Dougherty County Technology Plan Update FRIT 8132 Susan Daniels, Summer Mahan, Mary Frances Pinson

Introduction
The Dougherty County School System, located in Albany, Georgia, is comprised of four High Schools, six Middle Schools, sixteen Elementary Schools, and four other learning centers. The Dougherty County School System Technology plan is a three-year plan from 2009 to 2012. The components addressed in the plan include the planning process detailing the involvement and responsibility for planning and coordination with other planning initiatives. The plan provides an extensive analysis of student academic and technology needs, as well as, district vision statement and performance objectives for student achievement. The technology mission and the vision for the school system’s technology use are discussed; further, the current access to technology is addressed. The goals and benchmarks are included in the plan, detailing the instructional, administrative, parent/community uses of technology. The action plan described in the technology plan includes professional development strategies; strategies promoting research-based, best practice uses, equitable access strategies, and parent involvement strategies. The communication and marketing plan discusses sharing evaluation results, encouraging stakeholder involvement, and the roles of technology in helping students achieve QCC. The appendices address CIPA compliance, acceptable use policies, and other relevant policies and procedures. According to the Technology Coordinator, the plan is actually ahead of schedule and is actively followed. The plan is continuously evaluated to insure that technology resources are adequate to meets the needs of students and stakeholders.

Strengths/Weaknesses
Overall, this technology plan is very well laid out. It includes most of the required components, and those components explain what it is, how to use that component, and who will be responsible for that component. On our evaluation, we scored everything a three, which was the highest you can score. The biggest strength of this plan is it was very well planned and very well explained for everyone to understand. Organization was key in the formation of the technology plan. The writers used organizational charts throughout the plan to organize data and explain major components to the plan. Using these charts is strength of this plan. The weaknesses of the original plan are that items are not included in the plan. Several components need to be added such as standards, a pilot program, software agreements, and a gifts/disposal policy. Another weakness of the plan is it combines components that need to be separated.

Planned Changes
The Mission and the Vision elements of the DCSS Technology Plan were combined and should be separated. The statements should be distinguished from the Dougherty County School System mission and vision; there should be specific mission and vision statement for the Technology Plan. There were not originally any equipment standards in this plan, so we found a policy to add from Glynn County Board of Education.

The funding information is incorporated into the action plan tables and should be addressed separately in a Funding section. There was not originally a pilot program explained. We will add the Google Apps Education Edition pilot program for Albany High School. Maintenance/Support information was incorporated into the Staff Development table; this information should be addressed separately. Software agreements were added to the plan; Glynn County Board of Education's agreement was used because it works well with Dougherty County’s Technology Plan. A gifts/disposal policy from Murray County’s Technology Plan was added; it is general enough to work well with the DCSS Plan.

Resulting Improvements
The suggestion to separate the Mission and Vision elements of the DCSS plan would clarify the statements and the intent of the Technology Plan, resulting in an improvement to the overall plan. The other sections that were separated will improve the clarity of the overall Technology Plan. The Pilot Program of using Google Apps will improve the DCSS Technology Plan at minimal cost. It has already been proposed for DCSS to create email accounts for students. Instead of creating email accounts on the existing server, use of this pilot program should determine whether to incorporate Google Apps Education Edition for all schools. Additional benefits for using Google Apps Education Edition would include: IT personnel setup time, server space saved, reduced hard disk requirements for classroom computers, added applications available to students, and overall convenience. This initiative should prove beneficial to the Dougherty County School System. The addition of the National Educational Technology Standards would prove beneficial to the technology plan to clarify the ways the technology tools of the school system should be taught and understood properly by teachers and students. The Software Agreement would be a valuable addition to the DCSS Technology Plan. This gives evidence as to how software is purchased for the county. It gives a thorough explanation that software tools are to be used to benefit the academics of the student. Prior to the purchase of such software, the tool must be peer reviewed and deemed as effective and valued. The agreement also states the people responsible for the approval of software. With this addition to the technology plan, it will give clarity as to how the software for the county is purchased.

Table of Contents
(The sections are linked within the document, just click on the section)

Broad-based Support Needs Assessment Mission/Vision Goals and Objectives Action Plan/Multi-year Planning Program Integration Curriculum Integration Evaluation Standards Funding Alternatives School Pilot Projects/Educational Research Model Classroom Configurations Facilities Maintenance/Support Software Agreements Copyright/Acceptable Use Policy Gifts and Disposal Staff Development

Broad-based Support
(Original) Technology Collaborative Planning Process The DCSS’s technology planning process is managed through technology integration teams which consist of the technology department, instructional specialists and curriculum supervisors and coaches. The members of these departments collaborate with the committees at the local school building level to ensure that the district’s vision for technology integration is embraced throughout the school system. The school level committee has representatives from all instructional levels to serve as a support to the system as a whole. Each local building is serviced by a team of Technology Specialists, Instructional Specialists, and Model Classroom Teachers. These individuals work with administrators, teachers, students, and staff members to support the infrastructure, design, implementation, and professional learning for technology integration in the classroom. The Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Director of Management Information System, Coordinator of Educational Technology, Information Technology Project Coordinator, and the Instructional Specialist work in close collaboration to ensure there is a seamless path between technology and instruction. These individuals support the technology planning committee to ensure that all instructional department leaders are involved in the process of investigating, testing, purchasing, and implementing software to meet the desired needs of all students. Members of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Instructional Specialists, Media, Federal Programs, Technology, and Management of Information Systems communicate frequently to determine school progress and discuss plans for improvement. This group also includes building administrators, teachers, and business partners to focus on ensuring that schools are using best practices and are being provided the support that they need. These

individuals assist the system in determining the direction for technology growth and integration in one or more of the following ways: ¾ Serve on System Level Professional Learning Committee to ensure that technology integration is a viable source for improvement in instruction and student performance. ¾ Organize and provide leadership for school level technology initiatives and serve on textbook/software (Social Studies, Language Arts, Science and Mathematics) adoption committees. ¾ Serve as classroom experts (Model Classroom Teachers) to provide professional learning regarding technology and technology assistance to their coworkers. ¾ Media Specialists in the DCSS are involved in constructing and coordinating school level needs and participate as a member or facilitator of various groups in the schools and selected members attend the annual GaETC to stay abreast with current technology trends as well as conference exhibits to examine new technologies appropriate for the needs of the media program and other areas in the school. ¾ Instructional Specialists in the DCSS provide trainings to improve teachers’ level of proficiency in utilizing model classroom equipment as well as assists and supports teachers in the integration of technology for student achievement. They also attend national, state, and local technology conferences to stay abreast of cutting edge technology practices that empower teachers and engage students. ¾ ETC communicates with system level representatives regarding ongoing support and provides feedback on existing plan, and act as a liaison between the school system and the Georgia Department of Education. ¾ Business Representatives, Parents, and other community members are involved in the technology planning process in the following ways: Local businesses fulfill requests for technology resources through our partners in Excellence Program and school council. ¾ The Director of Federal Programs serves as an advisor to the technology planning committee. The following list identifies individuals who will serve and support the technologyintegration initiatives for the 2009-By FY 2012 Technology Plan. DOUGHERTY COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM Technology Planning Committee 2009-By FY 2012 Dianne Daniels, Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction Mary Barkley, Information Technology Project Coordinator Saralyn Barkley, Instructional Supervisor Les Barnett, Technology Coordinator Herb Bentford, Management Information Systems Horace Bentley, Instructional Coach Tina Crain, Lead Technology Specialist Jonathan Cude, Instructional Specialist Rodney Daniels, Instructional Specialist John I Davis, Instructional Specialist Vinson Davis, Middle School Asst. Principal Brent Fowler, Elementary School Asst. Principal

Zeda George, Elementary School Principal Dr. Betty Graper, Federal Programs Director Dr. Ufot Inyang, Middle School Principal Debra Johnson, Instructional Coach Eddie Johnson, Elementary School Principal Tracy Lane, Instructional Specialist Sheila Marshall, High School Principal Gail Solomon, Elementary School Principal William Thomas, Instructional Specialist Alphonese Wilson, Instructional Specialist SaJuana Wilson-Williams, High School Asst. Principal

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Needs Assessment
(Original) Dougherty County School System Extensive Analysis of Students Academic Needs in Grades 1-8 Mathematics CRCT 2008-2009 System Summary Report CRCT Spring 2009 Total Mathematics Level 1 2009 2008 2009 Level 2 2008 2009 Level 3 2008

System State System State System State System State System State System State

Does Not Meet
Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 7 11 24 27 23 40 26 49 13 13 22 26 21 25 16 30 9 11 30 36 42 41 30 52 14 15 29 30 28 31 20 38 50 62 47 52 49 54 59 41

Meets
50 58 41 46 43 57 54 47 56 70 41 52 45 55 59 39 52 63 39 49 45 57 54 47 43 27 29 21 28 6 15 10

Exceeds
37 29 37 29 36 18 30 23 35 19 28 12 13 4 11 9 34 22 31 21 26 12 26 15

The chart indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year, there was an increase in the number of students in grades 1-8 who were performing at Level 2 and 3 (meeting and exceeding standards) with the exception of grade 2 (no change in percentages). In addition, the chart shows the percentage of students exceeding standards has increased in grades 1-8. However, the two year comparison shows the state’s percentages of students exceeding standards in grades 2-8 were greater than DCSS percentages for the same grade levels. Additionally, the chart indicates that the state’s percentages of students not meeting standards were less than the percentages in DCSS for grades 3-8. The data in this chart further indicates that there is a strong need for an evaluation of existing instructional methods in grades 4, 6, and 8. Intervention in this content area is necessary to improvement student performance and to bridge the gap between system and state scores. We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing this area through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies. Dougherty County School System Extensive Analysis of Students Academic Needs in Grades 1-8 Mathematics CRCT 2008-2009 System Summary Report CRCT Spring 2009 Total Mathematics Level 1 2009 2008 2009 Level 2 2008 2009 Level 3 2008

System State System State System State System State System State System State

Does Not Meet
Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 7 11 24 27 23 40 26 49 13 13 22 26 21 25 16 30 9 11 30 36 42 41 30 52 14 15 29 30 28 31 20 38 50 62 47 52 49 54 59 41

Meets
50 58 41 46 43 57 54 47 56 70 41 52 45 55 59 39 52 63 39 49 45 57 54 47 43 27 29 21 28 6 15 10

Exceeds
37 29 37 29 36 18 30 23 35 19 28 12 13 4 11 9 34 22 31 21 26 12 26 15

The chart indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year, there was an increase in the number of students in grades 1-8 who were performing at Level 2 and 3 (meeting and exceeding standards) with the exception of grade 2 (no change in percentages). In addition, the chart shows the percentage of students exceeding standards has increased in grades 1-8. However, the two year comparison shows the state’s percentages of students exceeding standards in grades 2-8 were greater than DCSS percentages for the same grade levels. Additionally, the chart indicates that the state’s percentages of students not meeting standards were less than the percentages in DCSS for grades 3-8. The data in this chart further indicates that there is a strong need for an evaluation of existing instructional methods in grades 4, 6, and 8. Intervention in this content area is necessary to improvement student performance and to bridge the gap between system and state scores. We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing this area through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies.

