows

We

under our knees, upon

which blood drops,
game).
(
)

as

Therefore,
little

we go along, carrying (the we feel this sensation there. (2561)
boys do not
lie

Therefore, the
inside the hut
so
;

in the shade

they

lie

in the shade above yonder,
to us, when they have when the things walk at (2562)

that they

may beckon
(
)

perceived the things,
that place.

They

will beckon,

making us

see

;

for

we
( )

are wont, sitting at a distance, to watch them, Therefore,

as they sit above yonder.
other,

we say

to

each
seen (2563)

that the

children appear to have

things.

For, they beckon.

They

point to that place,
(?)

while they point to the place towards

which the

things are walking, where the Briakkop mountains lie thus spread out (?). ( ) So we may quickly chase (2564)

* An insect wHcli bites the ostricla, a black insect; an " ostrich louse " as the Bushmen describe it.
j-

(2556')

Whabbo explains that Wgu means " de bloem tijd ".

;

338

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
tchuen, au
ha.
Ika'o

bbS

a,

ha llkam

tta

;

ha tchuenya

ttaxya
1

Tchuenya
llnun

ttai

juhi-tta,
;

tchuen a ha *

sse

arroko

hho ha

ati

ha jnaunko ttea
i

(2565) Ihinya.
l;^uorri

I sse jkhe
ja
ti

akken au
;

(

)

tchuen,
I;^u6rri

sse

^auki
jkhe

jkhe
e,

tchuen

i

sse

juhi

tchuen,

!;^;we-lna

ha

tta'i

jkei jkhe hi.

IX.— 104.
B.

DOINGS AND PRAYERS

WHEN CANOPUSf
OUT.

AND
(3348)
l;^am-ka-jk^ten
:

SIRIUS

COME

{Given in October, 1873.)
Inf

Ikuatten-jkougen,
;

hin +kakka

(3349) jkhwa

" Inakki 0h6 Ike
ta,
;

(

)

h jkwe
ll;^e
;

jho hS,
jkditte
;

h

Ilka

jkditte,

jkditte
ta,

Ikammenya

ssan

ikarraka hi

ha ka ^aowa

Ihin ssa

ilkoin sse

IlkakdJ llkda hi jkditte tsa;i^au."

(3350)

jkdttoken Ihih ssa; jk^ten

(

)

l^keya hi Ikagen:
Ikagen:
hi

" jkuttau kah

Ike
Ilka

ssa;"
hi

hin +kd,kka hi

"U kk^
Ikagen:

sse

jkuttau."

Hin +kdkka

" jku ddi ^a a Ina jkuttau?"
jkukko:

jkukoken
jkuttau."

(3351) +kdkka
(2564')
* a
hi,

"I

(

)

Ilka

ka-g

Ina

=

au ha-ha.
for

f Four
[kelss^;

names given by the Bushmen
possible

Canopus are

as follows:

\kuatten-\kougm; W^koiiggu; \\xe-t&-\kuaUen-\kdugen.
is

J It

that

Wk&ka

should

have

been

-written

IIMll^^, here.

DOINGS A.ND PRA.YERS TO CERTAIN STARS.
the things at the
hill

339

things are walking.

which lies across, to which the The things walk, putting them-

selves in front of it;*
it,

we

will quickly pass

behind

while

it still lies

away (from the
(

springbok).

We
we (2565)

will stand nicely (ready) for

)

the things, that

may not steal up abreast f of the things, (but) that we may steal up in front of the things, at the place J
to

which the leader

goes.

IX.— 104.
B.

DOINGS AND PEATEES

WHEN CANOPUS
OUT.
to
a

AND
may put
(it)

SIEIUS

COME

The Bushmen perceive Canopus, they say child: "Give me yonder piece of wood, ( )
I

(3348)

that (3849)

(the end of)

it

(in the fire), that I

may

point

mother

bm*ning (towards) grandmother, for, grandgrandmother shall carries Bushman rice
;

make a
Sirius

little

warmth

for us

;

for she coldly comes

out; the sun§ shall another:

warm

grandmother's eye for us."

another
Sirius."

:

comes out; the people ( ) call out to one (3350) "Sirius comes yonder;" they say to one " Ye must burn (a stick) for us (towards) They say to one another " Who was it
:

who saw
(

)

One man says to the other "Our brother saw Sirius." The other man says to him (3351)
Sirius

?

"

:

:

* That f That
\

is,
is,

putting their faces towards the mountain.

not at the side of the game as

it

goes along, but riglit

(2564') (2565')

in front of its path.

The Bushmen

are at the back of the hill, waiting for the
it,

springbok to cross

coming

to the place

where they (the Bush-

men) are. § The sun

is

a little

warm, when

this star appears in winter.

(3349')

340

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ikiikoken
Ikiikoken
Ikdttau
;

+Mkka
+kd,kka
llkoin

ha:
ha:

"IS

ka

Ina

Ikuttau."
sse
Ilka

"^
sse."

kan
Iha

ka, a hi
;

hi
sse

sse
)

Ikailkai

jkiittau

(3352) yauki

y^wa

(

Ihih

jkiikoken
Ike,

+kd,kka

ha
Iho

Opuon:
hi,

"Hd

ssa kki
;

0ho Ikwa
sse

n jkwe

n

Ilka

[kdi'tte

Ikditte

Iko,

llkelike

jkukko

ll«k<5a-ggu."

Ikhwan hho ssa ha Ohd jkwa, han !kwe jho
(3353)
(

hf.

)

Hail

Ilka

jkeh

jkiittau*;
lli:!k(5a-ggu.

han +kakka

jkiittau

sse

ddabba

llkelike

Han

jkiitten;
;

hah
line

Ikutten

liakda-ggu,
if;

hah

jkiitta

jkuttau

hah

hi au

hi sse
ti (
)

ddd,bba
jkeh
li i.

llkelike

hi

Ikagen.

Hah

(3354) Igabbeten

Hah
;

llgu-ttih jnuih.

Hah kk^h
hah
tta
;

Ihih,

hah
tatti,

ssiieh

au hah ^auki ikShna
le

au hah

ha ttabba kki
;

jkuttau,

(3355) au llkoih-ta
Ikarraka ihih

Ikarrakeulkarraken
sse.

jkuttau

ss^h

(

)

jk^-ta-lkakaken jkagen kkau liikua ll^e; hih
Ikarra tte hi
llgai.

ttili

* In some instances, the second syllable of the word VcMtau

was pronounced
by an
o

as

between au and

o.

These are here distinguished

underneath them.

;;

DOINGS AND PRAYERS TO CERTAIN STARS.

341

The otljer man says to him: "I wish thee to burn (a stick) for us (towards) Sirius that the sun may shining come out for us that
;

"I saw

Sirius." *

may not coldly ( ) come out." The other man (3352) (the one who saw Sirius) says to his son: " Bring me the (small) piece of wood yonder, that I may put (the end of) it (in the fire), that I may burn (it) towards grandmother that grandmother may ascend the sky,
Sirius
'

;

like the other one, Canopus."

The

child brings

him

the piece of wood, he (the
it

father) holds (the end of)

in (the
;

fire).

(

)

He (3353)

burning towards Sirius he says that twinkle like Canopus. He sings he sings (about) Canopus, he sings (aboiit) Sirius he points to them with fire,t that they may twinkle like each other. He throws ( ) fire at them. He covers (3354) himself up entirely (including his head) in (his) kaross and lies down. He arises, he sits down while he does not again lie down because he feels that he has worked, putting
points (it)
Sirius
shall
;

;

;

;

Sirius into the sun's

warmth

;

so that Sirius

may

(

)

(3355)

warmly come out. The women go out

early to seek for

Bushman

rice

they walk, sunning their shoulder blades.J
* W^kdd-ggu, " Canopus," and
stars,
[kuttait,

" Sirius," are both female

(3351')

Wkdlho says.
stick that

f

With the

he had held in the

fire,

moving

it

up and

down quickly. \ They take one arm

out of their kaross, thereby exposing one

(3355')

shoulder blade to the sun.

342

SPECIMENS OE BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

IX.— 182.
L.

THE MAKING OF CLAY
{Dictated, in 1878, by lhan+kass'6,

POTS.
observation.)

from personal

(8054)
ta,

Ikagen llkuan ka Iku

liken,

hho u
i,

jk'ati

e llkau jk'au *
le
(

hhd u hi
au

;

lie,

hf

Ine

liken

Ihin

(8055) e llkhde \\nL
ilkho hi,

He

hi Ine

Ikhiii

hi;

hi

Ine

)

Ilh6.

He

hi Ine jgwi tte hi, hi Ine Iki

Ikuiten hi.

He, hi

Ine

;

llnau,
i

hi Ikditen

lla,
;

hi Ine ttdi

tati

ttiirru ike, hi

ttdrru Ike-ta-ttuken
hi,

hi Ine llhih hi.

(8056)

He hi He
ki

Ine Iki
(
)

lla

au llnSn.
Ik'aiten
Ike,

hi Ine ik'aiten !k9a,t

kui nnai-

nnaiiij hi.
Ik'aiten

He, hi
ddi

Ine

Ik'aiten

hi Ine H^fitt-

kui

nnainnaiu
;

Ike,

He,

hi

Ine

llkhoe tte Ikd

au jk'au

he hi

Ine IlkallkA jk'au.
Ine

He
Ine

(8057)

(

)

hi

Ine

llkillkd

jk'^, he hi
Ine
tt^rri §
e iki

ddi
i.

kiii

akken

llwei jk'au,

he hf

jk'au,

He, hf

(8055')

* jk'au llk^llkeya jkaiiokgn

tohuen

e llkhoa hi kakait^n.

Hin

e,

jk'au e jk'e ddi jkoa,

i,

hi Iki tchnei e llkhoa h?.

jk'au

Ine jkjya.

(8056')

jk'auii jkiya,

jk'^
i;

e,

jk'^ llelle hi, tatti
e,
i.

hin ||ken||ken ho,
hi liken,

i.

Hin
i.

Ine ta:

jkoa-ttii,
e, e,

au hin
:

dda

llkha-ttu,

He
(8058')
e

ti

hin

hi jne ta

jkna-ttu,
i.

t Ik'au
jk'au

hi ddi jkoa,

llkuan i;

hin Iku Ilkowa
jne
Ine

;

jk'eten
hi
;

Iku-g Ine jk'aiten,
jhin,
e

hin Ilkowa.
tt'aihya.
linSu,

He, hi He,
jk'au

hhurukgn
ttorottoro

hhiruken
\\i,

jk'au

hi
e

jho

jk'M

luerri'ya.

Hin
hi,

tt'a'inya,

hi

Ine

ttorottoro

juhf

||kho

|i^

au

jki.

(8056') (8057')

t jk'i'iten ddf
§

kui llkh6
;

\hii hi.

llkuan jnhf llkhoa h! au
I.

jki.

Ht

llkuan tabba h!

hi

llkuan tabha, ddi jkoS,

THE MAKING OF CLAY

POTS.

343

IX.— 182
'l.

THE MAKING OF CLAY
The -women
above, lifting
earth * which
dig,
it
is

POTS.
lies

removing the earth whicli
;

(8054)

away
into

and they only dig out the

inside there.
(

out
it
it

;

they put

it

)

the bag.

And they scoop it And they sling (8055)

(the

earth) over their [left] shoulder, they take

jiome.

And,

as they return, they go along plucking grass,
;

they only pluck the male grass

they bind

it

together.

And they take it to the hut. And ( ) they pound the pot (clay),t pound (it), (8056) making it soft.J And they pound the grass, they also pound, making the grass soft. And they put
the grass into the earth
wet.
;

and they make the earth

And

(

)

they make the earth wet, and they (8057)
nice indeed, and they

make the earth very

mould §

to glitter.

* The earth resembles stones which contain things whicli seem (8055') Hence, the earth of which the people make a pot

contains things which are like
particles).

them

{i.e.,

like the said glittering

The
to

earth

is red.

The earth
call it

which the people

go, to dig it out, is red.

They (8056')

" a pot's hole", because they dig, making a Therefore, they call it " a pot's hole ". there. f The earth of which they make the pot.
It
is

stick's hole,

earth-; it is
sift it, sift

dry; the people pound
out the earth which
is is

it

(when)

it is

dry.

(8058')

And
down

they

soft.

And

they pour

time].

hard [to be pounded again at another they pour it out upon a skin [a whole skin, which has no holes in it, a springbok skin]. (They) put it upon a skin. (8056') % Pound, making it like sand. they work, making a pot of it. (8057') § They work it

the earth which

With regard

to the soft earth,

;

344

SPECIMENS or BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
hi

Ilnau,

ddd jkoa jkhwi-lu, hi

Ine jkannjkanii
(

jkwa

(8058) hho +gwai, hi Ine ttdrokenttdroken
Ine
kiii

)

+gwai.
Ine

Hi

jkannjkann, tte

lla

+g-wai.
Ine

He, hi
ttferriya

+;^aunu

akken

llwei

+gwai; hi

ki llkaiten
ha,

!ko|.

He
ha.*

hi Ine

+^ahnu
(

ha,
)

+^amiu

+^annu

(8059) ha, ddi kui dkken llwei
jho
lla

ha,

hin Ine jkauaken

He, hi

Ine ddi

!k9a-Opua a +enni, ha
Ine Isrul Ikoa

ha

yaiiki
ta,
)

akken
jkoa

Ilka ha.

Hi

au

ssueii,
e,

au hi
(8060)
h-i
(

sse

>'auki

jk'drraken.

H^

tfken

Ine

!gui

jkoa

au ssueh,
Ilk6,

au jkoa jnaunko
li-ttuken

Ikaa,

au jkoa Ikagen
;

Ikoa
Ilk6,

jnaunko
ssueii.

Ikak

au hi

ta,

jkoa

sse

au jkoa
hi

Iki

(8061) He, hi Ine jkauaken jho

lla

jkoa;

Ine

ddf

(

)

jkoa-Opua; hi

Ine ddi kiii
lla

akken

llwei ha.

Hi
;

Ine

jkauaken jka jho
hi
Ine

jkoa-OpM au
;

jkoa

jkdrri

he

hho

ssa,

+gwai-ka ti-kko
Ine terri hi;

hi

Ine

ll^amki

llkalika hi.

Hi
hi;

hi Ine t^rri kiii
hi.

akken

(8062)

llwei

(

)

hi

Ine

jho

lla

Hi

Ine

ll^amki
Ine
Ilk6,

ddi jkoa-Opua-kko, jkoa-0pua a kkiya.

He, hi
Ine

jkauaken jho
(8063) hi
Ine

lla

ha.

Hi

Ine

ilnau,

jkoa
l^iii

Ine

ll^amki

ddi jkhoii,t hi Ine
l;^ii

hi

;

hi

(

)

l^ui hi, hi Ine

kiii

nnainnaih
;

hi.

Hi
kku

Ine
le

Igomm
(8069') (8062')
1,

llkhde llkho hi

au jkoa

he hi

Ine

* llkuan ka, ha sse
t jkhoti
tsaxa'iten
tatti,

Ilk5.

llkuan
Ihiii

Ihoaka; Ik'eten Ine

ta,

jkhdu ttxl,

au jk'eteu

hi

jkhou

iu.

THE MAKING OF
the earth.

CLA.T POTS.

345

And, when they have made the lower

part of the pot, they, holding, break off the clay,
the clay between their hands. They (8058) ( ) put the clay down (in a circle). And they smooth * the clay very nicely indeed ; they moulding, raise

they rub

(the sides of) the pot.
it,

And

they smooth

it,

smooth

very nice iadeed, they set (8059) ( it down to dry (in the sun).t And they make a little pot which is small, beautiful beyond comparison. They
it,

smooth

make

) it

anoint the pot with
to split.

fat,

while they wish the pot not

Therefore, they
is

while the pot

still

anoint the pot with fat, (8060) ( ) damp, when the pot has just

newly

dried, the pot's inner part (the inner layers, not
still it

the inside) being
pot to dry

damp

;

because they wish the
it

when
pot
;

has fat upon

(inside
;

and

out).

they make they make it very nicely indeed. (8061) ( They set the little pot to dry (in the sun) by the side of the large pot ; and they take the other part of the

And
)

they set the pot (in the sun) to dry
little

a

clay; they

make

it

also wet.
;

They mould
(
)

it;
it

mould

it

very nicely indeed

they set
a
little

they down. (8062)

They
is

also

make another
{lit.

little pot,

pot which
it

larger

" grown

").

And

they set

to

dry

(in the sun).

When

the pot dries, they also prepare

gum;

J

pound up in
IX.
f

they pound it (between stones); they ( )(8063) they pound, making it fine. They take it their hand (and) put it into the pot and they
it,
;

* This

is

— 185, and
The

done with a piece of boas called \kau or
also illustration.)
it

\au.

(See

may become dry. (8059') "the eyes") of the "Doom Boom" are (8062') black {i.e. " black gum "). The people call them the dung of the " Doom Boom ", because they come out of the stem of the
(They) wish that
berries
(lit.

%

\khoii tree.

A

white gum, called

\gii,'i,

seems also

to

be found on this tree.

346

SPECIMENS or BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

jkhoa.

Hi

Ine Iku,

au hih

tatti e,

jkhou e +a+dppem,*

tie llkdilkdya

Ikwaie.

(8064)

He,

lii

Ine llnau,

wdi

(

)

jk
wai

Una,
!gau,

\km gwai
au
Ikoa,
Iki

Ine

Ikha wai,
jkui

hi
Ine

Ine
Iki

Ikudii

le

he
lla

gwai

jkuiten

ll;^aTiken;

ha

Ine

ll^aiiken

au llnSn.
lid

(8065)

He
llkan.

jkui Iditi Ine

(

)

kku

le

ll;j(;auken

au jkoS

He, ha

Ine j^aiia ll^a'uken; he, Ine Iki Ihin jkoa,
jkoa, he,

ha ha

Ine llnau,
Ine Ikenn

ll^aiika Ilka,

ha

au

li,

Ihin ll^aiiken,

au

ha

Ine jho jkoa, I;

au ha

(8066) ka,

(

)

ll^auka ss^
Ine

kku

sswei.
ssa
jkoa,

He, hd t

W^^,

ha Ikam

he ha

Ine

kku

le

jkhoa,

ha

Ine j^aaa a.

He, hi yauki llvamki Ik'diten.t au Ikoa llkah a
(8067)
(8064')
(8066')
Ilka

jkhe,

au hi

ta,

ha
ti

sse

yauki
llnun,

(

)

Iki.

* Hin jne derri jkoa-ka
sse

e
ti

au

hiii ka,

lie

jkhou, hi

kku +a+app, au Ikoa-ka
gwaiya
|ku

e llnun.

t Ikui

tabba

|ki

wai-ta

jnwa,

ggaiiru

Iki

hi.

jkui laiti Iku tterri Iki

jkwonjkwon.

(8066')
(8067')

\

i-e.

Ik'diten

jkwaken.

