CHINESE CULTURE MODULE

MARY ELLEN PAGE 2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS Intended Learning Outcomes Introduction Chinese Legacy to the World English Vocabulary that Comes from Chinese Symbolism Terms and Expressions Trivia Shanghai Wuxi Suzhou Hangzhou Guilin Xi’an Beijing Forbidden City Hutong Tour Great Wall Language Writing Pinyin Chop Foods Famous People Past and Present Family Traditions and Values “One Child” Policy Education Marriage and Weddings Etiquette Geography Working with BC/AD Numbers Games and Activities Signs of the Zodiac Suggested Activities 4 5 6 13 14 16 19 27 30 32 34 35 37 39 41 45 49 53 53 54 54 55 59 61 61 62 63 64 65 66 68 84 88

© All exercises are for classroom use only and may not be used for commercial purposes Title page © Graphics: NOVA Explosion 600,000 1999-2005

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES Students will be able to ♦ Locate on a world map the country of China ♦ On a map of China, locate the following cities: Shanghai, Wuxi, Suzhou, Hangzhou, Guilin, Xi’an, and Beijing ♦ Recognize Chinese symbols and their meaning: emperor, empress, dragon, phoenix, pagoda, pavilion, panda, chopsticks, rickshaw, yuan, abacus, and Buddha ♦ Refine researching skills by working online to learn more about Chinese culture ♦ Discuss Chinese daily life and how some of their traditions differ from ours ♦ Pronounce correctly names of people, places, and things studied in this module ♦ Practice writing some Chinese characters ♦ Recognize that Chinese characters are NOT letters like we use, but rather concepts ♦ Recognize English words that have come to us from the Chinese language ♦ Learn names of several dynasties and the contributions they have made to China and the world ♦ Appreciate Chinese art as seen in the Forbidden City and the Cloisonné objects ♦ Understand the importance of the Chinese legacy to the world ♦ Recognize major contributions made by the Chinese people and Chinese-Americans to China and the world ♦ Progress with their math skills while working on culture materials dealing with BC and AD numbers ♦ Accept “culture shock” incidents as learning experiences

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