Mathematics Data Represented in a Graph Format
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5

State

State

State

State

State

System

System

System

System

System

System

State

Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

2009 Level 1

2008

2009 Level 2

2008

2009 Level 3

2008

The graph indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year, there was an increase in the number of students in grades 1-8 who were performing at Level 2 and 3 (meeting and exceeding standards) with the exception of grade 2 (no change in percentages). In addition, the chart shows the percentage of students exceeding standards has increased in grades 1-8. However, the two year comparison shows the state’s percentages of students exceeding standards in grades 2-8 were greater than DCSS percentages for the same grade levels. Additionally, the graph indicates that the state’s percentages of students not meeting standards were less than the percentages in DCSS for grades 3-8. The data in this graph

further indicates that there is a strong need for an evaluation of existing instructional methods in grades 4, 6, and 8. Intervention in this content area is necessary to improvement student performance and to bridge the gap between system and state scores. We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing this area through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies.

Extensive Analysis of Students Academic Needs in Grades 1-8 Social Studies CRCT 2008-2009 System Summary Report CRCT Spring 2009 Total Social Studies Level 1 2009 2008 2009 Level 2 2008 2009 Level 3 2008

System State System State System State System State System State System State

Does Not Meet
Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 30 35 30 NA NA 57 24 29 29 NA NA 37 13 12 13 NA NA 51 11 10 11 NA NA 41 59 59 59 NA NA 30

Meets
61 57 57 NA NA 44 72 77 74 NA NA 39 65 67 64 NA NA 50 11 6 11 NA NA 13

Exceeds
15 15 15 NA NA 18 15 11 13 NA NA 10 24 24 25 NA NA 9

The chart indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year less DCSS students were meeting standards in the area of Social Studies. Each grade level reflected an increase in the number of students not meeting standards. The chart also indicates that in 2008 and 2009, 30% to 77% percent of students met the standards across grade levels and 6% to 15% of the students exceeded standards. Although the chart shows the number of DCSS students meeting and exceeding standards is less than the state’s percentages in most cases, it also shows the margin by which DCSS students differ from the state’s percentages is in fact decreasing. The data in this chart indicates that there is a need for intervention in this content area to bridge the gap between system and state scores as well as decrease the number of students performing at Level 1(not meeting standards). We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing this area through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies. Extensive Analysis of Students Academic Needs

Grades 3-8 Social Studies CRCT 2008-2009

Social Studies Data Represented in a Graph Format

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

State

State

State

State

State

System

System

System

System

System

2009 Level 1

2008

2009 Level 2

2008

2009 Level 3

The graph indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year less DCSS students were meeting standards in the area of Social Studies. Each grade level reflected an increase in the number of students not meeting standards. The graph also indicates that in 2008 and 2009, 30% to 77% percent of students met the standards across grade levels and 6% to 15% of the students exceeded standards. Although the graph shows the number of DCSS students meeting and exceeding standards is less than the state’s percentages in most cases, it also shows the margin by which DCSS students differ from the state’s percentages is in fact decreasing. The data in this graph indicates that there is a need for intervention in this content area to bridge the gap between system and state scores as well as decrease the number of students performing at Level 1 (not meeting standards). We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing this area through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies.

System
2008

State

Extensive Analysis of Students Academic Needs in Grades 1-8 Reading CRCT 2008-2009 System Summary Report CRCT Spring 2009 Total Reading Level 1 2009 2008 2009 Level 2 2008 2009 Level 3 2008

System State System State System State System State System State System State

Does Not Meet
Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 5 8 19 20 17 18 15 14 9 8 12 13 12 10 11 7 7 7 20 19 17 11 17 14 10 8 13 13 13 9 12 9 51 49 61 60 70 63 74 71

Meets
50 44 57 55 67 55 70 62 58 60 60 61 72 71 76 72 52 53 53 56 66 61 75 68 44 43 20 20 13 19 11 15

Exceeds
41 48 31 32 21 35 19 31 35 32 20 20 11 18 7 13 39 39 34 31 22 31 13 22

This chart representing the Reading CRCT scores indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year, there is an increase in the number of students meeting and exceeding standards in grades 1, 3, and 7. In addition, the chart shows that there is a slight increase in the percentages of students that are performing at Level 1 (not meeting standards) in grades 2, 4, and 6. Although the chart shows the number of students performing at Level 3 has increased, DCSS students still fall below the state’s percentages of students in Level 3. Intervention is necessary to improvement student performance and to bridge the gap between system and state scores and student and teacher performance on these grade levels. We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing these grade levels through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies.

Dougherty County School System Extensive Analysis of Students Academic Needs in Grades 1-8 Reading CRCT 2008-2009

Reading Data Represented in a Graph Format
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5

State

State

State

State

State

System

System

System

System

System

System

State

Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

2009 Level 1

2008

2009 Level 2

2008

2009 Level 3

2008

This graph representing the Reading CRCT scores indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year, there is an increase in the number of students meeting and exceeding standards in grades 1, 3, and 7. In addition, the graphs shows that there is a slight increase in the percentages of students that are performing at Level 1 (not meeting standards) in grades 2, 4, and 6. Although the graphs show the number of students performing at Level 3 has increased, DCSS students still fall below the state’s percentages of students in Level 3. Intervention is necessary to improvement student performance and to bridge the gap between system and state scores and student and teacher performance on these grade levels. We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing these grade levels through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies. System Summary Report CRCT Spring 2009 Total Science Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

2009

2008

2009

2008

2009

2008

System State System State System State System State System State System State

Does Not Meet
Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 24 26 24 50 42 50 20 22 24 31 24 36 31 31 31 49 43 56 25 26 29 34 25 40 52 50 49 46 42 46

Meets
48 44 44 55 45 51 52 44 51 49 47 40 49 41 46 56 50 49 24 24 27 4 16 4

Exceeds
32 34 32 14 30 13 18 26 18 3 10 4 25 33 26 10 25 11

The chart indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year, there was a increase in the number of students in all grades except for grade 6 that were performing at Levels 2 and 3 (meeting and exceeding standards). However, the chart also indicates that the percentage of students exceeding standards (Level 3) in all grades were much lower than the state’s percentages from the 2008 to 2009 school-year. The data in this chart indicates that there is a strong need for an evaluation of existing instructional methods in grades 6, 7, and 8. Intervention in this content area is necessary to improving student performance and to bridge the gap between system and state scores. We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing this area through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies.

Dougherty County School System Extensive Analysis of Students Academic Needs in Grades 1-8 Science CRCT 2008-2009
Science Data Represented in a Graph Format

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8

State

State

State

State

State

System

System

System

System

System

2009 Level 1

2008

2009 Level 2

2008

2009 Level 3

The graph indicates that from the 2008 to 2009 school-year, there was a increase in the number of students in all grades except for grade 6 that were performing at Levels 2 and 3 (meeting and exceeding standards). However, the graph also indicates that the percentage of students exceeding standards (Level 3) in all grades were much lower than the state’s percentages from the 2008 to 2009 school-year. The data in this graph indicates that there is a strong need for an evaluation of existing instructional methods in grades 6, 7, and 8. Intervention in this content area is necessary to improving student performance and to bridge the gap between system and state scores. We consider this data as a true performance indicator for addressing this area through the integration of technology and innovative instructional strategies.

System
2008

State

Dougherty County 2008-09 Grade 4 CRCT Mathematics Results Ethnicity, Students with Disability and Economically Disadvantaged Students 4th Grade
70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 27% 20% 10% 0% 28% 12% 13% 29% 2009 2008 36% 39% 62% 60% 39%

All

AA

White

SWD

Econ. Dis.

Subgroups

The graph shows that in the 2008 school year 62% of 4 grade students with disabilities th (SWD) did not meet state standards and 60% of the 4 grade students with disabilities did not meet standards in the area of mathematics in 2009. Although the data shows a slight decrease in SWD not meeting standards, it is significantly higher than the 36% of all fourth grade students in 2008 and 27% of all fourth grade students in 2009 that did not meet standards. The data also shows a large gap between the percentage of African American students and White Students who are not meeting the standards. In 2008, 39% of AfricanAmerican students did not meeting standards while only 13% of White Students did not meet standards. The percentage of economically disadvantage students not meeting standards decreased from 39% in 2008 to 29% in 2009. Although the data shows an overall improvement from the previous year, there is still a need for intervention for students with disabilities and economically disadvantaged students. The data also clearly shows that there is a need to bridge the gap between Whites and African-Americans as it conveys an overwhelming achievement difference.

th

Dougherty County 2008-09 Grade 4 CRCT Social Studies Results Ethnicity, Students with Disability and Economically Disadvantaged 4th Grade Social Studies
60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% All AA White SWD Econ. Dis. 12% 13% 35% 37% 15% 2% 54% 35% 37%

13%

2009 2008

Sub-groups

The graph indicates that in 2008 35% of the students with disabilities in the fourth grade did not meet standards in the area of Social Studies while only 12% of all fourth grade students did not meet standards. The graph also shows that African-American students, Economically Disadvantaged students, and Students with Disabilities performed poorer that all other sub-groups in the two year comparison. Additionally, there is a large gap between the percentage of African-American students and White students that are not meeting standards. The data also clearly shows that there is a need for intervention for the Students with Disabilities. There is clearly a need to intervene with all subgroups in this area as each sub-group’s percentage of students who did not meet standards increased from 2008 to 2009. It is important to note that this data is extrapolated from the first three years of GPS in Social Studies. The state is currently undergoing a review process of the GPS in Social Studies.

Dougherty County 2008-09 Grade 6 CRCT Reading Results Ethnicity, Students with Disability and Economically Disadvantaged Students

6th Grade Reading
50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 18% 11% 19% 12% 10% 4% 48% 30% 20% 12% 2009 2008

0%

All

AA

White

SWD

Econ. Dis.

Sub-groups

The graph indicates that there is a great need for students with disabilities. In 2008, the percentage of each sub-group not meeting standards increased from 2008 to 2009. The data also shows a huge gap between Students with Disabilities performance and the performance of other sub-groups. There is also a definite need to bridge the gap between White Students and African American Students as it reflects an overwhelming achievements difference (19% African American and 10% Whites in 2009). This data clearly indicates an increase from the previous year of students not meeting standards, but the system is confident that those scores will subside with the use of integrated assessment tools, interactive software, hardware applications and other technology intervention.

