A PROJECT REPORT ON EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEASURES UNDERTAKEN AT

A SUMMER PROJECT REPORT SUBMITTED BY SARAVANARAJ.C.K [1044240] OF GOJAN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY In partial fulfilment of requirement for the degree of Master of business administration In Human resource management

(JULY –AUGUST 2011)

DECLARATION
I hereby declare that the project work entitled “EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEASURES” submitted to ashok Leyland, is a record of original work done by me under the guidance of MR. SANKARA NARAYANAN (ASST.MANAGER -HR), and MRS. ANURADHA(internal guide) this project work submitted in the partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION in human resource management

SIGNATURE OF THE STUDENT DATE: PLACE:

BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE Certified that this project report titled “A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEASURES” is the bonafide work of Mr.SARAVANARAJ.C.K (Registration Number: 1044240) who carried out the research under my supervision. Certified further, that to the best of my knowledge the work reported herein does not form part of any other project or dissertation on the basis of which a degree or award was conferred on an earlier occasion on this or any other candidate.

Supervisor

Head of the Department

Submitted to Project and Viva Examination held on ____________

Internal Examiner

External Examiner

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to express my sincere thanks to our Chairman Dr.G.Natarajan, Ph.D., our Secretary Thiru. E. Babu, M.A.,D.B.M., (Industrialist) Gojan School of Business and Technology, Edapalayam, Chennai – 600 052. For their whole hearted and kind co – operation. A Special thanks to our Principle Mr. S.Venkatesan, Gojan School of Business and Technology, Edapalayam, Chennai – 600 052. For giving me the opportunity to do this project works. I wish to take this opportunity to express my deep sense of gratitude to Mr.k.Thamilarasan vice Principal, and sincere thanks to Prof. Neena Rao M.B.A., (Ph.D)., Head of the Department, Department of Management Studies, and Dean of the Corporate and Industrial Interaction Gojan School of Business and Technology, Edapalayam for the valuable guidance in this endeavor. I own the pride to thank, Mr. SANKARA NARAYANAN (ASST.MANAGER -HR), Department for giving me an opportunity to undertake this project in ASHOK LEYLAND LIMITED. I am thankful for their motivation support for having helped me to complete the project. A special thanks to Mrs.ANURADHA, internal guide for his illumining observation, encouraging suggestions, constructive criticism and extremely valuable guidance throughout the course of my project work which have helped me in completing this research project successfully. I thank our faculty members of the Department of Management Studies, Gojan School of Business and Technology, Edapalayam, Chennai for his/her encouragement and valuable guidance provided for the successful completion of this project.

SARAVANARAJ.C.K

LIST OF TABLES
CHAPTER I II TITLE INTRODUCTION PROFILE OF THE STUDY 2.1. INDUSTRY PROFILE 2.2. COMPANY PROFILE 2.3. PRODUCT PROFILE III DESIGN OF THE STUDY 3.1. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 3.2. NEED OF THE STUDY 3.3. SCOPE OF THE STUDY 3.4. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY 3.5. REVIEW OF LITERATURE 3.6. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY IV DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION (SWOT ANALYSIS) FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS, CONCLUSION BIBLIOGRAPHY 19 20 21 22 23 24 3 11 18 PAGE NO 1

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This study gives a good support for improving the human resource department. The analysis of data was done using various tools such as percentage analysis and swot analysis. and this is solely an internal analysis of the company. It has also analysis the various measures of welfare facilities utilization during the period. The project work is based on primary data. The secondary data was collected from the department files and records of the company. The study is helpful of gaining the practical knowledge about the company. The project aims at analyzing the employees views over the welfare facilities provided by the company. .ABSTRACT A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEASURE IN ASHOK LEYLAND LIMITED ENNORE UNIT The study of this project is A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEASURE IN ASHOK LEYLAND LIMITED AT CHENNAI.

CHAPTER – I INTRODUCTION .

Definitions of welfare Anything done for the intellectual. by government or by other agencies. An organization‘s responsibility to its employees extends beyond the payment of wages for their services. physical. the enjoyment of health and the common blessings of life exemption from any evil or calamity prosperity happiness. Providing a safe and healthy environment is a pre-requisite for any productive effort. .INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY Safety and welfare measures are inevitable to any organization where workers are involved. This research deals with the study on the welfare measures provided to the employees at ASHOK LEYLAND. over and above what is laid down by law or what is normally expected of the contractual benefits for which workers may have bargained. moral and economic betterment of the workers. The employee’s safety and welfare on and off the job within the organization is a vital concern of the employer. Well-doing or well-being in any respect. whether by employers.

