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New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer

Book 1B p.1/33

Suggested answers to Practical Workbook for SBA
Ch 7 Gas exchange in humans
Practical 7.1
Questions (p. 7-2)
1 A Nose C Epiglottis E Cartilage G Right lung I 2 Intercostal muscle B Pharynx D Trachea F Right bronchus H Rib J Diaphragm

Examination of the mammalian breathing system

Nostrilsnasal cavitypharynxlarynx tracheabronchibronchioles air sacs(in lungs)

3 4 5

The air is moistened, warmed and cleaner. It closes the entrance to the larynx during swallowing, thereby preventing choking. It protects the lungs and the heart.

Practical 7.2
Results (p. 7-5)
1 2 3 4

Examination of the pig lungs

There are three lobes in the left lung and two lobes in the right lung. The trachea is hard. The lung tissue is soft and spongy. The lungs increase in volume. / The lungs expand. The piece of lung tissue floats in water.

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New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer

Book 1B p.2/33

© Oxford University Press 2009

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer

Book 1B p.3/33

5

Questions (p. 7-5)
1 2 3 4 It is because they have a very rich supply of blood vessels. The trachea, but not the lung tissue, is supported by cartilages. Air. The lungs tissue floats in water because the air in the air sacs gives the lung tissue a low density.

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The air sacs are richly supplied with blood. 7-8) 1 In the air sacs. The epithelium of the air sac is only one-cell thick. 2 Practical 7. Carbon dioxide in blood diffuses across the walls of the capillaries and the air sacs into the air in the air sacs.4 Comparison of the composition of inhaled air and exhaled air Results (p.3 Results (p. In the capillaries. and then diffuses across the walls of the air sacs and the capillaries into the blood.4/33 Practical 7. This allows rapid transport of gases to and from the air sacs so that a steep concentration gradient can be maintained for rapid diffusion. The moist inner surface allows gases to dissolve in the water film for diffusion across the epithelium. the carbon dioxide concentration is higher than that in the air sacs. 7-8) Examination of the mammalian air sacs Questions (p. 7-11) Inhaled air Burning time of candle(s) Final colour of hydrogencarbonate indicator 14 Red / orange Exhaled air 10 Yellow © Oxford University Press 2009 . the oxygen concentration is higher than that in the capillaries. Oxygen in incoming air dissolves in the water film lining the air sacs. This provides a short distance for rapid diffusion of gases. The large number of air sacs provides a large surface area for gas exchange.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.5/33 © Oxford University Press 2009 .

Therefore. Lime water.6/33 Questions (p. The colour of lime water changes from colourless to milky. 7-11) 1 The exhaled air contains less oxygen than inhaled air. Some carbon dioxide diffuses from the capillaries to the air sacs.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. Some oxygen in the inhaled air diffuses from the air sacs into the capillaries. less oxygen is found in the exhaled air. The exhaled air contains more carbon dioxide than inhaled air. The candle in exhaled air burns shorter. © Oxford University Press 2009 . more carbon dioxide is found in the exhaled air. 7-12) The exhaled air contains less oxygen but more carbon dioxide than inhaled air. Therefore. The colour of hydrogencarbonate indicator turns yellow. 2 3 4 5 Conclusion (p.

It is biconcave disc shape. White blood cell is the least abundant. Blood platelet is the smallest. Red blood cell is the most abundant. © Oxford University Press 2009 . This provides a large surface area to volume ratio to facilitate the diffusion of gases. 8-2) 1 Examination of a blood smear 2 Red blood cell Shape Nucleus Relative size Relative number Biconcave disc shape No nucleus Medium Abundant White blood cell Irregular shape Round or lobed Large Rare Blood platelet Irregular shape No nucleus Small Occasional Questions (p.7/33 Ch 8 Transport in humans Practical 8.1 Results (p. 8-2) 1 a b 2 a White blood cell is the largest.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.2 Examination of the transverse sections of an artery and a vein Results (p. Veins have a larger lumen to reduce resistance to blood flow. Practical 8. 2 © Oxford University Press 2009 . The body has abnormal cell growth. 8-4) 1 2 Artery Thickness of wall Size of lumen Thicker Smaller Vein Thinner Larger Questions (p. The absence of nucleus allows the accommodation of more haemoglobin. The muscles contract and relax to regulate the blood flow to body cells.This increases the oxygen-carrying capacity of the red blood cells.8/33 b No. 8-5) 1 Arteries have a thicker wall which contains a thick layer of muscles. There are valves in veins but not in arteries (except in pulmonary artery and aorta). 3 The body is infected with pathogens.

