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YOGA. Physiology, Psychosomatics, Bioenergetics.

YOGA. Physiology, Psychosomatics, Bioenergetics.

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Published by yoga_uyf
This book is based on 19 years of yoga practice and 14 years of teaching yoga and healing. It contains over 300 pictures of asanas -- how to come into them and how to go out, energy flows and possible mistakes while practicing hatha.
Structurally, the book is divided into several levels so that it can be useful to all readers with different experience in yoga -- from beginners to experienced practitioners.
In this book you will learn how to assemble your own yoga complex, depending on your health. You will learn about inward criteria of doing asanas right and how to get practical results from your meditation.
This book is based on 19 years of yoga practice and 14 years of teaching yoga and healing. It contains over 300 pictures of asanas -- how to come into them and how to go out, energy flows and possible mistakes while practicing hatha.
Structurally, the book is divided into several levels so that it can be useful to all readers with different experience in yoga -- from beginners to experienced practitioners.
In this book you will learn how to assemble your own yoga complex, depending on your health. You will learn about inward criteria of doing asanas right and how to get practical results from your meditation.

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Published by: yoga_uyf on Feb 09, 2012
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03/30/2015

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Those practitioners, who are used to all warming-up exercises,
can look at their fingers. There is a simple test: stretch your arms before
you, your fingers straight, and hold for some time. Gradually you’ll see
that some of your fingers automatically folder. Those fingers that crook
less are the less energised. So the respective meridians are weakened as
well. In this case, warming-up palms, you should pay special attention
to these fingers and musculotendinous meridians. An additional effect
can be achieved, if you clench the wrists or make a mudra during the
warm-up. The warm-up should be done with Muladhara set-up, i.e.
with the feeling, working out tendons.
The simplest way to enhance the legs warming-up is to raise legs
higher than usual. The tension rises according to the angle. Another al-
ternative is to draw the leg aside, turning it — in this way other mus-
cles are worked-out. Depending on the angle of drawing the leg, we
can activate different musculotendinous meridians.

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