Improve labour administration in factories.  To maintain social respects. 1948. the plantation labour act. The post has been created specifically to (i) (ii) Eliminate the malpractices of the jobber system in the recruitment of labour. FACTORIES ACT 1948 : Welfare facilities provided under this act as follows. restrooms and lunch rooms  Welfare officer . 1951 and the mines act.  To maintain discipline between the executives and employees as well as between employees. EMPLOYEE WELFARE OFFICER: The factories act.  Washing facilities  Facilities for storing and drying  Facilities for sitting  First aid appliances  Canteens  Shelters. 1951 provide for the appointment of a labour welfare officer if the no of workers employed within a unit exceeds 500.NEEDS AND IMPORTANCE OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE:  To get the work done without any dissatisfaction.  To improve the productivity.

CHAPTER – II PROFILE OF THE STUDY .

and first motorcycle. making it at least a candidate for the first automobile. Benz was granted a patent for his automobile on 29 January 1886.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE: AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY: The first practical automobile with a petrol engine was built by Karl Benz in 1885 in Mannheim.wikipedia. rather than a horse-drawn carriage fitted with an engine. patented a 0. making the country the second fastest growing automobile market in the world. Soon after. Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach in Stuttgart in 1889 designed a vehicle from scratch to be an automobile. Bernard enlarged the tricycle in 1892 to carry two adults. of the University of Padua. and began the first production of automobiles in 1888.4 cu in) one-cylinder petrol motor. According to the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers.9 W) 122 cc (7. his wife.6 million cars were sold in India in 2009 (an increase of 26%). India is home to 40 million passenger vehicles and more than 2. in 1882. fitting it into his son's tricycle.024 horsepower http://en. They also are usually credited as inventors of the first motorcycle in 1886. after Bertha Benz.2. As of 2009.org/wiki/Horsepower (17. Germany.from Mannheim to Pforzheim and back that the horseless coach was absolutely suitable for daily use. . Since 2008 a Bertha Benz Memorial Route commemorates this event. but Italy’s Enrico Bernardi. had proved with the first long-distance trip in August 1888 . annual car sales are projected to increase up to 5 million vehicles by 2015.

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY IN INDIA: The automobile industry in India is one of the largest in the world and one of the fastest growing globally. India manufactures over 11 million vehicles (including two wheeled and 4 wheeled) and exports about 1. Several Indian automobile manufacturers such as Tata Motors. Maruti Suzuki and Mahindra and Mahindra. with annual sales exceeding 8. Ahmedabad with Tata Motors Nano plant and Halol with General Motors in Gujarat. A chunk of India's car manufacturing industry is based in and around the city of Chennai. Mahindra and Mahindra. Gurgaon and Manesar near New Delhi are hubs where all of the Maruti Suzuki cars in India are manufactured.5 million in 2009. India emerged as Asia's fourth largest exporter of passenger cars. Volkswagen/ Skoda. The Chakan corridor near Pune. .6 million units in 2009. It is the world's second largest manufacturer of motorcycles. with an annual production of more than 2. the Indian automobile industry has demonstrated sustained growth as a result of increased competitiveness and relaxed restrictions. HISTORY: Following economic liberalization in India in 1991. India's robust economic growth led to the further expansion of its domestic automobile market which has attracted significant India-specific investment by multinational automobile manufacturers. expanded their domestic and international operations. South Korea and Thailand. Aurangabad in Maharashtra. In 2009. and Kolkatta in West Bengal are some of the other automotive manufacturing regions around the country.5 million every year. . also known as the "Detroit of India" with the Indian city accounting for 60 per cent of the country's automotive exports. India's passenger car and commercial vehicle manufacturing industry is the seventh largest in the world. Maharashtra is another vehicular production hub with General Motors. behind Japan. Tata Motors in the process of setting up or already set up facilities.

a monthly sale of passenger cars in India exceeded 100. Japanese manufacturers entered the Indian market ultimately leading to the establishment of Maruti Udyog. The auto market in India can boast of attractive finance . It was at this time that the Indian government chose and the gradual weakening of the license issues.7%. in 1947. the automotive industry started to grow. Until the 1930s.992 units in October 2009.In February 2009. strategic alliances. A number of foreign firms initiated joint ventures with Indian companies. cars were imported directly. However. but the growth was mainly driven by tractors. the growth was relatively slow in the 1950s and 1960s due to nationalization and the license problems which hampered the Indian private sector. INDIAN AUTOMOBILE MARKET: Many foreign companies have been investing in the Indian automobile market in various ways such as technology transfers. automotive component and automobile manufacturing growth has accelerated to meet domestic and export demands. a number of Indian and multi-national car companies launched operations. exports and financial collaborations. and with only 10% of Indian households owning a car in 2009 this progression is unlikely to stop in the coming decade. joint ventures. more than market demand. The first car ran on India's roads in 1897. Since then. commercial vehicles and scooters. the Government of India and the private sector launched efforts to create an automotive component manufacturing industry to supply to the automobile industry. Following the independence. Cars were still a major luxury. Congestion of Indian roads. From 2003 to 2010. car sales in India have progressed at a CAGR of 13.000 units and has since grown rapidly to a record monthly high of 182. After 1970. will likely be the limiting factor. Embryonic automotive industry emerged in India in the 1940s.