3 Results (p. To provide a large total cross-sectional area so that blood flows slowly in the capillaries. 2 White blood cells can change their shape. 2 Questions (p. so they can move along the narrower capillaries. This allows a longer period of time for exchange of materials.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.9/33 Practical 8. 8-7) 1 Examination of the capillary flow in a fish tail fin Observations Direction of blood flow Speed of blood flow Diameter of blood vessels Behaviour of blood cells One way Slow Similar to the diameter of red blood cells The red blood cells are squeezing their way through the capillaries. 8-8) 1 To provide a large surface area for rapid exchange of materials between the blood and the body cells. © Oxford University Press 2009 .

10/33 Practical 8.4 Results (p. Water comes out from the aorta.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. © Oxford University Press 2009 . Water cannot enter and no water comes out from any vessels. Water cannot enter and no water comes out from any vessels. 8-12) 1 Dissection and examination of a pig heart 2 Water run into venae cavae pulmonary artery pulmonary vein aorta What happens Water comes out from the pulmonary arteries.

Valves are present to prevent backflow of blood. It is because the left ventricle has to provide a greater force to pump blood to all parts of the body (except the lungs). 1 2 The ventricles have a thicker muscular wall to pump blood to all parts of the body. It is because the ventricles have to provide a greater force to pump blood to the lungs or other parts of the body. 5 The septum prevents the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood from mixing.11/33 3 A Anterior vena cava B Right atrium C Posterior vena cava D Tricuspid valve E Right ventricle F Septum G Pulmonary artery H Aorta I J Pulmonary vein Semilunar valve K Left atrium L Bicuspid M Heart tendon N Left ventricle Questions (p. The ventricles have a thicker muscular wall. © Oxford University Press 2009 .New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. This ensures a high oxygen content in the blood in the aorta for the body cells. it cannot enter the heart because it is stopped by the semilunar valves. whereas the atria only pump blood to the nearby ventricles. whereas the right ventricle pumps blood only for a short distance to the lungs. it enters the heart and comes out as in the normal circulation. 8-13) 1 When water is forced through the venae cavae and the pulmonary vein into the heart. when water is forced through the pulmonary artery and the aorta. However. The wall of the left ventricle is thicker than that of the right ventricle. 2 3 4 3 Heart tendons are present to prevent the valves from being turned inside-out when the ventricles contract.

Seedlings obtain nitrogen only in 2 3 4 5 © Oxford University Press 2009 .) and trace elements (e. nitrogen. Leaves may curl and dead spots appear.1 Investigation of the effects of different minerals on plant growth Results (p. It ensures the roots get enough oxygen for respiration. Poor growth.12/33 Ch 9 Nutrition and gas exchange in plants Practical 9. 9-3) 1 2 Flask A B C D E Appearance of seedlings Healthy growth of seedlings. and then turn brown.) needed by the plants. phosphorus. Respiration can provide energy for the root to absorb minerals by active transport.g. Poor growth. Depending on the species. Older leaves start to yellow at the edges. yellow or purple. manganese. leaves may become dull green. Yellowing of older leaves. etc. zinc. magnesium. Seedlings cannot use atmospheric nitrogen directly. All the major elements (e. Poor growth.) Questions (p.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. It acts as a control to show that symptoms appear in the seedlings are due to the deficiency of a particular mineral. (Answer varies with seedlings. potassium. Poor growth. Yellowing of older leaves. 9-4) 1 This prevents algal growth in the solutions. copper. etc.g. Algae take up the minerals in the solutions and affect the results.

