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the mountain hawk wide receiver screen game

the mountain hawk wide receiver screen game

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Published by: Michael Schearer on Nov 16, 2008
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02/01/2013

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The Mountain Hawk Wide Receiver Screen Game

Dave Cecchini Offensive Coordinator/ Wide Receivers Coach Lehigh University Bethlehem, Pa.

Pete Lembo Assistant Head Coach/ Offensive Line Coach

t is an honor and a privilege to contribute some of our wide receiver screen concepts at Lehigh University for the 2000 AFCA Summer Manual. We would like to thank Tim Landis, the Summer Manual Committee and Lehigh Head Coach Kevin Higgins for allowing us this opportunity. In addition, it is important to recognize the outstanding student-athletes in our program whose hard work and dedication has enabled us to reach the I-AA playoffs for the last two years. Wide receiver screens are an important element in our offensive scheme. There are five main benefits our wide receiver screen package provides our offense 1. It’s flexible. We are able to run at least one type of wide receiver screen out of all our formations and personnel groups. 2. It’s practical. We are able to install and fine tune our screens using a minimum of team practice time. 3. It’s high-percentage/high yield. Over the past three years, we have completed over 86 percent of our wide receiver screens, with an average of more than 12 yards per reception. 4. It slows down an opponent’s pass rush. As defensive linemen are forced to defend the wide receiver screen, they are less effective rushing the quarterback during dropback pass. 5. Big play potential. Every wide receiver screen has a chance to go the distance. The X Quick Screen The quick screen to the X or backside receiver is easy to install and can compliment just about any run game. Like most of our run and pass game, it can be used from a variety of personnel groups, formations, motions and even from the shotgun. Each week we will look to run this screen from a formation which is: 1. based on the defense’s typical alignment gives our linemen a chance to execute their assignments successfully and 2. reflects similarities to what we are trying to accomplish in the run game as it is a play-action screen Quick Screen Assignments and Techniques Tailback: If the quarterback is under center, fake the toss play to the strong side. If the quarterback is in the shotgun, fake the inside zone play to the strong side and look to pick-up the end man on the line of scrimmage

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Fullback: Sell full flow to the strong side and block the end man on line of scrimmage. Quick Tackle: Pull flat down the line of scrimmage and kick out the cornerback. Work upfield if necessary. Leave the five technique unblocked unless he buzzes to the flat in a zone dog. Quick Guard: Block an outside zone course through the weak side B gap, climbing to the Will linebacker. Center: Block an outside zone course to the weak side. Try to reach a three technique if you can. Prevent initial penetration. Strong Guard: Block an outside zone course to the weak side. Prevent initial penetration. Work up to the second level. Strong Tackle: Block an outside zone course to the weak side. Prevent initial penetration. Work up to the second level. Tight End: Block an outside zone course to the weak side. Prevent initial penetration. Work up to the second level. Quarterback: If under center, fake toss to the strong side, set and throw to X. If in the shotgun, fake an inside zone handoff to the strong side, set and throw to X. Z: Take an angle to cut off the half or third defender to your side. Stalk and cut if appropriate. X: Maximum split. Take two steps forward, then work back to one yard behind the line of scrimmage. Turn your numbers towards the quarterback. Once you make the catch, get behind and read the block of the quick tackle. Once you navigate his block, understand that the pursuit will come from the inside. Work back outside and score!

Diagram 1

Diagram 2

• AFCA Summer Manual — 2000 •

Diagram 3

the slip screen (quickly), and block deep half or third safety. Z: Maximum split. Take two steps forward, then work back towards the quarterback under control, getting three yards behind the line of scrimmage. Make the catch and get downfield!

Diagram 4
The Z Slip Screen The slip screen to the Z (outside) receiver is an excellent compliment to dropback pass. It can be used out of a variety of formations, with the quarterback under center or in the shotgun. In this scheme, the interior linemen will count the linebacker’s starting from the strong side. We try not to over-coach the Z receiver as to what to do after the catch, other than stressing to get downfield as quickly as possible Z Slip Screen Assignments and Techniques Tailback: (Quick side runningback) Run swing route and block the corner. Fullback: (Strongside runningback) Release and block defender over the slot wide receiver. Quick Tackle: Pass set, inviting the defensive end up the field, then seal him off from falling back into the play. Quick Guard: Pass set for a two count, then release to the third linebacker. If third linebacker blitzes, let him go and find the next most dangerous defender downfield. Center: Pass set for a two count, then release to the second linebacker. If second linebacker blitzes, let him go and find the next most dangerous defender downfield. Strong Guard: Pass set for a two count, then release downfield for the first linebacker. If the first linebacker blitzes or is engaged with the tight end or fullback, run the alley for the safety. Strong Tackle: Pass set, invite the defensive end up the field and cut him! Tight End:Release and block defender over the slot wide receiver. Quarterback: After receiving the snap, pump fake the screen away from the Z, then six turn and deliver the slip screen by leading the Z downfield with your throw. Slot: Release downfield to block corner. Stay flat on angle, especially vs. a hard or pressed corner. Stalk or cut if appropriate. X: If a single wide receiver, get downfield and block deep half or third safety. With a slot wide receiver inside you, fake

Diagram 5

If third linebacker blitzes, let him go and find the next most dangerous defender downfield. Strong Tackle: Pass set, inviting the defensive end up the field, then seal him off from falling back into the play. Tight End: Release and block defender over the slot wide receiver. Quarterback: After receiving the snap, pump fake the screen away from the X, then turn and deliver the slip screen by leading the X downfield with your throw. X: Maximum split. Take two steps forward, then work back towards the quarterback under control, getting three yards behind the line of scrimmage. Make the catch and get downfield! Z: Fake the slip screen (quickly) and get downfield to block deep half safety. If there is no safety, seal off outside.

Diagram 6

The X Slip Screen The slip screen to the X is similar to the Z slip screen, except that it is run to the quick side (two receiver side). This type of screen is excellent against teams that play man under coverages, as the three defenders covering the strong side receivers are removed from the play. In this scheme, the interior linemen will count the linebackers starting from the quick side. Slip Screen Assignments and Techniques Fullback: (Strongside runningback) Release and block defender over the strong slot wide receiver. Slot: Release downfield to block corner. Stay flat on angle, especially vs. a hard or pressed corner. Stalk or cut if appropriate. Quick Tackle: Pass set, invite the defensive end up the field and cut him! Quick Guard: Pass set for a two count, then release downfield for the first linebacker. If the first linebacker blitzes or has removed himself from the play by covering the slot, run the alley for the safety. Center: Pass set for a two count, then release to the second linebacker. If second linebacker blitzes, let him go and find the next most dangerous defender downfield. Strong Guard: Pass set for a two count, then release to the third linebacker.

Each week during the season, we spend approximately 10 minutes of team practice time reviewing our screen package vs. the defensive looks we are anticipating. Because of the simplicity of each play, this is usually enough time to keep us executing at a high level. We hope these concepts will be helpful to your offensive scheme. Our staff has learned from so many great coaches who took the time to help us get where we are today by sharing their ideas with us. Best wishes for a successful 2000 season.

Improve Your Professional Image
Ask your sports information director to mention your membership and involvement in the American Football Coaches Association in your biographical sketch in the school’s annual media guide.

• AFCA Summer Manual — 2000 •

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