Some vital statistics regarding the automobile market in India has been mentioned below:  India ranks 1st in the global two-wheeler and three-wheeler market. machines. HEAVY VEHICLES MARKET: Heavy vehicles market in India comprises of trucks. India stands at the fourth position of car manufacturers by superseding the benchmark of 1 million sales.  India is the 4th biggest commercial vehicle market in the world. TELCO. ASHOK LEYLAND. TATA. ambulances and school buses. buses or defence vehicles. and SWARAJ MAZDA . The popular heavy vehicles brands in India are VOLVO. EICHER.  India ranks 5th in pertaining to the number of buses and trucks sold in the world.  India ranks 2nd in tractor segment.  In the entire Asia. It is one of India’s . Following are the major players in the Indian Vehicles Market:  Tata Motors is the largest automobile manufacturing company in India that manufactures a wide range of heavy vehicles adhering to world class standards.  Ashok Leyland is an exclusively heavy vehicle manufacturing company situated in Chennai and was initiated in the year 1948.  It is the market leader in commercial vehicles in all the segments.  India ranks 11th in the international passenger car market. small vehicles. be it heavy vehicles. Tata Motors leads this segment with a market share of 16%. The Advanced engine imparted to these heavy vehicles makes them a class apart from the other heavy vehicles running on the Indian roads and highways. medium size vehicles.

and not just service. The firm has Research and Development improvement edge on international scale. The history of the firm can be traced back to 1948. Ashok Leyland is also renowned for producing auto spare parts and engines for marine and Industrial submission.  Eicher Motors was initiated in 3rd September. The modern automobile market in India has been considering key issue in the process of growth:  Customer care. when Goodearth Company was established for vending and repairs of imported tractor in the nation. military vehicles and also the second biggest commercial vehicle firm in India heavy vehicle division with a market share of around 27%. The firm manufactures various products such as Bus. buses.  Co-ordination with government to enable advancement.biggest producers of heavy vehicles such as trucks. The indigenously manufactured tractor was Introduced in the Indian market straight from Eicher’s Faridabad factory.  Road safety. Ambulance.  Searching through cut-throat competition.  Mazda represents advanced Indian expertise and manufacturing.  Used vehicle trade Automobile Industry Statistics by the society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) . 1960. Trucks etc.  Anti-pollution. The first firm to manufacture the first tractors in India.  Domestic as well as multi-national investments.

CATEGORY PASSENGER VEHICLES COMMERCIAL VEHICLES THREE WHEELERS TWO WHEELERS 20072008 1549882 1 490494 364781 7429278 7 20082009 1552703 384194 349727 7437619 20092010 1949776 531395 440368 9371231 AUTOMOBILE PRODUCTION TRENDS: CATEGORY PASSENGER VEHICLES COMMERCIAL VEHICLES THREE WHEELERS TWO WHEELERS 20072008 1777583 549006 500660 8026681 20082009 1838583 416870 497020 8419792 20092010 2351240 566608 619093 10512889 AUTOMOBILE EXPORT TRENDS: CATEGORY PASSENGER VEHICLES COMMERCIAL VEHICLES THREE WHEELERS TWO WHEELERS 20072008 218401 58994 141225 819773 20082009 335729 42625 148066 1004174 20092010 446146 45007 173282 1140184 .

INDIAN AUTOMOBILE COMPANIES:  Chinkara Motors  Hindustan Motors  ICML  Mahindra  Premier Automobiles Limited  San Motors  Tata Motors  Foreign automobile companies in India:  BMW India  Fiat India. with United Kingdom being India's largest export market followed by Italy. fuel-efficient cars has resulted in the expansion of manufacturing facilities of several automobile companies like Hyundai Motors. Netherlands and South Africa.5 billion in 2009. . Volkswagen and Suzuki. India's automobile exports are expected to cross $12 billion by 2014. India's strong engineering base and expertise in the manufacturing of low-cost. Nissan. According to New York Times. Germany. Toyota.EXPORTS: India's automobile exports have grown consistently and reached $4.

 Ford India  General Motors India  Honda  Hyundai Motor India  Mahindra Renault  Maruti Suzuki  Mercedes-Benz India  Mitsubishi  Nissan Motor India  Toyota Kirloskar 2.2 COMPANY PROFILE .