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. © Oxford University Press 2009 .13/33 dissolved forms of nitrate or ammonium.

potassium or magnesium results in the development of deficiency symptoms. 9-7) Examination of the structure of roots © Oxford University Press 2009 . other variables are kept constant.2 Results (p. For each nutrient solution in the experimental set-ups (flasks B to E). Practical 9.14/33 6 7 It leads to poor growth of the seedlings. they are transported from the older leaves to the actively growing young leaves. The deficiency of nitrogen. When the minerals are deficient. Yes. 8 Conclusion (p. only one variable (deficient in one mineral) is changed at a time.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. 9-5) Plants need different minerals for growth. phosphorus. Older leaves.

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. Numerous root branches and root hairs provide a large surface area for absorption of water and minerals. It provides a large surface area for absorption of water and minerals. (Answer varies with Ss.3 Design an investigation of the distribution of stomata on both sides of a leaf Design and perform an experiment (p. 9-8) 1 2 Root hair. The root hairs are long and fine. The epidermis consists of one layer of thin-walled cells only. water and minerals can easily pass into them.15/33 Questions (p. Therefore.) © Oxford University Press 2009 . It is not covered by cuticle. Practical 9. 9-10) 1 2 The upper side of the leaf has a lower stomatal density. They can easily grow between the soil particles to absorb water and minerals around them.

) C Collecting data 1 2 (Answer varies with the design.) Write an experimental report (p.) (Answer varies with the design.) (Answer varies with Ss.) D Risk assessment and safety precautions 1 2 (Answer varies with the design.) B Designing the set-up 1 2 (Answer varies with the design.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. Apparatus and materials Method 1: 1 pair of forceps 1 stop-watch 1 potted plant dry cobalt(II) chloride paper sticky tape Method 3: 1 vaseline 1 electronic balance 2 freshly-picked leaves of the same Method 2: 1 pair of forceps 1 beaker of hot water 1 freshly-picked leaf from a terrestrial plant Method 4: 1 microscope 2 microscope slides 2 cover slips 1 pair of forceps 1 microscope slide with a transparent grid © Oxford University Press 2009 .) Controlled variables (What will you keep constant?) (Answer varies with the design.) the design.) (Answer varies with the design.16/33 A Identifying variables Independent Dependent variable variable (What will you (What will you measure?) change?) (Answer varies with (Answer varies with the design. 9-12) Objective To compare the distribution of stomata on both sides of a leaf.) Control (What is the control in this experiment?) (Answer varies with the design.

Method 4: 1 2 3 Use a pair of forceps to peel off the lower epidermis of a leaf. Repeat step 4 for 3 times and take the average value. Method 2: More bubbles come out from the underside of the leaf. Repeat steps 1 to 5 for the upper epidermis. 2 Compare the weight of the leaves. Smear vaseline to cover the underside of the other leaf. Count the number of stomata in the field of vision. Observe carefully and compare the amount of bubbles coming out from each side of the leaf. Find a portion of the epidermis which fills the microscope’s field of vision at ×100 magnification.17/33 weight from a terrestrial plant 1 freshly-picked leaf (e. Mount the epidermis with a drop of distilled water. Put it on a slide.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.g. Weigh the leaves after one hour. Calculate the stomatal densities of the upper and lower epidermis of the leaf stomatal density 2 4 5 6 7 Method 2: 1 2 Immerse a leaf from a terrestrial plant quickly into a beaker of hot water. Measure the time taken for the dry cobalt(II) chloride paper to reach the same colour as a piece of moist cobalt(II) chloride paper used as a control. Zebrina) distilled water Procedure Method 1: 1 Use sticky tape to stick a piece of dry cobalt(II) chloride paper to the upper side and underside of the leaf respectively. Use a slide with a transparent grid of a stated grid size to estimate the dimension of the field of vision. Method 3: The decrease in weight of the leaf with the upper side smeared with vaseline is larger than the © Oxford University Press 2009 . Method 3: 1 Smear vaseline to cover the upper side of one of the leaf. 8 = n u m b e rf s to m a ta o a re ao f th em ic ro s c o' sp e fie ld f v is io (m m ) o n 2 Results Method 1: The dry cobalt(II) chloride paper on the underside of the leaf changes to pink faster than the one on the upper side.