Ixain-ka-jk'eten iya, au hin tatti, hi yauki |ki jko.
ilkou jhoa

Hi

llkuaii

jkwa, au

jkou a

jkhe

(

)

jk'au,

au hi Ine jkan-na

!kou a

|ki

ha

JlkeY, hi Ine !k'|iten

a;

jk'aiten, Iki

jkwi; au hin

tatti e, hi ta, hi sse

!x^^

^^t

lii

S86

kkwarreten ha.

; ;

THE MAKING OF CLAY

POTS,

347

pour in water [into the new pot].
boils,
it

It

[the

gum]

while they feel that

gum
)

is

that which adheres,*

resembles Ucwmii.

And,
(its)

if

springbok

(

are at hand, a

man

kills

(8064)

a springbok, they pour the springbok's blood into stomach, and the man brings back the blood he takes the blood home. And the wife goes ( ) to pour the blood into the (8065)

new

pot.
is

And

she boils the blood

;

and,

when
fire,

the

blood

cooked, she takes the pot ofE the
sets the pot
[i.e.,

she

takes the blood out of the pot (with a

springbok

horn spoon), and she
wishes
(
)

down

;

because she

the blood

the blood remaining in the (8066)

pot] to dry.

she t again takes the pot, and she pours water into (it), she boils meat.

And

And,
a

also,
is

they do not strike with a stone,J when

new

pot

on the

fire,

because they wish

it

not

(

)

(8067)

to split.

spoon,

* They smear the pot outside [with gum taken out with the (8064') made from springbok horn, with which they stir the gum
is

which

boiling inside], while they wish this

gum

to adhere to

the outside of the pot.
f A man works at springbok's A woman moulds pots.

arrows,

making them

straight.

(8066')

\han:^iass'6 further stated that his wife, Ssu6bia-l\Jceh,

had been

taught to make pots by Kkoe-ah (an elder
the maternal side).

sister of

her mother,

\kudhha-an), and also by \xii-an (another elder female relative on

The Bushmen do this because (8066 ) \ To break bones (with a stone). they do not possess an axe. They place a bone upon a stone which stands upon ( ) the ground, while they hold a stone which has (8067') strike, dividing the bone a sharp edge, they strike with it because they intend to boil it, that they may gnaw it.
;

348

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLELORE.

IX.— 184.
L.

THE
(6083)
Iku Ikhuken e a;
tsiii;j^u.

IKHU.*

{Given in January, 1878, hy Ihan+kass'o.)

Ikhiiken-ka

ti

e,

llkou jklie lia

Ikhuken lukenliikaken

Ine e a,

h^

e llken-

llken ss'o tu.

(6084)

Sr >'auki +eniia ti

e,

whal-ta

(

)

Iku^rrif Inu
e.

e.

In^bbaken llkuan a
Iten Iku
li'ten

a,

Ohoken
lli/ke
ti

llkuah
li

llnuai

jkann

a.

H^
Hin

ti

hin

e,

Ine

Ilka

kauin ha-ka

e

a.

Ine

iikhoii

lh(5aken.

IX.— 185.
L.

!AU.
{Given in January, 1878, ly lhan+kass'5.)

(6082)
e

jkwaken llkuan da ha.J

e

;

Ikaujkau e

;

l^aih-ka-jkuiten Iku
;

Han

Iku-g Ine tdbba ha

ban Iku

likufoni

ba, o Iguara.
Ikiiiten Iku e,
i

bi bi.
Iko'uwi hi.

(6083') (6084') (6082')

*

Ik'^-ta

tuken kan
a,

e

t Sail llkoe jkhe %

han Hkouta jkwa.
e

Han

Ikainya.

Ha

llkuan ddi,

jk^jkaii

Ik'u,

au Iguara.

in!il!l

ili

U

n-J
1.

1

.

riaything,

made by the

\kun.

2.

The

[khu, or

Bushman Soup

Spoon,

{Nearly

lialf-she.)

cc

\

1.

Length

of string in Fig. 1

= 48

of

wood about 3-4 mm.

Thickness cm., in Fig. 2 = 54 cm. The edges are sharpened.

^ cc
Ch

r

A

*.

*

3-1'
k

.^..

V
Instruments similar to
\^t'in-\guih,

made by the

\kun.

/

/

A

shaped rib bone called
(I-

[ait, used for eating certain food. of actual size.)

\,

1.

Arrow made by the
{i size.)

\kun.

2.

Bushman Aitow.
{i actual size.)

a.

Section showing red marks by which the arrows are recognised

by Bushmen.

1^

s^

1/

..V

>-.-'^*,

r
1. Ix<*

ywa*. male porcupine.

2.

jxd

|a»<«,

female porcupine.
J\rov.

lAdH+ioM'd,

21M, 1878.

4.

\kqo, Suricata Zonick, or "
1

Mierkat."

and

2,

males

;

3,

a female.

4,

a jackal which chases them.
\h(M^kau'd, Oct. ind, 1878.

BUSHMAN SOUP SPOON.

349

IX.— 184.
L.

THE BUSHMAN SOUP SPOON.* t
The
hair of the Proteles
is

here, that part of the (6083)

hair which

is ou the top of its back. J The roots of the hair are here, those which stick into the skin.
it is springbok's ( )(6084) [which binds the hair on the stick]. This § is the (wood of the) "Driedoorn"; it (the " Driedoorn ") is a bush. "We scratch the fire together with it {i.e., with

I

do not

know whether

paxwax

the handle of the brush).

Therefore, the
It

fire

burns,

blackening this part of

it.

becomes black.

IX.— 185.
L.

THE SHAPED RIB

BONE.||

A

bone

(it) is

;

a rib (it)

is

;

a
it
;

Bushman

is

the one (6082)
it

who makes

it.^

He
that

works

he shapes
it.

with

a knife. " Kambro "
*

is

which we eat (with)

Among some Bushman implements

given to Dr. Bleek by

a friend, was the brush of which a picture appears in the illustra" tions. Wkdhbo recognized this at once as a Bushman " soup spoon
;

with immense pleasure, in what manner the Bushmen eat soup with it, and how well it can be u?ed to take up the fat on the top of the soup, if rolled round in it. are those who biml {i.e., make) them. (6083') f The men
and showed
us,

t Really along
§
II

its

back, the narrator explains.
;

It is in the flesh

it lies

npou the bone.

It

is

yellow.

(6084')

See
*\

illustration.

He

works two

ribs,

with a knife.

(6082')

;

350

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

IX.— 190. L.

THE BUSHMAN DEUM AND DANCING
RATTLES.
{Given in January, 1878, hy Ihaii+kass'o.)

(6127)
e,

Hi

llkuan

llhifi,

jkauii llkho Mho, o jkoS ttd.*
!.

He
kui

hi Ine llhin llkho jnui,
( ) i
;

He, tin
hiii ta

Ine +ke,

(6128) ta !kwi, jkoa x^;^u,
aii

au

jkoa sse ^wa,

hi Ine jkauken jkoa.
!k'e-ta

ttuken sse
;

llhinllhin llkati llkho
aii

whai jnuntu,
Ine
ii,

o hi Inoalnoa f

hi sse jk'oa,
ti
e,

whai jnuntukea

(6129)

ywa
S,

;

Ilka
e,

(

)

whai Inuntu llkuan Ikuei
f.

Ilka ti
;

ssf ta

Ikeriten,
i.

Whai

jnujnuntuken

e

sslten In^ ta Ikeriten,
ssi

Hin

llkuan ywa, aken
( )

(6130) au

llhin

llkau

llkhda,
llhin

ssi

jnoa.

Hin
jnoa.

llkuan

ywa
Ine

aken,

au

ssi

llkau

llkhoa ssi

Hin
aii

llkuan

ywa
;

aken,

hin llkuan ssikenssaken,
Ine
(

ssi

jk'oa

au ssiten
hin

llhin
)

llkau llkhoa

ssi

jnoa.

(6131) jkoa a
Aken.
i
;

jk'6-ta

Ikagen
e,

jkauka,

hah

"llkuan

>Va

Hd
aken.

ti

Ik'^-ta

ttuken llkuan Ik'oa aken,
Ikagen
ttiiken
jka'uka, llkuan

au hih

tatti e, jkoa

a

jk'd-ta jk'e-ta

(6132) ywa
llkau.

Ikdriten e

llhihilhih

(

)

Ilkhda o hi Inoalnod llkuan

ywa aken; au hah
i
;

tdtti e, Ikui laiti

a taba ttwaii, ha llkuan a taba hi.

H^
(6133)
e,

ti

hih

e, 7
(

hi llkuan 3
)

ywa

ttwaii,
7

7

au hih

tatti

hi llkuan
i
;

aken.

Hd
jne

ti

hih

e,

hi llkuan

ywa

ttwaii,

au hih
||h6.
e,

tatti e, hi llkuan aken.
Mkdllka whai jxo'ux") whai
Ine Ilka, hiii Ine
i.

(6127')

* Whai-ta
tte-ta ttu;

Hin Iku-g
hi

hih

Ine llnau, hi
;

llhiii

jk'auri

llkho hi, au jkoa ttu

he ht Ine tata jkga,
tssi.

(6128

)

t

Hi

jnoajnoa Inalna

;

BtrSHMAN DRUM AND DANCING RATTLES.

351

IX.— 190.
L.

THE BUSHMAN DRUM AND DANCING"
RATTLES.*
They
mouth, t
the
tie,

putting the bag over the pot's (drum's) (6127) Then they tie on the sinew. And they
(
)
;

pull the drum's surface tight

f or

they Tvish that (6128)

drum may sound, when they beat the drum. The men will tie springbok ears upon their feet %
;

they will dance, while the springbok ears sound, as
(
)

springbok ears are wont to do, like what
rattles.

dancing

Springbok ears (they) are

them dancing

rattles.

They sound
feet.
(

well,
)

we call (6129) we call when we
;

have tied (them) on to our

They sound (6130) They well, feet. sound well, they rattle as we dance, when we have tied (them) on to our feet. The drum which the

when we have tied (them) on

to our

women

(

)

beat sounds well.
it,

Therefore, the

men (6131)
The
(6132)
is

dance well on account of

while they feel that the

drum, which the women beat,
dancing rattles which the

sounds well.

sound well, because a
the

men tie ( ) upon woman who works
good.

their feet

nicely

one

who

has

worked them.
(
)

Therefore,

they

sound nicely, because they are

Therefore, (6133)

they sound nicely, because they are good.
* For a drawing of the dancing rattles see illustration. They wet the skin of the springbok's f A springbok's bag.

(6127')

thigh

;

then,

when

it

is

wet, they tie

it

over the pot's

mouth

and they try the drum.
I Their insteps.

(6128')

352

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

How
(6133)
e,

THE Dancing Eattles are prepared.
llkuan ho
lii

jkui

laiti

whai jnuntu-ka ttu*; he
au ha jnuntu-ka
e,

ha

Ine

+umm whai
e,

Inuntu-ka jkon, au han Ikii-g
;

(6134) Ine llkhg ui whai jnuntu-ka ttu

(

)

jkoiwan
hi,

ha

Ine Ine

+umm
Igomm

hi.
Iki

He
le

ha

Ine

+umm
i.

he
e,

e,

ha

jk'au e tt'amya,

(6135)

He
ta,

hi Ine liken Ikuen, Iki
sse llko
(5a
;

le jk'au, i;

au hin

(

)

whai jnuntu
hi Iki
Ihiii

hi sse Iki

le llkerri

tsa^aiten,
llkho

jk'au.

He
au

e,

hi

Ine

llhin

Inui-Opua,

au whai

jnuntu

lemm-ka ti-0pua,
hiii

he
jhan

(6136) ssih

(

)

bboken

jkhe,
llkerri

Ine

llhinllhiii

llkdrri

tsa;^aiten,

tsa^aiten

sse

^auki

Ihin,

au whai jnuntu.
(6137) whai Inulnuntu,
ta
Ika'uken,
e,
i
;

He,

hiii ine ilkeiillkeh Ikhoii llkho,
(

he hi Ine
ttiika

) Ikilki le,

ttwattwainlau

Ik'e-ta

sse

llhiiillhin

llkau

llkho

whai jnujnuntu, au hi

jnoajnoa,.

IX.— 191.
X.

THE USE OF THE jGOINlGOIN, FOLLOWED BY AN ACCOUNT OF A BUSHMAN
DANCE.
{Given in January, 1878, by Ihan^ikass'o.)

(6108)

jk'e
jk'e,

llkuah jkauken Igoiiilgoih,

Ikhou sse ttenya f

jkho'u sse

leleya jk'e kuiten a Ikwetenlkw^ten,
* Ti a
t llkhou
Iki

(6133') (6108')
prepared and
filled,

Ikiiken.

liikwai.

are tied, in fours or fives,

on

to the top of

each

foot (on the instep), letting the men's toes appear

below them.

(6108')

§

To become abundant.

\
>,
trf^f^^

^,r^^!^^-'
#'
'--••"'""
i>..

^.•4S2"-'55|

''^'!is:s:?>

a

V.

BUSHMAN DANCING-RATTLES.

/

/

//' '/

"^'lotjivti^-^

L_!.>-

Length of the

{onee-ttoisted) string

= 405 cm.

\G6tS.\G6tS.

;

j

PREPARATION OF DANCING RATTLES.

353

How

THE Dancing Rattles are prepared.

A
ear
;

woman takes off the skin* of the springbok's (6133) and then, she sews the inner skin of the springwhen she has
;

bok's ear,

laid aside the (hairy) skin
)

of the springbok's ear
its

(

f or it is

the inner skin of (6134)

which she sews. And she sews it, and she scoops up with her hand, putting soft earth into it.
ear

And

that the springbok ears

they dig, lading in earth, because they ( ) wish (6135) may dry that they may put in \\Mrri'\ berries when they have taken out the earth. And then they tie on a small piece of sinew
;

at the tip of the springbok ear,

which was

(

)

open, (6136)

while they
ear.

tie

shutting in the WMrri berries, so that

the WMrri berries

may

not come out of the springbok
threads,

And
(

they pierce through the springbok ears;
)

and they
to tie,

put in

little

which the men are (6137)

fastening the springbok ears on their feet. J

IX.— 191.
L.

THE USE OF THE \G6lN\G6iN, FOLLOWED BY AN ACCOUNT OF A BUSHMAN
DANCE.
The people beat the \gbin\goih, (in order) that the (6108) bees may become abundant § for the people, (in order)
* The hairy
j-

skin.
of

being like that of They are found Its seeds are black, and small. a pumpkin. which is red. The root is roasted and underneath the flower, The seeds are also eaten, unroasted eaten by the Bushmen.

The top

this

plant

is

described

as

(6133') (6135'

being,

when dry, pounded fine by the women with stones, and mixed with " Kamhro " in order to moisten them for eating. explains that the springbok ears, when thus (6137') J The narrator

2a

354

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
sse-g Ine

!k'e

ha

Ikhoii.

He

ti

hin
ti

e,

jk'e

jkauken
Ikhou
la

(6109)

(

)

Igoihjgoin, !;
leleya

6 jk'dten ta

e,

jk'e-ta
;

sse

!k'e-kuiten a jkw^tenjkw^ten
aii

jk'e sse

jkhou; hi sse Iku jkhou

llhollho.
i.

(6110)

He
Ine

jk'^ten Ine
ti

Ikammain jkhou,

He
i.

(

)

Ik'e

Ikammain
lla

Ikuiten Ikhou 6 llnein,
llnein,
i.

He
ti

Ik'e
e,
e,

Iku Iki

Ikdgen jkhou, 6
jkhe

Ikdgen

la
)

6

llkah,
Iki
lla

i,

6

llnein.

He H^

hin hin

ti

(6111)

jk'e-ta

(

ttiiken
lla

IkAgen jkhoii 6 llnSh, i;

Ikagen
llkan-a

sse

ha;

au.

hin

tatti

e,

Ikagen
sse

ddda

6

llnSn;

au hin

ta,

Ikagen

jhda hi

jkoa *

;

hi sse jk'oa, au Ik^kaken Ine jkaiienya.

Ta,

hi yauki llgwlten,

au hih
i
;

tdtti hi llkah-a.

(6112)

(

)

He

hi Ine jk'oa,
e,

au Ikaka
Ine

jh(5a

he a
;

jkoa.

He
(6113)

tiken

Ikagen llkuah
jk'6-ta
)

jhoa hi jkoa

hih

llkuah Ine jk'oa.

ttukaken llkuah
tatti,
e,

e Ine jk'oa,

Ikdkaken Ine
ttiiken,

(

jhauwa, he

hi jkdeta jk'e-ta
;

o jk'e-ta ttukaken Ine

jk'oa
;

o jkui

laiti

a jkwai, hah Ine a jkauken jkoa
(6114) e Iwkwaiya, hih
(

o jk'e-ta Ikdgen
;

)

e Ine jk6eta jk'e-ta ttiiken

au

hih

tdtti,
ti

jk'e-ta ttiiken

Iwkwaiya, he jk'oa.
Ine
Ihih,

H^
hih
e,
e,

hih

e,

lloih

llkuah

o

hih
( )

jk'oa

(6115) Una, au hih
lloih

tdtti e, hi llkuah jkaiienya.

Hd

ti

Ine

Ihih,

o hih jk'oa Una

;

aii

hih
e,

tdtti
lloih

Ikagen llkuah Ine jkauenya.
* Ikagen
sse

He

ti

hih

(6111')

llgwita he, o Ikakaken |ne jkauenyl,

Ikagen sse

llxfui jhoa

he Igoo, hi sse jgumm.

A BUSHMAN DANCE.
that the bees that the people

365

may go into the may eat honey.

other people's places, Therefore, the people
desire that the (6109)

beat

(

)

the

\goih\g6in,

when they

people's bees
so that the

may go into people may cut
into bags.

the other people's places,

honey, that they

may

put

honey away

the people carry honey. And ( ) the people, (6110) carrying, bring the honey home. And the people take honey to the women at home. For, the women
are dying of hunger, at home.
( )

And

Therefore, the
;

take honey to the

women
;

at

home

that the

may go to eat, for they feel that the been hungry at home while they wish that the
women may make* a drum may dance, when the women
for them, so that they

men women (6111) women have

are satisfied with food.

For they do not frolic when they are hungry. And they dance, when the women have made (6112) ( ) a drum for them. Therefore, the women make a drum for them they dance. The men are those who dance, while the women ( ) sit down, because they clap their (6113) hands for the men when the men are those who dance while one woman is the one who beats the
; ;

drum; while many women
their

are those

(

)

who

clap (6114)

hands for the men
are dancing.

;

because they feel that

many

men

Then, the sun rises, while they are dancing there, while they feel that they are satisfi.ed with food. Then, the sun rises, while they are dancing there, (6115) ( ) while they feel that the women are satisfied with
food.

Therefore, the sun shines upon the backs of

satisfied

* That the women may play for them, when the women are (6111') with food that the women may also arrange the (game of) 1^00 for them, that they may roar.
;

;

.

