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English-Gypsy Songs

English-Gypsy Songs

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Published by Neill Henderson
Charles leland 1875
Charles leland 1875

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Neill Henderson on Feb 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/06/2014

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You may take your oath that he didn't stop

A saying of, How do you do %

But lie jumped on his horse and galloped like mad,

Till he got to some tents he knew.

And he said, "

My lads, when you're going to steal,

Take this bit of advice from me

Just find out first if some Gipsy deil

Ain't watching you under a tree !

"

Janet Tuckkv.

The iucideiit related in this ballad is given, with the ex-

ception of rhyme and metre, in almost the same words in

which it was told. It should be mentioned, however, that

the old Gipsy who contemplated stealing the hay, invariably

denies that anything of the kind ever took place. But as his

Rommanyfriends are fond of "

chaffing" him about the "

Gipsy

devil," and as he himself will sometimes, with a grave face,

insist that he never heard the story, it is probably true. In

Ilommany one negative is generally equivalent to an atfirma-

tive.

O RdMMANI CHtRICLO.

ROMMANI chiriclo 'pr6 o rukk,

Shunalo Rommani chiriclo pukk

Givelliii kushto, givellin sar,

Wavero chiriclo tiillera bur.

"

Pal, so's tiite dickdo kciiiifi,

Te tQ ghivdssa sa kushto aja ?

"

"

Tallero rukk kAi mandy shoni

Rinkeiii rani rovuU' adnJni.

"

Laki si kekeiii iiirr/ni)

;

Churedir si tonna chiriclo

;

Si bOro tug' adrii laki zi,

Kcirela pduni ndshcr avri.

"

Awer, tnlpal, ycck luT Ion akiii.

Tulla Avaver rfikk bcshclla ryo :

Yiiv te del l)ri.sh o' yilvs wtnigiir adiVim

Te vel 'dillla n'likiMii liiiiis roni."

84

ENGLISH-GIPSY SONGS.

"

Oh, mlro pal, sos tdchenus

Kairav i dui k6ttenus !

Yeck pirrfni te yeck pTriyno !

"

"

Awer sa, 6sti tute kairavit so ?

"

"

Besh^lla rani 'dr6 boro tuv

;

Lakis paiio dikklo's apr^ o ptiv

;

Chorava lis, te miikker' avri,

Ta lei lis avella prdi ml.

"

Te vel pdller(^lla mAn ap' an' alAy,

Awer kekera dava lis apre

Talla lifipperava la fon akdi,

Te sikkerava la ruzlo rye.

"

Te kuslito asa o mTli rye,

TVel rakker sa tAclio i giidli chi :

Awer kamescri te ka,mescr6

Ndstis jin sos kcrdo o chiriclo."

Chakles G. Leland.

THE GIPSY-BIRD.

The Gipsy-bird sits on the oak-branch high,

And talks to his mate on the hedge hard by ;

He's singing loudly, he's singing well—

Hear what the Gipsy-bird has to tell.

His mate says, " What is the matter, dear,

That you sing so loud, that you sing so clear ?

"

I sing, because under this very bough,

A beautiful lady is resting now.

"

She's all by herself, no inate has she.

No bird in the wood so poor can be •

Her heart is heavy with grief, I know,

For I am watching her tears tiiat llnw.

"But listen, a mile from here I .see

A youth sits un

;

He'd give the half of liis gold ami I.ukI

To win such a beautiful ladv's hand."

86

ENGLISH-GfPSY SONGS.

"

Little wife, it were a good deed, in truth,

To bring them together, the maid and youth ;

And of the two to make but one !

"

"Pleasant to do, if it could be done."

"

Look doAvn, little wife ; on the grass below

Is the lady's handkerchief white as snow :

I'll hasten to steal it, and on my track

She'll surely follow, to get it back.

"

And I'll lead her on over brier and fern

;

I'll never stop and I'll never turn,

Nor let her linger through all the chase,

Till she and the youth shall be face to face.

"

Then never again will she weep alone.

For he'll woo her softly to be his own,

And she'll answer him back with a softer word.

But they never will know it was done by the bird."

Janet Tuckey.

The Gipsy-bird, or Water-wagtail, can hardly be correctly

spoken of as singing. But both in Germany and England,

Gip.sies regard it as belonging peculiarly to them, and attach

strange superstitions to it. Thus they believe that it portends

the presence of Gipsies, and whenever a traveller sees it lie

will meet with the Eommany not long after. The Kipsi Kdsht,

or willow, is the Gipsy-tree.

bAllovas an yoras.

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