P. 1
fusingbracketpressure33-1

fusingbracketpressure33-1

|Views: 94|Likes:
Published by Michael Schearer

More info:

Published by: Michael Schearer on Nov 19, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/09/2014

pdf

text

original

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

I’d like to preface this presentation by reminding coaches reading this article that it may be helpful to think as this pressure­bracket package  as a toolbox from which defensive coordinators can pick and choose the parts of the scheme that may be most beneficial to your defensive  needs and personnel. Rather that concentrate on individual technique, the focus of this article will be the strategy of fusing bracket coverage  with pressure concepts within the 3­3 stack defense, both with one safety (3 shell) and 2 safeties (dime and safety comprising a 2 shell).  The package provides a wide variety of “specific tools” to address specific offensive strategies.  In order to facilitate a sound understanding  and installation progression of fusing these concepts, it may help to compartmentalize the elements of the package: the pressure  component, the coverage component, and the bracket component.  The Pressure Component In order to eliminate new teaching, therefore saving valuable practice time, we will utilize the same pressure concepts we use in our base  pressure package from a one safety look (3 shell). Some of the base pressure concepts are shown in the diagram below:

1

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

Choosing which pressure to employ should be a function of your opponent’s pass protection schemes and your specific strengths as a  pressure defense. Some general rules, which have proven effective, are the following: • Avoid inside pressure vs. 90 protection; your inside blitzers are not likely to be a factor • Use gap exchanges between linebackers and down linemen vs. man protection schemes • Use overloads vs. man protection schemes • Use outside pressure vs. slide protection (send one more than they can block TO the slide) • Create mismatches vs. Big on Big Protection (Assign your best pass rusher vs. their weakest link) • Utilize zone­pressure and zone­blitzes vs. 90 protection when a quarterback will make predictable hot reads • Don’t re­invent the wheel; utilize pressure which your opponent hasn’t picked up well based on scouting

The Coverage Component The coverage component is the most complex and time consuming in terms of teaching and installation. The first element is man­to man coverage. There will be defenders playing press man coverage both with and without safety help in this  package. If you are a defense that already employs man coverage in your base scheme, then you will have little or no new teaching to do  2

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California when installing the package. We have utilized both inside and outside press technique and off­man technique over the years in our  bracket/pressure package. Because each defender may be called upon to employ both inside and outside press technique (depending on the  bracket call), we practice techniques in pre­practice during one­on­one passing drills and during practice during pass skeleton. In the past,  we have utilized trail man technique as well. If you aren’t a team that already utilizes some man coverage techniques, you may find the time  you must invest in order to teach the man coverage prohibitive. For that reason, we start teaching our man technique to our defenders during  spring, and continue to work on perfecting it during 7 on 7 passing contests during the summer.  The second element of the coverage component is teaching the Dime’s assignment in the two­safety shell­look. From a two­shell contour,  the free safety will be aligned on one side and the Dime back (who is inserted for the least­capable man coverage defender) will align  opposite, thus a two­shell look. The Dime can be assigned various techniques to execute, depending on the call. He may be a deep­half  defender, a bracket defender, a low or high­hole defender, or an off man defender for a blitzing linebacker. See Diagrams below

3

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

4

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

5

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California As the diagrams show, utilizing all of these techniques would necessitate teaching each with specific routes. Teaching the techniques most  likely to be included in a week’s game plan can maximize productivity. Unless you are playing a team that throws the ball 60 times a game,  it is not likely you would use all of these techniques on a weekly basis.  Bracket Component This component refers to the specific technique used by two defenders (a Free Safety and a Corner or linebacker OR a Dime and a corner or  linebacker), and the various calls associated with the package. We currently use inside and outside bracket technique, with the safety  responsible for one side of the passing tree and the other defender (corner or linebacker) responsible for the other. See diagram below.

X

X

Bracket Technique (in  and out)

C

C

F F

Corner maintains outside leverage on Free Safety maintains inside leverage on all routes on the inside of passing tree. all routes on the outside of passing tre
6

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

We begin teaching the bracket component in spring, and carry on through summer. We walk the defenders through each route, and  show them the proper relationship to the receiver we expect. We want each to overplay their half of the tree and anticipate which route  is coming, based on scouting and the stem of the receiver’s route. For example, we want the corner to overplay the out route and not  worry about an “out and up” because the Safety is responsible for the second break. Likewise, the Safety will overplay the post,  knowing the corner is in position and expects the second break for the post corner. We run these routes without balls being thrown to  get the defenders comfortable reading the routes. We utilize the bracket technique extensively in summer to identify and correct  technique errors. We also will identify motion and formations, which will invoke coverage checks, and we will force our secondary to  check out of the bracket coverage from day one so that it is done with confidence should the necessity arise during the season.  Specific Schemes within the Package “Duo” is One of the bracket pressure schemes of this package. It is most effective when the back is included in the protection scheme.  See the diagram below: QuickTimeª and a
TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