Dougherty County 2008-09 Grade 6 CRCT Mathematics Results Ethnicity, Students with Disability and Economically Disadvantaged Students 6th Grade Mathematics
80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 40% 41% 30% 20% 10% 0% All 77%

67% 42% 44% 23% 18%

44% 44% 2009 2008

AA

White Subgroups

SWD

Econ. Dis.

The graph indicates that in the 2009 school-year 67% of the sixth grade students with disabilities did not meet standards in the area of mathematics, a significant decrease from the previous year’s 77%. Although a significant decrease relative to the previous year, it is still significantly higher than all students who did not meet standards (40% and 41% respectively). Additionally, the graph shows a large gap between the percentage of African-American students and White students who are not meeting standards. Although the number of African-American students who did not meet the standards slightly decreased, it is still 19% higher than the White students’ percentages of the same year. The percentage of economically disadvantage students not meeting standards remained constant from 2008 to 2009. The data supports that there is a great need for intervention among AfricanAmerican and economically disadvantaged students because there is little or no gains in improvement from 2008 to 2009. The data also clearly shows that there is a need to bridge the gap between Whites and African-Americans as it reflects an overwhelming achievements difference. In addition, with the exception of students with disabilities, very little improvement was shown in either of the subgroups and th the overall 6 grade population.

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Mission/Vision
(Original) System Technology Vision, Mission and Commitment The mission of the Dougherty County School System is to create a stimulating climate in which all teachers, administrators and students will pursue academic excellence through the infusion of technology in the classroom. All students, teachers, and administrators will have full access to technology resources as a tool for learning, communication, and collaboration. The Dougherty County School System champions high-quality education and strives to help schools provide effective instruction through the infusion of technology into the curriculum as a support for teaching and learning that will result in high student performance. The DCSS Strategic Plan states “we believe that we can make a positive difference in the quality of life for all Albanians providing exceptional service to students, educators, schools, and citizens.” The key desired outcome of the DCSS Technology Plan is “Increased percentage of students achieving and exceeding state standards at targeted performance levels in the Georgia Assessment Program.” We are committed to ensure that: • All students will be self-directed learners, able to make appropriate use of suitable technology in order to function in a knowledge-based society. • The Dougherty County School System will be a leader in providing technologysupported and enhanced learning environments. • The school system will be a driving force to create learning environments that maximize the use of technology in the classroom. • The school system will inform, challenge, and motivate. We will identify for system leadership the core elements, the best practices, and the innovative approaches that provide the impetus for Dougherty County Schools to truly take advantage of technology integration to advance the education of our students. Dougherty County is committed to the belief that the effective use of technologies will enhance the quality of teaching and positively impact the learning process. We envision an educational environment that is rich with opportunities for all learners to be exposed to the benefits of the latest emerging technologies. This educational environment will prepare our students to be high achievers, life-long learners, and successful in a changing society. The Dougherty County School System’s 2009-12 Educational Technology Strategic Plan addresses the system’s mission statement, beliefs, and it’s commitment to technology integration. We believe that effective use of technology will positively impact the quality of teaching and learning, and increase student performance. Our teachers will continue to integrate PowerPoint presentations, interactive whiteboards

(IWB), the Dibels Assessment Tool, Leaptrack, TI Graphing Calculators, and the Classroom Performance System (CPS) assessment program into instruction to provide immediate access to student performance data to increase student performance. In addition, software programs such as Geometry Sketchpad, iLearn Math, TI Smartview, and MathType will assist in classroom demonstrations, as well as provide a tool for student work to place in portfolios. Graphics programs will enrich the art classroom. The use of the Internet for research projects in all content areas will become commonplace. Grade book programs will allow teachers to quickly track student progress. Elementary schools continue to use SchoolMax to track attendance. While many of our schools are developing an effective infrastructure, some of them are not yet using their technologies in innovative ways. We understand that effective technology integration is a slow process that requires change in the way we perceive effective teaching. Therefore, we are committed to provide the technological resources and training that is necessary to ensure that the students in the Dougherty County School System will be able to compete in a society that is in a state of constant change and growth in the area of technology. The Dougherty County School System Educational Technology Strategic Plan is the vehicle that will provide guidance to identify resources that will assist the school system with providing effective instruction and improve student performance through classrooms where teachers integrate multi-media technology into inquiry-based, student-centered, interdisciplinary, and collaborative teaching practices.

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Goals and Objectives
(Original tables below)

TECHNOLOGY GOALS 2009-By FY 2012
ACCESS TO TECHNOLOGY Goal: To continue to improve, maintain, and support the network infrastructure to assure access for all employees and students to meet educational needs.
Action Plan / Strategies System will provide upgrades to fiber network services for existing structures. Benchmarks By FY 2010 E- Rate Application Electrical upgrades will be provided to existing structures. By FY 2011 E- Rate Application Electrical upgrades will be provided to existing2012 E- Rate By FY Application Electrical upgrades will be provided to existing structures. By FY 2010 the system will use Achievement Series to create benchmark assessments to support data-driven instruction. the By FY 2011 system will review software to support data driven instruction in every curriculum area. Evaluation Method/Timeline By FY 2009 System Annual Technology Inventory By FY 2010 System Annual Technology Inventory By FY 2011 System Annual Technology Inventory By FY 2010 software inventory and report conducted by the Director of Educational Technology and Curriculum By FY 2011 software inventory and report conducted the Director of Educational Technology and Curriculum Supervisors. Funding Source/Amount FY 2010 E-Rate Projected$675,000.0 0 annually FY 2011 E-Rate Projected$675,000.0 0 annually FY 2012 E-Rate Projected$675,000.0 0 annually FY 2010 Projected-$10,000 Title 1 Staff Development Title II A FY 2011 Projected-$10,000 Title 1 Title II D Title II A Principals and Federal Programs Coordinators. Person(s) Responsible MIS Director

The system will continue to obtain instructional resources to support the integration of technology into the standards-based curriculum.

The system will provide upgrades for switches and servers of all structures in the school system.

The system will maintain the Voice Over IP (VoIP) program.

By FY 2012 the system will review and acquire, as appropriate, software to support data driven instruction in every curriculum area. By FY 2010 Switches and servers will be evaluated for necessary upgrades for all schools. E Rate Application By FY 2011 Switches and servers will be evaluated for necessary upgrades for all schools. E Rate Application By FY 2012 Switches and servers will be evaluated for necessary upgrades for all schools. E Rate Application By FY 2010 VoIP will be maintained for all buildings within the system. E Rate Application By FY 2011 VoIP will be maintained for all buildings within the system. E Rate Application By FY 2012 Voice Over IP program will be provided for all buildings

By FY 2012 software inventory and report conducted by the Director of Educational Technology and Curriculum Supervisors. By FY 2010 System Annual Technology Inventory

FY 2012 Projected-$10,000 Title 1 Title II D Title II A

FY 2010 MIS Director E-Rate Projected$75,000.00 annually FY 2011 E-Rate Projected$75,000.00 annually FY 2012 E-Rate Projected$75,000.00 annually FY 2010 E-Rate Projected$60,000.00 annually FY 2011 E-Rate Projected$60,000.00 annually FY 2012 E-Rate ProjectedMIS Director

By FY 2011 System Annual Technology Inventory

By FY 2012 System Annual Technology Inventory By FY 2010 System Annual Technology Inventory

By FY 2011 System Annual Technology Inventory By FY 2012 System Annual Technology Inventory

within the system. E Rate Application By FY 2010 System will provide students with equitable and easy access The system will to the Internet, web-based adopt social studies learning, and instructional materials technologies to obtain that incorporate information and resources from technology and remote locations in an effort to provide technology collaborate, publish and interact resources for teacher2011 student use. with peers, experts, and By FY and other audiences. The system will adopt math instructional materials that incorporate technology and provide technology resources for FY 2012and By teacher The system will adopt science instructional materials that incorporates technology and provide technology resources for teacher The system will continue to By FY 2010 provide technical support technical support personnel for every school and personnel and maintain the state and improve a school-wide recommendations for local area network (LAN) in school-wide networks each school, allowing all will be used as a instructional guideline to assure computer workstations to compatibility and have common access to future upgrades of the programs centrally stored on By FY 2011 high-speed, technical support high capacity servers to personnel and facilitate distribution of

By FY 2009-2012 Curriculum Adoption Review Team Attendance Record will indicate that the curriculum adoption committee representatives from each school met to review instructional materials to insure that minimum technology standards are met.

$60,000.00 annually FY 20010 Projected-$0

Director of Curriculum and Instruction Director of Educational Technology

FY 2011 Projected-$0

FY 2012 Projected-$0

By FY2009- 2012, annual inventory will indicate that all schools have support personnel and maintain broadband, high – speed networks and reliable Internet access that enables students and educators to support their curricula activities.

Projected-$350,000 Annually E-Rate and Local Funds

Director of MIS Educational Technology Director Director of Federal Programs

Projected-$350,000 Annually E-Rate and Local

the state recommendations for school-wide networks will be used as a guideline to assure compatibility and By FY 2012 technical support personnel and the state recommendations for school-wide networks will be used as a guideline to assure compatibilitythe The system will upgrade the By FY 2010 and telephone services for existing system will provide and telephone new structures. services for existing and new structures. E Rate Application By FY 2011 the system will provide telephone services for existing and new structures. EBy FY Application Rate 2012 the system will provide telephone services for existing and new structures. The system will provide teachers By FY 2010 K-12 in each school full access to classrooms will current electronic maintain peripheral devices quality peripheral which provide device with adequate interactive and capacity and capability presentation technologies. to support K-12 By FY 2011 classrooms will maintain quality peripheral device with adequate

Funds

Projected-$350,000 Annually E-Rate and Local Funds

By FY 2010-2012 System Annual Technology Inventory

FY 2010 E-Rate Projected$455,000.00 FY 2011 E-Rate Projected$455,000.00 FY 2012 E-Rate Projected$455,000.00

MIS Director

By FY 2010- 2012 Annual GA DOE Technology Survey and system hardware inventory will be analyzed to determine how schools meet

Projected-$92,400 Title 1 Title II D Title II A Projected-$49,000 Title 1 Title II D Title II A

School and System Personnel

The system will continue to provide Classroom Inter-Com Services for all schools.

The system will provide webbased enhancement for Classroom Inter-Com Services for all schools.

New software acquisitions will be compatible with existing hardware to permit its most efficient use.

and capability to support successful learning. By FY 2012 K-12 classrooms will maintain quality peripheral device with adequate capacity and capability to support2010 By FY successful All classrooms will maintain access to the Inter-Com system. By FY 2011 All classrooms will maintain access to the Inter-Com system. By FY 2012 All classrooms will maintain access to the Inter-Com system. By FY 2010 All schools will have access to webbased Inter-Com system. By FY 2011 All schools will maintain access to web- based Inter-Com system. E Rate By FY 2012 All schools will maintain access to web- based Inter-Com system. E Rate Application By FY 2010 All software purchases will be compatible with the existing hardware.