18/33 one with the underside smeared with vaseline.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. © Oxford University Press 2009 .

) Number of stomata Stomatal density (number of stomata/mm2) Conclusion The upper side of a dicotyledonous leaf has fewer stomata than the underside. (Answer varies with the design. Fewer stomata on the upper side can reduce water loss by evaporation. Practical 9. © Oxford University Press 2009 . Stomata are present only on the upper side which is in contact with the air. 9-17) 1 It is used as a control.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. It shows that any colour changes in the indicator are due to light. Stomatal densities of both sides of a monocotyledonous leaf are about the same because both sides are exposed to more or less the same amount of sunlight. 9-16) Tube A B C D Light condition Bright light Moderate light Dim light Dark Colour of hydrogencarbonate indicator Before experiment Red / orange Red / orange Red / orange Red / orange After experiment Deep purple Light purple Red / orange Yellow Questions (p.19/33 Method 4: Area of the microscope’s field of vision at ×100 magnification (mm2) Upper epidermis Lower epidermis Analysis and discussion 1 2 3 4 5 The upper side of the leaf has fewer stomata.4 Investigation of the effect of light intensity on gas exchange in plants using hydrogencarbonate indicator Results (p. Stomata are absent. The upper side is directly illuminated by sunlight.

Leaves in light carry out both photosynthesis and respiration.20/33 2 a The colour changes in the indicator of tubes A and B show that carbon dioxide is absorbed by leaves in bright or moderate light. Conclusion (p.81 2. a The larger increases in pressure show that more oxygen is released by leaves in bright or moderate light. Since photosynthesis proceeds at a faster rate than respiration.42 +1.5 Investigation of the effect of light intensity on gas exchange in plants using a data logger Results (p.89 0. there is a net release of carbon dioxide by the plant.44 Change in pressure (kPa) +2.86 +1.4 Questions (p. there is a net absorption of carbon dioxide by the plant.39 0. Leaves in light carry out both photosynthesis and respiration. Leaves in the dark carry out respiration only. the amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by photosynthesis is much more than that released by respiration under the two conditions.25 1.04 Maximum pressure (kPa) 2.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. b © Oxford University Press 2009 . 9-21) 1 2 3 The water prevents the plant from heating up by the lamp.35 0.54 –0. b 3 Put all the tubes in a water trough. 9-21) Light condition Bright light Moderate light Dim light Dark Minimum pressure (kPa) 0. Since photosynthesis proceeds at a much faster rate than respiration. The colour change in the indicator of tube D shows that carbon dioxide is released by leaves in the dark. the amount of oxygen released by photosynthesis is more than that absorbed by respiration under the two conditions. Practical 9.39 0. 9-18) In bright or moderate light. In the dark. To allow the rate of photosynthesis to become steady. The decrease in pressure shows that oxygen is absorbed by leaves in the dark.

Conclusion (p. The volume of oxygen released per unit time can act as an indicator of the rate of photosynthesis. 4 Change the distance between the bench lamp and Hydrilla.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. 5 The volume of oxygen released per unit time. © Oxford University Press 2009 .21/33 Leaves in the dark carry out respiration only. Oxygen is produced as a by-product in photosynthesis. the higher amount of oxygen is released by the plant. 9-22) The higher of light intensity. Wrap the boiling tube with different numbers of layers of fine muslin or aluminium foil.

