P. 1
Oracle Business Suite

Oracle Business Suite

|Views: 216|Likes:
Published by Silpa Kotha

More info:

Published by: Silpa Kotha on Feb 14, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/18/2015

pdf

text

original

Oracle E­Business Suite Financials Handbook 

David James  Simon Russell  Graham Seibert 

Oracle Press™  McGraw­Hill/Osborne  New York Chicago San Francisco Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Milan New Delhi San Juan Seoul Singapore Sydney  Toronto  McGraw­Hill/Osborne  2600 Tenth Street  Berkeley, California 94710  U.S.A.  To arrange bulk purchase discounts for sales promotions, premiums, or fund­raisers, please contact McGraw­  Hill/Osborne at the above address. For information on translations or book distributors outside the U.S.A., please see the  International Contact Information page immediately following the index of this book.  Copyright © 2002 by The McGraw­Hill Companies, Inc. (Publisher).  All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or  distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of  Publisher.  Oracle is a registered trademark and Oracle11i is a trademark or registered trademark of Oracle Corporation.  1234567890 CUS CUS 0198765432  ISBN 0­07­213230­2  Publisher  Brandon A. Nordin  Vice President & Associate Publisher  Scott Rogers  Acquisitions Editor  Jeremy Judson  Project Editor  Pamela Woolf  Acquisitions Coordinator  Athena Honore  Technical Editors  Oracle Corporation  Copy Editors  Rachel Lopez, Carl Wikander  Proofreader  Sossity Smith  Indexer  Karin Arrigoni  Computer Designers  George Toma Charbak, Melinda Moore Lytle, Kelly Stanton­Scott

Illustrators  Michael Mueller, Lyssa Wald  Series Design  Jani Beckwith  Series Cover Design  Damore Johann Design, Inc.  This book was composed with Corel VENTURA™ Publisher.  Information has been obtained by Publisher from sources believed to be reliable. However, because of the possibility of  human or mechanical error by our sources, Publisher, or others, Publisher does not guarantee to the accuracy, adequacy,  or completeness of any information included in this work and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or the results  obtained from the use of such information.  Oracle Corporation does not make any representations or warranties as to the accuracy, adequacy or completeness of  any information contained in this Work, and is not responsible for any errors or omissions.  About the Authors  David James is an information technology consultant. He specializes in finance and the Oracle E­Business Suite and has  implemented Release 11i in a number of leading corporations.  Simon Russell has worked for Oracle for the last four years as an Applications technical consultant. He specializes in  solution architecture and customization. He has previous experience as a systems manager and business analyst.  Graham Seibert is a financial consultant specializing in the implementation of Oracle Financials. He is the author of  Working with Oracle Development Tools and Oracle Data Processing: A Manager's Handbook.  Acknowledgments  Writing a book has numerous rewards, the greatest of which are the people you meet along the way. It has been a  pleasure working with our publishers, Scott Rogers, Jeremy Judson, Jessica Wilson, Athena Honore, and Pamela Woolf  at Oracle Press.  This edition has been a broader collaboration than the first. We are indebted to Tony Cash, of Oracle Corporation, for so  much of the content of Chapter 11 Oracle Order Management, and to Paul Dean, of Braun Consulting, for Chapter 24  Oracle Financial Analyzer. The authors also wish to thank Paul Dean (pdean@braunconsult.com) who with assistance  from Mark Hoferle and Marcus Thompson, all from Braun Consulting, Inc. (www.braunconsult.com), contributed the  chapter on Oracle Financial Analyzer.  We much appreciate the assistance of Oracle Corporation, for their comments and advice on various topics. Specifically,  John Zerbel, Leta Davis, Srini Subramanian, Kathleen Helbling, William Curtis, Margaret Wong, Paul Berman, Ruthann  Enthof, Terry Williamson, Paul Scott, Kathryn Wohnoutka, Ingrid Verbruggen, Saumyendu Ghosh, Seamus Moran, Helen  Shanahan, an Lori Burke.  David James  Simon Russell  Graham Seibert  Thanks first to Simon Russell who, by agreeing to coauthor the second edition, brought to the project up­to­date Release  11i knowledge, Oracle centric experience and a deep technical understanding. I am particularly keen to thank David Brett  for his contribution to the first edition, which through oversight was not acknowledged at the time. David produced many of  the scripts that re­appear in Chapter 23, "Tips and Tricks."  I was particularly pleased to get feedback from Seamus Moran and Helen Shanahan, both of Oracle, on euro aspects.  This year has been busy for everyone involved in the euro and I would like to thank them both for taking the time and  trouble to provide a detailed review.  The scope of the Oracle Suite is sufficiently vast that no one can be an expert in all areas. I hadn't myself been involved in  a support capacity for a while and knew that I needed first hand problem­solving experience to provide tips for use in a

book such as this. Therefore I was most pleased to be sent an array of tips by Pramila Mane, who is currently working for  Oracle in their support operation. Thanks Pramila.  I would especially like to mention those with whom I have worked over the past few years, most recently Shaun Begley  and Stuart Worthington at Tiscali in London. Integrating a dozen start­ups to build Europe's largest Internet service  provider was never going to be easy. However, with Shaun's drive, Stuart's pre­eminence in the DBA arena, several other  like minded individuals, and a common platform built on Oracle, it is, at least, going to be possible.  Earlier this year I had the pleasure to work with MI Services, a global consulting firm that specializes in Oracle Process  Manufacturing. They continue to apply an extremely high standard of Oracle know­how and operate a no­nonsense  approach to their commercial projects. For this opportunity I thank Eddy Osborne, Danny McDermont, Kevin Saunders,  and Dave Maughan.  My warm thanks to the people I met at Thorntons Plc, in particular Sue Edwards and Michelle Edge on the IT team, Dan  Shipman and Kate Bull in Finance, and Phil Hicking who led the project. At United Agri Products in Yorkshire our go­live  date coincided with the worst of the foot and mouth crisis in the U.K. My involvement was short term and much of the work  had been completed before me, nevertheless I should like to thank Paula Newby, Stephen Hardy, and Stephen Ng for  their support.  At Europcar in Paris I would like to thank Pascal Vallerent, Bertrand Darrieus, Paco Granero, and Mike Davey. They had  the foresight to adopt a radical strategic approach to the euro, and nine months later their choice has been proven a  success. Alan Walder and François Duflot laid the groundwork at Europcar and continue the success at Accord.  I admire the ability of Deirdre Joy, Val Gay, Pauline Leech, Chris Richmond and Trevor Jones to grasp the complexity of  projects at Consignia. The U.K. postal service is fortunate to have such focused individuals as it regenerates itself as a  customer facing commercial organization.  In the last two years I have learned most from someone whose skill and experience goes beyond the narrow confines of  Oracle Financials. Gary Woods has become a good friend. His disciplined approach and professional rigor have saved  the day on many occasions. I would like to thank also Tim Liddell, working at Accenture, for keeping me abreast of  commercial developments in the ERP world outside of Oracle; and to my brother Dorien James, now at Capital One, for  his unfailing ability to provide informed insight on all kinds of subjects.  Finally this book is for my family Jane, Julia, Victoria and Tanya, Anne and Dorien and Branwen.  David James  London  October, 2001  I have found that working for Oracle you are among a group of characters who are professional but fun and approachable  with it. They are happy to share their knowledge and experience. This helps make light work of even the most demanding  project situations. I am thankful to my Oracle practice managers over the years, most particularly Andrew Moore, David  Cosh, and Liz Sinclair for their advice and support.  I have been lucky enough to work with and be mentored by some exceptional individuals. Jon Levy has given me many  opportunities and the confidence to take them; Gary Woods guided the Post Office Property Holdings Project astutely and  successfully; Malveen Mangat at Railtrack showed how meticulous attention to detail saves time and assures a result;  Ramez Younan and Sarah Penn gave the Oracle Foundation team solidity and dependability; John Longman at Jarvis  demonstrated the power of discipline and method.  When a group of people turns into a team, the work they can complete is staggering. The interaction between Oracle,  client and partner organizations provides a fertile ground for learning and I would like to thank all those too numerous to  mention here with whom I have worked. In particular I must single out those at Jarvis for their patience, as my foray into  writing coincided with a very tight project schedule. My development team there was a model professional unit who  performed all that was asked of them.  Finally, thanks to David James for allowing me to join in the fun (and making it so), Graham Seibert for having done all the  hard work well in the first edition, and to my family and friends for remembering that I am still alive even if they don't see  me: I have really appreciated you being there for me.  Simon Russell  London  October, 2001

The greatest reward to come out of the first edition of this book was getting to know David James. His steady hand and  good humour kept this second edition on course, in addition to which he had the wisdom to ask Simon to join us.  Thanks Edgar Kline, without whose excellent DBA support it would have been impossible to implement the systems  described here, and to Dan Hinkle and Steve O'Hearn of Montrea Consulting. It is hard to sum up but easy to appreciate  all that goes into good management. Thanks also to Andrea Rosario for her encouragement and support.  Graham Seibert  Bethesda, Maryland  October, 2001 

Table of Contents 
Oracle E­Business Suite Financials Handbook .................................................................................................... 1  Introduction .............................................................................................................................................................21  Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................21  About This Book .......................................................................................................................................................22  New in This Edition...............................................................................................................................................22  Who Should Read This Book? ............................................................................................................................22  Organization of This Book ...................................................................................................................................22  Topics that Are Not Covered ...............................................................................................................................23  About Oracle Corporation........................................................................................................................................23  The Oracle RDBMS..............................................................................................................................................24  The Oracle Application Server ............................................................................................................................25  Oracle Programming Tools..................................................................................................................................25  Data Warehouse Directions.................................................................................................................................26  The Future Direction of Oracle Applications ......................................................................................................26  Reasons for Choosing Oracle Applications........................................................................................................27  Use This Book for a Successful Financials Implementation.................................................................................28  Establish a Plan ....................................................................................................................................................28  Understand the Company's Business Practices................................................................................................28  Understand the Applications Suite......................................................................................................................29  Get the Needed Level of Commitment from Users............................................................................................29  Staff the Job Right, and Give It Time..................................................................................................................29  Be Pragmatic ........................................................................................................................................................30  How to Get Maximum Value from the Applications ...........................................................................................30  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................30  Part I: Getting Started............................................................................................................................................30  Chapter List...............................................................................................................................................................31  Chapter 1: An Overview of the E­Business Suite......................................................................................................31

Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................31  The Structure and Scope of the E­Business Suite................................................................................................31  Accounting Methods.............................................................................................................................................34  Operational Control ..............................................................................................................................................35  The Package Families..........................................................................................................................................35  The Benefits of Implementing Oracle E­Business Suite .......................................................................................36  What Are Your Objectives? Setting Parameters and Expectations .....................................................................36  Reengineer—Now or Later?................................................................................................................................36  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................37  Chapter 2: Implementing the E­Business Suite—Essential Concepts ....................................................................37  Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................37  Capturing the Financial Information Relevant to Your Business..........................................................................37  Flexfields ...............................................................................................................................................................38  Workflow................................................................................................................................................................43  Accounting for Transactions ................................................................................................................................44  Meeting the Varied Needs of Complex Organizations ..........................................................................................46  The Organizational Model Within Oracle E­Business Suite..............................................................................46  Financials in the Global Businesses Environment ................................................................................................49  Creating a Model of Your Business ....................................................................................................................49  Global Financial Applications ..............................................................................................................................50  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................52  Part II: The Financial Applications......................................................................................................................52  Chapter List...............................................................................................................................................................52  Chapter 3: Oracle General Ledger .............................................................................................................................52  Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................52  The Heart of Your Accounting System ...................................................................................................................53  Overview of General Ledger................................................................................................................................54  Integration with Other Financials Modules .........................................................................................................59  General Ledger Setup..........................................................................................................................................68  Accounting Flexfield Design—Best Practice..........................................................................................................73  What to Consider..................................................................................................................................................73  Good Design Principles .......................................................................................................................................79  What to Avoid........................................................................................................................................................81  General Ledger Reporting .......................................................................................................................................82  Financial Statement Generator ...........................................................................................................................82

Oracle Financial Analyzer....................................................................................................................................87  The Applications Desktop Integrator (ADI).........................................................................................................88  Oracle General Ledger Data Model....................................................................................................................88  Conversion from Legacy Systems ......................................................................................................................90  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................92  Chapter 4: Budgeting and Allocations........................................................................................................................93  Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................93  Differences Between Financial and Management Accounting.............................................................................93  The Limitations of Financial Accounting.............................................................................................................93  Different Types of Reports...................................................................................................................................93  Bridging the Gap...................................................................................................................................................94  Budgeting ..................................................................................................................................................................94  The Budgeting Process........................................................................................................................................94  Budgetary Control for Nonprofit Organizations..................................................................................................95  Types of Budgets..................................................................................................................................................95  Allocations.................................................................................................................................................................96  Allocation Formulas..............................................................................................................................................97  AutoAllocations Workbench.................................................................................................................................98  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................98  Chapter 5: Oracle Payables ........................................................................................................................................98  Overview ...................................................................................................................................................................98  Purposes of a Payables System .............................................................................................................................99  Innovative Uses of Oracle Payables...................................................................................................................99  An Overview of Payables in Your Business.........................................................................................................101  Timing Your Liability ...........................................................................................................................................101  The Payables Workflow .....................................................................................................................................102  The Payables Cycle ...........................................................................................................................................103  Supplier Data ......................................................................................................................................................109  Accounting Methods...........................................................................................................................................111  Accounting Entries for Payables Transactions ................................................................................................111  Integration with Other Financials Modules .......................................................................................................113  The Oracle Payables Data Model .....................................................................................................................115  Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................................................118  Chapter 6: Oracle Receivables .................................................................................................................................119  Oracle Receivables and Your AR Business Processes......................................................................................119

iReceivables........................................................................................................................................................121  Creating and Managing the Customer Database ................................................................................................121  Customer Profiles ...............................................................................................................................................122  The Customer Account ......................................................................................................................................123  Business Purposes.............................................................................................................................................124  Transactions ...........................................................................................................................................................124  Invoices ...............................................................................................................................................................124  Tax Considerations ............................................................................................................................................125  Automatic Account Generation..........................................................................................................................126  Printing Transactions..........................................................................................................................................127  Debit Memos.......................................................................................................................................................128  Credit Memos......................................................................................................................................................128  Receipts...............................................................................................................................................................129  Adjustments ........................................................................................................................................................133  Commitments......................................................................................................................................................134  Refunds to Customers .......................................................................................................................................135  Transfer to Doubtful Debt ..................................................................................................................................136  Customer Follow­Up ..............................................................................................................................................137  Customer Calls ...................................................................................................................................................137  Dunning Letters ..................................................................................................................................................137  Statements ..........................................................................................................................................................141  Integration with Other Modules .............................................................................................................................142  Order Management ............................................................................................................................................142  Projects................................................................................................................................................................143  Inventory..............................................................................................................................................................143  General Ledger...................................................................................................................................................143  Receivables Open Interfaces ............................................................................................................................143  The Receivables Data Model ............................................................................................................................144  Advanced Features ................................................................................................................................................147  The Customer Account and Balance Due........................................................................................................148  Reconciliation......................................................................................................................................................149  The Purge Feature .............................................................................................................................................149  Receivables Conversion Issues ........................................................................................................................150  Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................................................152  Chapter 7: Oracle Cash Management......................................................................................................................152

Overview .................................................................................................................................................................152  The Need for Cash Management..........................................................................................................................153  Bank Reconciliation............................................................................................................................................154  Bank Statement Interface Case Study .............................................................................................................156  Cash Forecasting ...............................................................................................................................................161  Cash Management Interfaces ...............................................................................................................................163  The Reconciliation Open Interface....................................................................................................................163  The Forecasting Open Interface .......................................................................................................................163  The Cash Management Data Model.....................................................................................................................164  Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................................................164  Chapter 8: Oracle Assets ..........................................................................................................................................165  Overview .................................................................................................................................................................165  Registering and Tracking Assets ..........................................................................................................................165  The Asset Additions Cycle.................................................................................................................................165  Tagging with Asset Identifiers ...........................................................................................................................166  The Asset Key Flexfield .....................................................................................................................................167  The Location Flexfield ........................................................................................................................................167  The Category Flexfield.......................................................................................................................................168  Depreciation............................................................................................................................................................169  Ledger Accounting..............................................................................................................................................169  Business Taxes and the Need for Multiple Asset Books ................................................................................170  Depreciation Methods ........................................................................................................................................171  Leased Assets ........................................................................................................................................................175  Capital Budgeting ...................................................................................................................................................175  Converting to Oracle Assets..................................................................................................................................175  Converting Tax Books........................................................................................................................................177  Trade­offs Between Recordkeeping and Reporting ............................................................................................177  Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................................................178  Chapter 9: Oracle Purchasing...................................................................................................................................178  Purchasing Overview .............................................................................................................................................178  Requisitions ............................................................................................................................................................179  Suppliers .................................................................................................................................................................180  Supplier Relationships .......................................................................................................................................180  Communicating with Suppliers ..........................................................................................................................185  The Implications of Multi­Org ................................................................................................................................187

Multiple Organizations in Inventory...................................................................................................................187  Receiving ................................................................................................................................................................187  Exceptions...........................................................................................................................................................188  Receipt Routing ..................................................................................................................................................188  Drop Shipment Receipts....................................................................................................................................188  Productivity versus Security ..............................................................................................................................189  Payment on Receipt...........................................................................................................................................189  Integration with Other Modules .............................................................................................................................189  Payables Integration...........................................................................................................................................190  Projects Integration ............................................................................................................................................190  Order Management Integration .........................................................................................................................191  Inventory Integration...........................................................................................................................................191  Accounting Issues ..................................................................................................................................................191  Average and Standard Costing .........................................................................................................................191  Accrual Accounts................................................................................................................................................192  Automatic Account Generation..........................................................................................................................192  Implementation .......................................................................................................................................................193  Converting the Vendor Master ..........................................................................................................................193  Converting Transactions....................................................................................................................................193  Converting Purchasing History..........................................................................................................................194  Testing.................................................................................................................................................................194  Customization .....................................................................................................................................................195  Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................................................195  Chapter 10: Oracle Inventory ....................................................................................................................................195  Overview of Inventory ............................................................................................................................................196  Integration with Other Modules .............................................................................................................................197  Item Setup...............................................................................................................................................................197  Item Numbers .....................................................................................................................................................197  Attributes .............................................................................................................................................................198  Revisions.............................................................................................................................................................203  Bills of Material ...................................................................................................................................................203  Grouping Items .......................................................................................................................................................204  Categories and Category Sets ..........................................................................................................................204  Catalogs ..............................................................................................................................................................206  Issues of Volume ................................................................................................................................................206