Projected-$49,000 Title 1 Title II D Title II A FY 2010-2012 System Annual Technology Inventory FY 2010 Projected$100,000.00 General Funds FY 2011 Projected$100,000.00 General Funds FY 2012 Projected$100,000.00 General Funds FY 2010 Projected$100,000.00 E-Rate FY 2011 Projected*$100,000.00 *General Funds Previous FY 2012 Projected*$100,000.00 *General Funds Previous FY 2010 Projected $0 Facilities Director

FY 2010-2012 System Annual Technology Inventory

Facilities Director

FY 2010-2012 System Annual Technology Inventory

Curriculum Director Title II D Coordinator and Educational Technology Specialist

Wiring of 21 Century Model Classroom (Interactive White Board Systems)

st

A minimum standard of hardware, technology resources, and networks will be established for all schools.

By FY 2011 All software purchases will be compatible with the existing hardware. By FY 2012 All software purchases will be compatible with the existing2010 By FY hardware. K-12 Model Classrooms will get the appropriate wiring for usage. E By FY 2011 Rate K-12 Model Classrooms will get the appropriate wiring for usage. By FY 2012 K-12 Model Classrooms will get the appropriate wiring for usage. E Rate Application By FY 2010 Technology committee will set guidelines for minimum standards

FY 2011 Projected $0 FY 2012 Projected $0 FY 2010-2012 System Annual Technology Inventory FY 2010 Projected$25,000.00 E-Rate FY 2011 Projected$25,000.00 E-Rate FY 2012 Projected$25,000.00 E-Rate FY 2010-2012 Annual FY 2010 Projected-$0 Local Inventory and Technology guidelines Funds will indicate that all technology purchases meet guidelines standards. System Technology Planning Committee MIS Director, Federal Programs Director, Technology Coordinators

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Action Plan/Multi-year Planning
(Original)

Instructional Uses of Technology Overview and Action Plan Since the implementation of the Dougherty County School System Educational Technology Plan, the system has made significant progress toward the integration of technology into the teaching and learning process. 97% of the classrooms in Dougherty County have at least three computers with Internet access, enabling teachers to better implement student-centered, authentic, project-based learning. The Internet and other online resources are used daily by teachers throughout the system to access research and educational materials to prepare, teach, and deliver lessons. Students in every school across the system have access to computers, printers, and a wide variety of educational software with which to learn computer/technology skills. Technology is readily available in each classroom, media centers, flexibly scheduled computer labs, public libraries, and in homes. Technology is becoming the norm, not the exception, in the educational environment of Dougherty County schools. Technology has opened many educational doors to children, particularly children with disabilities. Alternative solutions from the world of technology are accommodating physical, sensory, or cognitive impairments in many ways. Teachers are developing individualized learning plans that incorporate technology and are using technology in teaching methods that address all learning styles. Many teachers and administrators are tracking student performance and using this data to modify instruction and provide remediation in order to meet individual student learning goals and objectives. Through continued implementation of staff development, sharing of research, identification of best practices, and modeling of effective technology use in the classroom, all teachers and students are becoming proficient in using technology as an instructional tool. Technology is a tool that enables teachers and administrators to work more productively, offering solutions for time management, student monitoring and intervention, and interesting and effective lessons and classroom activities. The DCSS Instruction initiatives are models of well-designed instructional technology resources. We provide a curriculum-based reference Web resource that enables students to interact with and explore the world, bringing a wealth of information and experiences into the classroom, thus potentially overcoming geographical isolation, physical barriers, and economic hardships. Our Website encourages students' creativity and self-direction, while developing twenty-first century computer and information skills. Ultimately, technology is a tool that helps every teacher and every student master basic skills and develops critical thinking and problem solving abilities. Technology can be a support tool to reinvent schools so that all students achieve at higher levels and are better prepared for the workplace. Recent studies demonstrated that students with exposure to computers are doing better academically than their peers without computers.

Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012

42

Instructional Uses of Technology Action Plan
Goal: Technology Integration in Curriculum and Instruction: To continue integrating technology throughout the curriculum to enhance student learning and achievement. Action Plan / Strategies Benchmarks Evaluation Method/Timeline Funding Source/Amou nt Person(s) Responsible

The System will maintain video conferencing and increase the usage of Teleconferencing and Distance Learning Courses to support students’ interest and needs.

By FY 2010 Increase in Teleconferencing and Distance Learning course offerings for student by 10%. By FY 2011 Increase in Teleconferencing and Distance Learning course offerings for student by 10%. By FY 2012 Increase in Teleconferencing and Distance Learning course offerings for student by 10%. By FY 2010 Instructional

FY 2012 District Course Records/ District Distance Learning Courses Offered

FY 2010-2012 Instructional Technology

The System will provide teachers with training for using

FY 2010 Projected$45,000.00 annually E-Rate FY 2011 Projected$45,000.00 annually E-Rate FY 2012 Projected-

$45,000.00 annually E-Rate

MIS Director

FY 2010 ProjectedCurriculum Supervisor

Innovative Technology in the st classroom. (21 Century Model Classrooms)

Specialists will provide sustained training to increase use of IWB’s in all elementary schools. By FY 2011 Instructional Specialists will provide sustained training to increase use of IWB’s in all middle schools. By FY 2012 Instructional Specialists will provide sustained training to increase use of IWB’s in all high schools.

Annual Training Schedule

$7,000.00 per classroom

FY 2011 Projected-$0

FY 2012 Projected-$0

The system will utilize a variety of applications and technologies to meet the academic needs of identified students with special needs through the inclusion model for delivering instruction.

By FY 2010 increase special needs students’ equitability and easy access to effective and engaging technology resources by 10%.

FY 2010-2012 IEPs will be used to assess student’s needs for assistance with technology resources.

FY 2010 Projected-$0

Director of ESP Testing and Evaluation Curriculum and Instruction Building Administrators

By FY 2011 increase special needs students’ equitability and easy access to effective and engaging technology resources by 10%. By FY 2012 increase special needs students’ equitability and easy access to effective and engaging technology resources by 10%. By FY 2010 Increase the use of E-Instruction in elementary schools by providing teachers with sustained training from the Instructional Specialists. By FY 2011 Increase the use of E-Instruction in elementary schools

FY 2011 Projected-$0

FY 2012 Projected-$0

The System will utilize electronic assessment programs in each curriculum area.

FY 2010-2012 Classroom Observations from Instructional Specialists

FY 2010 Projected-$0

Curriculum and Instruction Director Instructional Supervisors Instructional Coaches Instructional Specialists

FY 2011 Projected-$0

by providing teachers with sustained training from the Instructional Specialists. FY 2012 Increase the use of E-Instruction in elementary schools by providing teachers with sustained training from the Instructional Specialists. The system will continue to use technology resources to collect and analyze data, interpret results and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and maximize student learning. By FY 2010 Increase use of the Achievement series web-based software program to provide data-driven decisions in each the classroom by 10%. By FY 2011 Increase use of the Achievement series web-based software program to provide data-driven decisions in each FY 2010-2012 Professional Learning Inventory and Achievement series database.

FY 2012 Projected-$0

FY 2010 Title I Title IID Projected$,78,000.00

Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction Administrators

FY 2011 Title I Title IID Projected$78,000.00

the classroom by 10%. By FY 2012 Increase use of the Achievement series web-based software program to provide data-driven decisions in each the classroom by 10%. By FY 2010 Increased parents and students usage of ParentLink by 10% By FY 2011 Increased parents and students usage of ParentLink by 10% By FY 2012 Increased parents and students usage of ParentLink by 10% By FY 2010 Increase student entries in the ALS Program by 10% FY 2012 Title I Projected$78,000.00

Provide students and parents with access to ParentLink.

FY 2010-2012 Annual Network Analysis

FY 2010 E-Rate Projected$52,000.00 FY 2011 E-Rate Projected$52,000.00 FY 2012 E-Rate Projected$52,000.00

MIS Director Information Technology Coordinator

Use research-based software programs to provide students with curriculum related assignments that are Technology-driven.

FY 2010-2012 Annual Network Analysis

FY 2010 Projected-$0

MIS Director Educational Technology Director

By FY 2011 Increase student entries in the ALS Program by 10% By FY 2012 Increase student entries in the ALS Program by 10% By FY 2010 Install iLearn in schools needing improvement.

FY 2011 Projected-$0 FY 2012 Projected-$0

Use research-based software programs to provide students with curriculum related assignments that are technology driven.

By FY 2010-2012 Assessment Program will provide usage reports annually

FY 2010 Title I Title IIA Projected$60,000.00 FY 2011 Title I Title IIA Projected$60,000.00 FY 2012 Title I Title IIA Projected$60,000.00

Federal Programs Educational Technology Director

By FY 2011 iLearn will be maintained in each elementary and middle school. By FY 2012 iLearn will be maintained in each elementary and middle school. Student technology competency goals as required by the Georgia Technology Standards will be incorporated into the curriculum at all grade levels. By FY 2010 Students will reach age appropriate technology literacy levels in all grades. By FY 2010-2012 Instructional Specialists, On-site Instructional Technology

FY 2010 Projected$60,000.00

MIS Director Building Administrators CTAE Director Title II D Coordinator

By FY 2011 Students will continue to reach age appropriate technology literacy levels at all grades. By FY 2012 Students will continue to reach age appropriate technology literacy levels at all grades. By FY 2010 Instructional Specialists conduct professional learning activities which impart skills needed to integrate and model technology skills. By FY 2011 Instructional Technology

Coordinators-Media Specialists (targeting 9 schools), Instructional Supervisors and administrators will monitor the frequency and range of technology use across grade-levels and GPS/QCC area through surveys of all certified personnel for technology skills proficiency.

FY 2011 Projected$60,000.00

FY 2012 Projected$60,000.00 FY 2010-2012 Media Specialist/ Instructional Technology Coordinators and administrators will monitor and survey the frequency of technology use across grade-level curriculum areas. FY 2010 Projected-$0 Curriculum and Instruction, Instructional Specialists Coordinators

Instructional Technology Specialists will model technology integration and assist teachers with implementing technology integration into the standardsbased curriculum.