VISION: Achieving leadership in the medium/heavy duty segments of the domestic commercial vehicle market and a significant presence in the world market through transport solutions that best anticipate customer needs. MISSION: • • • Identifying with the customer. to make them more robust and to enhance their effectiveness and efficiency in achieving stated objectives leading to Superior products manufactured as also services offered by the company. Maximum use of employee is potential to contribute to quality and environment by progressive up gradation of their knowledge and skills as appropriate to their functions. Towards this. QUALITY POLICY: Ashok Leyland is committed to achieve customer satisfaction by anticipating and delivering superior value to the customer in relation to their own business. through the products and services offered by the company and comply with statutory requirements. ABOUT THE COMPANY: . against the best in the industry. the quality policy of Ashok Leyland is to make continual improvements in the processes that constitute the quality management system. Being the lowest cost manufacturer. processes and people. with the highest value -to-cost ratio. Global benchmarking our products. Seamless involvement from suppliers and dealers in the mission of the company to address customers changing needs and protection of the environment.

Responding to the operating conditions and practices in the country. captured in four words: Global Standards. the Non-Resident Indian transnational group and IVECO. Ashok Leyland embarked on a major product and process upgradation to match world-class standards of technology. The blueprint prepared for the future reflected the global ambitions of the company. became the design philosophy of the Company. The 5. the overseas holding by Land Rover Leyland International Holdings Limited (LRLIH) was taken over by a joint venture between the Hinduja Group. Since then Ashok Leyland has been a major presence in India’s commercial vehicle industry with a tradition of technological leadership. Access to international technology enabled the Company to set a tradition to be first with technology.00. India's first Prime Minister persuaded Mr. felt by independent India.000 vehicles we have put on the roads have considerably eased the additional pressure placed on road transportation in independent India. . achieved through tie-ups with international technology leaders and through vigorous in-house R&D. Ashok Leyland pioneered all these concepts. In 1948. an industrialist. the Hinduja Group is 100% holder of LRLIH). The Company's destiny and name changed soon with equity participation by British Leyland and Ashok Leyland commenced manufacture of commercial vehicles in 1955. (Since July 2006. Global Markets. In the populous Indian metros. power steering or rear engine busses. Be it full air brakes. "Designing durable products that make economic sense to the consumer. which in turn has moulded consumer attitudes and the brand personality. Ashok Motors was set up in what was then Madras. over-engineering them with extra metallic muscles. tailor-made for high-density routes. In 1987. for the assembly of Austin Cars.The origin of Ashok Leyland can be traced to the urge for self-reliance. This was at a time when liberalisation and globalisation were not yet in the air. Some of them like the double-decker and vestibule buses are unique models from Ashok Leyland. to enter automotive manufacture. four out of the five State Transport Undertaking (STU) buses come from Ashok Leyland. using appropriate technology". the Company made its vehicles strong. Ashok Leyland vehicles have built a reputation for reliability and ruggedness. Raghunandan Saran. Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru.

The total covered space at these seven plants exceeds 6. • ENNORE: Spread over 135 acres. 50. It has also become the first Indian auto company to receive the latest ISO/TS 16949 Corporate Certification (in July 2006) which is specific to the auto industry. Gear Box. Axles and other key in-house components. The more comprehensive ISO 9001 certification came in 1994. the assembly plants at Alwar.500 personnel. QS 9000 in 1998 and ISO 14001 certification for all vehicle manufacturing units in 2002.000 sq m and together employ over 11. along with a Press shop). • HOSUR : UNIT 1 Established in 1980.In the journey towards global standards of quality. Apart from producing various types of diesel engines (including the engines manufactured under license from Hino of Japan) and CNG engines. Hosur-I is the engine-manufacturing center within the Ashok Leyland production system. Ashok Leyland reached a major milestone in 1993 when it became the first in India's automobile history to win the ISO 9002 certification. Ashok Leyland Ennore is a highly integrated Mother Plant accounting for over 40% ALL production. three plants at Hosur (called Hosur I and Hosur II. MANUFACTURING PLANTS: Ashok Leyland has seven manufacturing plants – the mother plant at Ennore near Chennai. and Bhandara and state-of-the-art facility at Pantnagar. The plant manufactures a wide range of vehicles and house production facilities for important aggregates such as Engines. the plant also .