Physical Storage and Management......................................................................................................................207  Inventory Organizations .....................................................................................................................................207  Subinventories ....................................................................................................................................................208  Locators...............................................................................................................................................................208  Lot Processing ....................................................................................................................................................209  Serial Number Processing .................................................................................................................................209  Balances..............................................................................................................................................................210  Counting ..............................................................................................................................................................210  Forecasting and Demand ..................................................................................................................................214  Industry Efforts to Improve Stock Movement.......................................................................................................215  Kanban ................................................................................................................................................................216  Warehouse Movements .....................................................................................................................................217  Conversion Issues..................................................................................................................................................217  Item Master Conversion.....................................................................................................................................217  Transaction Conversion .....................................................................................................................................218  Location Conversion...........................................................................................................................................218  Accounting Entries for Inventory Transactions ....................................................................................................220  Additional Accounting Transactions..................................................................................................................221  Variances ............................................................................................................................................................222  Average versus Standard Costing ....................................................................................................................223  Nonmaterial Expense Collection .......................................................................................................................223  Setting Standard Costs ......................................................................................................................................224  The Costing Tables ............................................................................................................................................226  Determining Sales Prices...................................................................................................................................228  Project Manufacturing ........................................................................................................................................228  INTRASTAT Reporting.......................................................................................................................................228  Activity­Based Costing .......................................................................................................................................229  Planning and Debugging Cost Transactions....................................................................................................229  Operation of Oracle Inventory ...............................................................................................................................230  Responsibilities...................................................................................................................................................230  Interface Manager Processing ..........................................................................................................................230  Archiving and Deleting Data ..............................................................................................................................231  Advantages of an Open Design ............................................................................................................................231  Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................................................232  Chapter 11: Oracle Order Management...................................................................................................................232

.........................................................................................................................................................236  Migration/Upgrade from Security Rules....................235  Processing Constraints ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................241  [1]  Using Credit Cards in Oracle Order Management  ...........................246  Available­to­Promise ........................................238  The Party Concept........................................................................................................................................253  Move Orders ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................242  Oracle Configurator Developer ......................................................................................................................................238  Customer Agreements .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................250  Demand Management Flow ...........................................................................................................................................................................................237  The 11i Customer Model ..................................................250  Oracle Shipping ...............................................................251  Pick Release ..................................................................................................................................................................................234  Functional Differences .............................................................................................253  Shipping Tolerances...........................................................................................................................................................241  Risk Management............................................................237  Workflow Integration....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................234  Attributes and Entities in Order Management .......................................................................232  OM Setups ......................................234  Defaulting Rules .................................................................................................................246  Shipment Scheduling .........................................................................236  Functional Differences ...........235  Sources of Values .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................244  [2]  Enhanced Scheduling  ....................................................................................................................................................................................................242  Items in Order Management.......................................................................................................................................................................237  A Single Source of Truth..................................................................................................................................................................................Overview ..............................................246  Specific Order Types................................248  Return Material Authorizations (RMAs) .......................................................................................................................................249  Oracle Release Management..................................................................................248  Internal Sales Orders ...............240  Sales Credits..............................................................235  Dependencies Among Attributes...............254 ..........................................................248  Drop Shipment........................................................................................................237  Migration/Upgrade from Order Types..........................................................................254  Freight Costs...............................................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................264  Revaluation .........................................................................................................................260  Order Purge ...........................................................259  Automatic Attachments ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................259  Decimal Quantity Ordering .............................................................264  Foreign Currency Transactions..........................................................................................................................260  Accounting ........................257  Price List Elements.......................................262  Order Import........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................255  Pricing..................262  Conversion Issues........................................................................................261  Integration with Inventory..............................263  Overview .............................................................................................................................................263  Chapter 12: Foreign Currency Operations..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Shipping Exceptions..259  Mass Change/Other Functionality.............................................265 ................................................................................................................259  Notifications........................................260  Integration with Other Modules .................................................258  Multicurrency Pricing..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................256  Oracle Advanced Pricing ...........................................257  Maintaining Price Lists ...................263  Multicurrency Accounting.............................................................261  Integration with Receivables..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................260  Integration with Order Capture ................................................................................................................258  GSA Pricing............258  Cross References.........261  Integration with Purchasing ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................262  Responsibilities...................................................................................................................259  Process Messages .............................................................258  OM Key Features .............................................262  Conclusion ......255  European Reporting .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................258  Customer Items ..................................................................................................................................................259  Folder­enabled Forms....................................................................................255  Containers.............................255  UPS Integration .........................................................

...................................................................269  Conclusion ............................................................................277  Setup ..............................................................................................................274  Oracle iReceivables ........................................................293  Client Extensions..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................278  Organization Setup.....................................................................277  Chapter 14: Oracle Projects...................................................................................................267  1­2­3 EFC..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................268  Migration to the Euro.........................286  Intercompany Projects .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................267  MRC and GL Translation—The Difference ...................................................................................................................................265  The Euro.......................................288  Interproject Billing ...............................................267  Multiple Reporting Currencies (MRC)........................................291  Integration with Other Modules .................................................................................................283  Billing .......................................................................268  Account Inquiry in Either Primary or Reporting Currency ........265  Balance Translation.......................278  Costing ..............................................................299 .........275  Implementation Considerations...........291  Reporting........................................................289  Project Processing Cycle.......................................................................................................................270  Internet Procurement.................................................................................................277  Overview ........................................................................269  Oracle's Vision and Direction ................................................................................................276  Conclusion ...........................................................271  Oracle Self­Service Time and Self­Service Expenses ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................269  Chapter 13: Oracle Self­Service Web Applications................................275  Other Self­Service Web Applications...............................................................................................................................................................................Conversion .......................................................................................................................269  One Step Subledger Processing....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................288  AutoAccounting ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................270  Oracle Self­Service Web Applications Architecture .......298  Data Conversion...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................266  Reporting in Multiple Currencies.......................................................................................................................................269  Overview ..............................................................................................................

............................300  Workflow User Client Tier ..............................................................325  Query Mode ..........................................325  Data­entry Mode.............................310  An Overview of Property Management..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................299  Chapter 15: Oracle Workflow and the Implementation Wizard .......................................................................................................................................310  Integration with Other Applications ...................................................................................................................320  Business Intelligence System....................................................................................................................................................................................................................324  Online Operations .............................................................................................................................................................................................................308  Using the Implementation Wizard ........................................................................................................................................................................319  Market Data Feed......309  Conclusion ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................324  Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................315  Oracle Treasury........................................................................Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................309  Chapter 16: New Applications in Release 11i ...............................................................308  Wizard Overview ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................323  Part III: Managing and Customizing an Applications Environment...................................................................................................300  Application Server Tier...........................................317  Integration with Other Applications .........................................................................301  Oracle Server Tier ......................................303  Using Workflow.................................................................................................................................................................................320  Conclusion .................................326  Navigation and Special Functions in Forms...................................................................327 ....................................................310  Oracle Property Manager .........310  Overview .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................303  Prebuilt Workflows...............................................................300  Overview .................................320  Architecture...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................324  Chapter 17: The Oracle Financials Environment .......................................................................................317  An Overview of Treasury Operations..................................................................................................................................................................................326  Messages.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................308  Why You Need a Wizard.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................323  Chapter List..........................301  Embedded or Standalone ...................................................300  Workflow Architecture ........................................................................

..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................347  Multiple Environments for Development.............................................................................335  Flexfield Validation ..............................................................................................................................................Display Formats............................................................337  National Language Support (NLS)....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................327  Multiple Open Windows ............................................329  Concurrent Program Parameters........337  Flexfield Definition .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................333  Key Flexfields..............................................................................................................................................................................................328  Batch Operations.....................................................................................................................342  Instances ...............................................................................................................349  Oracle's Application Implementation Methodology (AIM) ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................329  The Concurrent Manager.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................339  AOL­level Language Determination...........................................................................................................................................340  Alerts ............................................................................................................................................339  National Language Support for Reports................................340  Application Management ..............................................................350  Conclusion ..........................................348  Profile Options ..............351  Chapter 18: Oracle Applications Technical Architecture ....................................................................339  National Language Support for Flexfields ..............................343  File Storage............................................................................................................................................................................350  Hardware Considerations ...............332  Flexfields ...................................................................................................348  Multi­Org........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................351 ..............................................................................................................................................332  Printing and Other Means of Output ..........................................335  Contexts .............................................341  Security...............331  Request Sets ...345  Quickcodes and Lookup Types........................................336  Flexfield Security ...................................341  Users and Responsibilities ......................................................334  Descriptive Flexfields ....................................................................................................................................................347  Multiple Use of the Applications in Production.............................................................................................................340  National Language in Data ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................346  Managing the Applications Environment............

...........................................................................................................................................................................................369  Desktop Level Security Considerations.............Overview .............................................................................362  Platinum Versions...367  Unauthorized Activity by Authorized Users of the Apps........................................................................................367  Physical Security Threats ........364  The Universe of Threats ..........................................................................................................................................................363  Architecture of the Financials............................................370  Countermeasures.............................370  Development and Production Environments.....................................................................................362  Backups and Cloning Environments.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................363  Conclusion ..........................................................................................................354  Communications for Each Type of Session ..............................................................................................................................372  Control of Internet Access .................................................................................................367  Unauthorized Users of the Oracle Applications .........................................................................................................363  Chapter 19: Security ........................................................................................................................................................................................352  Architecture Components ..............362  Oracle Enterprise Manager.................................................................................................................................................................................................355  Mapping the Architecture to Hardware ...................................................351  Release 11i—The E­Business Suite.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................362  Support Advances and Tools ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................352  The Client Tier ...............................................................................370  Network Level Compromises...................................... Memory................................................................................................................................................................................................ and Disk Space ............................................................................................................................................................368  RDBMS Level Compromise..................361  The Transition to Global Installations ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................358  Base Software and Communication Technologies....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................371  Security Policy Definition .........................................................................................................................................367  Damage Caused by Fraudulent Users ..................................................355  Database Server Sizing: Your Processor.....................................................368  Threats Outside of the Oracle Applications.....................356  Windows and UNIX Operating Systems..............................................361  Time Zones .......................371  Access Control Policies .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................363  Overview ...............................373 ........................353  The Applications Tier..............................................................................................353  The Database Tier.................................