356

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ine

Ik^
Iki
(

Iko
)

sho

M
ti e,

llkoullkdutenttu

;

*
e,

6 Ikakaken

(6116) Ine

jkoS-ka jk'au.
Ik'au,

He

ti

hm

ttuken Ine
Ine
ti
i.

+kiten+kiten o

o

jkoa-ka

Ik'auii

juhita
e
;

Ikagen
ti

;^u,
e,

Ilka

Ikagen Ike jhauwa

h6

hin

jkoS-ka Ik'au Ine juhita Ikagen
hi

jj^u,

Hin
Ikii

(6117)

tdtti

e,

yanki

(

)

ttamOpua
e,

jk'oa,

ta,

hi

!k'6a

llwii.

H^
ti

ti

hin

hi

jnoa-ka

Ik'aun

Ine

luhltin Ikdgen ^li, i;

au hin
hi
(

tdtti e, hi llkuah jk'oa
Ikilkf
hiii

(6118)

llwii.
i,

H^

hii

e,

)

hi jnoa-ka jk'au,

he koiten Ihin he jnoalnoa,
Hin.
(

koiten
;

!a

le

hi

;

o hin jk'oa jkhe.

Ikii

jk'oa jkhe ta

o Ikakaken
Ine

(6119) Ine e

jhauwa,

)

o

jk'e-ta

ttiikaken

e

jk'oa

jkhe ta.

Hd
tatti

ti
e,

hiii e,

hi Ine

Opuoin ki
6
(
)

le

Il6iri,t

i;

o hin

hi

llkuan

lliiwa,

hin
jkoa,
i;

ddda
i.

Ik'oa

Una

(6120) o

Ik'e-ta

Ikakaken Ine Ika
le

H^ He

ti hiii e, e,

hi Iku-g Ine Opuoin, ki
llkuari

3/
lluwa,
a,

lloih,

o hiri tatti
ti

hi
e, 7
(

o hiii ddoa Ik'oa Una.
le lloiii, i,

hin

(6121) hi Iku-g Ine Opuoin ki
hi llkuan
lliiwa,

au

hiii tdtti e,

)

o hiii dda jk'oa Una.

Tiken
au

Ikii-g

Ine tss'iten, 6 hiii

dda Opuoin Una

;

hiii tatti e,

hi llkuaii lluwa, 6 hiii d6a Ik'oa Una.

(6122)
6

H^
ywa;

ti hiii e, jgaiie Ikii a,

(

)

hi Ine Iketen jka'uken

Ikhoa,
ta,

jka'uken hi

sse-g
llkuaii

Ine

Ikudnya

hi,
ti

hi
hiii

sse
e,

ddoa

lloiiiya.

He
hi

jkauken

llkuaii

Ine jkagen

kau ikuenya
( )

hi,

o jgaiie-

(6123) tiiken; hi sse ssa ^wa.
(6115') (6119')
*
t
jk'e-ta tiiken llkuaii e, lloin

Ta,

llkuaii

ddoa

IkS Iko

ssin hi llkdullko'utentu.

Hin Iku-g

Ine

Opuoin au
au
lloin

llkuanna,

au hin
le.

tatti,

Ikagen

|ku

llhiiiya hi a jkoa,

Iku Ikati

;

A BUSHMAN DANCE.
their

357
the dust of (6116)

heads;* while the women get

(

)

Then the men are covered (?) with dust, while the dust of the drum lies upon the women's faces, because the women are accustomed to sit down there therefore, the dust of the drum lies upon the women's faces. Because they (the men) do not ( )(6117)
the drum.
;

dance a

little,

for they dance

very much.

Therefore,

their foot's dust covers the

women's faces; because
Therefore, they
( )

they have danced strongly.
their foot's dust,

get (6118)

which

rises

up from

their feet,

it rises

up among them,
sit

as they stand dancing.

They

dance,

standing around,

whUe

the

women

are those

who

down,

(

)

while the

men

are those

who
;

dance, (6119)

standing around.

t because they are tired when they have been dancing there while the women leave off ( ) drumming. Therefore (6120) because they are they sleep, letting the sun set tired when they have been dancing there. Therefore, they sleep, letting the sun set; because ( ) they are (6121) The place tired when they have been dancing there. becomes dark, as they sleep there, because they are tired, when they have danced there. Therefore, morning is (the time) when ( ) they (6122)
;

Therefore they sleep, letting the sun set

send the children to the water, that the children may dip up (water) for them, that they may drink ; for they are thirsty. Therefore, the children go early
to dip

that they

up (water) for them, at the break of day, so may come to drink. ( ) For they are (6123)

on the backs of whose heads the sun (6115') upon " the holes above the nape of their neck "). shines {literally, at noon, because the women had bound on the (6119') f They sleep drum for them, when the sun had just set.
* The

men

are those,

;;

358

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Iloinya.
ti

Hin
e,

llnau,

ti

e,

hi llkuaii dda lluwa.
e, ti

H^
ddda

hm

M

yauki llkhda hi llkuan
;

sse
e,

Iketen

jkaiiken
Ikii

o jkhoa

o hin

jhamm
ti

ta
e,

hi

jna'unko

lluwa.

H^

hih

hi yauki llkhoa,
jkhoa.
(
)

(6124) hi llkuan e sse

Iketen

jkaiiken 6

Au
Una
ti

hin
aii

tatti e,

hi ddda Iku jna'unko
hi

Ihamm Opuom
lliiwa.

hin
e,
)

tdtti e,

ddda Iku jnaunko

Hd

hih
(6125)
(

hi ^auki llkhda he e sse Iketen jkauken o jkhoa.

H^

ti

hin

e,

hi llnau, hi Ine jkho,

i,

hih Ine

Iketen jkauken o jkhoa, i;

au hih
ti

tatti e, hi llkuah

Opuoin, kkaiya

hi.

He

hih

e,

hi

Ine

jkho,
i.

i.

(6126)

H^
Ine

e,

(

)

hi Ine Iketen jkauken 6 jkhoa,
Ine kiii,

Hih

+kakka jkauken, hih koa
Ta,

hih +kakka jkauken,

Ika'uken

sse antau Iki ssa hi Ikhoa, hi sse ardko
(
)

(6127) ssa ywa.

hi ddoa Iloinya.

IX.— 197.
i.

PKEPAEATION OF THE FEATHEE BRUSHES USED IN SPRINGBOK HUNTING.
{Given in December, 1878, ly Ihan+kass'o, from personal
observation.*)

(8073)

Hi

llkuah Iku jkoujkou llkho jkoaken, +kaih+kani

llkho tt6i Ikhu,

au jndbba.

Hih

llkhou Iwkwai

;

he

hi Ine jkau jkaoken e jkiya, hi Ine jya'uwi t jkdaken-ka

(8074)

(

)

Oh(5ken.

^

He,
le,

hi Ine ddf

wai llnwaintu-ka ttd

hi Ine jkaujkau

ttuattuain,J he hi Ine Iku jkdaken.

(8073') (8074')

*

N

llkuan ka ssin llwkoen,

n jkoii a jkouwi jkgaken.
jkuara

t ddi llkhou jki hi.

" Rieme " llkuan X llkuah ka, jya, I.

e.

Ihaujhau-ka jkanken llkuan

e.

PREPARATION OP FEATHER BRUSHES.
thirsty.

359

They

are aware that they are tired.

There-

fore, it does not

seem

as if they will be those to send
;

the children to the water

for they feel at first that they are still tired. Therefore, it does not seem as if they will he those to send the children to the

Because they are still sleeping there for (6124) because they are still tired. Therefore, they do not seem as if they will be those to send the
water.
( )

a while

;

children to

the water.

(

)

Therefore,

awake, they send the children to the they feel that they have had their sleep out. Therefore, they awake. And then ( ) they send the (6126) children to the water. They speak to the children, they thus say to the children, that the children must quickly bring them water, that they may quickly come to drink. For ( ) they are thirsty. (6127)
;

when they (6125) water when

IX.— 197.
L.

PREPAEATION OF THE FEATHEE BRUSHES USED speingboe: hunting.*

m

the feather brushes, binding the ostrich (8073) feathers (the body feathers) upon the "Driedoorn"
roll

They

They become numerous and they (the Bushmen) pound red stones,t they paint J the feather brush ( ) sticks. And they make ready the (dried) (8074)
stick.
;

skin of a springbok's chest
* I used to see
t

;

they thread

little

thongs §
(8073')

my

The red

stones here meant, are ||M; not

grandfather (Tsdtsi) roll the feather brushes. At the " Philaitd.
1876, I>id[kw(nn

delphia Exhibition," in November,

recognized

red hsematite as \\M. J Paint them red.

The "children § Thongs (they) are. The Korannas call them \ya.

of

thongs" (they)

are.

(8074')

360

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine

Hi
like

Iku

Ikoaken
hi
(

;

hi Ine
Ikanii

liken

llkuaiii,*

hi Ine

llkua'm,

lae
)

llkou

tte

Ikoaken,

au

(8075)

llkua'm-ta llg6o,
\6

au llkuam-ta llgoowa Ine kkditen
ddi
a.

Ikdaken.
(

(8083|)

)

Mmdi, hi
llkho
li

llkeii,t
tsa;;^aiten

Ilkha-ttu-Opua

;

hi Ine
jho
ssin
;

llkhde
llkuain,

He, hi
ta,

Ine

llkou

au

li

tsa^aiten;

au hi

llkua'mya

kkwe

ramemmennin ta, llkua'm ssan bbii le jkoaken, au liya mmemmennin, au hi mmemmenninya, au hf Ilka. Hi llkuan Ikarin Iko llkou llkhda, wa'i ttu, hi Ine
kkoiten, au llkuam ya'uki
!ku !h<5a jkou,

au
)

tl e,

jkdaken-ka Ikwdlkwdgen Una
i

(80832
rev.)

hi^

au hi

ta,

(

llgoowa ssin

Ihin,

au

tt(5i

Ikhu.

Taken from IX.— 198.

THE MAEKING OF ARROWS.
(^Given in March, 1879, hy \h.a.h^asi^b,

from personal

observation.)

(8289)

l^am-ka-lk'e llkuan

e,

+kdttenj !nwa,§ au hin
)

ta,
ti

(8290) hi ssin mmii tenn jnwa, au ( e jkwai. He, hi llnau, hi Ine
(8074')
* j^wl-kau (the name
juniper).
of a little

hi l^a-i wai,

au

Ike-i wa'i jnoa,

hi Ine

thorny plant, somewhat like
I,

Ha
Nan.

liiken

e,

jk'e ta

llkuain,

au hin

tatti, hi

ysiuki

ttamOpua
(80885')

He
i,

tiken

e, Ik'e

kkgiten hi au jkoaken.

jk'eten

In6 ta llku|in,

au !>'w|-kati

|u e leta Ik'au.

t !k'e-ta ttuken Iku liken au llkhaiten e ya'uki Iki

Ikweten

;

hin Iku

e,

jk'e-ta

ttuken liken,
is

1.

(8289)
(8289')

J ^ketten

(which

the same in the singular and plural)
the arrows

is also

the
§

name

of the

mark on

made with \kwd^ and

Ud.

jnwa-ka-ku.

MARKING OF ARROWS.
into (it)
;

361

They put away the

and they put away the feather brushes. feather brushes; they dig up Whuqkn* they roast (the stem of) the Wkuqin, they lay

the feather brushes over the

WkuMs

smoke,

(

)

while (8075)

the Wkuam^s smoke ascends into the feather brushes.
(

)

First,

they dig f
little

horn],
it.

making a

[with a stick pointed with (8083^) hole they put live coals into
;

And

they put Wkumn upon the live
for the

coals,

while

they wish that the Wkudm
not flame up
;

may smoke quietly, and Wkudm would set the feather brushes on fire, if the fire were to flame up, if they (the stems) flamed up, when roasted. They (the Bushmen) put the springbok skin % over (the fire) they put a stone upon the place where the
;

feather

brush sticks

are,

for

they intend

(

)

that(8083f')

the smoke should only go out through the ostrich
feathers.

Taken from IX.

— 198.
L.

THE MARKING OF AEROWS.
The Bushmen
are those

they wish that they may they are shooting springbok at one place. And, (8290) ( ) when they are following the springbok spoor, when
*
Its

arrows,§ while (8289) recognize the arrows, when

who mark

stem

is

does not a

little smell.
it.

that whioli the people call \\km'tn, because it Therefore, the people smoke the feather

(8074')

brushes with
is

The people

call the

stem

of the \ywq-Jcau,

which

in the earth, \\kuqin.

which have no digging-stick stones(8083i') f Men dig with sticks (upon them) they are those with which men dig. skin, into which the feather brushes have been X They turn the put, upside down, over the hole into which the live embers and
;

the Wkuqin were put. § AH the arrows.

(8289')

;

362

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
hi,

Ilnau,

Ine ttdi

tau hoho !nwa, hi Ine

mmu

+enn
e,

!nwa.

Hin

Ind ta:

"A-ka jawa kan
(

llkhoa

ta,

(8291) hf-ta +k^ttea Iku Ikuii
kiii
:

}

tt."

jkukko a ha

Ine
lla,

"I, A-ka !nwa kan Ike."
a.

Hi

Ine

ll;^a,

hi

h6 jnwa
(8292)

jkukko a ha Ine

kiii:

"l^T-ka

jnwa

Ike

llkhoa Ike; ta, hi-ta tkdtten Iku Ikuei ii."
(

)

Ikwa^*

llknaii

^,

hi ddi +kdtten,

!.

Hi

Ine

llkhoe tte tt6, he hi Ine jkaiten lli^k^ tt5,

an Ikwae;
i.

he Ikwae

Ine llkhou \k\, l;

h^

e,

hi +kdtten tawa,

The Adhesive Substance used by the Bushmen
MAKING Arrows,
{Given in January, 1878, hy Ihan^ikaas'o.)

in

(6088)

Ikwaiiten llkuan e;
llkeya

llkudrri

llki'ten

e.

(6089)

ikii

Ikuita;

>'auki llkeya

"pompoon", han ku^rrekudrre. han llkellkdya jkhoa. Ha ( ) llkiten ttamOpua Ikiiita M-ta jkuitenjkuitaken llkejkhwa'iten. Hih Ine e jgaubken.
;

Han llkeHa llkiten

Ssiten Iku ;^hanna jho a;

he

e,

ssiten Ine jkahn
llki

(6090) jkuh jho !goe,
ssih

i;

(

)

o ssiten ka, ha
Ikwai,
i.

sse

juhi
Ine

!gge

;

ssi

sse

di
li

He
( )
;

ssi

Ikii-g

kunkuh, ddi
(6091)
hi,
i

kvii
li.

ta

hi
e,

;

he

ssi

Iku-g Ine
Ine

jk'aiti,

hiii
i.

In^

ta
ssi
;

He
i

ssi-g

Ik'aiten

^ab

He
.Inabba

Ine

Ik^i,

6 tadbba
kiii

ssiten Ine ikwa,

o

o
e,

ssiten

ddi

liudrrekkudrre

ha

ssiten +i, ti
jkaiiken.

ssi ta ssi se

ddi wha'i-ta jguatten-ta

(8292')

*

Hi

llkuai ka Harpi's,

I.

ADHESIVE SUBSTANCE USED IN MAKING ARROWS.

363

recognize the

they are going along picking up the arrows they arrows. They say " Thy arrow it
:

seems to he, for, their mark is like ( ) this." Another (8291) man says: "Yes, my arrow is yonder." They again go to pick up this arrow. The other man says: "My arrow seems to he yonder; for their mark is
like this."

\ktvqS*

is

that with which they

make

the marks. (8292)

They put ttd into (it), and they pound the ttd together with the \kwde and the \kwae becomes red on account of it then, they mark the arrows with it.
: ;

The Adhesive Substance used by the Bushmen
MAKING Arrows.
it is Wkudrri juice. It \kwqk t pumpkin, it is round. Its juice is white ;

in

It

is

;

is
it

like
is

a (6088)

like

water.

Its

(

)

juice

is

not a

little

white;
it

its

white- (6089)

ness resembles milk.

It is poison.

We
down
it
;
;

make an
)

incision (?) (and) set

(the Wkudrri)

(

and then we hold a tortoise (shell) underneath because we wish its juice to be upon the (6090)
(it)

tortoise (sheU), that

we warm
beat(?)
cooling
it, it.

we may make \kwqe of it. And by the fire, making it hot and we when it is hot. Then, we ( ) beat (?), (6091)
;

And we

take

it

up

in this manner,^ with

stick; we do in this manner to it, " Driedoorn " stick, as we make it round ; with the while we think that we intend to make little spring-

a "Driedoorn"

bok arrows.
* They (the farmers)
call
it

" Harpis."

(Probably harpuis, (^8292')

* * * "resin.")
of this word has been followed in the f The later spelling translation, as probably more correct.

X

The narrator here imitated the manner
it

of

taking

up the (6091')

McwaS by means of rolling

upon a

stick.

; ;

3G4

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

IX.— 210.
L.

MODE OF GETTING

RID. OF THE EVIL INFLUENCE OF BAD DREAMS.
dialect,

{Given in August, 1875, in the Katkop

hy Dialkwain.)

(5161')

N
ha

^oa, ha

kan ka
Ikau,

ssin llnau,

ha ka ha
jkau,

sse Iwkua,

llnau,

ha ka ha
Iho

sse ttai,

ha Ikam

ha

llnau,

ha Ikomm

o
(

if-ta
)

Ikulkuiten,

ha kku:

(5162')"jkabbi-5 Ike!" o ha
ssin llkhabbo-a Iki
llnallna
li
;

ka tchuen
hi ha.

jkojko'in e,

hd

he, ha ka, he
ttaS,

sse Ilk6a-ken llkhoe

6 he ya'uki

Ta, ha

llnau,
ttai,

hd

j^a

Ikwei

Ikwelkwa, ha ddi, hin kfe sse

hi ha.

He

ti e, ti

ha
e,

ttai he,

he kko
(

Ine ya'uki

dken
tchuen

(5163') o ha +eli-na,
Ikojkoiii,

ha

ssiii

)

llkhabbo-a

h^
i

ya'uki
;

aken.

He
Ilka

tfken
ti e,

e,

ha Ikwei
llnau,

Ikwan, ddi,
ttai,

o han tta
a,

ha-g

ha

hia llkhabbo

ha ssin llkhabbo-a ha, ha ka

ttai

yauki

ssiii

^wa +hannuwa.
he, hiii ^auki ssin.

ll;^e e,

ha

llk^ii

ykwa^^kwa ha
a,

(5164')

1^

s he tta

Ilka ti e,

ha

(

)

Iku llkhabbo-a lli^kdaken.
ll;^;eya

He

tfken

e,

ll^e

yaiiki
ti e,

ka

^wa mama

i;

6 ll;^eten tta Ilka

mama
i.

iku llkhabbo-a llwkdaken

he tiken

e, ll;^e

Ikwei ^o,

IX.— 211.
L.

CONCERNING TWO APPARITIONS.
{Related in January, 1876, in the Kathop dialect, hy

D[ajkw|m.)

