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CWK Division D

CWK Division D

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Published by: PoliceUSA on Jan 30, 2012
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01/30/2012

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WHAT YOU CAN DO TO FIGHT TERRORISM

While we agree that the root causes of terrorism need to be addressed, your
views about who is right and who is wrong will not provide any protection for
your family members and pets in a terrorist attack. This is the world we live in
now and whether we like it or not, we had better get used to it.
There are a number of simple things to you can do to fight terrorism:

DEALING WITH A STATE OF EMERGENCY

A terrorist attack is intended to inflict suffering and maximum psychologi-

cal damage. It causes great uncertainty, disrupts people’s personal and

daily business routine, disrupts the economy and creates a very real cli-
mate of fear that more attacks will follow.

The physical and psychological trauma runs the gamut from emo-
tional outbursts, stress and fear to loss of appetite and may trigger
asthma or heart attacks.

The best and indeed, the only way to handle such adversity is to be
prepared for it to whatever degree is humanly practical. The more
we can feel confident about protecting our loved ones and pets, the
better able we are to deal with an emergency when and wherever
it arises.

Prepare a family emergency plan and be familiar with the various
emergency situations and their associated dangers and responses

Conduct emergency drills with all the members of your family

Depending on the nature and severity of the attack, you need to be able to
plan ahead to decide whether or not you should stay in your home or leave
If you have to leave, always bring your pets with you

Every family member should learn how and when to turn off your water,
gas and electricity including the location of the shut off valves and switch-
es and keep the necessary tools next to them (if you do turn off your gas,
a professional must turn it back on, do not attempt to do this yourself)

Be familiar with all aspects of your human and pet emergency kits and
practice giving first aid to your family members and your pets

Talk things over openly with your family

If there are elderly or disabled people in your neighbourhood, please in-
clude them as a part of your community and/or family emergency plan

D-41

U59

Make certain that in the event of a terrorist attack that each member of
the family knows where they should meet up at the earliest and safest
possible opportunity and that each person has a complete of phone num-
bers for each family member, friend or relative
Take your personal emergency kit and your pet emergency kit
and lock the door of your home behind you.

CITIZENS CORPS

After the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, many Americans asked what
they could do to make their communities safer. People really wanted to vol-
unteer and to work together with their neighbors. President Bush created
Citizen Corps and encouraged all Americans to volunteer their time to help
others.
How does this work? There are four Citizen Corps programs:

Neighborhood Watch;
Volunteers in Police Service
Community Emergency Response Teams; and
the Medical Reserve Corps.

The Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) are overseen by FEMA.
These very special teams are trained to help first responders in an emergen-
cy. What does that mean? In a large emergency, emergency responders such
as firefighters, will be very busy. They will not be able to help all the
people who might need help. This is where CERT comes in. These
special teams are trained to help out. They can do basic first aid,
help with evacuations and other duties that are very important in an
emergency.

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

First off, be sure your family is prepared. Then talk to your teacher
about school preparedness. Then, find out if there is CERT in your
community. Even youngsters can learn basic first aid or help with
providing information to a community. The bottom line is this: Get
Involved!

To find out more about Citizen Corps
and CERT, go to www.citizencorps.gov

CONCLUSIONS

All of the steps you take to protect those you love can be used in the
event of a terrorist attack, natural or manmade disaster

Be prepared
Hope for the best, plan for the worst
Be alert
Do your part in the fight against terrorism
Be as self sufficient as humanly possible
Follow the advice and directions of health care professional and emer-
gency services personnel

D-42

L59 WHAT YOU CAN DO IN THE WAR ON TERRORISM

WHAT YOU MAY EXPERIENCE
FOLLOWING A TERRORIST ATTACK

People who have experienced or witnessed a
terrorist attack may go into a state of acute
stress in reaction. You may feel one or all of
these symptoms:

Recurring thoughts of the incident
Becoming afraid of everything, not leaving
the house, or isolating yourself
Stopping usual functioning, no longer main-
taining daily routines
Survivor’s guilt -- "Why did I survive? I should
have done something more."
Tremendous sense of loss
Reluctance to express your feelings, losing a
sense of control over your life

COPING WITH THE TRAUMA

Identify the feelings that you may be experienc-
ing. Understand that your feelings are a normal
reaction to an abnormal situation. Remember
that you have overcome adversity and trauma in
the past. Try to remember what you did that
helped you overcome the fear and helplessness
in that situation.