.............................................414  Configuration Management ...........................................................................................383  Custom Output...........................................377  Strong Authentication.........................................................................................414  Document Control ....................................410  User Reference Manuals ............................................................................380  Overview .............381  Risks and Costs in Customization ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................406  Custom Forms ............................................................................................402  Using Descriptive Flexfields ............................................................................................................419  Chapter 21: Project Organization and Management .........................................................................................................................378  Conclusion ................................................................................................396  Populating the Open Interfaces..........................................................................................................................................................................407  Performance Tuning...............................................378  Virus Threats....413  Using a Regression Tester for Mass Updates ...................................414  Log Maintenance ............................................................................................................................................................................................................410  Reading Code...........................................................................................................................397  Scripts for Inserting Rows into Standard Tables.411  Detailed Table Analysis ...............................................................................378  Hacker Countermeasures..................................................408  The Analysis Process ..............................................380  Anticipating and Planning Customizations and Modifications ....................................................................................................................................................................................................390  Overview of the Open Interfaces...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................An Overview of Public Key Cryptography ...........................................................................................410  Laboratory Method ..............................................................................411  Regression Testing .....................................................................................................................................................................399  Updating Standard Tables .........................................................................................................................403  Customizing Workflows.....375  Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) .....................................................418  Conclusion ..........................................................................................................................................................................................406  Messages..............................................................................................................................373  Implementation of Public Key Cryptography..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................381  The Framework for Modifications..................................................................................................410  Technical Reference Manuals (TRMs) .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................379  Chapter 20: Customization and Modification.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................419 ...........................................

....................................................................................................................................................................................................426  Functional Team Leads .................................443 ................................434  Applications User References .........................430  Project Phasing ...............................................................................................419  Oracle Software as a Step Toward Corporate Maturity ..................................442  Quality Assurance .........................................................................................435  Online Help Within the Applications........................Overview ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................436  Third­party Oracle References ..................................................................................................................................................433  Managing Bug Fixes.........439  Testing.............................................436  Oracle Tools and RDBMS References...............................436  Applications Technical References...........................................................................432  Resolving Errors: iTARs and Patches .............................................422  The Project Budget ........................................................................................................................................................................434  Reference Sources for Oracle Applications ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................431  Managing Your Relationship with Oracle .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................421  Developing the Project Plan..........................................................................................................................................................437  Managing Implementation Activities ...................................443  Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................437  Operating System References .....................................................437  The Solution Definition...............................................................................442  Problem Management..................................438  Written Business Procedures ..............................................................................424  The Project Management Hierarchy ......................................................................428  Sources of Staffing .........................425  Team Formation ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................435  AOL References .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................420  Spreadsheets versus Project Management Software.....................................................................................................................428  Programmers .............................................................................................................................................................................................................437  User's Group Materials ....................................................................................................................................................427  Database Administrator .........................................................440  Configuration Management ...................432  Oracle Releases and Versions...............................................430  Types of Contracts..........................................................429  Staff Size .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................460  Automatic Job Submission ...............................................................................................................................................................464 ..............................................................446  Conversion Processing and Cleanup ...........................................................................................................445  Cutover Training .............................................456  The Import References Table...............................................................................................444  Introductory Training .......................452  Sunsetting the Legacy System...459  Segment­level Security ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................462  FNDXLOAD........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................453  Conclusion ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................445  The Data Conversion Approach..........458  Freeze GL Journals...........................................................................................................................................................................................461  Forms Runtime Diagnostics (FRD)........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................449  The Cutover Plan ....445  Data Mapping: Legacy to Oracle..................................................................460  Rollback the Effect of Asset Depreciation .................................................................................................................................................................................460  Changing the Date Format .................................................................................................................450  Phased Cutover .......................................................................443  Overview ......................................................................Chapter 22: Data Conversion.............................................................................453  Chapter 23: Tips and Tricks ............................................................................... Training........453  Overview ...............................................443  Training Requirements............454  Closing Periods—Month End and Year End..............456  The Global Accounting Engine.................................................................458  Subledger Drilldown in 11i .................................................................................................................444  Technical Training .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. and Cutover...................................................................462  Context Variable Used by Multi­org Views......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................447  Conversion Strategies............459  Cross­ledger Transactions...................454  Finding Rogue Transactions.............458  Lesser­known Features .............................................................................................460  Matching and Carry Forward in GL.............................................................................................................................................................................455  Year End .............................................................................................................461  Hard­to­Guess Password Validation...............................................................................................................................................................................................452  Post­cutover Activity.............................................................................................................................................................

..........................469  Case Study....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................468  Researching Hanging Processes...................................................................................................................477  Express Database Design ..........472  Concurrent Manager Queue Design.......................................485  OFA Application Design...................................................................................................473  Oracle Express Server.................................................486  Loading Non­Oracle General Ledger Information ............................................473  Express Architecture and Components..................................................................................472  Chapter List ................................................................................................................................................................................................................471  Running the GL Optimizer ..............464  Troubleshooting Common Problems ........................................................................................................................................................................................493  Future Product Direction.........................................................................................................................................................................................................472  Chapter 24: Oracle Financial Analyzer...483  Implementing OFA.........................................................................................469  Rebuilding Interface Tables................478  How Express Stores Data.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................467  Mismatched Account Types ..............................................................................................................466  Invalid Bank Accounts and EFT Programs .........................469  Boosting the Hit Rate of Receivables Lockbox.......................472  Part IV: Other Oracle Applications..............................................................................................................468  Correcting Data Problems ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................483  OFA Architecture .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................478  Sparse Data ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................473  Oracle Express .......................491  Other OFA Implementation Tasks .........................................................................................................................................................................................465  Identifying Customizations Prior to an Upgrade .............Using eTRM .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................472  Conclusion .475  Express Data Model ................................................................................................467  Mass Update of Customer Information in Receivables........................................................................................................................................................481  Oracle Financial Analyzer......................................................................473  Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................473  Overview ....................485  OFA General Ledger Link...................494 ...................................................................................................480  Other Express Storage and Performance Considerations......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ supply chain management.............................................................................495  Marketing......................................................499  The Human Resources Suite .....................................................................................................................................505  Oracle Quality ........................................................................................................ their purpose has remained unchanged................................ World­class business automation builds on the  preeminent Oracle database using the full range of Oracle's own development tools............................................................502  The Manufacturing Suite.........................................................495  Customer Relationship Management (CRM) .....................  Oracle Applications serves a broad market ranging from small.............................................................................504  Oracle Material Requirements Planning........................................................................................495  Overview .............................................................................505  Oracle Flow Manufacturing.... and customer relationship  management.....................................................................................................................................................................................502  Oracle Training Administration ......................501  Oracle Human Resources .............................................................................501  Oracle Payroll ................496  Sales...................... While the application suite has  grown over the last decade........................497  Service......................................................503  Oracle Bill of Materials ..............................................494  Chapter 25: Overview of CRM............................ PC­based organizations to Fortune 500 companies  downsizing from rooms full of mainframes.........................................................................................505  Oracle Process Manufacturing (OPM).......................................................... HR...... The suite is fine­tuned to enable  rapid implementation.......................................................................................................................508  Conclusion ............................................................................................................................ Applications users and their data processing support staff have more in  common: They appreciate the benefits that Oracle's immense power and flexibility can bring—and they almost always  underestimate the amount of planning.................................................................................................................. project systems.........................................................502  Oracle Time Management ....................509  Introduction  Overview  The Oracle E­Business Suite is an integrated product made up of more than 150 software modules for financial  management...................................................................................................................................................................  Oracle Applications combines extensive functionality with state­of­the­art technology...............................................................Conclusion ...........................................................503  Oracle Engineering.................... manufacturing............................................. and Manufacturing.................504  Oracle Master Production Schedule ............................................ human resources.................. Application software is a cornerstone  of Oracle's strategic direction........504  Oracle Work in Process ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... and hard work required on their part to achieve those benefits........................................................................... preparation........................... Oracle Corporation has built its reputation in the database market................................. .....................................................................................................

 Finance managers and  systems personnel recognize that they can draw from the collective wisdom of the thousands of organizations that have  already implemented Oracle Applications. but rather a pragmatic  approach to understanding the Applications.  This book is not an Oracle marketing brochure or a replacement for the reference manuals. The book is aimed at business people with a managerial accounting  background and technicians with information technology experience. . In  describing the functionality we have focused on the Oracle Financials modules. We do this by detailing specific information on the technical aspects of Oracle Financials for accountants. and the  Automatic Account Generator have been covered in depth.  Part II covers the function and the implementation issues involved with using the Financial Applications.This book focuses on those Application modules that are oriented toward financial management. If you are totally new to Oracle  Applications. The purpose of this book is to share much of the knowledge and hindsight that  has been accumulated by all three authors during many years of successful Oracle Applications implementation projects. In addition to fully revising the chapters  in the last edition. We have assumed that the business people have no  specific technical skills and that the technicians have no accounting knowledge. Significant changes to  existing features introduced in Release 11i.  "Beginning­to­intermediate" understates this book's utility. five entirely new chapters have been added. It should repay the time  spent in reading many times over. New Applications in Release 11i (Chapter 16).  Organization of This Book  §  §  Part I contains an overview of the scope. we  think. The cross­pollination of ideas will assist developers who  need to understand the underlying business functions before they can reliably attempt customizations and modifications.  About This Book  The number of organizations that choose the E­Business Suite as the logical way to handle their core financial procedures  is growing rapidly. This material is an overture to themes that appear later in the book.  Who Should Read This Book?  The data processors and the functional users have to pull in tandem to install the Applications. and their colleagues. and Oracle Financial Analyzer (Chapter 24). the essential concepts of Oracle Financials. and the essential concepts underlying the Oracle  Applications suite. This second  edition has been updated to cover Oracle's 11i Release of the E­Business Suite.  Oracle Workflow and the Implementation Wizard (Chapter 15). the underlying technical aspects. and some  of the underlying technical and accounting theory. We have attempted to highlight the integration aspects of each  Application. While only the reference materials that Oracle itself publishes can provide the depth that specialists  need in each functional area.  and providing guidance on the business functionality for implementers and developers. you should read Part I first. and the  management and organization of implementation projects.  The Applications force an integrated view of the company. Many are moving from legacy administration systems to UNIX­ or Windows 2000­based open  systems—and implementing Oracle Financials as a standard company­wide accounting system.  New in This Edition  Our first book (Oracle Financials Handbook) covered Smart Client Release 10. and a practical manual for any implementation team. and Oracle Human Resources. Self­Service Web applications.7. the functionality. CRM. The chapters  in Part II are included for your ongoing reference; they need not be read in order. A large part of the book's appeal. Our aim throughout has  been to present three themes: the business functionality of these modules. the common frame of reference they need  to work together on integrating the system. This book is aimed at  people who are involved with implementation—people with inquiring minds who will want to get a synopsis of Oracle  Financials and a preview of the complexities and pitfalls of implementing packaged software. We have pitched this book  to provide each with a broad understanding of the other's role. and help you avoid costly mistakes. Oracle  Applications Technical Architecture (Chapter 18). this book will provide them. The book is divided into four parts to reflect these threads. Lastly the functional enhancements relevant to each  application have been addressed in Part II of this book. the technology and  project management chapters apply equally to Oracle Manufacturing. such as Order Management. Despite this focus. Almost every reader will be a beginner with respect to some of  the topics we cover.  We explain how to organize a successful implementation project. will be interrelating business decisions and technical aspects in a way that both business people and technicians  can understand. It offers the kind of outside perspective that Oracle could not provide with  regard to conversion and integration. These cover material on Oracle Projects (Chapter 14). as well as Release 11.