(5810)

ggi

kkan

Inau llkho

it

Iha,

6 kkuerrekkudrre-ttuken.
ssi

Sslten Ine llnau, o sslten

ka

jnau kkulten ha-ha,

AGAINST EVIL INFLUENCE OF DREAMS.

365

IX.— 210.
L.

MODE OF GETTING RID OF THE EVIL
INFLUENCE OF BAD DEEAMS.

My mother used to do in this manner, when she (5161') intended to go out to seek for food, when she was
about to
start,

she

took

a

stone;

(and)

as

she she
(

plunged the stone into the ashes of the fire, exclaimed: " Eider (?) yonder!" while she wished that the evil things, about which she been dreaming, should altogether remain in instead of going out with her. fire For, if did not act in this manner, they would go
;

)(5162')

had
the
she

out

which she went would that she had ( )(5163') dreamt of evil things which were not nice. Therebecause she was fore, she acted in this manner aware that, if she went out with the dream which she had dreamt, her going out would not be
with.

her.

That place

to

not be nice;

while she

knew

;

fortunate.

The Bushman

rice

favourable to her,

which she dug would not be because it was aware that she ( ) (5164')

rice

had dreamt evil things. Therefore, the Bushman would not be favourable to mamma; while the Bushman rice was aware that mamma had dreamt therefore, the Bushman rice would act evil things manner about it. in this
;

IX.— 211.
L.

CONCERNING TWO APPAEITIONS.

We

buried

my

wife in the afternoon.
her,

When we (5810)

had finished burying

we

(

)

returned to the (5811)

366

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine Ikuiten

(5811) ssiten
e

(

)

he 6a Ihin he.
ssi ttai juhi

n llka;^ai Whai-ttu-ggii llnSn, Hin ssan jnau hi n, 6-g n Iha;
lla

(5812) h6

ho

(

)

ik'mL,

i.

He

ssi

lauwi tss'a
jk'ou,

a llkho

jkhwa-Opua, o han
llkau.

!uhi ss'o

6 hail llkhda ha Ikwllkwi

ta,

6 ha jkwajkwagen.

(5813)

Heii

llka^ai

Whai-ttu kukkui, han
Tss'a dde

(

)

ttuttu ssi:

"lliikoen yyfi!

^a

'ke,

juhf ss'o !k'6u?

Ha
han
(5814) ha

llkho

jkhwa-Opua."

He
Ikei

jk-weiten-ta-llken

kukkui,

ttuttu ssi:
tss'a,

"Ine
( )

lliikoen

yyu

!

Tss'a ddih a,

ha

Iku

llougen

Ikwaiya jkui a?
Iha
siii

Han
(5815) l«ke:

llkho

ha jkhiya,
He,
fit

jkhi

a Ddiajk-wain

jkhiya ha."

llka;^ai

Whai-ttu kukkui,
!

haii
jkei

"I,

h

ll^a-Opua
ti e.
lla,

wwe
ka

(

)

Ti kkaii

llougen llkho,
llnaii,

Ilka Iha

sslh Ikuei-u, i."

Han

ssi ttai

hah

llkhda

ha ss6 ko

ll^koen, ti

e,

ssi

Ihih he.

(5816)

He
kail
lli/ke

llku-ah kukkui,
ssiii

han

liike

:

(

)

" [k'e Ikelkerriten

ka

+kakka ke,

ti e,

jnu jk'e

hha ka
ha

lluau,
i,

a he +ni Ikui
ha.
ssiii
Ikii

a, hiii

ha ka a
ti

Ikui luhi ssiii
e,
( )

(5817)

i

Ini

Uken
Iki

llkuaii

+eh-na,

ttiiko

llkuah
e,
ii

Ikhwa-Opud a +enni, he tiken llkuah
i

sse a hi,
a,

sse

llwkoen tss'a

a
jkui,

juhi

ss'o
Inaii

Ik'ou

wa
Una,

ha Iku Ikwai kw6kkwaii-a
)

ha
ii

(5818) Iku

(

u

ikui."

He k
llnaii,

kukkui,
o

\^ke:

"+karnOpua!
ssa

N
ii

kaii sse

ka
ii

!;^uohni

Ikam
ii

h-ka

llneiii,

sse llbkoen, ti e,

Ino sse il^a

ssa Ini ha, o

ha
lla

ss'5."

(5819)

He

(

)

ssi

he

llneiii,

i.

He

ssi
ii

lau llnallna,

i,

6 llwke-ka ti-0pua.

He h

kukkui,

l^keya he

a,

CONCERNING TWO APPARITIONS.

367

home

of

my

sister,

Whai-m*
me
;

and

tlie

other people,

whence they had come

bmy my
over
a
( )

wife with

forth. They had come to and we went away, crossing

the salt pan.

(5812)
a

And we
little
it

perceived

thing

child, as it sat

upon the

which looked like salt pan, seeming
questioned (581.3)
\kweiteii-

as if

sat

with
sister,
!

its legs

crossed over each other.
(
)

And my
us
:

Whai-ttu, spoke, she

salt

Look ye pan? It is
"

"What thing

sits

yonder upon the

like a little child."

And
(
)

ta-Wken [another sister] spoke, she asked us:

"Look

ye!

Why

is

it

that this

thing

is

truly like (5814)

a person?

seems as if it had on the cap which Ddid\kwqm''s wife used to wear." And my sister, Whai-ttu, spoke, she answered: "Yes, my younger sister The thing truly resembles that which (5815) ( ) brother's wife was like." It did thus as we went
It
!

along,

it

place from

seemed as if it sat looking (towards) the which we came out.

"The old people (5816) ( ) me, that the angry people were wont to act thus, at the time when they took a person away, they used to allow the person to be in front Ye know that of us, (so that) we might see it. child, therefore, ye (5817) she ( ) really had a very little should allow us to look at the thing which sits upon this salt pan; it strongly resembles a person,
Wkii-dn spoke, she said:
tell

And

used to

its

head
said
:

is there, (

)

like a person."

And

I spoke, (5818)

I

"

Wait

!

I will

my
it,

home,

I will see,

do thus, as I return to whether I shall again perceive

as it sits."

And

(

)

we went
little

to their

home.
I

And we
spoke,

talked (5819)

there, for a

while.

And

I said to

* W7iai-Uu means "Springbok Skin".

368

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
+i,

he llkhda kan
(5820) iikSin
Ine
+i,
le.

n yau
(

tan,

h kan
ti
e,

jkuiten;
i.

ta

He n
e,

llkuan

)

Ine Ikditen,

ii llkuau
ssiii

ti

Ikuan, ssa, i;

n kan n sse
ha
ha

He,

Ilka,

ssi

Ikuei

tta'uko llwkoen, tl e,
ss'6.
IST

n

Ino sse
(
)

(5821)

ll^a,

£i

Ini

ha, o

llkuan Ine ttaiiko
;

lliikoen, ti e,

ssin ss'o

he

o

Iku ss'o ssin
ha, 6
ti e,
)

e.

N

Ine lli/koen, ti

kah +i, ti e, n yauki
Ine llkuan
e. e,
i

e,

0h6

Ine Ini

ha

ssin ss'o he.

He, n

jhumm,
llnau,

(5822)

ti e, (

tss'a a Ij^arra,

ha oa Iku

ssin
ti

Ta,
Igiten

mama-ggu ka +kakka
e +ni
i,

ke,

ha

I'ten

ha
i
i,

llnau,
a,
( )

llwke

a,

he kie
i

sse
Ike-

(5823) llkoaken Ine

Iki

ttai

ha
I

lli/keten a,

kko ha
tta
Ilka

Ine juhi ssin
ti
e,

o han ka,
+i
i, i.

sse Ini ha, 6

ha jnaunko

He
hai

ti'ken
(

han ha e,
ha

(5824) llgo* jnaiinko kie li^koen
e,

6

tta
ttii
i.

)

Ilka ti

ha

Iki
i.

llkuan ^auki ka ha ttai j(U

i; ta,

!ge o

He

tlken

e,

i

jnaunko

Ini

ha,

ManssegnJ Ine +kakka ssi a, ti e, (5825) ha ha ( ) llnau, o hah jhann-a ttin, hah ha llnau, hah ttai la, hah ha lauwi jkhwa-Qpua, o hah hhitya § 6 Oho H^a^u. He, ha ha kukkui, hah N-ka jkhwa ^a e ( ) ss'o ssin !ku;^e jgauka h ? (5826) +i
ll^ai

N

lha,t

I

:

'

(5823')

* Ha-ka
Ikndn ddi,
1

ti

e,

ha jnaunko
Iki

4:1

1,

bin
a,

e,

ha ssan juhi ssm
a,
1

1,

1;

liyke a Igiten Ijj^arra
a.
t\

ttai ha,
Iki

ha ll^keten
ke,
ti e,

ha

Ikue'i

Ta,
e,

mamaggu

+kakka
;

Ikuken,
a,

ilkellkeya

Inu-jk'e

dda he

he ta

Ikvaiya hi

tss'a

a Ixarra.

(5824')

t -^

Wx^
IlkaxSi

Ita

is,

the

narrator

explains,

an

abbreviation

of

N

likaxai Iha.
{

N

la-kkumm |han

e,

+kakka

ssi

I,

ti

e,

ha |na

jkhwa a Iku jhammi ha.

Han. Iku ka ha jkuxe Ihm.

(5825')

§

hhika or hhitya

is,

Diajkwiin

sa'i/s,

=

hhiten ha-ha.

CONCERNING TWO APPARITIONS.

369

them that they appeared

to

think that I did not

wish to return (home); for the sun was setting. And I ( ) returned on account of it. I thought (5820) that I would go in the same manner as we had come that I might, going along, look whether I should again perceive it, as it sat. Going along, I ( ) looked at the place, where it had sat; because (5821) I thought that it might have been a bush. I saw that I did not perceive it, at the place where it had sat. And I agreed that ( ) it must have been (5822) a different kind of thing. For my mothers used to tell me that, when the sorcerers are those who take us away, at the time when they intend to take us quite away, ( ) that (5823)
;

the time when our friend is in front of us, while he desires that we may perceive him, because he feels that he still thinks of us. Therefore, his outer * still looks at us, because he feels skin that (5824) ( ) he does not want to go away (and) leave us; for he insists upon coming to us. Therefore, we still perceive him on account of it. My sister's husband, Mdnsse,'\ told us about it, that it had ( ) happened to him, when he was hunting (5825) about, as he was going along, he espied a little
is

peeping at him by the side of a bush. And Can it be my child who ( ) seems to (5826) he thought
child,
:

'

* That part of him (with) which with which he comes before us, at that is the are taking him away manner. Por, my mother and the
;

he

still

thinks of us,

is

that

(5823')

the time

when time when he

the sorcerers
acts in this

others used to tell me, that

(when we
f

die)

we

do as the \nu people do;
it

they

change

(?)

themselves into a different thing.

My

sister,

\a-kkumm's husband
child

was who

told us,
It

that he
to

(5824')

had perceived a
run away.

who was

afraid of him.

wanted

2b

370

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
n.'

Han Ine ss'o llgu jk'ui, o han ss'o ssin Igaiika He Mansse ha kukkui, han +!, Akke n ttai
'

Iko

(5827)

lie,

i
e.'

sse

il«koen jkhwi a a,

ti

e,

(

)

Ikhwa dde

Ino

He Mansse
llir^koen, ti e,

li| liakoen, ti e, jkliwa

ha

llnau,

jkhwa

ha

ttai

Ikam

lla

Ikhwa, ha sse ll«koen
e,

jkhwa a
(5828)
(

e,

han ha

liakoen, ti

jkhwa h| ywan

)

ha jhainmi ha.
;

jkhwah ha ssneh-a llnun hho
;

Oho

Ikhwan ha

Ik'a'uru-i

tiken

ha >'wan ha ka
lla,

ha Iku^e Ihin. (5829) he jkhwa ha (
Ihin;

H^ ha ha
)

llkuan ttai jhin
i.

6 ha;

kkdRii Ihin,

Han
!kii;^e

ttai !k'a'ui'U-a

han ha ^wan ha ka ha
llwkoen, ti
e,

Ihin.

He Mansse ha
ha Ihammi
Ikhwa
ha.

tss'a

dde (no a jkhwa
(
)

(5830) ya'uki In6 ka ha sse ha a; he Ikhwa Iku

^wan
i
;

lli/koen Ikhe a.

He ha ha kkunnin-i Han ha llkuan

Ikhwa,

6
e,

llwkoen, ti llwkoen,
ti

Ikhwa latti-Opua llkuan e; han ha
(5831) jkhwa Kkuan
Iku-g Ine
(
)

e,

tiken-kkuften,*

ikw^ya jkui. Han llnau, tlkenhan ^auki Ikwaiya jkui; han ha kukkiii, han +i, han iku sse ;^ii ttii jkhwa.
jhammi
o
ha,
(
)

(5832) Ta,

jkhwa a Iku
ha ha Iku

hd ko
^li

Iku

a

a.

He He
hail

ttai,

Ikhwan
ti
e,

Ikhe
ttai

Ik'a'uru-i.
ttiii

jkhwa ha llwkoen,

ha

ha;

ha

Ik'ii

ssa,

haii ssuen.

(5831')
I

* Hail
jkui; ta,

llnau, lli:;ke-kko, o

ha

lli!koen ha,
tss'a

han >aiiki IkwSya

ha Iku Ixarra-sse Ikw^ya,

a Ixarra.

Han

llkuan

kho

Ikui, o ti-kko.

CONCERNING TWO APPAEITIONS.

371

have run
"while it

after

me ?

It seems to

have

lost its

thought

:

seems to have followed me.' And Allow me to walk nearer, that I may'

way, Mdnsse
(5827)
this

look at this child (to see)

(

)

what child
child

(it) be.'

And Mdnsse saw

that

the

acted

in

manner, whea the child saw that he was going up to it, that he might see what child it was, he saw The (5828) that the child appeared as if ( ) it feared him. child sat behind the bush; the child looked from side to side it seemed as if it wanted to run away. And he walked, going near to it and the child ( ) (5829) It walked away, looking arose, on account of it.
; ;

from side to side; run away.

it

seemed as

if

it

wanted

to

And Mdnsse
( )

looked (to see)

why
to
it

it
;

was that the

child did not wish

him

to

come

seemed
it

to

be afraid of him.
little

And

and the child he examined the (5830)

child;

as the child stood looking at him.

He saw

that

he saw ( ) (5831) In other parts* (of it) it was not like a person; he thought that he would let the For a child who was afraid of him child alone. was here. And he walked on, while the child (5832) ( ) And (as) the child stood looking from side to side. saw that he went away from it, it came forward (near the bush), it sat down.

was a

girl;

that the child

was

like a person.

* At one time, -when
for,
it

lie

looked at

it, it

was not like a person; (5831')

was

different looking,

a different thing.

The other part

of it

resembled a person.

372

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

IX.— 228.
L.

THE JACKAL'S HEAET NOT TO BE
EATEN.*
{Dictated, in September,

1878, Jy lhaii4:kaB3'5, from his maternal

grandfather, Tssatssi.)

(7457)

Hi
he
hin
ti

llkuaii tatti e,

jkhwa-Opua

Ik^ ta ddi Ikdrre,

hih

e,

Ikhwa-Opua yauki
koro yaiiki
Ihia.

ta hi koro

lili,

au

tatti e,

ttamOpua jhammi,

ta,

kdro

(7458)

(

)

ka Iku jku^e
a,

llkaueyaken

jkhwa-Opua ka ha ha
Ihammi.

li,

ha a

yaiiki

Ihammi,
li,

ta,

jkhwa-Opua Ike-g
Ine Igauko
e,
i

Ine ddi li-ssa,

au kdro

hail

yauki
tiken

(7459)

He
kdro

ya'uki ka-g Ine h
tatti e,

jkhwa-Opua

(

)

li,

au iten

k6ro Ike ta Iku jku;^e u
i

He,

au ha ya'uki

Ini i;

au ha Iku

t6a

i

jnoa l;^droken,

ha Iku

jkii^e u,

au ha ya'uki jkwe

sse.

Wote added ly
(7457')

the

Narrator.

Ha

Iku

ssiii

Mamma

Ikuiiijkuiii

au Igappem-ttu,

he Igappem-ttii wa-g
Ik^-i jkuiii,
jkuiri,

Ine

a

ha

jkuiii.

He ha
jkuin

Ine

ha

Ine llhin jkuiii, i;
a,

he ha

Ine Iki ttdi
a.

au ha jkanna au jhou

ha

llhiiiya

Ha jhamma
(7458') jkuiiiya
jkuiii,

Iku llhiiillhin jho jkuiii; he,
llkhai
(
)

ha

llnau,

Ine

ha-ha jhou, ha Ine

!khou-i

he jkuiiiya
Ine l^ao
;

Ine Ikha-i kdro.
;

Ha
koro
*•

kdro ttu

he,

n

Ikoettiika Ine

Ikuakken

ttuttii
this

hi Ikuakken hi, hi
of
is

+umrQ

hi.

In

piece

native literature

several

words occur

of

which the meaning

not yet clear to the translator.

;

jackal's heart not to be eaten.

373

IX.—228.
/,.

THE JACKAL'S HEAET NOT TO BE
EATEN".
They
to

(the

Bushmen)

feel that a little child is
little

wont (7457)
little

be timid; therefore, the
hearts;

child does not eat
is

jackals'

because the jackal
(

not a

afraid; for the jackal

)

runs away.
little

(7458)
child

The leopard
eats;
it

is

the one whose heart the

which is not afraid; for, a little child becomes a coward from the jackal's heart, it fears
(?).

immoderately
Therefore,
jackal's

used to

we do not give to a little child ( ) the (7459) heart; because we feel that the jackal is run away, when it has not (even) seen us;
has only heard our foot rustle,
it

when
while

it it

runs away,

does not look towards (us).

Note added by

the

Narrator.

He (my grandfather, Tssqtssi) had bought dogs (7457') from \gdppem-ttu, and \gdppem-ttu gave him a dog. And he took hold of the dog, he tied the dog up and he took the dog away; holding the thong with
which he had tied up the dog. He at first kept the dog tied up; and, when the dog had slipped ( )(7458') his thong (?), he put it upon the scent (?), and the dog killed jackals. He (my grandfather) skinned the jackals; and

my

grandmothers dressed the jackals' skias

;

they

dressed them, they sewed them.

;

374

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ihdbblsse,

H4

ha jkauken kdro, hin

ll'ua,

ha

Ikilki

ssa hi, ha l^ao hi.

He, ha

Ine

ddk Igdppem-ttu a
Ma,
tdtti
e,

Inuiii,

kdro-ka Inuin,

au ha
(7459')

Ine

Inwa
Ine

ll'ua-ka Inuin, ll'ua ttu.
Iki

He, ha
jnuiii,
(

Igdppem-ttu a !nuin, koro-ka
e,

)

au ha
tiken

Igdppem-ttuwa

a,

a ha a

Ikuiix.