FY 2011 Projected-$0

Specialists continue to conduct professional learning activities which impart skills needed to integrate and model technology skills. By FY 2012 Instructional Technology Specialists continue to conduct professional learning activities which impart skills needed to integrate and model technology skills. FY 2012 Projected-$0

Administrators and Staff Use of Technology and Action Plan Technology increases productivity, brings worldwide experience and expertise into the classroom, and stimulates interest in learning. Therefore, it is the ultimate tool in the professional educator's repertoire. It offers a variety of tools that help decrease the time spent on paperwork, thus increasing time available to spend with students. Access to the Internet offers endless opportunities for professional development and educational research, as well as access to up-to-date curriculum resources. With resources such as iPaqs, iProfile, IQ, School Max, IWB’s, e-Instruction, LeapTrack, Dibels, Rubicon-Atlas Curriculum Mapping, Achievement Series, and the Intranet, teachers, administrators, and staff have desktop and laptop access to a variety of information resources. This information allows educators to track individual progress and mastery of skills (and the conditions that might affect that progress); develop strategies, skills, and policies that assist in that mastery; and, ultimately, create a quality, data-driven environment that affects high student achievement. These tools allow administrators to monitor student performance extensively and to effectively provide teachers with guidance on curriculum implementation.

Administrative Uses of Technology Action Plan
Goal: Administrative Uses of Technology: The teaching and learning process will be enhanced through the use of technology for administration, management, and communication. Action Plan / Strategies Administrators will routinely use technology for the following: • Data Management • Track student learning • Communicate with parents Evaluation Method/ Funding Source/Amount Timeline By FY 2010 FY 2010-2012 NA Administrators and Review Entry Data of supervisors will continue the School Max using the School Max Program and use Program to access Performance Based student information. Evaluations to determine use and understanding Benchmarks By FY 2011 Administrators and supervisors will continue using the School Max Program to access student information. By FY 2012 Administrators and supervisors will continue using the School Max Program to access student information. By FY 2010 10% of administrators will use Achievement Series, einstruction, and Rubicon Atlas to analyze student NA Person(s) Responsible Administrators MIS Department Curriculum and Instruction Supervisors and Coaches

NA

The System will train administrators to use the Achievement Series, CPS (e-Instruction) immediate response devices, and

FY 20010-2012 Review Training Participants Attendance Forms; Performance -Based

FY 2010 Staff Development Projected-$0

Curriculum and Instruction Supervisors Instructional Specialists

Rubicon Atlas Curriculum Mapping Program to monitor the implementation of the GPS and analyze student data.

data and monitor curriculum implementation. By FY 2011 15% of administrators will use the Achievement Series, e-instruction, and Rubicon Atlas to analyze student data and monitor curriculum implementation. By FY 2012 20% of administrators will use the Achievement Series, e-instruction, and Rubicon Atlas to analyze student data and monitor curriculum implementation. By FY 2010 Administrators will routinely use Internet/Web and Email communications By FY 2011 Administrators will routinely use Internet/Web and Email communications

Evaluations

FY 2011 Staff Development Projected-$0

FY 2012 Staff Development Projected-$0

Administrators, certified and non-certified personnel will model the use of technology in the administration of their responsibilities.

FY 2010- 2012 Administrators e-mail addresses, Evaluations and Survey

NA

Director of MIS Information Technology Coordinator

NA

By FY 2012 Administrators will routinely use Internet/Web and Email communications Instructional Supervision, By FY 2010 Observation and Evaluation and evaluation practices will Observation tools will address the use of include indicators for instructional technology technology integration in for student achievement of classroom instruction. the GPS. By FY 2011 Administrative supervision will continue to utilize evaluation and observation tools that will include indicators for technology integration in classroom instruction.

NA

System Curriculum Academic Team Evaluations and Observation Records

FY 2010 Projected-$0 Local/State Funds

Department of Curriculum and Instruction Instructional Specialists

FY 2011 Projected-$0 Local/State Funds

Building Administrative teams will create an of environment and

By FY 2012 Administrative supervision will continue to utilize evaluation and observation tools that will include indicators for technology integration in classroom instruction. By FY 2010 FY 2010-2012 System and School 80% Teachers and Professional Learning Administrators will be

FY 2012 Projected-$0 Local/State Funds

FY 2010 Projected$20,000.00

Department of Curriculum and Instruction Coordinator of Title II D and

provide opportunities for professional planning and collaboration for technology integration.

engaged in technology integration professional learning collaborative sessions By FY 2011 90% Teachers and Administrators will be engaged in technology integration professional learning collaborative sessions. By FY 2012 100% Teachers and Administrators will be engaged in technology integration professional learning collaborative sessions.

Plan

Title IID Title II A Professional Learning FY 2011 Projected$20,000.00 Title IID Title II A Professional Learning FY 2012 Projected$20,000.00 Title IID Title II A Professional Learning

Title II A Building Administrators

The System will continue providing all schools with Video Conferencing Capacity

By FY 2010 Schools will continue utilize Video Conferencing to communicate throughout the system and with students across the country. By FY 2011 Schools will continue utilize Video Conferencing to

By FY 2010-2012 System and School Technology Inventory

FY 2010 Title II D E-Rate Title I Projected$45,000.00

Director of Management Information Systems

FY 2011 Title II D E-Rate Title I

communicate throughout the system and with students across the country. By FY 2012 Schools will continue utilize Video Conferencing to communicate throughout the system and with students across the country.

Projected$45,000.00

FY 2012 Title II D E-Rate Title I Projected$45,000.00

DCSS will provide support and training for board members to use pioneering systems and technology.

By 2010 Board of Education members will be provided access to electronic systems including on-line meeting documents (DocuScan andlaptops at meetings. By 2011 Board of Education members will continue to have access to electronic systems including on-line meeting documents (DocuScan andlaptops at meetings. By 2012 Board of Education members will continue to have access to electronic systems including on-line meeting documents (DocuScan andlaptops at meetings.

FY 2010-2012 Board meetings records will reflect the use of electronic communication of board members.

FY 2010 Projected$40, 000.00 Local Funds

MIS Director Information Technology Project Coordinator Director of Educational Technology

FY 2011 Projected-$40,000.00

FY 2012 Projected-$40,000.00

The System will establish an evaluation and assessment committee to target current assessment tools for the purpose of

By FY 2010 Evaluation and Assessment committee will provide an Evaluation Report on

FY 2010-2012 Assessment Tools will generate reports concerning use of Technology and

FY 2010 Projected-$0

Curriculum Supervisors Instructional Specialists

evaluating and assessing technology integration of teachers and administrators.

technology use of all stakeholders. By FY 2011 Evaluation and Assessment committee will continue to provide an Evaluation Report on technology use of all stakeholders. By FY 2012 Evaluation and Assessment committee will continue to provide an Evaluation Report on technology use of all stakeholders.

committee will make recommendations for future use on an annual review basis FY 2011 Projected-$0

FY 2012 Projected-$0

Parent/Community Uses of Technology Overview-Action Plan Technology is the fundamental vehicle for communication with the community and the family. E-mail, telephones in every classroom, community-access television, and school resources are made available electronically throughout the community. These resources will allow and encourage adult participation in a child's education. Our goal is to establish learning systems within our schools so that parents, teachers, students, and the community can learn new skills and share resources. The highest level of student achievement occurs when families, schools, and community organizations work together. Parents can increase involvement as time constraints dissolve and education-related interactions occur in the comfortable, familiar context of home. With technology, the school and its values of learning and achievement can enter every home, thus enhancing and extending teaching and learning to every individual regardless of age or socioeconomic status.

Parent/Community Uses of Technology Action Plan
Goal: Parent/Community Uses of Technology: Communicate with and inform parents, community members, and others about key education technology issues confronting policymakers, administrators and educators. Action Plan / Strategies The System will maintain the curriculum and instruction websites which includes Georgia Performance Standards, resources, content web links that supports the DCSS curriculum. Benchmarks By FY 2010 District Web site will update Local Requirements, GPS, and content related activities. By FY 2011 District Web site will continue updating Local Requirements, GPS, and content related activities. By FY 2012 District Web site will continue updating Local Requirements, GPS, and content related activities. Evaluation Method/ Timeline FY 2010-2012 Review data captured from the District Web Site Funding Source/Amount FY 2010 Projected$0 Person(s) Responsible Web Master, Curriculum Department, and Public Information Director

FY 2011 Projected$0

FY 2012 Projected$0

Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012

60

The System will promote technology tools and practices that facilitate parent and community communications

By FY 2010 An increase of 10% of Teachers will use the ParentLink Program to communicate with Parents. By FY 2011 An increase of 10% of Teachers will use the ParentLink Program to communicate with Parents. By FY 2012 An increase of 10% of Teachers will use the ParentLink Program to communicate with Parents. By FY 2010 Albany State University ETTC will train Monroe High School math and science teachers and administrators to use Interactive Whiteboards and other electronic devices. By FY 2011 Albany State University ETTC will train Monroe High School math and

FY 2010 FY 2010-2012 ProjectedAnnual Network $0 Review (Generate Home Work Hot Line Report)

Web Master and MIS Director

FY 2011 Projected$0

FY 2012 Projected$0 FY 2010-2012 ASU ETTC Training Attendance Record FY 2010 Projected$20,000.00 Title IID Coordinator

The System will collaborate with higher education institutions to prepare preservice for administrators and teachers using interactive whiteboards and other electronic devices.

FY 2011 Projected$20,000.00

Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012

61

science teachers and administrators to use Interactive Whiteboards and other electronic devices. By FY 2012 Albany State University ETTC will train Monroe High School math and science teachers and administrators to use Interactive Whiteboards and other electronic devices. The System will seek input from business and industry representatives, and others to determine current and emerging workforce skills needed in the community. By FY 2010 Initiate an annual survey for businesses input on current technology and skills needed in the workforce. By FY 2011 System will discuss and plan based on annual survey for businesses input on current technology and skills needed in the workforce. By FY 2012 System will discuss and FY 2010-2012 Completed Surveys

FY 2012 Projected$20,000.00

FY 2010 Projected$0

Technology Planning Committee

FY 2011 Projected$0

FY 2012 Projected62

Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012

plan based on an annual survey for businesses input on current technology and skills needed in the workforce. The System will increase parent and community involvement in the education process through the use of technological communications. By FY 2010 Provide access to Instructional Videos for home-bound students in distance learning courses. By FY 2011 Provide access to Instructional Videos for home-bound students in distance learning courses. By FY 2012 Provide access to Instructional Videos for home-bound students in distance learning courses. FY 20010-2012 Recordings of Instructional Videos and Parental Response Surveys

$0

FY 2010 E-Rate Splost Title I and II D Projected$25,000.00

MIS Director Title IID Coordinator

FY 2011 E-Rate Splost Title I and II D Projected$25,000.00 FY 2012 E-Rate Splost Title I and II D Projected$25,000.00

Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012

63

(return to table of contents)

Program Integration
(Original) The mission and vision of the Dougherty County School System Technology Plan st are clearly being demonstrated in the continued roll-out of the 21 Century Model st Classroom. The goal of the 21 Century Model Classroom initiative is to integrate technology in each classroom in order to implement data-driven decisions to improve student academic performance. The key component is the implementation of the interactive whiteboard and software system and a mounted projector to enhance student visual learning. The interactive whiteboard of choice for the Dougherty County School System is the Promethean ACTIVboard. It is unique because while most whiteboards simply drive existing applications like PowerPoint or note-taking, the ACTIVboard system is a catalyst of change, changing the ways teachers can present concepts, engage students, get them to really interact, and get immediate feedback on comprehension. The following is a brief description of the instructional components st utilized in the 21 Century Model Classrooms and the rollout plan for 2009-By FY 2012. (return to table of contents)