• HOSUR : UNIT 2 Ashok Leyland established this state-of-the-art production facility in 1994 at Hosur. The Shop is equipped to stamp select panels for Cargo cab.m. it is also the tallest in the Hosur industrial belt. Hosur II has won acclaim from several automotive experts who have visited the facility. including CNG buses. the Alwar Unit in Rajasthan is an assembly plant for a wide range of vehicles with an emphasis on passenger chassis. The versatility of the presses can be utilized for making panels of complex shapes and profiles with appropriate tooling and dies. Right now it houses eight presses and has the provision to accommodate four more. Spread over 236 acres. The facility is spread over 103 acres and is innovatively laid out. optimizing the use of all resources. etc. This state-of-the-art facility is housed in a 99-acre expanse with a built up area of over 15. G-45 and C45 FES . situated close to the northern market.000 sq. The complex also houses one of the largest press facilities in India for pressing frame side members. 55 panels and their variants. Hosur II houses finishing and assembly facilities including sophisticated painting facilities. • ALWAR(RAJASTHAN): Established in 1982.manufactures and assembles heavy duty and special vehicles. • BHANDARA(MAHARASHTRA) Ashok Leyland's Bhandara Unit houses manufacturing and assembly facilities for sophisticated synchromesh transmission and also has facilities for assembly of vehicles. Laid out with an eye for the future.totally. Marine Gear Box. • HOSUR : UNIT 2A Ashok Leyland’s brand new Cab Panel Press Shop is an imposing addition to the industrial skyline of Hosur. . AGBs. Axles. At 800 m above sea level.

it houses best in class industrial architecture combined with the latest manufacturing technologies that is also ecology sensitive. The facilities have been so designed as to accommodate further expansion in terms of capacity and future models. the Pantnagar plant of Ashok Leyland is also its largest and one of the most integrated manufacturing facilities in Indian commercial vehicle industry.000 vehicles will roll out of the Pantnagar plant. At full capacity utilization.000 sq. USA.• PANTNAGAR(UTTARAKHAND): Set over 190 scenic acres. Europe and India. The factory boasts of latest generation equipment sourced from global leaders in Japan. Speedy 3. Value creator 4. process control for high quality of output and flexibility to manage variety with quick changeovers are built into the machine and process selection. Ethical ASSOCIATE COMPANIES: • • • Automotive coaches & components Ltd (ACCL) Lanka Ashok Leyland Hinduja Foundries IRIZAR – TVS Ashok Leyland Project Services Ltd Gulf Ashley Motors Ltd Foundries Ltd • • • • .m of built up area. International 2. On 200. Innovator 5. THE FIVE AL VALUES : 1. 75. Designed on lean manufacture principles.

Metropolitan Transport Corporation (MTC). Parveen Travels. Chennai. ASHOK LEYLAND LTD. Tamilnadu. State Express Transport Corporation (SETC). • • • • • • • • • Honduras Armed Forces (HAF). Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation (MSRTC). Andhra Pradesh State Road Transport Corporation (APSRTC). Tamilnadu State Transport Corporation (TNSTC). (AUTHORITY FLOW) MANAGING DIRECTOR WHOLE TIME DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SPECIAL DIRECTOR GENERAL MANAGER . US Army. Sharma Transport ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE OF M/s. Kerala State Road Transport Corporation.CLIENTS (Not exhaustive) • • Indian Army.

DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER ASST.MANAGER SENIOR OFFICER 2. moulding the country's commercial vehicle profile by introducing technologies and product ideas that have gone on to become industry norms. GENERAL MANAGER DIVISIONAL MANAGER SENIOR MANAGER MANAGER DEPUTY MANAGER ASST.5 tonne to 49 tonne in haulage vehicles.  Luxura  Viking BS-I . from numerous special application vehicles to diesel engines for industrial. from 7. marine and genset applications.city bus .3 PRODUCT PROFILE: OFFICER For over five decades. Ashok Leyland has been the technology leader in India's commercial vehicle industry. Ashok Leyland offers a wide range of products. From 18 seater to 82 seater double-decker buses.

city bus  Viking BS-III -city bus  Cheetah BS-I  Cheetah BS-II  Panther  12M bus  Stag Mini  Stag CNG  222 CNG . Viking BS-II .

CHAPTER – III DESIGN OF THE STUDY .

To collect suggestion from the employees regarding betterment of welfare schemes and safety items.1 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: PRIMARY OBJECTIVE To find out the effectiveness of the employee welfare measures In ASHOK LEYLAND. • • .3. SECONDARY OBJECTIVE: • To analysis the various welfare measures adopted by the company. ENNORE. Evaluating awareness level of employees about the existing welfare activities and safety items.

3.2 NEED FOR THE STUDY ➢ The study is carried out to analyze the employee welfare measures. ➢ The importance of this project is to gain practical exposure and purpose insight on the topic under study. ➢ This study gives a good support for improving the human resource department. ➢ This study can be helpful to the management to improve its core weaknesses by the suggestions and recommendations prescribed in the project .