 McCormick and Dodge. Justice Department. Open alternatives to IBM. project organization and management. among them DEC. and software  development will nevertheless be of benefit to readers working with these vertical market products. however. however.  Client/server's graphical user interface (GUI) proved to be so attractive that it overcame the architecture's shortcomings in  cost and performance. for most of the 1980s. There is no space to cover upgrades; this book is written from the  perspective of a fresh implementation at a Greenfield site. Oracle released powerful "fourth­  generation" development tools to make it easy for programmers to use the database for data capture.  Oracle Applications followed a different growth path than competing products. Their vision was correct; the Internet is a better  architecture for delivering enterprise solutions. and the  nonproprietary UNIX operating system. and later financial and manufacturing software using  that technology. PeopleSoft developed their suite of human resources. would provide enterprises with plentiful and inexpensive processing power. and  American Software fought for dominance in the world of applications software. The  vision of Oracle's founder and longtime CEO Larry Ellison was that a database would be essential to exploiting that  power—and that the database could be proprietary. Meanwhile.  saw the limits of client/server. These may each be implemented on their own or. tools.  The "fourth­generation" programming languages add significant value by making programmers hugely more productive. is not to program at all.  By the late 1980s Oracle's database and tools were robust enough to compete with IBM in supporting enterprise­level  systems. and saw beyond it to the Internet. The founding vision behind Oracle was similar to that of Microsoft. the environment in which the Applications  operate.S. Ellison's Internet vision experienced technical delays. through evolutionary market forces aided by pressure from the U.  CRM. SAP reengineered their mainframe­hosted R2 software to run in client/server mode. seeing the dramatic value Oracle could offer using its powerful database. and development  expertise to develop world­class applications. Oracle.  The greatest boon to programmer productivity. This section is essential for anyone with  management responsibility for an Oracle Applications implementation. Though he  rightly predicted the exponential growth of the 'Net.  §  Oracle Clinical  §  Oracle Public Sector Financials  §  Oracle Student Systems  §  Oracle Energy  §  Oracle Consumer Packaged Goods  §  Oracle Grants Management  We hope that the material we do cover on system set up. At the same period during the 1980s  when Oracle was claiming its position as the dominant open­systems database. Oracle's competition embraced client­  server computing; the model for enterprise computing that emerged along with the Windows desktop environment in the  early 1990s. Here you're introduced to the  common building blocks that give the Applications their power and unity. he appears to have underestimated the time it would take until . Oracle's character­mode applications lost ground to their GUI­based competitors despite Oracle's  superior performance and functionality. and Manufacturing.  Oracle Corporation experienced phenomenal growth. as is often the case. Each  successive version of its database product offered more features and greater reliability. They worked primarily within the IBM world  of proprietary operating systems and databases and the COBOL programming language. doubling its sales each year.  About Oracle Corporation  Oracle likes leaning into the future.  Part IV is an overview of the E­Business Suite products. Unfortunately it proved to be uncomfortably far in the future. served at its own test site. Oracle. whose explosive  growth presented a major need within the company for integrated software controls. reports. major  opportunities emerged in the technical community. As the IBM  monolith cracked.  Topics that Are Not Covered  Some important topics could not be covered. which are peripheral to our main theme: Financial Analyzer. and the Oracle programming tools that can help you customize the Applications to meet your specific needs. MSA. committed to building a financial software suite. in consort with  the core Financial Applications. Ellison. and ad­hoc  queries.§  §  Part III covers the technical and managerial issues that apply to all the Applications. HP. HR. Oracle's product placements that address industry­specific  needs are too diverse to cover in a book such as this.  You'll learn about the organization and management of an Oracle Application implementation project and the live­  operation issues you must consider once you are up and running.

  The relational model was simply a better way of looking at data than the hierarchical and networked models it replaced. the RDBMS. which builds on the most significant portion of Oracle's Smart Client investment. 10. Strong security features have been  implemented in Oracle's Web products. This is  the Apache Web server that has the best performance of any product in the sector. It uses Developer  6i.  Initially. expanding . They announced  Smart Client. Microsoft parlayed a product they bought called QDOS (Quick  and Dirty Operating System) into a desktop monopoly.  The growth of Oracle's software products slowed as their client­server offerings suffered in comparison with competitors'  more mature offerings. Release 10. suppliers. Let him! Empower the customer to see his orders. though this would be a major change and a challenge to designers to fit the same functionality found today  in the core screens into the new technology. Code generated 100 percent from designer still remains in the future. Lotus borrowed heavily from Electronic Arts. Oracle built an entire technology  stack in­house. Let your  employees keep their personal details up to date. Though CASE is a very powerful tool. Java was a longer time coming than Oracle expected.  The developer tools were upgraded to generate code that could be use the secure HTTP communications protocol for  rollout across the Web. Oracle does use CASE technology to  generate much of the Applications. has the longest pedigree of the Internet  enabled ERP packages. and Apple from  Xerox. The E­Business Suite. increasing the utility of the base product by adding tools and applications. Oracle is no exception. and offers CASE metadata to Applications customers. placing application processing in the bosom of the database for efficiency  and integrity.  isolating the user from the operating system by building a lot of operating system functionality into its product.  Oracle has been a pioneer in CASE (computer aided systems engineering) technology. it was also less efficient and not much easier to program. but the customer would rather do it  himself. and the Applications themselves to allow global access without  compromising confidential data.6 offered GUI functionality and several new  products that were available only in GUI. Larry Ellison saw it as an opportunity. such as orders. and employees  across the Internet. It uses Oracle's proven Web technology. Oracle's Self­Service Web Applications are increasingly giving these  groups the ability to reach in for information and to submit data. Oracle's vision for the E­  Business Suite gives companies an opportunity to extend their relationships with customers. their client/server version. The latest versions of iProcurement and CRM show the way the user interface is  going. This is the way that the GUI is presented to the user without having the screen programs (forms) on the  client PC—that functionality is in the application servers.  Not only does it cost money to have your employee give order status to a customer. Projects.7 solidified the GUI product line and provided year 2000 compliance. Oracle's Internet Computing module requires Java applets to provide intelligence at  the desktop level. IBM saw the SQL language developed by the resident academics at their Santa Theresa  labs as a promising concept but a threat to their dominant IMS database.  The Internet Computing module brings all the pieces together.6 in 1996. using it successfully  requires a high level of competence and commitment. which is  in part because of the need to reuse the investment in coding made in previous Applications versions. Working within the Oracle product  line. Only  toward the end of the 1990s did Java become mature enough in business computing to make Oracle's Internet Computing  the best architectural choice.network browsers became intelligent. timing thwarted them. which  was not required once the old economy players started to operate E­Businesses themselves. and Human Resources  products to anyone with Internet access. bolt­on  modules to extend the functionality of their mainline Purchasing. now comprising more than 150 modules.  Oracle's Web tools grew robust in the time the Smart Client applications were maturing. The Applications group released the Oracle Self­Service Applications as front­end. they have been able to offer the most extensive integration between upper CASE (analysis and design) and lower  CASE (automatic program generation) in the Designer tool. Order Management. This could even be the way the whole Application will go one day (replacing Forms with Java and Java  ServerPages). The failure of the dot  com companies in 2000 was partly a failure to see this—many were offering a middleman service to customers. and Oracle owns the entire technology stack. but has since replaced their Web server with a new product—Oracle Applications Server (9iAS).  The Oracle RDBMS  Great software empires are often built on borrowed ideas. with Release 10. and the vendor to see your upcoming needs.  If it had been Oracle's goal to bypass the client/server phase in product evolution. Internet Computing uses the  cartridge technology supported since Oracle8. It is ideally suited for use by software houses—such as Oracle in its  role as the author of the E­Business Suite.  Disintermediation—taking out the middleman—is one of the most significant benefits of the Internet. Oracle has succeeded by consistently keeping its  database performance at the head of the pack.