He

ha

Ine

ddk lgd.ppem-ttu a jnuih
llkhi;

au ha dda Igappem-ttu a jkuin

h^

ti'ken e,

ha

Ine h igappem-ttu a Inuin,

he Igappem-ttii a
a,

Ine

ll^amki a ha a jkoa, au ha luka n jkoin
Inuin.

kdro-ka

He, h jkoinyk
ti'ken e,

Ine Ikiiiten,

i.

Hd
(7460)
iki
lili,

n

Ikoih ta ssin llnau,
( )

au ha
i

Ine j^aua

kdro,
ta,
i

ha

Ine ta:

"Aken

ss'6 ka,

ta hi
ssi

kdro

Ik^ ta ddi li-ssa."
lili, i.

H^

tfken

e,

>'auki

ssiii

hi kdro

Ta, n Ikoih Ike ya'uki ssih hi kdro, hah ka ssih
Iku
i

!;^aiia

ha Opuohdde koro.

Taken from

IX.—237.
L.

IIHAEA

AND

TTO.

{Given in August, 1878, hj Ihaii+kass'o.)

(7273')
i;

llhdra llkuah e Ikd ihdaka;

jk'dten
jk'e

ttamm-i hi Inah,
i,

au ttogen

Ine jkiya,

he

jyaui hi &hsh.^

au

hi !kau hi; hi Ine jkau hi, jkau hi, jkau hi, hi Ine
jyaui hi eixeh^
i.

Hi

Ine jkau llhAra, hi Ine
;

ttamm
hi

hi Ina,

au hi mail hi Ikau tt6
ttd,

* hi Ine

ma'ii

* The Dutoli name, used for
or

appears to be " Kooi Klip"
for
it.

"Eoode Klip".

A

Koranna gave the name \nou

IIhIea

and

tto.

375

He
And
kaross,

again
lie

Lalandii,

(?) killed (?) a jackal and an Otocyon brought them (home), he skinned them.

he made a kaross for \gdppem-Uu, a jackals' while he put on the Otocyon kaross, the

Otocyon skin.

took the kaross to \gdppem-ttn, the jackals' while he felt that \gdppeni-ttu was the (7459') ( ) one who had given him the dog. Therefore, he made a kaross for \gdppem-ttu; while he made for
kaross,

And he

\gdppem-ttu an equivalent (?) for the dog; therefore, he gave the kaross to \gdppem-Uu, and \gdppem-Uu
also

gave him a pot,

while he

rewarded (?)

my

grandfather for the jackals' kaross.
father returned home.

And my

grand-

Then my grandfather used to act in this manner, when he was boiling a jackal, he said: ( ) "Thou (7460) dost seem to think that we eat jackals' hearts? for, we become cowards (if we do so)." Therefore, we
did not eat the jackals' hearts.
For,

my

grandfather used not to eat the jackal;

he only boiled the jackal for his sons.

IX.— 237.
L.

WEARA AND
Whdra *
is

TTO.
it

black

;

the people [having mixed

with (7273'
red,

fat] anoint

their heads

with

it;

while
it,

ttd

is

and have pounded it they pound it, pound it, pound it, they rub their bodies with it. They pound Whdra^ they anoint their heads, when they have first
;

the people rub their bodies with

when they

*

A

certain stone whioli

is

said to be bath, hard

and

soft.

;

376

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
hi enen,

\yam

au

tt6.
(

He, hi
)

Ine

jkau llhdra,
kiii

i,

(7274') hi Ine ttainm hi
llwei hi
Ina,

Ina.
ta,

Hi
Ind,

Ine

ttamm

dkken

au hi
;

hi

Ikhu wd, sse llkhoe.
hi ttamm-i hi Ina
hi Ina sse ddi kii

He, hi au hi
llkho

Ine jkui, i
ta,

au hi
jkii

tdtti,

Ikhiika sse

llkhde,

yu^rriten, au Ihoakenlhoaken,
Ihoaka.

au hi Ina ^au

ttamOpua

He
tatti,
f

hi Ine jkuiten, au hi Ine Ihin jkiikko, au hi
hi
\

Ine
,

jkuiten

hi-ta

llnein

;

au hi +kdkka
hiii

jkiikko a, jkiikko sse

dda hi &
lid,
la'iti

llhara,

k(5a ttd.

(7275') Ta,

ha
;

ll;^amki
llhollho

(

)

sse

lid

Ikudkka
ssa

ha

llhollho

e,

ha
sse

sse

ll^amki

Iki

jkukko
llhdra,

hi;

au jkiikko d
jkukko

ll;^amki
llhara.

Ikiiwa

ha a

au

wa

j;^oa
;

He

jkukko

Ine

ssd,

Ikuwa
Ikiya

ha

llhdra

au

ha

ll;^amki

Ikudkken,

iku
a,

jkukko a

llhollho;

au ha +kakka jkukko
Iki

jkukko koa ssah ll;^amki
tt6
;

ssa

ha a

llhara,

hin

td,

ha a
(

ssiii

Ha jkukko, he ha ^aiiki ssah ine

(7276') sse jkukko,
sse
lla,

)

td,

jkukko a
;

ssdii Ine

lie

ha; jkukko
lla

Ika
e,

llhollho

au jkukkowa

Iki

ha

tt6.

H^
lla

tiken

jkukko ka-g Ine ll;^amki

i;

ha

Ine Iki

jkukko, tt6, hih llhara.
llhara

llkuah

wawaiten
J.

;

h^
hi

tiken

e,

i

Ina

ka
Ine

I^krraken,
j^arraken.
Iniilmitatta

i

;

au hi
tiken

td-tti,

wawaiten

;

hi
ka,
Ikdo,

H^

e,

l^am-ka-jk'e

ta

au

+kakken

Una,

"

Ha

Ikui,

ha e

au

;

llHAEA

AND

TTO.

377

pounded
ttd.

they first rub their bodies with ttd they pound Whdra, they anoint their heads. ) They anoint their beads very nicely, while they (7274') ( wish that their head's hair may descend {i.e., grow
th.e
;

And

becomes abundant on account of it; because they have anointed their heads, wishing that the hair may grow downwards, that their beads may become black with blackness, while their heads are
long).
it

And

not a

little

black.

they return, when they come away from the other man, while they return to their home when tbey have told the other person (the woman) about it, that the other person shall prepare [more] Whdra for them, as well as ttd. For he (the man) also goes, (his) wife will go to dress bags for him, (7275') ( ) bags wbich he will also bring to the other man while the other (man's wife) will also put aside Whdra for him, when the other (man) collects Whdra. And the other (man) comes to put aside Whdra for him while she [the wife of the man who brought
;

And

;

the bags] also dresses (and) puts
other;
for,

she has told

away bags for the the other (woman) that
ttd;

the other must also bring her Whdra and
she has been to the
other,

for

and she will not be

coming (soon again) to the other, ( ) for, the other (7276') must go to her the other must go to receive the
;

bags,

when

the other takes
;

ttd to her.

Therefore,

the other one also does so
ttd

she takes to the other

and Whdra.

Whdra sparkles; therefore, our heads shimmer, on account of it ; while they feel that they sparkle, they

shimmer.

Therefore, the

Bushmen

are
:

when
he
is

the old

women

are talking there

wont to say, " That man,
of

a handsome young man, on account

his

378

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.
e,

ha Ina

hi

yau akken

Ilka

hi,

au

llhara
a,

;

M-ta
Inkn

Ihdakenlhdaken."
(7277')
(
)

Hi

In^ ta,

" Ikao "

"

Ha

yaiiki

akken
e,

Ilka

hi; ta, ha Ina llkhoa jkhi."
ssi-ta
!;^(5e,

0h6
hin

ilkuan

he Una

hin Ine e
e
;

jkhi,

jkuiya,

0h6

jkerriten
ssi-ta

Ilkuan
!j^(5e,

hin

^auki

ttamOpua Iwkwaiya, au
hin
Ikhi.

hin kda

llbk^rri,

HOW
(7275)

TTO

IS

OBTAINED.
jk'eten

Tt6 Ilkuan Una jkou, tt6 ttu;

llkuai ka,
i.

tt6 ttu Ika ss'o jkou, jk'eten Ine ta, tt6 ttu,

(7276)

jk'eten

jhammi
'

hi,

au
Ine

(

)

jk'eten tatti
llnein,
i.

e,

jk'e

Ike
e,

Una hi

(jgi'ten).

Hin

dda

H^

tiken

jk'e hd, ka,

jkau tt6, hi j^au hi, au hi Ine j^oa tt6.
lla
'

He
(7279)
( )

hi hd, Ine llnau, au hi 3
tt6 ttu,

tt6, hi —
?

ha

3*30
114

Ine Ikaiten-i

au hi
tt6,

ta,

jgi'ta

sse j^e, hi sse

kkwe,

ddi Ikiiki
ttu.

au hin
e,

tdtti e,

jgften Ike

Henna tt6
hi hi

Hd

tiken

hi ha ka

Ikelkem
)

Ikaiibken,
j;;^e,

(7280) '^6 jkaiten-a tt6
sse
lla

ttu,

au hi

(

ta,

jgita sse

kkwe,* ddi
tt6, tt6,

Ikilki
;

tt5.

He, hi

Ine

lla,

ddi
hi

Ikiiki

tt6

hi

Ine
;

ll^amki ddi

llhara, "j"

Ine Ikii llhara, hiii

k6a

tt6

he hi

Ine jkMten.

(7280')

*

'^^'

^^ ^^?^ ttaiittan, au Igita lli^ko'en hi.
ss'o
;

f llhara ttu Ilkuan Iku llj^aniki Ixara sse

tto

ttuwaken

Iku llxamki Ixara sse

ss'o.

HOW
head,
-whicli
is

TTQ

IS

OBTAINED.
beautiful

379

surpassingly

with

the

Whdra's blackness."

They
is

say,
(

"Handsome young
) is

man"

to

him,

"His head
is

beautiful; for, his head
It is a tree

surpassingly (7277') like the \kM tree."*
;

which
;

in our country a great tree.
:

it is

the [Mi
are not

tree

;

it

is

large

(it) is

They

a

little

abundant in our country

the W^kerri tree and

the \kM.

HOW
is

TTO

IS

OBTAINED.

in the mountain, the ttd mine; the people ("7275) Ttd say that the ttd mine is on the side of the mountain,

the people say

'

ttd

mine

'

to

it.

The people are afraid of it [that is, of the sorcerers live by the mine], because ( ) the people are (7276) aware that people are there (sorcerers). They (the sorcerers) make a house t there. Therefore, the people who intend to pound ttd, rub themselves when they (go to) collect ttd. And when they go

who

to the

ttd,

they throw stones at
to

(

)

the ttd mine, (7279)
at the ttd,

when they wish the sorcerers that they may go undisturbed

hide themselves,

to

work

while they feel that the sorcerers dwell at the ttd mine. Therefore, they take up stones, they throw stones at the ttd mine, when they ( ) wish the (7280) sorcerers to hide themselves, that they may go in
peace J to work at the ttd. And they go to work They also get Whdra ; § they put at the ttd, ttd, ttd. away the Whdra and the ttd, and they return home.
* The \hM tree bears berries; and has no thorns.
their houses are small holes, like f The narrator thinks that mouseholes. would be ill, if the sorcerers saw them. X For, they
§

(7276)
(7280')

The Whdra mine

[literally,
ttd

"mouth"
is

or

"opening"]

is

in

a different place; the

mine

also in a different place.

380

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

IX.— 240.
L.

SIGNS

TO

MADE BY BUSHMEN SHOW THE DIEECTION THEY HAVE GONE.
from
and from personal
observation.)

IN ORDER IN WHICH

{Given, in April, 1879, hy Ihaii^^kass'o,

his mother, lxabbi-an,

(8374)

Hiii Iku llnau, au jku-kko ttdiya, jkukoken ^aiiki
In^ ta

ha

jkuiten, hin

Ine

jkuru,* au

lii

!koa,

he au

hi

Ine
)

Ikdikd

jho
Ine

lke,t

au Ikurujkuru, he jku-ko

(8375)

(

llnau,

ha

jkuiten,

hd
ha

Ine

ssa

jkd

hi,

llnein.

Ha

Ine llwko^n llnSn,

Ine lli/kodn, lliiikoen, Ine
lla

ha

Ine Ini Ike Iko jkhe.
Ike.

He, ha
Ine

Ike,

ha
a,

Ine

(8376) iiiiko^n

Ha
kiii

(

)

ll;t?ihki

Ini

Ik^

ha

kail jkhe.

He, ha

Ine

:

"

Ik'e

tan
Ine
e,

^oa Ikoa Ikam
Ikain
jk'e
lla

lla

jkhoa-ttu e."

He, ha Iku-g
llgaiie
jk'6,
ti

jkhoa, au
lla

ha
(8377)
( )

lla,

llwkoen

Inu

Henna

ha !kh9a.
Ine
llkaiten
lla

He, ha
llkou
ssiii,

jkhoa-ka Ikdo
ll^koen,
llneilln^i,
)

;

ij:

ha

Ine

hd

sse

ss'o

ko
Ini

il^ko'en

llgaue

llneilln^i.

He, ha
\yh.L

Ine

au

llneilln^iya
;

(8378) kan jkuJten

Ha

Ine (
||

ll^koen

ss'o, i

liya §

Ine kkqiten Ihih llnSlln^i,

au hd

lliikoen ss'o.

Hd,

hd
(8374')

Ine kiii:

"

llneiii

llkuaii

ddda a

kaii

!

"

He

ha

* Hi ilkuan jkuru jho hi Inoa, au
f Ilkuan ilkeiillken
le

jk'aii.

Ike

au ©hoken.

(8377') (8378')

X
§
II

'M°
li

l"i^§i

e,

a jkhoa llnun ss'o ha.

U'tenliten Ilkuan kkgiten, hf-ka ku.

llku|n Iku juhi

ss'o.

GUIDING SIGNS.

381

IX.— 240.
L.

SIGNS

MADE BY BUSHMEN IN OEDEE TO SHOW IN WHICH DIEECTION THEY HAYE GONE.

They (the Bushmen) are accustomed to act thus, (8374) when another man has gone away (and) does not
return, they

push their foot along the ground,* if they travel away and they place grass f near the marks (they have made) ; and the other man ( ) (8375) does thus, when he returns, he comes (and) misses them at the house. He looks at the house, he looks (and) looks, he perceives the grass standing And he goes to the grass, he looks at the upright. He ( ) also perceives the grass which stands (8376) grass.
;

yonder. %

" The people must have travelled away to the water pool there." And he goes to the water, while he goes, looking (and) seeking for the people, (to see) wliether the people have gone to

And he

exclaims

:

dwell at

(

)

that water.
;

(8377)
§ he
sits

And, he upon (it), that he may,
for the huts.

goes, ascending the water's hill
sitting,

look, look seeking

And he perceives the huts, as the white yonder. He ( ) sits, looking at (8378) huts stand rises from the them ; the (smoke of the) fire And he exclaims: "The huts,5[ as he sits looking.
||

* They push their foot along the ground. (8374') (They) stick grass into the bushes. f + There are four pieces of grass, at a distance from each other, (8376') people have gone. in the direction of the place to which the /Qohrtrn is. (8377 ) (It) is a hill, behind which the water
§
II

All the
fire

fires
is

smoke.

(8378')

\ The

outside.

382

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

Ine ui,

ha

Ine

Ikam

lla

llnein,

he ha

Ine Ikiiiten Ikhe

(8379)

(

)

lla

lln^h.

He
ssa, ta,

Ik'e-kulta

Ine kiii:

"I

Ilka
ttd'i;

llkuan
ta,

ddoa

Ike

ha a ka
e,

Ikuei

^ua hd

!^oe-ss'o-!km
Iki,

llkuan

ha +ehna Ikhoa.
!^o llnein.
( )

Ha

ssah Iku Ikuei
ssaii
li

(8380) ^^ ^^
sse

\^^

Ha koa
Ta,
i

Ikii

Ikam ha

jkhod,

e ha Iku +enna hi.

ssin ka,

sse llgwi jk'u,*

au h ka, n Iwke,
sse

tan Iku sse jkoa.
( )
i

(8381)

Uken

ssih ta,
i

ha

Ilgwi

jk'ii,

au n ka

tan ssan

Iku sse jkoa,
jkoa
;

koa ki

>'auki

+kakka ha
e, i

a, ti e, i

ta,

jkhoa e ui.

He

tiken

Ine !koa, i."

(8382)

I llkuah ka

llxam^i

Ikof ©hoken.
Ine

I Ine ka,
leta,

i

llkhollkho hi, hi Ind

kkerruka
Una.
i

jkun
)
i

au Oho
i

(8383)

lu

wa-g
Ihd

Ine

e

llkou
a.

He
Ine

(

Ine
jho,
i

ll^a,

lla

kail
i

Oho

He,
i
lid,

jkiiru

au
i

i

tdtti

ya'uki sse ll^a

jho

Oho-ko; au

tatti,

Iku-g

Ine llk(5aken jkoa

lla.

(8384)

He
ssa,

tiken
Ine

e,

jkd-kko ka

llnau,

au ha

Ine

(

)

jkuiten

ha

jko lln&ih.

Ha
"llgwi

Ine

llvi/koen,

he,

ha

Ine

(8380') (8382')

* Ixam-ka-lk'eten " verdwaal."
t
llkug,!!

e

ta,

!k'5,"

au

Iha

e

Ine

ta,

liken le
tatti,

ha au

Ik'SS.

N

llku|n

n ka

ssin ll^^ko'en

n Iko'mya

Iko.

GUIDING SIGNS.

383

house must be yonder "
!

And
:

lie
(

arises,
)

to the house, and, returning, arrives

he goes at home. (8379)

And

the other people exclaim

"

Our brother must

be (the one who) comes yonder; for, he is the one who walks in this manner; for, a man of the place (he) is, he knows the water. He would do thus, when he came past (and) missed the house. ( ) He (8380) would come to the water which he knew. For, ye did say that he would lose his way,* when I said that we should travel away. Ye did say that he would lose his way, when I wished ( ) that we (8381) should travel away, although we had not told him about it that we should travel away for, the water
;

was gone.
of it."
(

Therefore,
are used

we

travelled

away on account

)

We

also to reverse branches. f
is

We (8382)

thus place them, their green top
the stump of the branch
is

underneath, while

And ( ) (8383) we again, we go yonder to place that branch. And we draw our foot along the ground (making a mark), while we feel that we shall not again go to place another branch because we altogether travel away. J Therefore, the other man is wont to do thus, when he ( ) returns home (and) misses the house. (8384)
uppermost.
;

* The Bushmen are those who

say, Wffwt
{i.e.

\Jc'ii,

while the white ("8380')

men
one's

are

those

who

say,

"verdwaal"

verdwalen,

"to

lose

way").

f Pierce it into the ground.

(8382
five) are said to

)

I feel that I used to see
J

my

grandfather reverse (branches).