Curriculum Integration
(Original)

Technology Collaborative Planning Process
The DCSS’s technology planning process is managed through technology integration teams which consist of the technology department, instructional specialists and curriculum supervisors and coaches. The members of these departments collaborate with the committees at the local school building level to ensure that the district’s vision for technology integration is embraced throughout the school system. The school level committee has representatives from all instructional levels to serve as a support to the system as a whole. Each local building is serviced by a team of Technology Specialists, Instructional Specialists, and Model Classroom Teachers. These individuals work with administrators, teachers, students, and staff members to support the infrastructure, design, implementation, and professional learning for technology integration in the classroom. The Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Director of Management Information System, Coordinator of Educational Technology, Information Technology Project Coordinator, and the Instructional Specialist work in close collaboration to ensure there is a seamless path between technology and instruction. These individuals support the technology planning committee to ensure that all instructional department leaders are involved in the process of investigating, testing, purchasing, and implementing software to meet the desired needs of all students. Members of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Instructional Specialists, Media, Federal Programs, Technology, and Management of Information

Systems communicate frequently to determine school progress and discuss plans for improvement. This group also includes building administrators, teachers, and business partners to focus on ensuring that schools are using best practices and are being provided the support that they need. These individuals assist the system in determining the direction for technology growth and integration in one or more of the following ways: ¾ Serve on System Level Professional Learning Committee to ensure that technology integration is a viable source for improvement in instruction and student performance. ¾ Organize and provide leadership for school level technology initiatives and serve on textbook/software (Social Studies, Language Arts, Science and Mathematics) adoption committees. ¾ Serve as classroom experts (Model Classroom Teachers) to provide professional learning regarding technology and technology assistance to their coworkers. ¾ Media Specialists in the DCSS are involved in constructing and coordinating school level needs and participate as a member or facilitator of various groups in the schools and selected members attend the annual GaETC to stay abreast with current technology trends as well as conference exhibits to examine new technologies appropriate for the needs of the media program and other areas in the school. ¾ Instructional Specialists in the DCSS provide trainings to improve teachers’ level of proficiency in utilizing model classroom equipment as well as assists and supports teachers in the integration of technology for student achievement. They also attend national, state, and local technology conferences to stay abreast of cutting edge technology practices that empower teachers and engage students. ¾ ETC communicates with system level representatives regarding ongoing support and provides feedback on existing plan, and act as a liaison between the school system and the Georgia Department of Education. ¾ Business Representatives, Parents, and other community members are involved in the technology planning process in the following ways: Local businesses fulfill requests for technology resources through our partners in Excellence Program and school council.

¾

The Director of Federal Programs serves as an advisor to the technology planning committee.

The following list identifies individuals who will serve and support the technologyintegration initiatives for the 2009-By FY 2012 Technology Plan.

DOUGHERTY COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM Technology Planning Committee 2009-By FY 2012
Dianne Daniels, Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction Mary Barkley, Information Technology Project Coordinator Saralyn Barkley, Instructional Supervisor Les Barnett, Technology Coordinator Herb Bentford, Management Information Systems Horace Bentley, Instructional Coach

Tina Crain, Lead Technology Specialist Jonathan Cude, Instructional Specialist Rodney Daniels, Instructional Specialist John I Davis, Instructional Specialist Vinson Davis, Middle School Asst. Principal Brent Fowler, Elementary School Asst. Principal Zeda George, Elementary School Principal Dr. Betty Graper, Federal Programs Director Dr. Ufot Inyang, Middle School Principal Debra Johnson, Instructional Coach Eddie Johnson, Elementary School Principal Tracy Lane, Instructional Specialist Sheila Marshall, High School Principal Gail Solomon, Elementary School Principal William Thomas, Instructional Specialist Alphonese Wilson, Instructional Specialist SaJuana Wilson-Williams, High School Asst. Principal (return to table of contents)

Evaluation
Annual System Technology Survey, Software Inventory and Report, Technology Survey (return to table of contents)

Standards
(Taken from Glynn County Board of Education Technology Plan) For our teachers: Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS•S) as they design, implement, and assess learning experiences to engage students and improve learning; enrich professional practice; and provide positive models for students, colleagues, and the community. All teachers should meet the following standards and performance indicators. (ISTE. 2007). Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity Teachers use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments. Teachers: promote, support, and model creative and innovative thinking and inventiveness engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students’ conceptual understanding and thinking, planning, and creative processes model collaborative knowledge construction by engaging in learning with students, colleagues, and others in face-to-face and virtual environments

Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessments incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS•S. Teachers: design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and resources to promote student learning and creativity develop technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own progress customize and personalize learning activities to address students’ diverse learning styles, working strategies, and abilities using digital tools and resources provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use resulting data to inform learning and teaching Model Digital-Age Work and Learning Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and work processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society. Teachers: demonstrate fluency in technology systems and the transfer of current knowledge to new technologies and situations collaborate with students, peers, parents, and community members using digital tools and resources to support student success and innovation communicate relevant information and ideas effectively to students, parents, and peers using a variety of digital-age media and formats model and facilitate effective use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze, evaluate, and use information resources to support research and learning Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility Teachers understand local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and ethical behavior in their professional practices. Teachers: advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing equitable access to appropriate digital tools and resources promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information develop and model cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with colleagues and students of other cultures using digital-age communication and collaboration tools Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership Teachers continuously improve their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources. Teachers: participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative applications of technology to improve student learning

exhibit leadership by demonstrating a vision of technology infusion, participating in shared decision making and community building, and developing the leadership and technology skills of others evaluate and reflect on current research and professional practice on a regular basis to make effective use of existing and emerging digital tools and resources in support of student learning contribute to the effectiveness, vitality, and self-renewal of the teaching profession and of their school and community For our Students: Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students: Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression. Use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues. Identify trends and forecast possibilities. Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students: Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. Develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures. Contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems. Research and Information Fluency Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students: Plan strategies to guide inquiry. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media. Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. Process data and report results. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students: Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation. Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project. Collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions. Use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions. Digital Citizenship Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students: Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and

productivity. Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning. Exhibit leadership for digital citizenship. Technology Operations and Concepts Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students: Understand and use technology systems. Select and use applications effectively and productively. Troubleshoot systems and applications. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies. (return to table of contents)

Funding Alternatives
E-Rate, Title I, Title II A, Title II D, Local Funds, General Funds, (return to table of contents)

School Pilot Projects/Educational Research
(Pilot Program created) Pilot Program: Implemented at Albany High School: 786 students; 84% African-American; 11% Caucasian; 5% Other; 75% economically disadvantaged students; 8% students with disabilities. Google Apps Education Edition, a free suite of hosted communication and collaboration applications designed for schools and universities. Google Apps includes Gmail (webmail services), Google Calendar (shared calendaring), Google Docs (online document, spreadsheet, presentation, and form creation and sharing), Google Video (secure and private video sharing – 10GB free) and Google Sites (team website creation with videos, images, gadgets and documents integration), as well as administrative tools, customer support, and access to APIs to integrate Google Apps with existing IT systems. Nevin, R. (2009). Supporting 21st century learning through google apps. Teacher Librarian, 37(2), 35-38. Retrieved February 28, 2011 from EBSCOhost. (return to table of contents)

Model Classroom Configurations
(original)
The Instructional Components ¾ Promethean ACTIVboard and Ceiling Mounted Projector ¾ ACTIVslate

¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾

e-Instruction ACTIVstudio (ACTIV Primary) Software The ACTIVtablet Document Camera DVD/VCR 6 Student Desk Top Computers Teacher Laptop

ACTIVslate The model classroom incorporates the ACTIVslate to allow both the teacher and students to control the ACTIVboard from anywhere in the classroom. The ACTIVslate enhances classroom management allowing the teacher to be able to control the board from any proximity in the classroom. It also enables students to write on the board without leaving their desks. Classroom Performance System (e-Instruction) The e-Instruction system allows teachers to gather instant student feedback while delivering their lessons! Students input answers to questions displayed on the ACTIVboard using wireless, hand-held devices, and teachers can display and export results to assess student progress. ACTIVstudio software makes it easy for teachers to create multiple choice, true/false and yes/no questions using their choice of images, colors, backgrounds and fonts. ACTIVstudio A key component of the ACTIVboard Collaborative Classroom System is the software, ACTIVstudio. This innovative application was built with the educator in mind and with direct input and contributions from thousands of teachers with resource libraries and backgrounds numbering well into the thousands. Teachers in both elementary and secondary classrooms alike will benefit from the comprehensive magnitude of categories. Educators from every subject, including but not limited to, mathematics, science, geography, social studies, language arts, foreign languages, music, physical education, and athletics will enjoy the flexible features and added visual effects. ACTIVtablet The ACTIVtablet is a small A6 graphics tablet that gives teachers the flexibility to develop their lesson plans and ACTIVstudio flipcharts when away from the board, or at home. The ACTIVtablet simply plugs into the USB port on the computer, and it is ready for use. One license of ACTIVstudio is included with each ACTIVtablet. Document Camera/DVD/VCR The Document Camera allows the teacher to visually display detailed drawings, 3-D renderings, photos, formal presentations, newspaper clippings, textbook information, student work, and more —in the classroom setting. Whether the teacher is using a document camera in a classroom to demonstrate an intricate biology project or to display textual information, the teacher has the power to focus the student's attention on nearly anything. The DVD/VCR allows the teachers to incorporate other video media into the daily classroom instruction. 6 Student Desktop Computers There are 6 student desktop computers in each model classrooms. These computers allow teachers to address individual student needs and to assess student

comprehension of skills taught.