3 SCOPE OF THE STUDY: ➢ Knowledge of general level of satisfaction about welfare activities. ➢ Various analysis were made and necessary suggestions and recommendation were given. relevant to the conditions prevailing in the organization.3. . ➢ Improving the standard of living of employees. ➢ Creation of awareness of welfare activities to employees.

➢ The workers were busy with their work and had little time available from interview or a conversation.3. ➢ The researcher could not see all the members in person. . ➢ Information obtained from the respondents may not be free from personal bias.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY: ➢ The study is subjected to the limitations of time and resources.

shrm.3. we begin with the search of relevant material in the library.org www.com\ for motivation related articles www.splinger. We also took help of online material and resources in order to obtain the varied and diverse information as much as possible. The various online & offline sources used for this research are as follows: • • • • • • www. information and facts.qualitydigest.motivation123.com Human Resource & Management –Text & Cases by V S P Rao Business Today – article on how to keep employees happy . We referred to various books.com www. magazines and journals related to our topic of research. REVIEW OF LITERATURE To collect the necessary data.5.

PRIMARY DATA COLLECTION: In this stage I collected data through questionnaire’s given to the workers working at shop II in Ashok Leyland. I also visited various databases like EBSCO and splinger. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY RESEARCH: Research is conscious approach to find act the truth which is hidden and which has not been discovered any one applying scientific procedure. I used secondary data from the internet (old news items relevant to the topic. SECONDARY DATA COLLECTION: For background information. DEFINITION OF RESEARCH: REDMAN AND MORY define research as a “systematized effort to gain new knowledge”.3.6. websites of Ashok Leyland Limited) and other related magazines and journals. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY SAMPLE SIZE: 30 DATA USED: primary and secondary data POPULATION: 150 DESCRIPTION OF STATISTICA TOOL USED: Percentage analysis RESEARCH DESIGN: The research design for this study employed a descriptive survey method. .com for research articles on motivation of employees.

RESEARCH DESIGN: A research design is the arrangement of condition for collection and analysis of data in a manner. That aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economic procedure.RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: Research methodology is way to systematically to solve the research problem. It may be understand as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. (a) Unit: The sampling unit is the employees of ASHOK LEYLOND. . POPULATION: The population considered for the study was the whole employee in ASHOK LEYLOND. (b) Sample size: The sample size taken by the researcher is a 50. ENNORE. SAMPLING METHODS: In this study the convenience sampling method was followed. DATA COLLECTION METHOD AND SOURCES: The sources of data is a study as a primary data as well as the secondary data. ENNORE.

So one figure is taken as base and it represented by 100 Percentage of Respondent = No. The other information that is a relevant for the study collected from books and journals. of Respondent x 100 .(a)Primary data: The structured questionnaire was used for collecting the primary data. of Respondent Total no. (b)Secondary data: The secondary data was collected from personal department files and records. TOOLS FOR ANALYS Percentage analysis method PERCENTANGE ANALYSIS METHOD: The percentage analysis was used throughout the dissertation whenever required and frequency tables have been prepared for understanding the opinion of the respondents. The percentage analysis is obtained when ratios are multiplied by 100.

CHAPTER -IV DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS .

3% TOTAL 30 100% . only 13% of employees belongs to the group 25-35.TABLE -1 AGE GROUP OF THE EMPLOYEES AGE NO OF RESPONDENTS AVERAGE 25-35 4 13% 36-45 6 20% 46-50 0 0% ABOVE 50 20 67% TOTAL 30 100% CHART -1 AGE GROUP OF EMPLOYEES INFERENCE: Most of the people working in Ashok Leyland belong to the category of above 50.3% Above 20 years 25 83.4% 10-20 years 4 13. Nearly 67% of employees are above 50. 20% belongs to the group 36-45. TABLE -2 EXPERIENCE OF THE EMPLOYEES YEARS OF EXPERIENCE NO OF RESPONDENTS AVERAGE Below 10 years 1 3.

63% are getting around 25000-30000 and finally 20% are getting around 20000-25000. TABLE -3 SALARY OF THE EMPLOYEES Salary NO OF RESPONDEN TS AVERAGE Below 10000 0 0% 1000015000 0 0% 1500020000 0 0% 2000025000 6 20% 2500030000 19 63% Above 30000 5 17% Total 30 100% CHART -3 INFERENCE: 17% of employees are getting salary above 30000.4% of employees are below 10 years experienced.3% of the employees have the experience of about 10-20 years and 3.CHART -2 INFERENCE: Nearly 83.3% of the employees have been working for more than 20 years in the company. 13. .