7

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

Some of the pressure we use includes the following: Ohio is a term for outside pressure, Indiana is a term that signifies inside pressure.  The nose is engaging the center briefly, and then dropping as a low hole player, defending quick crosses and draws. We may tag the call  to bring the pressure from the right or left, field, or boundary. For example, if we want outside pressure from the field, we would make  the call, “Duo Ohio.” Duo signifies double bracket utilized on the number 2 receivers and single coverage on the outside. Although this  coverage is best used when the single back is used in the protection scheme, a simple way to safely assign coverage to him would be to  teach the ends a peel technique, whereby they peel off their pass rush and cover the back on any flare by the back, and/or assign the  nose to pick up the back on a back’s release between the tackles.  8

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

9

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California Another scheme within the package from the base defense (three­shell) assigns the safety and a corner to bracket a pre­determined receiver. For  example, if the receiver to be double covered was wearing number 89, the huddle call would be “1 bracket #89 (blitz desired).” See diagram  below.

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

10

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

Some of the pressure that could be used with the 1 bracket scheme are shown in the diagram below:

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

11

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

The hole player would be defending draws, quick crossing routes, and quick hitting runs. Obviously, the offense may not come out in a vanilla 2  by 2 set, so checks should be in place. Some possible adjustment to trips are listed below:

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

12

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

1

2

2

1

Another part of the package is the “numbers” package we have been utilizing for years with our even front and 3­4 package, but have recently  adapted to our 3­3 stack. It is run from a two­shell look (3 down linemen, 2 linebackers, 4 man to man defenders, and 2 safeties). For teaching  QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor purposes, receivers are identified by number from outside­in. So, in a 2 by 2 set, the two receivers to the defensive left, the Z would be identified  are needed to see this picture. as #1, and the Y identified as #2. On the opposite side, the X, or outside receiver is identified as #1, and the inside receiver, the H, is identified as  #2. If the offense went empty, utilizing a 3 by 2 set, then the inside most receiver would be identified as #3. In the numbers package, we will be  utilizing a double bracket on predetermined receivers base on pre­snap alignment. For example, we may want to bracket the outside most  receivers in a formation, the receivers identified as the #1s. The Dime and left corner would bracket the number 1 (Z) on the defensive left and  the Free Safety and Right Corner would bracket the #1 (X) on the defensive right. 

13

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

Dime Numbers “22” Tiger Swap

Therefore, double covering the number 1s would be called “Dime Numbers “11” The first digit assigns the left safety (dime) to double a  particular, while the second digit assigns the right safety to double a specific receiver to his side.  Therefore, if we wanted to double both slot  receivers, we would call “22.” We can also assign the dime to be a hole player, cover for a blitzing defender, or play deep half, as we discussed  QuickTimeª and a QuickTimeª and a earlier. Some of the possible combinations are seen in the diagram below. TIFF (LZW) decompressor
are needed to see this picture.
TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Four­Man Pressure

Five­Man Pressure
14

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

Dime Numbers “Hole 2” Red

Numbers 
QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

15

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California

Due to space limitations, it is not feasible to list all the possibilities. There are dozens of pressure and bracket combinations possible in this  package. For reasons I hope you understand, I am not included many adjustments to trips and motion, of which there are many. A safe adjustment  on motion to trips is to keep the bracket on to the 1 receiver side, break the bracket to the trips side and assign the safety to man up on the motion  man while keeping the pressure on. Still another safe adjustment is to check to a base zone if there is concern of a mismatch favoring the offense.  An adjustment to empty can be handled many ways, one of which is to break the bracket to the three­receiver side and assign the safety to that  side to cover the back. If you’d prefer to keep the double bracket on, adjust to the third receiver to one side with one of the remaining two inside  linebackers and either keep the pressure on with the remaining inside linebacker or check out of the pressure and drop him as a low hole player.  16

Fusing Bracket Coverage and Pressure Concepts I the 3­3 Defense By John Rice, Head Coach, Eisenhower High School, Rialto, California A key is to have more than one adjustment per formation or motion. I hope I have been able to give coaches some ideas, which they may  incorporate into their defensive scheme. You may contact me at zacoach102@aol.com

17

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->