Current Model Classrooms 2008-2009
Schools Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools South Ga. Regional Achievement Center Isabella Total Grade Levels K-5 6-8 9-12 4-12 K-12/Training Number of Classrooms 401 160 178 6 2 737

Projected Model Classroom Rollout 2009-2011
Schools Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Total Schools Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Total Grade Levels K-5 6-8 9-12 Number of Classrooms 52 34 28 114 Number of Classrooms 52 34 29 114

Projected Model Classroom Rollout 2011- 2013
Grade Levels K-5 6-8 9-12

Projected Model Classroom Rollout FY 2013-FY 2015
Schools Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Total Grade Levels K-5 6-8 9-12 Number of Classrooms 53 34 29 116

Total Number of Model Classrooms By FY 2015
Schools Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Total Count Total Cost Grade Levels K-5 6-8 9-12 Number of Classrooms 558 262 264 1084 Projected-$1,657,500.00

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Facilities
(original) The advent of system technology integration planning and school building designs has increased the potential for creating a safe environment for teaching and learning. A technology infrastructure that includes integrated security and protection systems, such as telephones in every classroom, warning devices, and monitoring cameras, protects individuals and the facility. The real benefit of technology in a safe and orderly educational environment, however, is in the resources it brings into the classroom and school library media center. Because technology opens doors to the world, while simultaneously focusing students on the task at hand, student interest and motivation are heightened and discipline problems decrease. When students are motivated and successful, they tend to work harder and longer, raising the possibility of higher student achievement. This success fosters a culture in which learning is the expectation and ultimate goal. (return to table of contents)

Maintenance/Support
(Original) (information also provided in the Staff Development section/table) The System will identify and provide technical support personnel with network and software training. By FY 2010 Network/Wireless Training will be provided for all technology support personnel. By FY 2011 Network/Wireless FY 2010-2012 Review Training Participants Attendance Forms and Performance Based Evaluations Annually FY 2010 Title II D Projected$4,000.00 Educational Technology Director Title IID Coordinator

FY 2011 Title II D

Training will continue to be provided for all technology support personnel. By FY 2012 Network/Wireless Training will continue to be provided for all technology support personnel. By FY 2010 Horizon software training will be provided for all of the Technical Support Leadership Team. By FY 2011 Horizon software training will continue to be provided for all of the Technical Support Leadership Team. By FY 2012 Horizon software training will continue to be provided for all of the Technical FY 2010-2012 Review Training Participants Attendance Forms and Performance Based Evaluations Annually

Projected$4,000.00

FY 2012 Title II D Projected$4,000.00

The System will identify and provide technical support personnel with network and software training.

FY 2010 Title II D Projected$2,500.00

Educational Technology Director

FY 2011 Title II D Projected$2,500.00

FY 2012 Title II D Projected$2,500.00

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Software Agreements
(Taken from the Glynn County Board of Education Technology Plan) Software purchased by the county using federal, state or local funds must go through an adoption process. A software committee made up of representatives from Title I, Special Education, Technology Support, Technology Integration, and Instructional Support Staff, along with a representative of the curriculum area being addressed, will review all software based on a series of adoption requirements. Included in the requirements for software adoption is evidence that the software has provided researchbased evidence of its effectiveness and value. No software will be purchased without evidence of scientific and peer review. Data analysis shall be an important component of all software adoption. Furthermore, all software must be aligned to nationally established criteria, and must facilitate the targeting of QCC/ GPS standards. (return to table of contents)

Copyright/Acceptable Use Policy
(Original) Board Policy Internet Acceptable Use

Descriptor Code: IFBG

COMPUTER/INTERNET USER POLICY INTRODUCTION The Dougherty County School System is committed to providing all students and employees with appropriate access to computer technology. Simultaneously, the School System is as always extremely concerned with protecting the physical and psychological well-being of the children and students of Dougherty County. This policy provides guidelines for the use of computers and the Internet in the Dougherty County School System that seeks to achieve both of these goals. The sole purpose of computer technology in our schools is to support research and education. The curriculum and the objectives of the Dougherty County School System, as well as the instructional needs of the school community shall guide the use of computers and the Internet. Use of any other network accessed through a DCSS connection must comply with the acceptable use policy of that network. The computer is seen as one of the many tools that can assist in the acquisition of knowledge and in the encouragement of lifelong learning and should be used in conjunction with other effective teaching practices and resources. With access to computers and people all over the world also comes the availability of material that may not be considered to be of educational value in the school setting. Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012 74

The DCSS has taken some available precautions to restrict access to controversial materials; however, on a global network it is impossible to control all materials, and industrious users may gain access to controversial information. All student users must participate in an introduction to computers session that provides express, oral instruction regarding how to properly use, and how to avoid unacceptable use, of the DCSS computing resources. The State of Georgia and the United States have promulgated laws governing the use of computers and related technology. The Georgia Computer Systems Protection Act specifically forbids various forms of computer misuse and abuse, and the U. S. copyright laws govern the duplication of computer programs. signing the Dougherty County School System Computer Use/Internet Agreement and using the computing resources of the Dougherty County School System, the user agrees to abide the referenced Georgia law, any and all other relevant laws of the United States and the State of Georgia, and the following guidelines and regulations regarding the use of computers and the Internet promulgated the Dougherty County School System. The School Library Media Specialist has information on the provisions of Georgia and United States laws. PRIVILEGE Any individual's use of the computing resources of the Dougherty County School System is a privilege, and as such is conditional upon the individual's compliance with any and all state and federal laws, school regulations, and the exercise of good manners. Inappropriate use may result in cancellation of those privileges, and conduct otherwise in violation of

Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012

75

Dougherty County School System policies or regulations may also result in disciplinary proceedings. The Dougherty County School System reserves the right to regulate any particular use of these computing resources pursuant to the Dougherty County School System Instructional Media Policy. The computing resources in the Dougherty County School System shall be fully accessible for instructional use only during normal school hours. In the DCSS computer laboratories, student educational activities and research take priority overall other computer applications. A signed parental permission form is required prior to all first-time use of the Internet students. The signature of a parent or guardian acknowledges that the parent or guardian is aware that use of the DCSS computing resources is a privilege, that the parent or guardian is responsible for their child's access and usage, and that they understand some materials available on the Internet may be unsuitable for their child. ETIQUETTE Students are responsible for their behavior while using school computing resources just as they are responsible for their behavior in classrooms, hallways, and all other times during which the are under the supervision of the Dougherty County School System. Therefore, all general school rules regarding student conduct, behavior, and communications apply to the use of school computing resources, including, but not limited to, those rules contained in The Dougherty County Board of Education Policy Manual, Section J. Furthermore, all users are expected to abide the generally accepted rules of network etiquette, the most important of which are listed below. Students are reminded of their instruction under the DCSS character education program described in The Dougherty County Board of Education Policy Manual, Section I, Policy IDAA, and to refrain from mistaking the apparent anonymity of the Internet for a license to behave in a manner not otherwise appropriate. Because all DCSS computer accounts are identified their DCSS addresses, every transmission involving a DCSS created computer account reflects upon the entire school system. Therefore, access to DCSS computing resources will be provided only to those users who are and continue to act in a considerate and responsible manner, including but not limited to, the following guidelines: 1. Students shall be polite and considerate of other users. 2. Students shall use appropriate language at all times. 3. Students are encouraged to use their best grammar and spelling at all times, so that their ideas may be evaluated on their content rather than on the manner of their presentations -- but be forgiving of the errors of others. 4. Students shall use printing resources wisely. 5. Students shall use computers in a timely manner, so that all students may have an opportunity to utilize computing resources. 6. Students are encouraged to tell the system operator whenever they find a particularly interesting site on the Internet. Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012 75

ACCEPTABLE USE The purpose of the DCSS computing system is to support research and education. The following guidelines constitute a demonstrative listing of acceptable uses; however, these guidelines are not exhaustive, and the Dougherty County School System reserves the right to apply any and all regulations, including, but not limited to, those elsewhere listed in this policy, to the conduct and activity of any student or employee engaged in use of a Dougherty County School System computing resource as listed below: Computers: 1. Use related to class work, including research and access to instructional materials. 2. Computer applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, etc. 3. Computer programming and other functions related to a computer skills course. Internet: 1. Use related to research and education, particularly access to unique resources not available in the local setting. 2. Electronic mail. 3. Use of individual accounts as dictated the service provider and the Dougherty County School System. UNACCEPTABLE USE The Purpose of the DCSS computing system is to support research and education. However, the resources of the DCSS are limited, and use of the DCSS computing resources for purposes other than research and education necessarily detracts from the ability of other users to benefit from the DCSS computing system's intended purpose. The following guidelines constitute a demonstrative listing of unacceptable uses; however, these guidelines are not exhaustive, and the Dougherty County School System reserves the right to apply any and all policies, including, but not limited to, those elsewhere listed in this document, to the conduct and activity of any student or employee engaged in use of a Dougherty County School System computing resource. The system operators will have the discretion to suspend or terminate any student or employee's access to and use of the DCSS computing system upon the breach of these terms and conditions the user. Prior to a suspension or termination or as soon after as is practicable, the system operator will inform the user of the suspected breach and give the user the opportunity to present an explanation. After this point any grievance will be handled as designated in The Dougherty County Board of Education Policy Manual, Section J, Policy JCE(1), Student Grievances, or Section G, Policy GAEA, Personnel Complaints and Grievances, whichever is appropriate. Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012 76

Computers: 1. Neither students nor employees shall use DCSS computers for commercial business or profit or for solicitations or purchases of any kind.

2. Neither students nor employees shall use DCSS computers to play games. 3. Neither students nor employees shall use any personal software in DCSS computers without prior approval, nor shall any user deliberately access, remove, or copy any program or file on a network belonging to someone else without specific authorization 4. Neither students nor employees shall add programs to the DCSS computer system, delete programs, copy programs, or tamper with existing programs in any way. 5. Neither students nor employees shall use any DCSS computer or computer network in such a way that causes it to stop performing computer operations or disrupts the use of the network others. Internet: 1. Neither students nor employees shall use an Internet connection provided DCSS for any commercial business or profit or for solicitations or purchases of any kind. 2. Neither students nor employees shall engage in any conduct, including chat activities, which harass, libel, or slander another individual. 3. No students shall access, display or send any materials that are vulgar, threatening, or indecent. 4. Neither students nor employees may disguise or hide their identity, including changing their name on the system. Only the system operator may change a user name and account. 5. Neither students nor employees shall create "home pages" or directories without approval the system operator. 6. Neither students nor employees shall use DCSS computing resources to access, display, or send materials that are obscene or illegal. 7. Neither students nor employees shall use DCSS computing resources to advertise any product or to engage in political lobbing or advertising. 8. Under absolutely no circumstances should students arrange to meet an individual they have contacted while utilizing the DCSS computing resources, and students should notify their parent or guardian and the system operator immediately upon an attempt any user to arrange to meet them or upon a Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012 77