Four tranches (and sometimes

be used; the

(8383')

placed opposite to the house, the next about fifty yards distant, the next a little further than that distance, the next rather more than double the previous distance, and, then, no
first is

more.

At the last stick, the foot is drawn along the ground in the direction of the place to which they go, from the last stick;
which leans
in the

same

direction.

384

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLOKE.

Ini

oho;
7

he, 7
e, ta,

ha
hi
(

Ine
e,
)

kui:

"

Ik'e

llkuaii a
^

D

y&a Ikoa 3

o

jkhoa-ttu

hi Iko jkhe jhda,
Ik'ai

au

ti
lla,

e jkhoa

(8385)

ss'<5 hi.

N

sse

jkhoa,

n

ssiii

llbkoen

llffdue Ik'e Inoa,

au Ikhoa, au
jkhoa.
jk'e

ti e,

hi ss'o

llaii

Ikua*
lla

hi,

hin Ine

!;^u!xii Ihin hi."
lla

He, hd
He, ha

Ine
lla

Ikam

Ikhoa,

ha

ine jk'ai

Ine

llwko'en

(8386)

(

)

jkhoa,

ha ha

Ine
Ine

Ini

jnoa-ka
hi,

jgudra,

ha

Ine
lla

Ike-i

hi,t

Igauoken

jgauoken ki jke

hi au llnSn.

A BUSHMAN, BECOMING FAINT FEOM THE SUN'S HEAT WHEN EETUENING HOME, THROWS EAETH INTO THE THOSE AT HOME AIE, SO THAT MAY SEE THE DUST AND COME TO HELP HIM.+
{Given
in

November,

1878,

hy

Ihai+kass'o,

from Ms mother,

Ixabbi-an, and

from personal

observation.)

(7961)

!kui llkuan
(

ka
ti

llnau,
e,

ha ggaiiwa
ttan,

llneiii,

ha

ilnau,

(7962) au

)

ha ha

ta,

ha ^auki

hd

sse

Ine

Me
sse

llnSh,

Ine

llkou,

au ha ka,

llnein-ta

jk'e

Ini Ik'au.

He
(7963) au ha

jkui a,

ha

!goa-i,§

jkwalkwai jkhe, ha
yaiiki
(
)

!g6a-i,

ta, ti e,

llkoih

ya
;

ttamOpua

ta
he

li,

/OQgnn /ggggn
r7961') (7962')

* |!:;kua|^ku^n |ku Ixarra
f
t §
Ik'e

Ikuaaken |ku Ixarra,

lien ssin

ti.

jnoa-ka Iguara e
Ikii

lla.

Ikuken
I'^-'J^

e,

jkui ta llkdu,

a.

'^^ llkuan e;

au ha

tatti e,

gwaiya yauki

jkui'ta; ta,

ta Iku

llwko'en, ti e,

jk'e-ta-kuwa Iku jkuita.

SIGNALLING "WITH DUST.

385

He
that

looks (about), and

exclaims:
(a branch),

"The

folk

h.e espies a branch.; and he must have travelled away to

little pool,

for, this is

why
( )

they have reversed

pointing in the direction of the place
is.

where the water
water, that I
prints
at

I will

go down(?) to the (8385)

may go

to look for the people's foot-

at the place to which they have gone to make a house,* (from which) they go to the water." And he goes to the water, he goes down (?) to the water. And he goes to look at ( ) the water, he espies the people's foot- (8386) path, he takes it,t he follows it, follows it along

the water,

seem

to

to the bouse.

A BUSHMAN,

BECOMING FAINT FROM THE SUN'S HEAT WHEN EETUENING HOME, THEOWS EARTH INTO THE AIE, SO THAT THOSE AT HOME MAY SEE THE DUST AND COME TO HELP HIM.J
man
is

when returning home, when ( )(7961) he should not reach home, he throws (7962) up earth (into the air), because he wishes that the
wont,

A

he feels as
people at

if

And
up
not
(

tbe person
a
little

home may perceive the dust. who is looking out,§ standing
outj^because she
hot,
feels that the

to look
)

—she
is

sun

is

stands

up,

she

looks (7963)
is

different

* Seeking for food (to dig up) "to dwell at a place."
:

one thing; making a house

(8385')

f

X (into the air).

The people's footpath is Dying is that on account

that which goes along.
of

(8386') which a person throws up earth (7961')
feels that (her)

§ (It) is the

man's wife; while she
for,

husband (7962')

has not returned; returned home.

she sees that

all

the (other) people have

2c

;

386

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ine

ha

Ikwajkwai

jklie,

ha

Ine

!goa-i.

*

He,

hd

llnau,

ha jgoa-a
a,

[khe,

ha

Ine Ini Ik'au,

ha

Ine kiii:

"!kui taA

llkou

Una!"
!kti;^e
Ihiri

He
antau

!k'e
(

Ine !ku;^e,
)

toTikenf
llkou,
i.

Ilnein,

an
sse
ta,

(7964) hi k5a:

"Ha
He,

11

ike
Il4,

e,

ha

Uken

!ku;i^e

u

sse

arriiko a
lih

ha a Ikhoa,
e;

ha
lla,

li

e;

Ilkoin e Ikhi
a,

ha; ha
jkm.

u

sse arriiko

a ha

jkhoa."

An
lla

jk'e tatti,

jk'e-ta-kwa Ike
Ine
lla,

(7965)

(

)

Iku

Ikiij^e

Ikam

Hi

kkebbi|

kkuerre

jkui,

au Ikhoa.

He, ha
ta,

Ine

+kam0pua

ssueh, §

hh6

lii

Iho a ^ii

llkoih-ta Iho Ik^ Iku ttaii Ilga.

(7966)

jk'e-ta-lkagen-ka

ddi-ddi
e.

^auki

e,

ta,

jk'e-ta-

tuken-ka ddi-ddi Iku

Hi
(7967) he hi
(7963')
*
-'^u

Ilkuan tatti
Ine
li^

e,

hi !ku;^e
tatti
(

|1

tchueii,
e,

jku^e wai
llk'uwa,
k'ari

llnau,

hi

)

hi

au

tatti
Iklie,

e,

Inuyowa

a ka

:

" jkoeya, a
Iha.
i.,

ya'uki ta

!kw|!kwa'i

a ssin jgoa Ilga'ue

Ilkomyafi tuko ^auki

ta Ikhelklig, ta, Ilkoia |ku ssin Iku

au n

ttai ssa,

au

ti

e

;

u

jgaiie

yau

Iku ssin jnaunko

e,

Ilkoin ssin Ikii Iki n."

f

Au

hi tatti, hi Iwkwaiya.
lift

(7965')
to

(with the raised tone) means "to J Kilhi look over"; Mhhi, "to pour (as water)."
§ Hail Iku ta,

up the head

au ha

|T.

(7966') (7967')
(7966')

llku|,ii
II

lln|ua wai;
(

jkuxe
)

wa'i

a

i

Ixa ha.

"Wa'i

a ttulya,

hi |n^ ta: ttuissa I
ttuiya, hi |ne ta
!^'e
:

{fl. ttuftenttuften-ssa).

"Wai a >"*uki

wai. Ikoujkou, a.

6

Igiya llkoih, hin e

jkuxe
Ilkoin,

wa'!,

e

Ikffujkoiiiika;

hi Ine
i.

Ikuxe M,

llkhoe

jho

hi

au

he

wa'i

Ine

kkwakken,
llneiii.

He, hi

ine Iki Ihaii wai, llkai ki Ikain lla wai,

au

)

SIGNALLING WITH DUST.
around.*
perceives
to

387

And, as she stands looking around,
tlie

slie

dust, she exclaims
!

:

"A

person seems
the house,

be throwing up earth there " And the people run, run outf
( )

of

exclaiming:

"His

heart

is

that on account of (7964)

which he throws up earth. Ye must run quickly, that ye may go to give him water quickly; for, (it) is his heart; the sun is killing him; (it) is his heart; ye must quickly go to give him water." While the people feel that all the people ( ) run (7965) to the man. They go, pouring (water), to cool the

man with And he
his face
;

water.
first sits

up, J to

remove the darkness from

for,

the sun's darkness resembles night.

These are not women's doings;
they are.

for,

men's doings (7966)

they chase § things, happens thus when ( ) (7967) they are tired by running, the sun is killing them
(the
feel that
it

They

Bushmen)

chase the springbok; and

* While she feels that the old man (her father) was the oiie said: "My child !(?) thou art not standing up that thou mightst look around seeking for (thy) hushand. The sun is

/"7

Q fi 3

'

who

if it

it did scorch me as I walked hither as were not still morning, the sun did scorch me." f While they feel that they are numerous. (7965') J He was lying down, on account of his heart. springbok, to run after a springbok (7966') § (To) run after a (wounded) which we have shot. A wounded springbok they call "a wounded which is not wounded, they call: (7967') thing(?)." ( ) A springbok,

really (?) very hot, for

;

:

"a

living springbok."

who are strong to bear the sun('s heat), they are who chase the living {i.e. unwounded) springbok they run them through the sun, and the springbok vomit on account
People
;

those
after
of
it.

(7966')

And

they tura the springbok, chasing, take the springbok to

the house.

388

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMiKT FOLKLORE.

Ikuj^e,

IlkSmya
I

Ine

Ikhl

M, au

hi llk'dwa.
e.
I

H^

e,

hi Ine
Ihii,

la

l;^;6aken,

au

llk'u

ll^amki
e,

Ilk'S-g
la

Ine

he hi

Ine kkuerre.
lla
(
)

Hd

hi Ine

l;^6aken, ta
e,

(7968)

i;
li;

au hi ka au hi
lla

kkuerre, au hi

ssiii

jhamma
ti

tatti,

hi Inaunko jkhuka.

H^

hin

hi Ine
lie

l^daken, i; au hi ya'uki Ine tan, hi sse

llnein;

hd tiken
(

e,

hi Ine

lla

ssuen, I; hi Ine
linSii-ta jk'e

(7969) llkou; llkou

)

llnSii-ta jk'e,

au hi ta

ya

sse Ini jk'au.

IX.— 253.
L.

DEATH.
(Given in January, 1876, in the Kaikop
dialect,

hy Dia!kw|m.)

(5776)

Ikuatten

kkan
a,

llnau,

llwke a
1 1

i

li

ttatten

jkui a,

ha
(5777)

llii/keten
o

Ikuatten /030
ti
e,

A.O
li

yam
(

ttatten
)
i.

Ikiii

a

/

;

o

Ikuattaken tta Ilka tiken
e,

i

jkhe j^uonni.

He
Iki

Ikuatten ttatten
i

Ikiii,

Ta, Ikuatten

+en-na llwke a

ikiiken a.
(

Ikuattaken +kakka Ik'eti e, i

(5778) kkuiten e ^auki

)

+eh-na,
llnaii, I
:

Ikuka.

He —
Ikiii,

tiken a

e, Ik'e }
'

ka

he Ina Ikuatten, o Ikuatta — 030/ OD
" ll^koenyyii, tss'a ddin
(
)

he kii-kku, he Iwke
jkiii

(5779)

a,

Ikuatten

a?

I

kkan

(5a

sse ttu

kkumm;
hin

ta,

Ikuatten

ttatten

Ikiii.

Ti e yaiiki aken,

llkhoa ddi ttinya, ti e l;^arra; ta, Ikuatten
hi,
ti
e,

+kakka

ti

jkglkoin ddi ttiiiya,

ti

e l;^arra."

: ;

DEATH.

389

when they

are

tired.

Then,

they

go

staggering
out,

along, also (from) fatigue.

The fatigue goes
(
)
,

and they become

cool.

Then, they go staggering

along, while they go along

becoming

cool,

when (7968)

they were previously hot; while they feel that they
still

perspire.

Therefore, they go along staggering,
if

while they do not feel as
therefore, they go to sit

they should reach home
;

they throw up earth (into the air); throw up earth for ( ) the people (7969) at home, while they wish that the people at home

down

may

perceive the dust.

IX.— 253.
L.

DEATH.
manner, at the time when (5776) our heart falls down., that is the time when the star also falls down; while the star feels that our heart falls over.* Therefore, the star falls down on (5777) ( ) For the stars know the time at which account of it. we die. The star tells the other people who do not know that we have died. (5778) ( ) Therefore, the people act thus, when they have seen a star, when a star has fallen down, they say

The

star does in this

"Behold ye! Why is it that the star falls down? "We ( ) shall hear news; for a star falls down. (5779) Something which is not good appears to have
occurred at another place ; for the star tells us, that a bad thing has happened at another place."
* As when something which has been standing upright,
over on to
its side.

falls

(5777')

390

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
jMn, ha llnau, 6 Ikuatta ssin jkoa, ha
sse,

(5780)

(

)

ha
jk'e

llnaii,

ha

llkhou

llkau

hh(5a

i,

ha

llkerri.*

kii-kku, he lake:

"TJken yau tda

Ihin,

6 Ikuatten
ti
e,

(o781)

ggjjj^

jkui?

(

)

Hah

llkuah ssah +kakka hi,

i-ka jkui Ikuka."

Ik'e kii-kku,

he Iwke, jhiu kkah

ya'uki e tss'a a ddaii-ddau, ta,

ha ^auki ka ha
;

sse

(5782) sse

i

llneih,

6
e,

(

)

ha
ssa

j^a

+eh-na

ta,

ti

e,

ha

+en-ria,

i,

he

ha

f-ta
e,

llneih,

i;

o hah ka,

ha
(5783)

sse ssa liikeya hi a, ti

1-ka jkui Ikuka.
llnau,

He
Ihin,

tfken

e,

(

)

md,ma-ggu ka ssih

he tt5a

o Ihinya llkhou llkau ho Ha
:

ssi,

he kii-kku,
Ikhe,

he Iwke
(5784) jka
( )

"A
tt^i,
;

kah
ta,

ka, a sse

Ma
ti

jkumm
e,

+ka
ssah

h

+eh-na,

a

llkuah
ti
e,

+kakka ke " o mama-gguken
a,

li/ke,

kkunim
ti

ha ssah +kakka, ha Iku
Ikualkuatten
e,

sse

le

l»ki-ta
)

jkhwa,
!.

(5785)

e,

jkhe,

llkde

ta

( le

jkhwa,
he.

He

tfken
ggii

hd-ka kii-kkummi

sse Ha

Ta,
a,

mdma-

yaiiki
ta,

+kauwa he
he +en-na,
a,

sse
ti

ttu
e,

kkumm
jhin
a,

ha ssah
(
i,

(5786) +kakka;
a,

llnau,

)

il^ke

jkui

Ikuken
a, ti

ha

lli/keten
Ikiika.

ha ssa
Ta,

a,

hah
Iki

+kakka hi
(5780')

e,

jkui

mdma-ggu
it

* yhkl or ydahl

is

the bird's cry, which

repeats twice.


;

DEATH.

391

(

)

The hammerkop *
it

acts in this

manner, when [57 80)
over us,
it

a star has fallen,
cries. t

comes; when

it flies

The people say: "Did ye not hear the hammerkop, when the star fell? ( ) It came to tell (5781) us that our person is dead." The people speak, they say that the hammerkop is not a thing which deceives, for it would not come to our home, if ( ) (5782) it did not know; for, when it knows, then it comes to our home because it intends to come and tell
;

us about

it,

namely, that our person has died.

Therefore, ( ) mother and the others used, if they (5783) heard a hammerkop, when it flew, going over us, to say: "Do thou go (and) plunge in, * * ( ) *, (5784) for I know that which thou camest to tell me " while mother and the others said that the story, which it came to tell, should go into the Orange

River's water, where the stars stand in

That is the place where its stories For mother and the others did not want to hear the story which it came to tell for they knew
;

the water. (5785) should go in.
( )

that the

time
it

hammerkop does ia when a man dies, that
to us,
it

this
is

manner
it,

(

)

at the (5786)

the time at which
that the

comes

tells

us about

man

has died.

For, mother and the others used to say,

description

* Of this bird, the Scopus umbretta, or Eammerhop, the folio-wing is given in " The Birds of South Africa " by E. L. Layard,
'

Cape Town, 1867, p. 312. The " Sammerlcop " (literally. Hammerhead) is found throughout the colony, and all the way to the Zambezi, frequenting ponds, marshes, rivers, and lakes. It is a strange, weird bird, flitting about with great activity in the dusk of the evening, and preying upon frogs, small fish, &c. At times, when two or three are
feeding in the same small pool, they will execute a singular dance, skipping round one another, opening and closing their wings, and

performing strange
\

antics.'
!

ydh

!

or

ydak

is

the bird's cry, which

it

repeats twice.

(5780')

;

392

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
tss'a
a. a,

(5787) kkan Iwke, Ihin e

Iku Una

jkhwa
e,

a,

(

)

i

llwkoen tchuen-ta-ku
ti

He

tiken

ha

+efi.-iia,

e dda, i;

o

ban

tta Ilka ti e,

ha

Ikii

Una jkhwa
( )

(5788)

a,

ha

llkho

jk'ou,

ften ll^koen tchuei-ka-kku

a; tchuen e Una !g'wa;^u, iten lli/koen he, 6 jkhwa, o
i

jkau

jkhe,

jkhwa

ttii

Ip^au.

Iten

llwkoen,

tchuen- ta-kku,
llkallka jkhe.

Ikualkuattaken

llkho

li'tenliten

e

(5789)

(

)

Iten llnau llga

6,

iten llnau Ikukkg

kkan

ttai

luha, iten llwkoen ha,

6 ha ttai llkhde hda Ikhwa.
e,

Tfken
(5790) iten

Ikii

llkho

llkuonna
(
)

o ha ttai Una jkhwa.
ha.
ttai

Iku

lldkogn
a,
i

+ka

Tiken
lla

Ikii

llkho

llkuonna
e,

lliykoen,
li/ke,
ti

han
e,

a.

He
Ina,

tiken
jkui a
i,

mama-ggu
)

!hin

llnaii,

ha

Ikiika,

o jkhwa, ha llnau,
llnaii,

llkhwetyan kki ssan
ti
e,
i

(5791)

(

ha

ha +en-na,

e

Ike-kko
lie
i,

e,

ha

llkhou.

Ihin

ka, ha sse

ha jkhwa, ha lla +kakka hi
)

llkhoii
a,
ti
e, e,

Ikam

o han.

i-ka jkui Ikiika.
a,
a,

(5792)

He ko
i-g
Ine

(

Ikuattaken
ta,

Ikii

tkakka hi
e,

o

i

ya'uki ttu

kkumm;
i

he Iku
jhaii

+kakka hi
iten
Ine

he,

llnau,

ssin

ttoa

jhin,
( i
i.