 and provides a rich programming environment. are in constant evolution. there are huge savings to be made in running one large system rather than many smaller ones. The names of the programming tools have  changed over time as their functionality has evolved. larger databases. there are times when a  programmer has to tell the computer exactly how to perform an operation. programming support. and cultivating a  wide number of third­party business partners through its open architecture. Its data caching  mechanism will further enhance the performance of the Applications. The tools. The term "non­procedural" means that a programmer  does not have to tell it how to proceed. By their very nature many of the tools described below tend to deal with one record at a time.  Oracle Programming Tools  The Oracle RDBMS is a premier device for storing and retrieving transactional data.  The Oracle Application Server  The Application Server sits in the middle tier of the architecture.  SQL is the foundation language for Oracle and most other RDBMS systems. Despite the power of SQL.  The Application Server has already moved to a 9i version. such as an address or a person. or "programmable" extension to SQL. It is a huge tool set of communication services. but it is not intended for end users. The performance and reliability  of this component is key to the success of the Internet Computing model (although there are often multiple Application  Servers. and their  use in the Oracle Applications. just as it was in  mainframes. Expect new versions of the E­Business Suite to take  advantage of these features.  The RDBMS that lies beneath Oracle Applications manages the data.  Since version 8i of the RDBMS. A programmer uses the SQL language to describe  the characteristics of the desired result. It is common to most Oracle products. The  language specifications.  PL/SQL is the procedural. This is in response to the  market demand for fewer. does backup and recovery. The reliability of the  database in the face of great demands is key to the globalization process. The intelligence to decide how to produce the result is programmed into the  RDBMS. set by industry committees. The remaining operating system questions  concern reliability and scalability.  In this way the structure of an address is embedded in the database itself rather than being a programming construct. most notably the database server. It is  designed to deal with sets of records rather than individual records. which is required for Release 11i of the Applications (known as the E­Business Suite).  Programmers access the database using the industry­standard SQL and PL/SQL languages for relational databases. It frees users to choose the underlying operating system on  a commodity basis. a vastly improved COBOL. monitors its own  performance. The database  and the E­Business Suite support the Unicode character set so that multi­byte character sets such as Cyrillic script and  Japanese can coexist in the same database as English and Western European languages. It runs the forms and handles the connections across the  Internet and the communication with the other servers. through compiled programs in  languages such as COBOL and C. reporting and consolidation. and they can be made to rebalance the load if one fails). are as follows: . Oracle's implementations have generally been as full as any in the industry. because most of the discriminators are in Oracle itself. They always include features that the  major vendors have yet to implement. SQL's genius is that it is non­procedural. They created "fourth­generation" programming  languages with built­in database interfaces for programmers and end users. PL/SQL is the  modern language for procedural programming. The programmer can now define a data type to describe a particular object. Oracle itself has moved to a global single database instance. but the functional niches they fill are consistent.  Early in its existence Oracle recognized that programmers would be much more productive using products that had built­  in features for accessing their database through SQL and PL/SQL. and presentation  tools that enables applications and portals written in many different technologies to be supported. is  object­relational.the concept of an RDBMS to include concepts such as distributed processing and object management. that is.  Programs have to accept data and queries from users and present results back to them. With data centralized in a  single database. which will almost certainly be certified to work with the E­  Business Suite in due course.  Version 8i and to an even greater extent 9i concentrate on performance and fault tolerance. how to perform a query. one record at a time. On top  of this there are advantages in terms of global transaction handling. Programmers initially worked  with Oracle the same way they worked with most of the databases of the early 1980s. it has adapted object­oriented database management system (OODBMS) concepts into its relational  architecture.

  Data Warehouse Directions  The SQL language and the Oracle RDBMS were originally intended to for decision support environments. while they are not programming languages per se.  Some of the current and upcoming highlights of the Applications suite are:  §  Online Services The Internet.  Oracle has adapted these concepts into its data warehousing offerings in several ways. It is a good tool for  developing quick. the latest RDBMS product.  supporting executive decisions and visually depicting alternatives in "what if" scenarios. It is used by the Oracle Applications install and patch processes to create database  objects for Oracle Applications. recovery and reorganization software is very sophisticated.  The Future Direction of Oracle Applications  Transaction processing has always been the strength of Oracle Applications.  especially in program maintenance. into information to support key business decisions. It can be a significant aid in writing large extensions to Oracle Applications. They have powerful tabular and graphic data presentation facilities consistent with their intended use. The other  utilities. It is also a part of  Oracle Developer. Oracle  Application reports are built in Oracle*Reports version 6i. previously SQL*Forms. Oracle Enterprise  Manager (OEM) is a set of complex modules to monitor and control database activity on a real­time basis. By design. Applications programmers make significant use of  Oracle*Loader to load "flat" operating system files into Oracle tables for import into the Applications. This comprises a ready to run  warehouse that integrates with the Business Intelligence offerings such as Purchasing Intelligence and Financials  Intelligence. It is intended for both  programmers and end users. that is. which are not). It  is common for Applications users to write custom programs using Oracle*Reports. As companies' use of ERP matures. including technical reference manuals for the Applications. The Balanced Scorecard and  Activity­based Management products also add value to warehouse data. The key Data  Warehouse product for the E­Business Suite is the Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW). operating over public and private networks. Different  technologies. SQL*Net is the software layer that links servers to clients. Customer  demand and the architecture itself favored optimization for transaction processing. The database as used by the E­  Business Suite is optimized for certain access paths through the definition of primary keys and indexes. which enables HTTP and HTTP­S communications that are  optimized for the Internet. simple reports. Oracle's data warehouse direction transcends both products. The RDBMS evolved in a different direction. It generates code  for Oracle*Reports and Oracle*Forms. Thereafter. in cost  cutting and revenue enhancement. Oracle distributes most reports in character mode so they  will be the same for all users. tagged as "inverted list. is part of Oracle Developer. frees companies of the need to have a  local data center.  Oracle*Forms.  Oracle provides several utility programs to support the RDBMS.  Oracle Corporation uses their Designer CASE tool internally for development of the Applications.  Oracle*Reports replaces the products previously named SQL*Reports and SQL*Reportwriter. Oracle Online Services program remove the need for customers to have their own computers. The core  Oracle Applications' interface is written in Forms (as opposed to the Self­Service modules. consolidates its position as a relational online  analytical processing (ROLAP) engine. including legacy and third­party systems. and the inter­relationship between these products is likely to grow closer. Collection packs are separately available to take data from the Applications." were often used to support queries that make no  assumptions about the data organization. and batch processes. Express is used for  specific multidimensional modeling through Oracle Financial Analyzer and Oracle Sales Analyzer.  require programming talent to set up and run." "multidimensional. and servers to  servers in a distributed system. Oracle 9i. Oracle*Reports supports both character mode and bitmapped (GUI) reports. Designer is intended to improve software reliability and boost productivity. Oracle Applications can accept custom code written in SQL*Plus. It can be used to bring together data from a number of ERP components from different  vendors. but it is easy even for character­mode users to convert them to bitmapped operation. Oracle Express is a multi­  dimensional data warehouse.  they will increasingly turn to data warehousing to use the information in the database as input to further measures.  Oracle Express and Oracle Discoverer are the end­user tools designed to extract and present information from the data  warehouse. . deriving  meaningful management information from transaction data. Oracle's latest products distill transaction  data from many applications.§  §  §  §  §  SQL*Plus is the simple." and "cubic. first they take initial cost reductions through process automation. direct programming tool for the SQL and PL/SQL languages. such as export and import.  The Oracle environment includes a number of software modules that. are primarily of interest to database administrators. The E­  Business Suite was written using Forms version 6i. It is exclusively a programmer's tool. makes modifications  to their code easier and more reliable in Release 11i. and the product is extensible  using Oracle Warehouse Builder. The backup. There is a  specific E­Business Suite tool set for OEM.  Oracle's delivery of CASE metadata.

 for use over the  Internet. SAP. "universal  access to untrained users" through front­end bolt­on products that interface with the Applications. It ensures data integrity by using the standard Open Interfaces to reedit the transactions as they enter the  core Applications. Oracle may in the future enable customers to make customizations at the design level  rather than through setup parameters. but they will not have the responsibility of maintaining any of it. they will take with them most of the rationale for having local  storage and a large.  §  Small Business Suite Combining the advantages of the Internet to remotely host applications.  Oracle's vision for the Internet is that whatever capabilities customers need on their desktop can be provided remotely.  networking. iProcurement allows all  employees direct access to raise requisitions—lowering the cost per requisition. Here  is Oracle's story:  §  Oracle Applications can be most efficient because they are wedded to the Oracle database. and IBM. A weakness is that they  sometimes require all users to deal with design issues that affect only a few. Payroll. Oracle's database  and network products have the openness. Many functions. General  Ledger is an early example: Users can seamlessly import budgets developed in spreadsheets. It will free customers of the need to buy hardware. The Workflow  product provides users with the guidance they need to be successful. Oracle has developed the ability to operate in mixed  environments at the database. The product is expensive. word processors. The DI concept can be generalized across client­side software  packages using industry­standard interfaces. PeopleSoft.  which enable them to offer this service at a lower cost than companies would pay for the equivalent service run in­  house. Access to more  suppliers reduces the risk of a stock out. and reliability to provide centralized management of data and  programs to support this vision. are working on Java implementations of word  processors and spreadsheets. Each has woven them into a development  platform that is available to their customers to use in writing extensions to the systems. Yahoo.  Desktop Integration (DI) DI links Oracle Applications with spreadsheets and other desktop software.  Reasons for Choosing Oracle Applications  Oracle's major competitors. Originally launched via Netledger. and applying patches and upgrades. and JDEdwards.  Mass Customization All package users today are constrained to some extent by package design. It  has made that vision a reality for the Applications suite. the Oracle Small Business Suite is aimed at companies who on their own could not  afford the cost and overhead of running full function application software. in Oracle's words. and applications levels as well. Oracle Applications can manage objects from  voice applications. Portability among .  §  §  §  §  Open systems and the Internet are unifying themes throughout Oracle's product line. intangible. The organizational model will be  enhanced to support centralized purchasing at the same time as distributed receiving and payment. The strength of  Applications' packages is that they include almost all the functions that any user needs. have used a mixture of third­party development. When those applications go. set up as if it were to run at a company site. speed. By implementing the Applications in its own CASE technology and object­oriented  programming techniques. such as e­mail. and CRM. linked to registers  such as TPN. Sometimes the architecture dictates that  a user take several steps to accomplish a simple task because the software must also accommodate users for which  the task is not so simple.Oracle itself hosts an instance of the Applications. Economies of scale derive savings for Oracle.  Several software companies. and competition reduces prices. Oracle Exchange. and a ground up  rewrite of business functionality. In a less structured way. and presentation packages. The Oracle RDBMS and  programming layers beneath the Oracle Applications are an essential part of their strength in comparison with other  vendors' applications software.  True Global Purchasing Step changes have taken place in the Supply Chain applications. Buying the product means buying a story about the architecture and the vendor. Enterprise­level software is an unusual purchase. Desktop users will have access to a library of  programs as large as the Internet itself. Other vendors forego the  use of productivity features in Oracle's and other vendors' DBMS in order to support them all. project management packages. graphics. staff database administrators.  More Self­Service Applications Oracle's Workflow product makes it possible to offer. broadcasts purchase requirements to a broader market place of suitable suppliers. tools. It protects Applications with security and  encryption. Oracle products have always been  able to run on most hardware and operating system platforms.  and impossible to fully understand. among them Corel. disaster recovery. the  Oracle Small Business Suite contains functions to deal with Finance. All this is available today. and export actual  balances for use in spreadsheet projections. configurable operating system on the desktop. power. and data warehousing tools in implementing their products. Oracle has  recognized the trend amongst global organizations towards shared service centers. are inherently network­oriented. and deal with the issues of  backups.