10-2) 1 To prevent the respiration of soil organisms and the evaporation of soil water from affecting the results. (Water turns dry cobalt(II) chloride paper from blue to pink. Cobalt(II) chloride paper Original colour Blue Not applicable Final colour Pink Not applicable Questions (p. The liquid is water. 2 3 4 Conclusion (p. Little or no transpiration will take place in plant A because the stomata are only slightly open or even closed in the dark. 10-2) Plant A B Changes in the bell jar A layer of moisture and drops of liquid are formed on the wall.1 Demonstration of the occurrence of transpiration Results (p.) Set-up A. transport and support in plants Practical 10. No. 10-2) Water vapour is released from plant A but not from plant B.22/33 Ch 10 Transpiration. The bell jar remains clear. © Oxford University Press 2009 . Water.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. Transpiration takes place in the aerial parts of the plant.

2 Measurement of the rate of transpiration using a bubble potometer Results (p. The air bubble therefore moves towards the shoot along the tube. When the plant transpires and absorbs water.23/33 Practical 10. 2 Practical 10. 10-4) 1 To prevent air bubbles from entering the xylem vessels of the plant and blocking water uptake.) Reading 2 Reading 3 Questions (p.) Weight of the entire set-up (g) © Oxford University Press 2009 . 10-7) Water level in the burette (cm3) At start After the practical (Results vary with Ss.3 Measurement of the amount of water absorbed and lost by a plant using a weight potometer Results (p. 10-4) Reading 1 Time period (min) Distance travelled by the air bubble (cm) Rate of movement of the air bubble (cm / min) (Results vary with Ss. water is drawn from the capillary tube. 3 4 5 No. The water absorbed is to replace an equal amount of water lost by transpiration. The movement of the air bubble may be affected by the friction between the air bubble and the wall of the capillary tube. The rate of movement of the air bubble indicates the rate of water uptake.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.24/33 © Oxford University Press 2009 .

It is because some of the absorbed water is used in photosynthesis and other metabolic activities.) The amount of water lost is slightly less than the amount of water absorbed. It is because the weight potometer can measure the rate of transpiration directly. © Oxford University Press 2009 . 7 A weight potometer is easier to handle and has a higher accuracy in measurement. the rate of water uptake is slightly higher than the rate of transpiration. etc. Practical 10. humidity or air movement. No.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. The amount of water absorbed is the difference between the water levels in the burette before and after the practical. The amount of water lost is the difference between the weights of the whole set-up before and after the practical. 10-10) Higher light intensity / higher temperature / lower relative humidity / higher wind speed increases the rate of transpiration.25/33 Questions (p. 10-10) 1 Light intensity. temperature. 10-7) 1 2 To prevent the evaporation of water in the burette which will affect the results. Error: Water may be present on the leafy shoot when the plant is removed from water. Improvement: Blot the plant with tissue paper before the experiment. (Answer varies with Ss. 3 4 5 6 Conclusion (p. As some water remains in the plant. 10-8) The amount of water lost is slightly less than the amount of water absorbed by the plant. but the bubble potometer can only measure the rate of water uptake of plants.) (Answer varies with Ss. Design and perform an experiment (p.4 Design an investigation of the effects of environmental factors on the rate of transpiration Propose a hypothesis (p.

26/33 © Oxford University Press 2009 .New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.

B Designing the set-up (Answer varies with Ss. 3 (Answer varies with the design.) C Collecting data 1 2 3 (Answer varies with Ss. / Temperature: use a heater. © Oxford University Press 2009 . / Take the average of several readings under the same condition. D Risk assessment and safety precautions 1 2 The scalpel used to cut the plant is very sharp and may cut our fingers.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. Handle the scalpel with care. Control (What is the control in this experiment?) The potometer that is put in normal conditions.27/33 2 Light intensity: use a bench lamp. / Relative humidity: use a dehumidifier. / Use a capillary tube with a narrower bore in the bubble potometer. Allow a few minutes for the shoot to equilibrate before taking any readings or ignore the first few readings. the distance travelled by the air bubble in a given time in a bubble potometer.) A Identifying variables Independent Dependent variable variable (What will you (What will you measure?) change?) The environmental The weight of water factor being lost in a weight investigated. etc. potometer. Controlled variables (What will you keep constant?) The parameters and conditions other than the one being investigated. / Air movement: use a blowing fan.) Use a shoot with more leaves.