20% of employees are neutral. 63% of employees are satisfied. TABLE -5 HYGIENE LEVEL IN THE CANTEEN Hygiene level Highly satisfied Satisfied 17 57% Neutral 7 23% Dissatisfied 1 3.3% CHART-5 .TABLE -4 QUALITY OF THE FOOD Quality of the food No of respondents Average Highly satisfied 5 17% Satisfied 19 63% Neutral 6 20% Dissatisfied 0 0% Total 30 100% CHART-4 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 17% of employees are highly satisfied.3% total 30 100% No of respondents 4 Average 13.4% Highly dissatisfied 1 3.

57% of employees are satisfied.40% of employees are dissatisfied . 40% of employees are neutral .7% of employees are dissatisfied .INFERENCE: From the above given chart 13.3.3.30% of employees are highly dissatisfied .3% of employees are highly satisfied. 40% of employees are satisfied. 6% of employees are highly dissatisfied. TABLE -7 BASIC FACILITIES (Drinking Water and Wash rooms) . 23% of employees are neutral . TABLE -6 FIRST AID CENTRES First aid centres Highly satisfied Satisfied 12 40% Neutral 12 40% Dissatisfied 2 7% Highly dissatisfied 2 6% total 30 100% No of respondents 2 Average 7% CHART-6 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 7% of employees are highly satisfied.

57% of employees are satisfied.3% of employees are dissatisfied . TABLE -8 EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE Educational assistance No of respondents Average Highly satisfied 0 0% Satisfied 12 40% Neutral 12 40% Dissatisfied 3 10% Highly dissatisfied 3 10% Total 30 100% CHART-8 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 40% of employees are satisfied.Basic facilities No of respondents Average Highly satisfied 7 23% Satisfied 17 57% Neutral 5 17% Dissatisfied 1 3% Highly dissatisfied 0 0% Total 30 100% CHART -7 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 23% of employees are highly satisfied. 17% of employees are neutral . 0% of employees are highly dissatisfied. 40% of .

30% of employees are neutral .20% of employees are dissatisfied . 10% of employees are dissatisfied. 10% of employees are highly dissatisfied. 4% of employees are highly dissatisfied.9 TRANSPORT FACILITIES Transport facilities No of respondents Average Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total 1 3% 13 43% 9 30% 6 20% 1 4% 30 100% CHART -9 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 3% of employees are highly satisfied. TABLE. 43% of employees are satisfied.employees are neutral. TABLE-10 RESTROOMS Restrooms Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total .

. 70% of employees are satisfied. 13% of employees are highly dissatisfied. TABLE-11 PROVIDENT FUND Provident fund Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No of respondents Average 4 14% 21 70% 3 10% 1 3% 1 3% 30 100% CHART-11 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 14% of employees are highly satisfied. 3% of employees are highly dissatisfied. 37% of employees are neutral. 27% of employees are dissatisfied.3% of employees are dissatisfied . 10% of employees are neutral .No of respondents Average 0 0% 7 23% 11 37% 8 27% 4 13% 30 100% CHART-10 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 23% of employees are satisfied.

27% of employees are dissatisfied . 10% of employees are highly dissatisfied. TABLE -13 LOANS AND ADVANCES Loans and advances No of respondents Average Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total 2 7% 15 50% 9 30% 2 7% 2 6% 30 100% .TABLE-12 HEALTH CHECK-UP Health check-up Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No of respondents Average 1 3% 10 33% 8 27% 8 27% 3 10% 30 100% CHART-12 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 3% of employees are highly satisfied. 33% of employees are satisfied. 27% of employees are neutral .

.7% of employees are dissatisfied . 30% of employees are neutral . 54% of employees are satisfied.13% of employees are dissatisfied . 50% of employees are satisfied. 13% of employees are neutral . TABLE-14 UNIFORM AND PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Uniform and personal protective equipment No of respondents Average Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total 6 20% 16 54% 4 13% 4 13% 0 0% 30 100% CHART-14 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 20% of employees are highly satisfied.CHART-13 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 7% of employees are highly satisfied. 6% of employees are highly dissatisfied.

13% of employees are dissatisfied . 27% of employees are neutral . 53% of employees are satisfied.TABLE -15 SATISFACTION LEVEL Satisfaction level Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total No of respondents Average 2 7% 16 53% 8 27% 4 13% 0 0% 30 100% CHART-15 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 7% of employees are highly satisfied. TABLE-16 DISAPPOINMENT OF ANY WELFARE MEASURE .

.16 INFERENCE: From the above given chart 40% of employees opinion was yes and 60% of employees opinion was no.Disappointment of any YES welfare measure No of respondents Average 12 40% NO Total 18 60% 30 100% CHART.

.SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGTH: ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ Good training system Good organizational climate Skilled Employees Standard quality product Well known brand with good reputation Planned and smart international WEAKNESSES: ➢ High Price ➢ Sales representatives are less ➢ Lack of experience in certain new sectors OPPORTUNITIES: ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ Demand for heavy vehicle has stepped up all over the globe Company provide better credit facility to dealers Government support Emerging market high demand for passengers buses at low costs THREATS: ➢ High Competition ➢ Downturn of the world economy ➢ High level of competition and environmentalism ➢ Oil rising prices.