(5793) Ikuatten, iten
o
i

Ine
i

Ikii

)

iten

ttui

amm
ssiii

mmaii,

Ini

he

:

he

Ine ttiii

M^am Ini kkumm, kkumm, i

6 h^

Ikuei Ikue, he ddi, o
Iki

Ta, mama-ggii

+kakka
he;

ssi a, ti e,

jkhwi-lkagen

(5794) e jkhwa

(

)

ll;^au

he

jkhwi-lkakari

Una ha
e,

jkhwa, he jkhwa ll^auwa he; jkhwi-lkagen
luaitye.

jkhwa
Ine

jkhwdgen

Ine
(
)

bbSten
Ikwai
Iki

Ikhi

he

;

hiii

(5795) ddi Ikuatten, o he
Ine Iku ddi Ikuattl.
ssi
a,
ti
e,

j;^uonniya.
Iki

Hih
ssi-

Ta,
llnau,

mama-ggu

+kakka
ha,

jkuila

jkhwa ll;^auwa

hah

DEATH.
that the

393

hammerkop
( )

is

a thing which liyes at that
see all things.

water in which
it

we

Therefore, (5787)

knows what has happened; while it is aware that it lives at the water which is like a pool, in
which we see
in the sky
all

things

;

(

)

we

see in the water, while

the things which are (5788) we stand by

the water's edge.
like fires
(
)

We

see all things, the stars look

which burn.
it

When
we

is

across,

see him, as

It seems as if it

when another man walks (5789) he walks passing the water. were noonday, when he walks by
night,

the water.

seems as
along.

see him ( ) clearly. The place (5790) were midday as we see him walking Therefore, mother and the others said, that,
if
it

We

when the hammerkop has espied in the water a person who has died, even though it be at a distance, ( ) when it knows that (he) is our relative, (5791) it flies away from this water, it flies to us, because
it

intends to go to
(It)

tell

us about

it,

that our relative

the star are those who tell (5792) ( ) when we have not heard the news; for they are those who tell us about it, and when we have heard the hammerkop, we also perceive the star, we afterwards ( ) hear the news, when we (5793) have just perceived them and we hear the news, when they have acted in this manner towards us.

has died.

and

us about

it

;

For, mother and the others used to tell us about
it,

that girls are those

whom

the Rain

(

)

carries

(5794)

and the girls remain at that water, to which the Eain had taken them, girls with whom the Eain is angry. The Eain lightens, killing them; they become stars, while their ( ) appearance has (5795) been changed. They become stars. For, mother and
off;

the others used to

tell

us about

it,

that

a

girl,

394

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.

(5796) ddi

kui

llkho

Oho

(

)

Ikw^iten-ttti *

e

l^kagen

llkhde jklie jkhwa.
I e ya'uki +en-na, I'ten kle sse llnau, o
i

Ina he,

6 he

llkhde
Ikuei-ii,
lla

jkhe
i;
(

jkhwa, o
) it

i

Ili^koen,

ti
+i,

e,

he-ka

(5797) aken
kail

en kii-kkm, iten

'n kkaii
Ikhe

Ikam Oho !kweiten-ttu e kfe
Ta, he ya'uki ttamsse aken.'
ssi-ssi
a, ti
e,
(

llkhde

jkhwa.

Mama-gguken
!kweiten-ttu
Iku

(5798) +kakka
llnau,

)

Oho

6 ha

lli^koen,

ti

e,

ssi

Ikam Ha ha, han Iku
i +i,

llgwi-ssin

Ikhwa
(

llkaie.
)

Iten Ine ssin ka,
jkhd,
ti a,

'Oho
?

(5799) !kweiten-ttu e
Tss'a ddih
ssin
Ikii

ssin

e

S,
ti

he ka dde
e,

a,

n

Ya'uki Ini

he

6

he llkuan

jkhe, ti e
(

a?'
)

Han
ha

Iku ttchdaken llkhdeti
Ikii
e,
le i

(5800) ssin jkhwa, o ha

lliikoen,

Ikam Ma ha;

iten ya'uki sse Ini ha, ta,

Ikhwa.
ssi
)

He
(5801) yauki

tiken
sse

e,

Ikam

mdma-ggu Iwkeya ssi a, He Oho !kweiten-ttii (

kkgo
e
ssi

ll^koen he, hin llkhde jkhe jkhwa, 6 ssi ki lliikoen,

hd-ka aken.
(5802)
e,

Ta, jkhwi-lkagen e jkhwa +hauwa, he
jkauiten-tti
ssi
Ikii
;

he llkho Ohoken
Ikii
e,

(

)

ta,

jkhwa-ka
ttiii

Ikagen

he

ll«koen,
e,

;^u

he.

Ta, ssi ll;^am llk^llke he,

ti

he dda he.
hd-ka
jhammi,
( ( )

(5803)

He
laityi,

tiken

e,

mdma-ggti
he

llnau,

l^am-kattin,

hin ^auki ka he sse a he sse ttai-a
ta,

o

jkhwa kkau-a ssa;
(5804)
ll;^:am

Iki

ti
)

e,

jkhwa

ka jkhwa
e,

sse bbaiten Ikha he.
Ikii

Ta, jkhwa
ti,

Iki

Ikii

tss'a a

llnau,

ha kkau jkhe he

xoii labbe-ttii, han a hh| ba +kakka mdma a, Oho jkweiten-ttu e li/kagen llkhoe jkhe jkhwa, hail Iwkeya mama a, ti e, mama llkhoa kail +i, mama ^au sse Wxam ddt (5796') Oho jkweiten-ttu, o ( ) mama ^auki jhammi jkhwa.

(5795')

* +kammg-aii

o

DEATH.

395
like

when the Eain has
a flower *

carried her off, hecomes which grows in the water.

(

)

(5796)

We
think,

who do

not

know

are apt (?) to do thus

when
water,
)

we perceive them, as they when we see that they are
'

stand
so

in

the
(

beautiful;

we (6797)

which are For they are not a little beautiful.' Mother and the others said to us about it, that the flower when it saw that we went (579 ( ) 8) towards it, would disappear in the water. We should think, The flowers which ( ) were standiag (5799) here, where are they? Why is it that I do not perceive them at the place where they stood, here?' It would disappear in the water, when it ( ) saw (5800) that we went towards it; we should not perceive it, for it would go into the water. Therefore, mother and the others said to us about which (5801) it, that we ought not to go to the flowers ( ) we see standing in the water, even if we see their beauty. Tor, they are girls whom the Eain has taken away, they resemble flowers; ( ) for (they) (5802) are the water's wives, and we look at them, leaving them alone. For we (should) also be like them (in) what they do. Therefore, mother and the others do in this manner with regard to their ( ) Bushman women, they are (5803) not willing to allow them to walk about, when the Eain comes; for they are afraid that the Eain also intends, lightening, to kill them. ( ) For the Eain (5804)
I will go (and) take the flowers

standing in the water.

'

is

a thing which does in this manner
* r^iMmmi-dn's motlier,
\ahhe-tt&,

when

it

rains
told

was the one who formerly
;

(5795')

mamma' about the flower which grows in the water she said to mamma about it, that mamma seemed to think that she would not
also

become a

flower, if

(

)

she did not fear the Eain.

(5796')

396

SPECIMENS OP BUSHMAN FOLKLORE.
Ikii
e,

ban
(5805) o
ti

Ikhou

i

l^kwal, hail Iku bbaiteu Iki iMn,
( )

ha kkaA
Ikhi
ssi a,
(
i,

kkau jkhe
ti;

he.

Hah
e,

Ikii

kah

bb^ten
+kakka
(5806)
ssi,

o he

he tfken

mama-ggu
Iki

ssi

sse llnau,

jkhwa kkau-a

Ha o
ssi

ssi

)

ttai
e,

llkh(5e

hhda jkhwa,
bbaiten,

ssi sse llnau,

llv^koen

ti

jkh-wa
lie,

o

!gwa;^u,
i;

ssi

sse

(5ro-ko

jkwe
(

ti

e,

jkhwa bbaiten,
ko Ikha
ssi.

jkhwa a
sse
llnau,
lie,

(5807) ssih ka, ha
(6)
ssi

)

j;^e-a
ssiii

Ha
ssi
a,

ha jkweita ki
sse
ssi

ggauwa

ssi,

sse jkwe

ll^koen
(
)

Iki

!;^uorLniya
Iki
e,

ssi

ha jkwSten;
llkellkeya

(5808)

ta,

tsa^au
tiken

ll^arn
ti

+^i

ha

jkweiten.
ssi

He
o

ll;^am
e,

^wah ha jhammi
I
)

tsa^au,
ha.

hah
tiken

tta
e,

Ilka ti

Ikii

oroko jkwe

(5809)

lla

He

ha
Iki
e,

Ine

(

llkou
I

hho

i,

i;

o

hah

tta Ilka ti e,

ha

j^uerriten

tsa^aii e +^i
i,

juhi-ssih ha.
llah

He

tiken

ha jkhai Ihih
i.

i;

hah

kah ssneh

jk'au,

o ha yaiiki Ikha

THE RELATIONS OF WIND, MOON, AND CLOUD TO HUMAN BEINGS AFTEE
DEATH.
{Given in August, 1876, in
heard
it

the

Katkop

dialect,

hy Diajkwam, who
it

from

his

parents and observed
i

himself.)

(5147)
ta,

jkhwe ttah
1

llnau,

Ikuken, 1-ka jkhwe-ten tchui;
;

e Ikm,
e,

i Iki

Ikhwe

iten
(

ka Ikuasen, 6
)

I

Ikuka.

(5148)

He
i

tiken
o

jkhwe ka

llnau,

i

Ikuka, jkhwe ddi
ttu,
i

jk'au,

ha ka, ha
i
;

sse

tchu,

hho

jnoa,

e,

ssih ttai-a ttih,

6 iten yauki jnaunkko tte Ika,

DEATH.
here,
it

397

smells
it
(

our scent,
)

it

lightens

out

of

the

place -where

rains.

It lightens, killing us at (5805)

this place; therefore,

mother and the others told us falls upon us (and) we ( ) walk passing through the Rain, if we see (5806) that the Rain lightens in the sky we must quickly look towards the place where the Eain lightens; the Rain, which intended ( ) to kill us by stealth. (5807) It will do in this manner, even if its thunderbolts* have come near us, (if) we look towards (the place where it has lightened), we look, making its thunderfor our ( ) eye also shines (5808) bolts turn back from us
ahout
it,

that

when

the Eain

;

like

its

thunderbolts.

Therefore,
it

it

also appears to

fear

our eye,
it.

when
while

feels
it
(

that
)

we
it

quickly look
over us

towards

Therefore,
it;
it

passes

on (5809)

account of
us;
it

feels
it.

that

respects our
it

eye which shines upon
goes to
sit

Therefore,

goes over
it

on the ground yonder, while

does not

kill us.

THE RELATIONS OF WIND, MOON, AND CLOUD TO HUMAN BEINGS AFTER
DEATH.
The wind does thus when we die, our (own) wind (5147) blows; for we, who are human beings, we possess wind we make clouds, when we die. Therefore, the wind does thus when ( ) we die, the wind (5148) makes dust, because it intends to blow, taking away our footprints, with which we had walked
;

about while

we

still

had nothing the matter with

* Black, pointed, shining stones, whicli only come from the (5807') sky when it lightens. They disturb the ground where they fall.

They

are called \lchwa \hweiten (the Eain's thunderbolts).

398

SPECIMENS OF BUSHMAN FOLKLOEE.

(5149) he,

1

Inoari

e,

(

)

Jkhwe ka
Ta,
e,

lia

tch.u
llkho,

lilio
i

ttu he,

he ka ssan +ka
jk'atiwa.
1

ta.

ti

ssan

Inaunkko
ttii,

He

tiken

jkhwe ka ha tchu, Ikam

[noa,
(
)

1.

(5150)

He

tiken

e,

i

!kw| *
Ikain,

llnau,

i

ikuken,

hin
o

!uhf-ssin
i

!gwa;i^u;

hin

juhi-ssho

jgwa^u,

Ikuka.
( )

(5151)

He tiken e, mama ka ssin llnau, wa tten ssa, jkajkarro wa jkorro
ku-kku, ha Iwke
:

jkajkarro

jkhe.

Mama
jk'e

" jkajkarro kan Ikammaihya
Ikii e,

(5152) e Ikuka. t

Ta, u

lliikoen,

ti e,

(

)

ha

Ikuei

Ikudn, tta, i; he

ha jkorro

tta,

6 han tta
e

Ilka ti e,

ha Ikammain Ikha ha, 6
(5153)
e,
(

Ik'e

Ikuka.

He

tiken
;

)

ha

jkorro tta,

i.

Han
Ikuei

ya'uki e llk'auru

ta,

ha
ttu

Ikii

e ll^kdaken-ka jkajkarro. o jkajkarro

TJken ka,
tta.

u

sse

kkumm,
llkuah

Ikuah,

jkuften

(5154)

(

)

a Ikuka, ha jkajkarro Ikammainya ha.

He
(5155)
i

tiken

e,

u

llkuan ka,

ii

ssan

ttu, ti e,

kie dda,

o jkajkarro Ikuei u,"
( )

Ina-lkhu, hin kie

ssin

llkho
i.

Ikuagen, o

i

Ikiika, ti e, i Ikuei

ydken Ikuagen,
;

He
+1,

tchueiiyan

(5156)
(5150')

e,

Ikwaiya Ikuagen
*

(

)

he,
i

i

kah
i

Ikuagen
ssin,

e.

Mama

han. kan. 4:kakka ke,
li,

llnau,

llgaua
li,

6 tiken
ti
e,

yauki

tte ko, tta

o tiken ttamsse tta
11.

iten Ine tta,

llkiianna

ttan,

ha

tta

Iten

Ine
ta,
(

ku-kkui,
)

iten +T,
tsa;^au

'

Akke
yaiiki
i

(5151') n amni
ttamsse

llgaua
tta
11
;

Ikho

ssin
sse
e,
i.

0ho
|mm.

;

llk'oin

n
o
tl

llgaua

ssin.'

Iten

Ikuagen,
11.
i,

llnuan-aii Ihlii;

i

llgaua ssin, o tiken ya'uki tta
tl

He
hin

tikgn
e, 1

e,

1

Ikuagen,
i.

Ta,

e,

llkuanna

kwokkwan

e,

llgaua ssin,

f

The narrator

says that his mother heard this from her

own

mother.

DEATH.
us; and our footprints, -whieli
to

399

the wind intends (5149) ( ) blow away, would (otherwise still) lie plainly visible. For, the thing would seem as if we still Therefore, the wind intends to blow, taking lived.

away our
(
)

footprints.
gall,*

And, our

it sits

green in the sky,
lying

when we die, when we are

sits

in the sky

;

(5150)

dead.

Therefore, mother was wont to do thus
the

moon

down came, (when)
:

the

hollow.

Mother spoke, she said

when ( ) (5151) moon stood " The moon is
ye are those and it lies (5152)
;

carrying people

who
) it

are dead.

For,

who

see that

(

lies in this
is

manner
itself
is

hollow,

because

it

killing

(by)
(

carrying
)

people
hollow.

who

are

dead.

This

why
it

it

lies

(5153)

It is not a [Ik^auru;

for,

is

a

moon

of

badness (?).t Ye may (expect to) hear something, when the moon lies in this manner. person ( ) (5154) is the one who has died, he whom the moon carries. Therefore, ye may (expect to) hear what has

A

happened,
(
)

when
hair
die,

the
of

moon

is

like this."

The

our head will resemble clouds, (5155)
in this

when we

when we

manner make

clouds.
;

These things are those which resemble clouds ( )(5156) and we think that (they) are clouds. We, who do
* Mother, she used
if

to tell me, that it (thus)

happens to us/g]^gQ5\

-we sit in the shade
it is

when
hot.

the place

is

not particularly warm,
feel that the
'

when
seems

(only) moderately

warm, (and) we
:

summer

Allow me to sit for "We think a little in the shade under the bush; for ( ) the sun's eye is (5151') (then) not a little hot I will sit a little while in the shade we make clouds our liver goes out from the place where we are
as if it

would be
;

;

'

;

sitting in the shade, if the place is not hot.

Therefore,

we make

clouds on account of

it.

For,

when

it is

really

summer, then we

(may)

sit iu the shade. Possibly, " of threatening." f

400

SPECIMENS OP BTJSHMAN FOLKLORE.
+en-na,
iten

I

e ya'uki
e.

e

Ikuei-dddken
llnati,
i

+i,

ti

e,

Ikuagen (5157)
e,

I e +en-na,
i,

I'ten

llwkoenya, ti
ti
e,

he

Ikuei-ii,

(

)

ften
e.

+en-na,
I e

jkui-ka
Iten
e,

Ikuagen
Ikuei

e

;

ha
iten

Ina-lkhu
+i
;

+en.-iia,

e
Iki

kkui,

6
(

iten
e,

tta,

Ilka

ti

i

(5158)

mmu

+enn, Ikuagen,
i.

) ti

lku|gen Ikuei ^dken,

Ikuagen,

DEATH.
not know,

401

we

are those

that (they) are clouds.
see that they are like

who think in this manner, We, who know, when we this, ( ) we know that (they) (5157)
(that they) are the hair of

are a person's clouds;
his head.

who know, we are those who think thus, while we feel that we seeing recognize the clouds, ( ) how the clouds do in this manner form (5158)
"We,

themselves.

2d

Inanni,

Tamme,

luma, and Da.

APPEN^DIX.

A FEW

IKUN TEXTS.

;

404

APPENDIX.

I.

\xu4.

THE DOINGS OF
(9402')
ta
1;^^^

IXUE

AEE MANY.
liwa Ine-d, ta tkhi;

(Given 18th March, 1880, by jnanni.)

taba

ti

+khi;
ti

ta

Ikiia

m

ba ba Karu
ti +k]ii.

jkod

me

l^ud

taba,

ta

l;^ud

taba

YARIOTJS TEANSFORMATIONS OF \XUE.
1.

ii:UE

AS

!NA;(:ane.

{Given in March and April,

1880, by Inaini, from his paternal

grandfather, Karu.)

(9348')

Ikam
l;^ud
ti

ti

Igi,

l^u^

ti e

!na;^ane; tsaba ti
ti

mm
e
ti

l^u^;
;

e jna^ane.
td,

Ikam

+na'u,
Ini,

l;^ue l;^ue

ti

l^ud

ta

sbu,

ti

tsd.
;

Igii

ta
Igf,

sbu,

tsa

ku^-ssin

ti

dzbo

ta

Ikam
ila,

ta

l^ud e jni^ane

tanki, !iia;^aiie Inu Ine

d jkan.

Ta

Igii

Ini,

l;^u^

Ikua e !kan, ta e

l;^;u^,

ta shu.

2.

FUETHER CHANGES OF FORM.
Igi,

(9381) (9382)
e

Ikam

ta l^u^ e

dm;*
Ikam
td,

ta

Ikam

+na'u, ta l^ue

Dama,
lu

ta

shu

;

ta

Igf,

ta l^u^ e
;

l^u^,

(

)

ta

jmierre

tanki,

e

shdo
Ikan

f

ta

Ikam +nau,
ha
Ine-ssin

(9876')
(9382')

* 1*^1 §° dzha'o

;

ha

Ine-ssin

;

Ikara tanki,

jnumma, ha
t

Ine-ssin ti jga.