g. Record the initial water level in the pipette. Record the water level again after a certain time (e.28/33 Write an experimental report (p. Apparatus and materials 2 pipettes (1 cm3) 2 glass tubings 2 rubber tubings 2 retort stands 4 clamps 1 wash bottle with water 1 scalpel 1 plant with leafy shoots Procedure 1 Set up the apparatus as shown on the right. 6 7 8 Results Condition Under an environmental condition being investigated Amount of water absorbed in 15 minutes (cm3) Rate of water uptake (cm3 / min) © Oxford University Press 2009 . depending on the environmental factor being investigated: Light intensity – near a bench lamp Temperature – near a heater Relative humidity – near a dehumidifier Air movement – near a blowing fan 3 4 5 Put the set-up in a laboratory with normal conditions to act as the control. 15 minutes). Adjust the water levels in the glass tubing and the pipette to the same level by raising or lowering the2 arms of the U-shaped potometer. 2 Put the U-shaped potometer in one of the following places. Allow 5 minutes for equilibration.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. Hypothesis Higher light intensity / higher temperature / lower relative humidity / higher wind speed increases the rate of transpiration. Readjust the water levels and repeat with 2 more readings. 10-12) Objective To investigate the effect of light intensity / temperature / relative humidity / air movement on the rate of transpiration.

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.29/33 Under normal conditions © Oxford University Press 2009 .

Wind blows away the water vapour and prevents the decrease in the concentration gradient of water vapour between the air space in the leaves and the surrounding air. a b Higher light intensity causes the stomata open wider.5 Examination of the vascular tissues of a young dicotyledonous plant Results (p.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. the rate of transpiration increases. the use of the bench lamp to increase the light intensity may also have increased the temperature of the surrounding air. Conclusion The rate of transpiration increases at higher light intensity / higher temperature / lower relative humidity / in windy conditions.g. More water vapour in the air space diffuses out through the stomata. Improvement: When investigating the effect of light intensity. c d 3 Error: Changing of one environmental condition may have changed another. put a beaker of water in front of the plant to prevent the plant from heating up by the lamp. Higher temperature increases the rate of evaporation from the water film on the cell surfaces and the diffusion rate of water vapour out of the stomata. It also lowers the relative humidity of the air. Hence. 10-16) © Oxford University Press 2009 . Practical 10.30/33 Analysis and discussion 1 2 To allow the rate of transpiration to become steady. The rate of diffusion and therefore the rate of transpiration increases in windy conditions. e. Lower relative humidity in the surrounding air increases the concentration gradient ofwater vapour between the air spaces in the leaves and the atmosphere. the rate of transpiration increases. Hence. Hence. water vapour diffuses out of the leaves more rapidly and the rate of transpiration increases.

at the centre and in the midrib vein respectively. Phloem transports organic nutrients in the plant. 2 The vascular tissues in the stem. © Oxford University Press 2009 . the root and the leaf are found on the periphery. 10-17) 1 Xylem transports water and minerals in the plant.31/33 Questions (p.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.

New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p. The xylem. 10-19) Questions (p. / Put the plant in bright light or near a bench lamp. (Any two) © Oxford University Press 2009 . / Put the plant near a heater. 10-20) 1 2 Yes.32/33 Practical 10. / Put the plant near a dehumidifier.6 Investigation of the plant tissue responsible for water transport Results (p. / Blot dry the leaves. Put the plant near a blowing fan.

© Oxford University Press 2009 .33/33 Conclusion (p. 10-20) The xylem is the main tissue responsible for water transport in the herbaceous plant.New Senior Secondary Mastering Biology Practical workbook answer Book 1B p.