V FINDINGS.CHAPTER. SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS .

Finds that (50%) of employees are satisfied with loans and advances provided by the company. Finds that (70%) of employees are satisfied with provident fund. Finds that (53%) of employees agrees that welfare measures have taken by the company is satisfied.3%) of employees are in the experiences of above 20 years.FINDINGS • • • • • • • • • • Finds that most of the employees are in the age of above 50. Finds that (63%) of employees are satisfied with the quality of food provided in the canteen. Finds that (54%) of employees are satisfied with the uniform and personal protective equipment provided by the company. Finds that (40%) of employees are in the stage of satisfied and neutral for the educational assistance provided by the company. • • • • • • SUGGESTIONS . Finds that (83. Finds that (63%) of employees are earning between 25000 -30000. Finds that (33%) of employees are satisfied on health check up conducting by the company. Finds that (37%) of employees are in the stage of neutral with restrooms. Finds that (57%) of employees are satisfied with the hygiene level in the canteen. Finds that (57%) of employees are satisfied with the basic facilities (Drinking Water and Washrooms). Finds that (43%) of employees are satisfied with the transport facilities provided by the company. Finds that (40%) of employees are in the stage of both satisfied and neutral with first aid centres. Finds that (60%) of employees are does not disappointed by any of the welfare measure in the company.

• • • • Company can also set up more sports. Proper care should be taken when employee working in dangerous machine. Health check-up conduct by the company must be improved regards to the health of employees working near dangerous machines. Extra hours worked can be reward with over time. • . cultural activities and family get together which improve employee to express their views. The facility of washrooms and restrooms must be improved.

So the company have to maintain the existing welfare facilities as well as they want to give extra facilities by interrogating and understanding the employees behaviour over the company . And it can reduce absenteeism and increase retention. this is very helpful for many career in HR field. the organization cannot succeed. machines and technology but if the quality of manpower is not good.CONCLUSION According to my project report. infra structure. BIBLIOGRAPHY . Any organization success and growth depends on employees. Employee welfare plays a vital role in every organization .which will helpful them to put their full efforts on their work . but some percentage of employees expecting various welfare facilities in the company. By improving the welfare facilities in the company it will helpful to achieve the company’s target without any dissatisfaction.And the quality and productivity of manpower depends on the welfare measures provided by organizations. By conducting this study I have acquired and in-depth knowledge regarding employee welfare and how it contribute towards organization success. material. I would like to conduct a further study in employee welfare if i get an opportunity. The company may have rich resources of capital. It shows the welfare facilities provided by the company are in a best level.

shrm.com www.projectreporton.com .scribd.splinger.com www.org www. TRIPATH  Research methodology by C.KOTHARI Website: www.sharetermpapers.com www.citehr.qualitydigest.com www.com www.com www.google.managementparadise.com www.R.com www.C.tancem. Personal management and industrial relationship by P.

...... How do you rate the quality of food provided by company? . Salary: (a) Below 10000 (c) 15000 – 20000 (e) 25000 -30000 (b) 10000-15000 (d) 20000 ....k student of Gojan School of Business and Technology undergoing a project on a topic Employee Welfare Measures..APPENDIX INTRODUCTION:I am Saravanaraj.... 1... The information obtained through this questionnaire will be kept confidential and used only for my academic purpose.......c.... I kindly request you to fill up the questionnaires with correct responses.. Marital Status: (a) Single 4..... Department you work in.. So... Age: 2. Years of Experience: (a) Below 10 Years (c) Above 20 Years 5... The following questionnaire takes only a few minutes but will provide me with valuable information...25000 (f) Above 30000 (b) 10-20 Years (b) Married 6.......... 3......

How do you rate the drinking water and washrooms provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 10. How do you rate the first aid centres provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 9. How do you rate the hygiene level in the canteen? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 8.(a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied 7. How do you rate the transport facilities provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 12. How do you rate the educational assistance provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 11. How do you rate the restrooms provided by the company? .

How do you rate the health check up provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 15. Have you ever been disappointed by any of the welfare measures? . How do you rate the uniform and personal protective equipment provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 17. What is your level of satisfaction regarding welfare measures provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 18. How do you rate the provident funds provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 14.(a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 13. How do you rate the loans and advances provided by the company? (a) Highly Satisfied (c) Neutral (b) Satisfied (d) Dissatisfied (e) highly dissatisfied 16.

.................................... Date: Signature: Thank you .......................(a)Yes (b) No If yes (kindly specify).......................

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