Talk to others about your fears. It’s okay to

ask for help. Workplaces may convene small
groups with an EAP counselor or other men-
tal health counselor so people can share
their feelings.
Make efforts to maintain your usual routine.
Think positively. Realize that things will get
better. Be realistic about the time it takes
to feel better.

Recognize that the nature of terrorist at-
tacks creates fear and uncertainty about the
future. Continue to do the things in your life

that you enjoy. Don’t get preoccupied with

the things you cannot control to the extent
that they prevent you from living your nor-
mal life.
Know the actions our government is taking
to combat terrorism and restore safety and
security. Recognize that trained officials
throughout the country are mobilized to
prevent, prepare for and respond to terror-
ist attacks.
Limit exposure to media coverage.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Talk about it. Not expressing your feelings
will keep you from being able to work
through what happened. By talking with
others, you will relieve stress and realize
that other people share your feelings.
Get plenty of rest and exercise. Remember
to eat. Avoid excessive drinking and risk-
taking activities.
Spend time with your family. If you have
any children, encourage them to discuss
their concerns and feelings with you.
As soon as it feels comfortable, go back to
your usual routine.
Do things that you find relaxing and sooth-
ing.
Recall other times when you have experi-
enced strong emotions and how they were
resolved.
Do something positive that will help you
gain a greater sense of control
(for example, give blood, take a first aid
class or donate food or clothing).
If you feel overwhelmed by the disaster, ask

for help. It’s not a sign of weakness. Talk

with a trusted relative, friend, social work-
er, or clergy member.

1. What preparations can you make to prepare for a future ter-
rorist attack?
2. How might you feel after being involved in an attack?
3. What is Survivor’s Guilt?
4. What you should do after being in an attack?
5. How can you help yourself to gain back a sense of control in
your life?

D-43

In addition to the obvious
dangers of confrontations with
criminals, officers are on
constant alert for any number
of threatening situations. In
most jurisdictions, officers are expected to be armed
and exercise their authority even when they’re off-
duty.

Many law enforcement officials deal first hand with

death and suffering which can really wear down one’s

state of mind. It takes a strong will to deal with the
long hours, difficult emotional situations, and the
general stress of being a police officer. Still sound like
fun?

The reward at the end of the
day is the knowledge that the
work officers do helps to keep

our nation’s cities and homes

safe...even if that means
working holidays and weekends.

If all the oh-so glamorous
responsibilities covered in
the last unit sounded inter-
esting, you might be won-
dering if you have what it takes to
be a police officer. No buts about
it: the work is demanding, dan-
gerous and stressful.

Now, have your cadets take
out their Cadet Handout for
this unit.

U60

DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES?

Officer Beverly Freshour and
Lamar Middle School Cadets,
Austin, Texas

OVERVIEW:

DISCUSS THE DEMANDS OF A CAREER IN
LAW ENFORCEMENT.
DISTRIBUTE THE CADET HANDOUT AND
EXPLAIN THE PROCESS OF BECOMING A
POLICE OFFICER.
CONCLUDE WITH A GUEST SPEAKER
DISCUSSING HIS OR HER EXPERIENCES AS
A LAW ENFORCER.

OBJECTIVE:

CADETS WILL GAIN A DEEPER
APPRECIATION FOR THE DUTIES A
POLICE OFFICER PERFORMS AND BE
ABLE TO IDENTIFY THE QUALITIES
REQUIRED

FOR

A

SUCCESSFUL

PROFESSIONAL CAREER.

D-44

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