contact from any user for an illicit or suspicious purpose on the DCSS computing system. PRIVACY In no event shall any student give out their full name, home address, phone number, or other personal information while using DCSS computing resources; nor shall any student or employee give out information of this kind regarding any other person. Neither student nor employee shall give out his or her password to anyone other than the system operation, nor shall any student or employee use the account or password of any other DCSS account holder. All users should remember there is no guarantee or reasonable expectation of privacy in electronic mail. Any recipient of e-mail can forward the message to any other user. Additionally, the system operators have access to all electronic messages and may in the course of maintaining the system be required to exercise this access. Any messages relating to or in support of illegal activities should be reported to the authorities and may result in loss of DCSS computing resource user privileges, as well as civil and criminal liability. SECURITY Security on any computer system is always a high priority, especially when the system serves a large number of users. The Dougherty County School System abides all federal copyright guidelines, laws, and licensing agreements governing the user of software. All users of DCSS computing resources are expected to abide all federal copyright guidelines, laws and licensing agreements, including laws regarding the duplication of computer programs. Information regarding any security problem or infringement of copyright laws should be reported to the system operator immediately and should not be demonstrated to other users. No user shall deliberately view, remove, or copy the files of another user or the file or software of the DCSS without specific, written authorization to do so. The ability to access a file or program shall not be interpreted as permission to access a file or program. Any effort a user to pass a preventative mechanism, including violating or changing a password, would be considered an inappropriate use of a computing resource and may lead to revocation of user privileges, as well as additional disciplinary or criminal penalties. VANDALISM No user shall undertake any malicious attempt to harm, modi, or destroy the data, materials, equipment, or software of another user or of the DCSS. Such conduct includes, but is not limited to, the uploading or creating of any computer virus. Any software not provided the DCSS must be reviewed the system operator before it can be used in any school computer. Vandalism will result in immediate cancellation of privileges, as well as additional disciplinary action when appropriate. SAFETY The Children�s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) was signed into law on December 21, 2000. The CIPA is federal legislation that requires public schools and libraries to implement and Dougherty County School System 3-Year Technology Plan 2009-By FY 2012 78

enforce a policy of Internet safety which includes measures to block or filter Internet access to certain visual depictions. In order to comply with the CIPA, the Dougherty County School System has selected and installed Websense Internet filtering software. SANCTIONS Violations of the Dougherty County School System Computer and Internet User Policy will be handled as specified under The Dougherty County Board of Education Policy Manual, Section J, Policy JDD/JDE, in cases of students, and under O.C.G.A. 20-2940 through 20-2-947, including any local board policies implementing these sections, in the case of staff. Such sanctions may result in : 1. Revocation of the privilege of access to the DCSS computing resources; 2. Disciplinary action as otherwise appropriate under existing DCSS policies and procedures, up to and including expulsion for students and termination for employees;

3. Notification of appropriate law enforcement agencies. DISCLAIMER The Dougherty County School System makes no warranties of any kind, either express or implied, for the online services it provides. All users must assume responsibilities for their own searches, as the system operators are unable to control the massive, unpredictable contents of a world-wide computer network. The Dougherty County School System will not be responsible for any damages suffered while using the services, including, but not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, misdeliveries, service interruptions, and/or exposure to offensive or threatening material. As always, computer users are encouraged to maintain backup files of all information that is not easily replaced. The Dougherty County School System specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy of information obtained through these services. Use of any information obtained through the Internet is undertaken at the sole risk of the user, as the Internet is fundamentally unregulated; and the information found on the Internet has not been verified for accuracy. The Dougherty County School System denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through its services. (return to table of contents)

Gifts and Disposal
(Taken from Murray County's Technology Website – http://www.murray.k12.ga.us/teacher/kara%20leonard/New%20Teacher %20Orientation.htm#donate)

Equipment may be donated to Murray County Schools for classroom use. However, it must be approved, in good working condition and compatible with our network. Please contact the Technology Department if you would like to donate. Equipment that needs to be disposed of will be given to the Technology Department to take care of it properly.

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Staff Development System Readiness for Technology
The ultimate worth of professional development for the staff is the essential role it plays in the improvement of student learning. Professional development is important for every area of student learning but especially so for technology. Teachers not only have to develop new skills and roles with technology but also have to learn how to integrate it into the curriculum. Because technology affects the activities in individual classrooms as well as the entire school organization, professional development activities with technology must be monitored on a regular basis. Educators must pay attention to the impact of professional development on the job performance of staff, the effectiveness of the organization, and the success of all students. Each professional development effort should be accompanied by a well-designed evaluation plan for determining its effectiveness. Technology use in the schools can be the basis for positive changes in teaching and learning. Evidence indicates that when used well, technology applications can support higher-order thinking engaging students in authentic, complex tasks within collaborative learning contexts. As with all change, however, the success of technology rests on the ability of the individual teacher to use technology in the classroom to enhance and support student learning. School districts may prepare elaborate technology plans and spend large amounts of money on equipment and software. But if professional development for the educational staff is not a distinct part of the plan, positive and sustained change will not take place and eventually the technology will be underutilized or even unused. Professional development is an important part of effective technology use, and only high-quality professional development can ensure the maximum benefits from the time and money spent. Educational technology requires educators not only to become familiar with the technology available in their schools but also to totally transform the

teacher role. Professional development helps teachers learn new roles and teaching strategies that will eventually improve their students' achievement. Along with the demand for quality professional development comes the need to be accountable. Professional development programs must be assessed to document their value to the school organization, individual educators, and ultimately the students. To ensure the effectiveness of each professional development effort, evaluation must be seen as an ongoing process that is initiated in the earliest stages of program planning and continued beyond program completion. When professional development programs are being planned, they should be based on the learning goals decided on for students and should be specifically related to the intended use of the technology. As the program is being developed, evaluators should start to think about questions that focus on the value of the program, such as: What are the objectives of the professional development program? Is it grounded in research? Such questions will help guide the development and evaluation process.

System Readiness for Technology/Professional Learning Action Plan
Goal: Access and Usage of Technology: Continue to establish, maintain, and support the network infrastructure to assure access for all employees and students Action Plan / Strategies The System will identify and provide training on development, delivery, and technical support of technology-delivered courses. Benchmarks By FY 2010 Virtual School and Distance Learning Training will be provided for 10% of High School Teachers. By FY 2011 Virtual School and Distance Learning Training will be provided for 10% of High School Teachers. By FY 2012 Virtual School and Distance Learning Training will be provided for 10% of High School Teachers. Evaluation Method/ Timeline FY 2010-2012 Review Training Participants Attendance Forms and Performance Based Evaluations Annually Funding Source/Amount FY 2010 Title II D Title IIA Projected-$5,000 FY 2011 Title II D Title IIA Projected-$5,000 FY 2012 Title II D Title IIA Projected-$5,000 Person(s) Responsible Curriculum and Instruction Department Federal Programs Director Instructional Specialists

The System will promote training that results in effective technology integration into the curriculum.

By FY 2010 Instructional Specialists will be provided for the district to increase technology integration modeling and training for teachers . By FY 2011 Instructional Specialists will be provided for the district to increase technology integration modeling and training for teachers. By FY 2012 Instructional Specialists will be provided for the district to increase technology integration modeling and training for teachers.

By FY 2010/ongoing Review Training Participants Attendance Forms and Performance Based Evaluations Annually

FY 2010 Title II A Title IIA Projected$250,000.00

Department of Curriculum and Instruction Instructional Specialists

FY 2011 Title II D Title IIA Projected-$ 250,000.00

FY 2012 Title IIA Projected$250,000.00

The System will identify and showcase best practices on effective integration of technology in the classroom

By FY 2010 Showcase best practices on effective technology integration on the DCSS Intranet and in Model Classrooms. By FY 2011 System will continue to showcase best practices on effective technology integration on the DCSS Intranet and in Model Classrooms. By FY 2012 System will continue to showcase best practices on effective technology integration on the DCSS Intranet and in Model Classrooms. By FY 2010 Network/Wireless Training will be provided for all technology support personnel. By FY 2011 Network/Wireless

FY 20010-2012 Annual Web-Site Review Model Classroom Teacher Observation Logs

FY 2010 Title IID Professional Development Projected$10,000.00 FY 2011 Title IID Professional Development Projected$10,000.00

Curriculum and Instruction Department District Web Master Instructional Specialist Web Master

FY 2012 Title IID Professional Development Projected$10,000.00 FY 2010-2012 Review Training Participants Attendance Forms and Performance Based Evaluations Annually FY 2010 Title II D Projected$4,000.00 Educational Technology Director Title IID Coordinator

The System will identify and provide technical support personnel with network and software training.

FY 2011 Title II D

Training will continue to be provided for all technology support personnel. By FY 2012 Network/Wireless Training will continue to be provided for all technology support personnel. By FY 2010 Horizon software training will be provided for all of the Technical Support Leadership Team. By FY 2011 Horizon software training will continue to be provided for all of the Technical Support Leadership Team. By FY 2012 Horizon software training will continue to be provided for all of the Technical FY 2010-2012 Review Training Participants Attendance Forms and Performance Based Evaluations Annually

Projected$4,000.00

FY 2012 Title II D Projected$4,000.00

The System will identify and provide technical support personnel with network and software training.

FY 2010 Title II D Projected$2,500.00

Educational Technology Director

FY 2011 Title II D Projected$2,500.00

FY 2012 Title II D Projected$2,500.00

The System will provide Distance Learning training for technical support personnel.

Support Leadership Team. By FY 2010 Distance Learning Training will be provided for technical support personnel. By FY 2011 Distance Learning Training will continue to be provided for technical support personnel. By FY 2012 Distance Learning Training will continue to be provided for technical support personnel. By FY 2010 Instructional Technology Specialist will provide training to all administrators and teachers with CPS kits. By FY 2011 Instructional

FY 2010-2012 Review Training Participants Attendance Forms and Performance Based Evaluations Annually

FY 2010 Title II D Projected$1,000.00

Educational Technology Director

FY 2011 Title II D Projected$1,000.00

FY 2012 Title II D Projected$1,000.00

The System will provide CPS EInstruction Training for teachers and administrators.

FY 2010-2012 Professional Learning documentation for training provided and participants.

FY 2010 Title IIA Projected-$0

Instructional Specialists

FY 2011 Title IIA Projected-$0

Technology Specialist will continue to provide training to all administrators and teachers with CPS kits. By FY 2012 Instructional Technology Specialist will continue to provide training to all administrators and teachers with CPS kits.

FY 2012 Title IIA Projected-$0

By FY 2010 The System will provide interactive Instructional board training for teachers and administrators. Technology Specialist will train administrators and teachers on interactive whiteboard use. By FY 2011 Instructional Technology Specialist will train administrators and teachers on interactive whiteboard use. By FY 2012 Instructional Technology Specialist will train administrators and teachers on interactive whiteboard use.

FY 2010-2012 Professional Learning documentation for training provided and participants.

FY 2010 Projected-$0

Department of Curriculum and Instruction Instructional Specialists

FY 2011 Projected $0

FY 2012 Projected-$0

References Murray County Technology Plan. (2011). Retrieved April 23, 2011 from http://www.murray.k12.ga.us/teacher/kara%20leonard/New%20Teacher %20Orientation.htm#donate Nevin, R. (2009). Supporting 21st century learning through google apps. Teacher Librarian, 37(2), 35-38. Retrieved February 28, 2011 from EBSCOhost. Schwartz, R and Marshall, W. (2009). Glynn County Board of Education Technology Plan. P. 3-5, 23.

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