Sh|o e jkan Inu +ga-n, llkellkeya jkuni.

1.

Ix|(e aB 3.

a tree by day, and himself
\xui'i fire.

by
4.

night.
I'x^i

2.

^xH^ tuL '

tx^i ddi.

tcM.

l^ui'i hut.

1.

\xu* as \ndxani,

yd Mx^m, ground

jn^xon*.

2.

The place

at

which lx«« went into the earth when he became

a \n&xane.
3.

A

spot where water had been.
ttuumi, Stpt,, 1880.

1-

IX«e.
(

4.

\nd!xane,

which grew out of

his teeth.

\-^ui Wnaii

\

lx«^'» little

Uima. bow.

wood

pigeon's feathers.

3,

\k'b.ru,

quiver.
\nanni,

March Ut,

1880.

TRANSLATION OF IkUN TEXTS,

405

THE DOINGS OF

i;tyE

ARE MANY.

Tlie works of \j(u4 are many, and were not one, (9402') but many; and my father's father, Kdru, told me about \j(ue''s doings, for I;^m^'s works are numerous.

YAEIOUS TEANSFORMATIONS OF
1.

\XJm.

I;CUE

AS

!NA;:tANE.

rose, \j(ue was \naj(ane; the birds (9348') was \naj(ane. The sun set, (and) \j(ue The night \j(u4 was \j(ue; and lay down and slept. fell, and \j(_ue lay down, (he) slept; the place was dark; and the sun rose, and \j(ue was another (kind of) \na-)(ane, a large (kind of) \naj(ane, which is a tree. And the night fell, (and) \j(ue was not a tree, and was l^we, and lay down.

(When) the sun
\j(ue;

ate

2.

FURTHER CHANGES OF FORM.
rose,
\j(u4

and \j(ue was a dui;* and the sun (9381) was an Omuhererd, and lay down; set, and and the sun rose, and \-xue was \j(ue, ( ) and went (9382) into another country, and was a shqb t ^^^ the sun

The sun

;

* The flower
t

of the dui is light-coloured; its fruit is green;
its fruit

(9876')

another day, (when)

has ripened,

its fruit is red.
?).

The shad

is

a tall tree, like the \huni (palm

(9382 ')

;

406

APPENDIX.
l;^ue

ta

e

Goba,

ta

sliu

;

ta

Ikam

Igf,

ta

l^ue e

Ina^ane.*

3.

i;i:yE

as a

iigui
l^u^ e

teee and as a fly.
l;^ii^,

(9392)

Ikam

+na'u, ta
td,

ta

shuwa

ya, ta ti tsa,

liwa lne-6,
ta l;^u^

ti

shiiwa yi, ta

ti tsa.

Ta Ikam

Igi,

sa'u,

ta

kob
jkaii.

ta Inu, ta ssin Ikam,

Ikam tsema,

ta e llgui, td e

(9393)

Ta, ha

za'u ssiii llgul,

ta

(

)

llkiia

tsha

llguf, ta

s^

ti gxi llgul Ind,

ta llgul

kuanna; ta
le

l;^ud e dzoa-dzoa.
ti

Ta

lia za'u

ikaiiwa ha

kue ^a, Xk

tchih-a

llgul,

ta Mkfe.

Ta l^u^
Ife

e dzoa-dzoa, ta llkuwa lle.f

Ta ha

(9394)

za'u jka'uwa

kue

ya, ta

ti

tchin-a

(

)

Hgul.J

4.

i;^IJE

AS

WATER AND

THINGS. IN HIS OWN EUBS FIRE AND DIES.
(9404)
ti

AS OTHER FORM, HE
Ta
+ne+nfebbi
ta

'/C¥^ ^

"S^j ^^ "S^ ® !^^^
Ine-ssin.

llkho-a.

m'm

Ikiii

Ta

l;^u^

e

gdrii,

shiiwa
ti +klii.
lla

('9382')
ta
ti

* liSx^ne Shu yt,; jnaxane tanki
jkaii

ti

e |kaii;

Inaxane

InSxane Ine-ssin dzbao.

Ikaii

jnaxane Ine-ssin inu Ine

ya jnaxane
t
+

Ine-ssin tseme, ta ti ||ke||keya Ikui jne-ssin, ti jga,

tseme, ta +klii.

(9393') (9395')

Ta ha llkuwa
llg?i

goo, ta go jjkoa.
Djii
ti

He jku e gob.
llgui

e

jkaii.

mm
ti

||gui,

Ine-ssin.
llgui.

Dju Ikua
ti

liiwa

llgui

kue yh, ta

Inu

m'm luha

llgui

yk\

ikhu-ssiii.

l3cW

is a llywi-tree.

(The

\\g^\. is

a tree about the size of a loquat-tree, beating edible
fi-uit,

which

is

eaten raw.)
\nann\,

March

\1th, !880.

"%

\

^

VH^

\xui

»

\M.

i^ui

is

a l*«|-tree.

\xui
\j(ui is

/

\^dn-ac td

e

\kah tiima

^mm ;

ta \ku(i » ^xy^is

a \kltn^, a

little

food-bearing tree, for he
\nanm,

not

lx*f^>

May

\9th, 1880.

;

V

is |lX«'i an elephant,

2.

His tusks. isks.

Ma

dsai, ttih ha, ta kod,

ta t&la

b. awhil (the

name

of a certain large

food tree).

His wife sees him, and She prepares food.
'

is afraid.

6.

The

wife's

the

hands are [kah-a fruit ^IIM tree grows out of

Ma

dsa'A.

^^-qmm ha

hut \gai.ru.
7.

her head.

His wife beats him with a knobkeny.

The

wife's long great toes.

TRANSLATION OF
set,

|KTJN TEXTS.

407

sun

rose,

and \^u4 was a Makoba, and lay down and \j^ii4 was a \naj(ane*

;

and the

3.

i;^TJE

AS A
set,

llGUi

TREE AND AS A FLY.
was
I^m^,

and lay upon (9392) the ground, and slept, was alone, and lay upon the ground and slept. And the sun rose, and \j(ue awoke and and stood up, and saw the sun, a little sun, and was Wgui^ and was a tree. And his wife saw the Wgui, and ( ) went to the (9393) II^M^, and went to take hold of a Wgui fruit, and the Wgui vanished; and \j(ue was a fly. And his wife laid herself upon the earth, and cried about And \j(ue was a fly, and settled the Wgui, and died. upon the grass, f And his wife lay down upon the earth, and cried about ( ) the Wgui.X (9394)
and
\j(u6
.

The sun

.

.

4.

i;tUE

AS

WATER AND AS
HIS

OTHER

THINGS. IN RUBS FIRE
\j(ue

OWN
DIES.
the

FORM,
(in)

HE
the (9404)
ate

AND
And

was water
of

;

and the water was

shadow

the

tree.

wood pigeons

* (One kind
\naxane
is

a tree.
is

tree \naxane

upon the earth; another (kind of) (9382') The \naxane are numerous. The fruit of the The fruit of the tree [naxane is large; yellowish.
of) \nax(ine lies

and the ground
is red, is small,

Vnilxa^^ fruit is small,

and resembles the

\hui fruit,

f

and abundant. And he settled upon the

grass,

and the grass broke.

The (9393')

name of the grass is god. People is a tree. X The Wgui
People do not put the
has thorns.
Wgu'i into

eat the llywi, the Wgu'i fruit.
it

(9395')

a pot, but eat

raw.

The Wgui

;

408

APPENDIX.
l«k<5ro.

Ikui

Ta ssm
ta

tne+nfebbi,

ta
llgd

e

llgii.*

Ta

(9405) +ne+nebbi
taba
11^

ssiix llgu,

(

)

kaWa

yL
ta

Ta l^ue
ka
ta
gii

Inu

Ine

11a,

llkellk^ya
Ige

llnoa,

+ne+nfebbi.

Ta

+iie+nfebbi

ti

mm

llgii,

11^

f

ko

6,

ta jne +ne+iifebbi

tsi,

ta +iie+nfebbi ti tchin

ta +ne+iifebbi tanki jka u.

Ta

l;^u^

e

1^11^,

ta

sa'u,

ta

gii

+ne+iifebbi,

ta

ti

(9406) sua +iie+nfebbi
jyuf-esin,

jyui-ssin,

ta

sh^u^ +ne+nfebbi
llgii

(

)

ta ta

shiiwa

^a.

Ta

kuonna, ta bd

e

\^u6

;

sb^u^

+ne+iifebbi

l^m, ta sbiiwa
sbu.

yL
ta

Ta sau +ne+nfebbi
sail,

taii-a,

ta

Ta

sbusbii,

ta lg6 j^d
^j
jjjj^

+ne+nebbi tan-a, kue da-a.
(
)

(9407)

ip^

+ne+nebbi, ta s'4 Dama,

ta

sa'u.

Ta

llk(5a

sba
^a.

Dama,

ta
Ige

Dama
>'aru

ssin

ba.

Ta ba
ba,
ta
Ikiia

kam-ma
ssin

Dama
e

ba,

yam
;

ba.

Ta

ts^ma,

ta

e

Inu-^rre
jkaii,

J

Dama
ssin

(9408)

iigo

daba ssin Inu-^rre

llkiiwa

ta (

)

ba

(9404')

* Ikua e llgu |nu Ine
t 'x¥® 6
lie

lla,

ta e Hgii tsema,

yi.

||gu.

(9405')
(9407')

(e go), ta tsema, ta

jne +ne4:iiebbi.

He Inu Ine

Ha, e llnoa, ta

gu +ne+nebbi; ta e Ixue.

i Tsaba tsema.

TEANSLATION OF JKUN TEXTS.
the fruit of the
[/cm.

409
lizard,*

And

\)(ue

was a

and

lay in the dead leaves of the (km.

the wood pigeons, and was water, f pigeons saw the water, and ( ) settled upon the (9405)

And (he) saw And the wood

worked large grass, like wood pigeon. And the wood pigeons came to drink (lit. to eat) water, and the grass J came near, and bit the wood pigeon's bill, and the wood pigeon cried out; and the other wood pigeons flew away. And \j(ue was \x^e, and rose up, and took hold of the wood pigeon, and plucked out the wood pigeon's feathers, and put the wood pigeon's ( )(9406) feathers in his head, and lay upon the ground. And the water vanished, and he was l^we; and put the wood pigeon's feathers in his head, and lay upon the ground. And (he) put the wood pigeon's body into the hot embers, and lay down. And continued to lie down, and arose, and went to take out the wood pigeon's body from the fire. And (he) ate the wood pigeon, and heard Ovaherero, and arose. And went to the Ovahererd, and the (9407) ( ) Ovahererd saw him. And he hid himself on the ground. The Ovahererd came to search for him, to search for him, (and) did not see him. For (he) was little, and was a \nu-erre § and a little Omuherero boy saw the [nu-erre upon a bush, and
water's

edge.
it

And

\j(ue

reeds,

and

took hold of a

;

* This lizard (called also gg6ru and hgqru by my \kuh informants /'Qnn7'\ and ihai-Qpua by \han:^Jcass'o) appears to be the common Gecko. f (He) was not a large (piece of) water, but (?) was a little /Qin^n water, a water hole. f \xue was a grass which is (called) gd, and (is) small; and bit ^9405') Large grass, which is (called) reeds, took hold the wood pigeon. and was Ix^^^'. of the wood pigeon °
;

§

A

(certain) little bird.

(9407')

410

APPENDIX.
ta ti tchin.*

Ddma,

TA ka
:

e

jk'ii

Iga

llgii,

(ta ti

ska yi).

Ta ha kue

" Y^-he

!

Ye-he

!

Ye-he

"
!

Ta Dama sa-a;
Ikua
ssiii

ta y&rxi ha,
h..

>'aru ha,

yaru ha, ta

ha, ta jka
llkoa

(9409)

(

)

Ta

f |ka sh4 ha
Inii-erre,
ssiii

td,i

jnuerre, ta ssin

ha

ba, ta

Ikiia

e

ta e l;^u^, ta Mkfe.J

Ta ha
llkoa

ba

li

ha, ta Ige

ha, ta
t&,

ha Ukh.
sa'u.

Ta ha ba

u

;

ta

ha

Ikiia Mke,
!

e l^u^, ta
ta

Ha

dzon ha

ba:

"M

bd wooo "
!

ha ba dzon ha, ta kue:
kiie

"Me
td
ti.

Mha wooo " ta ha dzon ha bd
tchin:
(
)

kk

Ine-e,

"+no! +n5

!

" ta sha ha tdi jnudrre.
ti

(9410)

Ta

ha bd ssin ha, ta

l^u^rri ha.
;

Ta ha

sa-a ha ba. shu,

Ta
yk.

ssin

ha

ba, ta Mke

ta e g(5ru, ta

shuwa

Ta ha ba
(9411)
Ikiia
\(k.b.

ssin ha, ta

kue

:

"

Me
(

Mha
)

I;;^u^

6,

ta

e djii tanki, ta e

me

Mha;
ta

ta ssin me, ta

Td
e

ti

tnii
djii

jkah

da-a,
ta e
ta
tsuai

ssin

me,
td

ta

\\kh

;

ta

Ikiia
ti

tahki,

me
Ikua
!

Mha,
ssin
!

e

l^u^.

Ta nd
(9408')
*

u me
tchin:

jnuerre,
" Tsuai
!

me
Ddma

Mh^,

ta

Ta

llk^ii

tsuai

"

diba ssm

ha, ta

ha

e

Inu-Grre.

Ix'ie e Inu-erre,

ta ti tchin.

Ha
ta e

Ikua e Inu-erre Ine-e; ta e

lnu-6rre +khi.

(9409')

t

Ha Ha

Ikiia

e Inii-erre +khi,

Inii-erre

Ine-e,

ta u

ha

tai

jnuerre.
X

llkunna jnoe tsema, lou tnoo,

loii-de

Inoo.

; :

TRANSLATION OP JKUN TEXTS.

411

and cried out.* And (9408) ) he saw the Ovahererd, was the Bushman's eye water and fell upon the
(

ground.

And

he said

:

" Y4-he

!

Ye- he

!

Ye-he

!

"

And

the Omuherero heard, and sought for him, sought for him, sought for him, and did not see him, and (he, \xue) flew away.
( )

And

(he, Ij^we)

f flew, coming to his mother's (9409)

country, and saw his father, and was not a \nu-erre^

but was I^Me, and died. J And his father went to him, and came to look at him, and he was dead. And his father went away, and he was not deiad, and was \j(ue, and rose up. He called to his father "My father " and his father called to him, and said: "My child! 0!" and he called to his father once, and cried out: ^'^no! ^nh!''^ and came to his
!

!

mother's country.

saw him and stealthily (9410) approached him. And he heard his father. And (he) saw his father, and died and was a lizard, and lay down, lay down upon the ground. And his father saw him, and said: "It is my
(

And

)

his

father

;

child,

\^ue

!

for

it

is

not

another

person,

but

is

and (he) saw me, and died. And (9411) ) ( (he) was rubbing sticks (to make) fire; and saw me, and died and is not another person, but is my child, and is l^we. For, I went (?) away to my country, and did not see my child and to-day,
ray child;
; ;

(he) cried: " TsucCi ! tsucd! Uudi!" (Two) Ovaherero (9408') saw him for he was a \nii-erre. He was not one \niX-erre \xue was a \n'a-irre, and cried out. but was many [nH-erre. \ He was [now] not many InH-erre, but was one hiii-'Srre, and (9409') went to his mother's country.

*

And

children

;

J He carried over his shoulder a little bag, the antelope, a female antelope's skin.

skin of an

412

APPENDIX.

(9412) Ikam

e,

na

ti

ssin

me
;

\\h&,

(

)

ta

me

\\h& ti

+nu

da-a, jkan ts^ma da-a

* ta
;

me

\\h& ti +iiti, ta ssiii

me, ta
e
lyiie.
A.
o

Mkfe,

Ta
ti

e

l^ue

ta

Ikiia

e djii taiiki,

ta

Na
na

koa 3
o

llha, me ••7
;

ta

me

llha

ti

llkfe.

(9413)

Na
me
ta

ti

u me Imidrre
ti

(

)

ta

me
na

jnudrre

+^a,

ta

llnue +khi,

u

me

jmidrre, Ikiia ssin
e,

me

jnu^rre,

jnu^rre +;^a.

Ta Ikamma
ti

ti

ssin

me

Mtia,

me

[!ha

e

l^ue, ta

tabba da-a,
)

Ikan ts^ma
da-a, ta
lia

(9414) da-a,

td

ti

m'm

tshana,
ti

(

ta

+nu

llga'iissin

kwi, ta ha
l;^^-lln'u,

tchin, ta ssin me, ta jjke;
l;^ue ssin
ti

ta ta

na e

ta

me Mha

me, ta

Nkfe;

nd

ti

koa me
e +^a.

llha.

Na

u

me

Inudrre,

me

Inudrre

ka

(9415)

"Tame
Ta sb^u^
In^

Hha e dju

( )

tanki;

n a

ssin

me

Mba.

+ne+nfebbi \ywi; ta

me

Mha ssin me,

me
ta

kue +ne+nebbi \ywi, +ne+nfebbi j^wi +kM,
e +ne+nfebbi sa.

ba
(9416)
(

Ta Ikam

e,

na

ti

kod

me

llha,

)

td

ti

u me

jnu^rre."
;

Ta u ha

jnu^rre

ha
\\L

jniidrre

Ikii
ti

e

lln9a

;

ta e

jnum, !num Inu Ine
*

Ta ha

u ha jnuerre.
jkaii

(9412')
ti
lie

l^^ii

!'^"

6

In'au-lkumm; ta e jkan sa; da-a
llnoa.
;

+gaan;

tsema ta n+gaan, llkellkeya
llxnn-a jkan tanki kue
;

jkafi
ti

tanki

ti

shu ya; ta ha

lie

ha

+nuru

da-a, da-a ti 4=nauwa

ta,

ha

ti

gu

da-a,

ha

ti

dshu da-a.

;

TRANSLATION OF JKUN TEXTS.
I

413

saw

my

child,

little

sticks'

and fire;* and
( )

my my
is

saw me, and
person, but

died.
is

And
I

was rubbing fire, (9412) child rubbed fire, and \j(^ue and is not another
child
;

l^we.

am
(

afraid of

my

child,

for

my

child is dead.
to

and my country is far (9413) away, and (during) many moons I go to my country,

"I go

my

country;

)

(and) do not see
distant.

my

country

;

my

country

is

far

And, to-day, I see my child, for my child is l;^Me, and makes fire, little sticks' fire, and eats tshdna,^ ( ) and rubs fire, and his hands hurt (him), (9414) and he cries, and sees me, and dies for I am \j(^e-\\n'u, and my child, l^we, sees me, and dies and I am afraid of my child. I go away to my
;

my "And my child. And
country,
feathers
;

country that(?)
child
(I)
is

is

far distant.
(

another person;

)

I see

my (9415)

wear in my head wood pigeons' and my child saw me, my head with