 written procedures. Oracle's architecture makes it easier to bridge gaps between user  requirements and the delivered functionality than other vendors' packages. which dominates a custom implementation. it is increasingly to Oracle.  The foregoing should convince you that Oracle is a sound long­term choice for meeting your business needs. PeopleSoft. Its major  competitors already use the Oracle RDBMS. reduces to a few conversion and  bridge programs in the Applications. which is increasing its dominance in the RDBMS arena. They are widely viewed as being highly efficient.  Oracle's development tools are tightly integrated with the Designer CASE tool. These all gain greater relative import. of value to most software customers. can now automate setup by  inserting them into the database.  Oracle Applications' open architecture makes them easy to customize and integrate with other vendors' packages. More important than creating the plan in the first place. and accessible  by linkage even to non­Oracle databases. User  input tends to be less visible to resource planners precisely because they have historically been secondary concerns. SQL*Net. At this writing.  consultants. Oracle is developing robust tools such as the Oracle Web  Server to support it. Most companies stick with one RDBMS  vendor. . and Baan. When they do change. to get a thorough understanding of the system. In addition.  Almost all application logic is available. including those many modules that are best  not to change.  Establish a Plan  A Financials project typically involves a significant number of packages. Oracle has a significant advantage over less integrated vendors in moving its applications  suite to the Web.  Chapter 21.  Use This Book for a Successful Financials Implementation  Although the steps involved in a Financials implementation echo those of traditional development. The development phase.  Economies of scale make consolidation a driving factor in the software industry. people. Everything else moves in from the periphery: analysis. setups. The  architecture offers a sound basis for long­term growth. Accept the best available advice from Oracle. Though the greatest benefits  are to be realized by changing business processes. Oracle is the only vendor with enough control over its technology stack to protect its customers'  applications software investments whatever the vendor.  but many will be poorly understood or difficult to estimate even if you understand them.  Almost every step of an Applications implementation involves users to a greater extent than custom development.  Make a plan despite your imperfect knowledge of what needs to be done. even if it means moving deadlines. These tools are tightly integrated with Developer and Designer 2000. which will make them even easier to customize." addresses the unique concerns of an Applications implementation. The amount of money a company  has free for product development increases in direct proportion to its user base; the big keep getting bigger. A user can expect that Oracle or third parties will write translators into and out of  AIM. to facilitate integration and conversion among major applications vendors such as SAP. which captures the parameters for setting up Oracle Applications.  Understand the Company's Business Practices  You must have an idea of how the business will operate as you set up the Oracle packages. the Oracle Applications are gaining market share  from industry­leader SAP. many companies decide to convert to Oracle first and then reengineer  the business later.§  §  §  §  §  §  §  database vendors is not.  Oracle's AIM product.  Oracle's direction indicates that Oracle Applications will be interoperable with other vendors' applications.  The Internet is central to Oracle's overall product strategy. they are widely used outside Oracle  Applications. the process is  altogether different. and testing. None of the tasks are huge. such as SAP or PeopleSoft. and tasks. published. The table structure is open. however. and your own staff. It is not nearly as difficult or expensive to find programmers to customize Oracle's applications as those  that use proprietary languages. Programmers can analyze it all. Oracle  has achieved a dominant position in the RDBMS market and appears to be in an excellent position to leverage itself  into dominance in the Web and applications markets. Oracle is on the way to achieving data integration through its EMDS and  OADW products. or in the ultimate instance will be an accommodating system from which to migrate. and its openness suggests it will work cooperatively with other  systems.  training. commit to modifying the plan as  your experience grows. It suggests that Oracle may at some point distribute Oracle Applications as  metadata. and the rest of  Oracle's product suite. This linkage makes it easy to develop  custom extensions to Oracle Applications.  The programming tools with which the Oracle Applications are written also benefit from being specific to the Oracle  RDBMS. "Project Organization and Management.

 if they have not been through a major systems implementation.  The job is challenging and confusing. in the form of a help desk or a Superuser. Training. Oracle asks the users to apply systems engineering disciplines  borrowed from the realm of data processing. Garbage Out" starts with  conversion. "Garbage In. Though the MIS department may help.  Product knowledge is significantly more important for package implementations than it is for custom development. Line­level users often need expert support. It  may be that all new customers are accepted on a COD basis. the implementers are  gone. who must play the dominant role. and how they are expressed in your test scenarios and test scripts. Even though the MIS department may staff the help desk. and  the users themselves. Users of those legacy systems  ultimately own the data.  Many companies." offers a comprehensive plan for Oracle and in­house training. will make the level of effort required visible. Chapter 21 covers how you document business processes. procedures.  Understand the Applications Suite  Most people who have been through an Oracle Applications implementation have become experts in one or more areas.  Any new system takes training. the Oracle setup will require that you define your current mode of operation in each  application area. Almost every customer can benefit from using consultants to speed their Oracle Applications  installation. They take time to learn and apply. as in "Mary handles customer returns—ask her.  Ironically. with certain exceptions. Companies obviously rely heavily on Oracle consultants and independent consulting firms to bring in the expertise  when it is needed. and  Cutover. . the users have to be responsible for cleaning up and  converting the data. one must proceed not knowing exactly how the code was written—only the externals of the "black box. data processing disciplines. just as an organization has cut over to Oracle Applications and needs experts badly. For companies whose processes are not already written down." Defaults are another broad area of exceptions. Chapter 22.  Staff the Job Right. may not be aware of the scale of their  involvement or the criticality of their commitment. with exceptions. Processes may be  defined by personality. this seemingly simple task almost always  takes more time than is budgeted. especially smaller ones. Even if you intend not to  change your business rules at all. It is hard work—gritty and unappetizing—but essential.  and project management. MIS department. a joint product of the consultants. far beyond the visible costs of the packages. The software works. it is  the system users. training is no  substitute for experience. unless the organizations' own staff is closely involved. The job is to decide  how to use it. however. With  the Applications. The project plan.  Get the Needed Level of Commitment from Users  Although the tasks in an Oracle Applications implementation echo those of traditional data processing development. and certainly not programmers. However. Oracle or outside  consultants who have implemented Oracle Applications before can be of great help both in building a project schedule  and in defining your business processes to Oracle.  User departments. and business  practices supported by their automated systems.  consultants. data processing equipment. the Oracle applications.Many users find that their current business processes are not well defined—especially the exceptions. it is the user departments that  must ultimately support their own people as they use Oracle. "Data Conversion. and conversion. The stakes are large.  Almost every Oracle Application replaces another automated system of some kind. for  the first few weeks of operation. This is a job for people in the functional areas. they will lack critical knowledge of how  the system was set up. not the MIS department. Be sure to make a liberal allowance in the project schedule. In the short term."  Installing the Financials is not "development as usual" and cannot be handled as such.  Oracle's comprehensive design provides automated support for processes and exceptions. The users have to assume two jobs: keeping the business running with the old  system and preparing for Oracle. Senior executives on the user side need to make sure  that the personnel will be available. where  they fit in the project plan. or all customers have Net 30  payment terms. and Give It Time  Success requires a rich mix of expertise in the company business.  This book itself provides a fast track to fill the product knowledge vacuum. are not in the practice of documenting the policies.

 They give you  the ability to apply the best practices in industry to your business. and integrate the operations of the  departments that use the Applications. the most significant benefit is in expanding your  ability to grow. user departments.  Part I: Getting Started . Installing the Oracle Applications will make it possible for you  to continually refine your operations. Although buying a package relieves you of the need to observe  many traditional data processing methodologies.  be willing to accept that there are occasions when it makes sense to write an extension to the system. which include  §  Support for ongoing business operations during the implementation  §  Appropriate package setup  §  Complete and clean data conversion  §  End­user training and support  §  Data processing and network infrastructure capable of delivering the system to its users  §  Trained staff to maintain. however. and to inspire them. Others have simply evolved their own particular. it brings a host of new requirements. You can. Or rather. and upgrade Oracle Applications  People can come from the MIS department. Oracle consulting. The mix of required skills. You must. The project manager will do well to establish ground rules for performing cost/benefit analysis of such  modifications. and make your suppliers true partners. Though  many of the initial benefits of Oracle Applications are in cost avoidance. and to adopt procedures for managing such changes from the ideas in Chapter 20. That notwithstanding. modes of  doing business. use the Applications to dramatically improve communications  within and outside your company. large integration firms. the price is significant. to manage. "Customization and  Modification. every company is individual. The hallmark of a successful project is flexibility: the ability to recognize the right mix of people. They do common functions well  and completely. if you want. enhance. resolve your year 2000 problems. let whole new classes of customers browse your offerings and buy online.  Conclusion  Buying the Oracle Financials has put you in an excellent position now and for the future. will protect your  investment both in the Oracle Applications and other systems. Sometimes a company has a novel mode of operation  that gives it a unique competitive advantage. to assemble them. the products themselves and the integration among them.  including those of the project manager.  A purchaser of the Oracle Applications should plan to use them "Plain Vanilla" to the extent possible. and to serve customers. You have to be willing to continually reengineer your business to  take maximum advantage of the Oracle features as your business evolves and Oracle functionality improves. at a  minimum. albeit successful.The staffing objective should be to assemble the best possible group to meet all the project objectives. Oracle's  commitment to open systems. It has been designed from the start for use over the Internet. is altogether new. You can implement policies through it that will cut your transaction costs. and the technology directions they have chosen for the Applications. or even modify  Oracle's code. they enable you to transform your business. Its built­in functionality will handle  the vast majority of your business needs. whatever the  source. They will. provide consistent financial accounting. and independent  consultants.  Installing and operating the Oracle Applications is not like developing custom software. conserve your  cash.  Though the returns are worth it.  You can measure margins in far greater detail than before. It takes full  advantage of Oracle's Web­oriented technology stack."  How to Get Maximum Value from the Applications  Oracle Applications can transform your business.  The benefit you derive from the Oracle Applications is proportional to the investment you make in them.  Be Pragmatic  The Oracle Applications include all the functionality that is common to most businesses. Our hope in writing this book is to  give you an understanding of what the packages can do and an appreciation of the steps required to install and operate  them successfully. both legacy and third­party.

  Although Oracle Applications can satisfy almost all business needs.  This book focuses on those Applications modules that are oriented toward financial management. which serves primarily as a supplement to  existing modules. supply chain  management.  Oracle Applications combines powerful features with state­of­the­art technology. Both groups appreciate the benefits that Oracle's immense power and flexibility can bring. a number of questions arise: What is each application designed to do?  What are the benefits? Is buying them a good business decision? What strengths of the Oracle Corporation might cause  you to favor their software over their competition? Once you've chosen Oracle. which were the first modules released back in 1989. remain at the heart of the  product line. Figure 1­1 shows the packages that have long been considered to make up the Oracle Financials Suite. It  offers world­class business automation built on the preeminent Oracle database. converting to it. human resources. project systems.  Oracle Applications serves a broad market. Oracle's corporate structure recognizes two major revenue streams: firstly databases. manufacturing. and  Oracle Applications is a huge software suite. and hard work required on their part to achieve those benefits. documentation. Inventory.  The Oracle Financials components. and Order Management. This is true with any of the "canned" software currently available. most of the technology chapters as well as  the project management sections apply equally to the Oracle Manufacturing and Oracle Human Resources product  families. Our aim throughout is  to cover three basic areas: the business functions of these modules. and tools are designed to make its code uniquely easy to modify to meet your specific  needs. and sales force automation. However. ranging from small organizations to Fortune 500 companies. Our focus. using the full range of Oracle's own  development tools. which is configured to enable rapid  implementation. it  cannot be all things to all people. These original modules (which we focus on in Part II of this book) remain the most  widely used of the Applications. the technical aspects of the software. In the outer circle of the diagram. The modules vary in size  and complexity from Oracle Inventory—the tables of which interface with a majority of the Oracle products and affect  many different departments within your company— to Cash Management. They form the architectural anchor for the complete Applications product line. preparation. which is the likely growth  business of the future. The  ones in the inner circle handle money and generate General Ledger transactions. how can you succeed in installing the  software. and they both almost  always underestimate the amount of planning. its purpose has remained unchanged. Oracle  Applications users and their data processing support staff often find they have more in common than they originally  thought. This book is divided into strategic sections to reflect these  threads.  and Web tools. which have been the core of the company; and secondly the E­Business Suite. Although the Applications Suite has grown over the last decade. development. and taking advantage of it to improve your business? Software is an intangible product. and the  management and organization of implementation projects.Chapter List  Chapter 1: An Overview of the E­Business Suite  Chapter 2: Implementing the E­Business Suite—Essential Concepts  Chapter 1: An Overview of the E­Business Suite  Overview  Choosing and implementing a new software package can be a monumental and expensive task for your organization. so answering these questions can be a detailed undertaking.  When considering the Oracle E­Business Suite. Oracle's  architecture.  The Structure and Scope of the E­Business Suite  Oracle Applications is a suite of more than 55 integrated software modules for financial management. is on the Oracle Financials modules; however. .  Purchasing. of course. and does offer tremendous value for the money. as  illustrated in Figure 1­2. usually are included under the title of Financials because they generate  transactions with financial implications.

Figure 1­1: Oracle Financials—the core modules  Note  Figure 1­2 omits industry­specific applications. some of the applications might have undergone  name changes since the printing of this book; their names are revised often. . In addition.

Figure 1­2: Logical organization of the Application modules .

  §  This level of cohesion brings major advantages over traditional "stovepipe" systems. The other core  applications are grouped by functional areas in the larger circle surrounding the Financials.The Applications are primarily designed to manage operations. nonprofit. and government worlds in their software design. you have purchased a very sophisticated integration model.  Oracle offers several additional Applications products that enhance the function of the Core Applications. Each package is a set of  processes and tables designed to support a distinct business function. also known as management accounting. large­scale  integration has rarely been achieved in custom­written systems. For example. The Applied  Technology products grouped at the lower left in Figure 1­2 give the Core Applications additional messaging and analysis  capabilities.  In most cases the transactions that drive financial and management accounting are just by­products of corporate  operations. and Purchasing systems. Controlling those operations is the more significant function of the E­Business Suite. Businesses evolve so quickly that few ever agree on an  enterprise­wide design. services delivered. Consider a company that  has bought office equipment from a supplier and is to receive the invoice later. and the implications of any financial  transaction in one application are accurately transmitted to other affected applications. In every package except the General Ledger itself. items. Financial data are mere by­products. is internal. Financial measures  are certainly the best reflection of how the business is doing. but only a reflection. to take best advantage of the supplier's terms?  §  Is there enough money to cover the draft?  The financial transaction is comparatively simple: Credit the payables account and debit the office equipment expense  account identified as the invoice was entered. Work in Process. True business activity is in the  operations that generate financial transactions: warehouse receipts.  Cost and management accounts are generally intended for use by management; they are at a greater level of detail than  statutory reports. as when  Order Management must decrement inventory to reflect a shipment or send an order line to Receivables to be  invoiced. Oracle  Applications provides the operational controls needed to optimize financial results and capture financial transactions at a  level of detail that supports rigorous measurement of operations. and flexible enough to be expanded to meet your individual needs. Oracle ripples  the implications of a price change through the Inventory. In  buying Oracle Applications.  Transaction data is integrated Oracle automatically bridges transactions from one system to another. suppliers. employees.  Accounting Methods  Financial accounting satisfies the information needs of two major external audiences: investors and tax authorities. It shows corporate management the financial workings of  the enterprise in the formats best suited to support executive decisions.  Oracle incorporates best practices from the corporate. enabling untrained end users—both inside and  outside the organization—to query and submit transactions to the Core Applications under the control of Oracle Workflow. the financial reporting  logic is subsidiary to operational control. which address the needs of  individual functional areas. much less develop and implement a comprehensive data management system. Cost  accounting. They form the basis of informed management decisions and can answer a number of questions: Which  groups of customers have large outstanding receivables? Should we change payment terms? Which departments and  product lines are most profitable? Which ones show the best improvement in gross margins? Should we reward those  managers? .  Financial data is integrated Financial data is carried in a common format. the key feature of all the Oracle  Applications modules is data integration:  §  §  Master data is integrated All the applications share common files of customers. Although integrated systems have long been a major objective of systems design. both financial and cost accounting reports are derived from the same financial  transactions. and orders entered. The Self­Service Web Applications function as front ends. Oracle Applications uses the same databases to satisfy both the internal and external kinds of financial  reporting requirements. The operational issues to consider are  §  Does the invoice represent a real obligation?  §  When should the invoice be paid. broad enough to serve most  businesses in most industries. Although cost accounting works at a greater level  of detail than financial accounting.  Figure 1­2 shows the products that Oracle now calls the Financial Applications in the inner circle. and  other entities that are used by multiple applications. However.

  Although the classifications continue to evolve.  §  The Financials products in the inner circle are closest to the money and to General Ledger reporting. Oracle modules are designed to minimize the effort involved in routine operations. The Supply Chain Management modules are often included under the concept of Manufacturing. Control means satisfying customers: making  commitments that satisfy customer needs and meeting the commitments. The system  modules shown at the lower left in Figure 1­2 enhance the function of all the other packages. such as approvals and inspections. and HR.  §  The Human Resources product family obviously deals with people. and  Inventory. they are much easier to administer if they are  set for all customers.  §  The Projects applications apply a project dimension to Purchasing. There is a financial need to see projects  integrally—not period by period but inception to date—and most important. Receivables. there are legitimate exceptions to  almost every routine. or CRM covers the Marketing. with defined exceptions Business must be handled by routine. The following are some useful classifications that can be imposed on  the applications shown earlier in Figure 1­2:  §  Customer Relationship Management. Project Manufacturing links it with the rest of the Manufacturing suite. is a term that covers the remainder of the product line. In other cases.  Capturing and editing parameters for batch processes Oracle Applications is fully generic to support a wide  range of users.  The Package Families  Oracle Applications has defied Oracle's best attempts at classification.  §  Supply Chain Management handles distribution—the business of getting materials from suppliers to customers. Every year brings new packages and a new view  of the organization of the older packages. each new module will only increase the level of integration and  interdependence. the exact path depending on the nature of the  transaction and the outcome of prior steps. Each time a new package enters the product line it shifts the  relative importance of the integrated relationships. Any business—your business—will benefit greatly by adapting this vast body of integrated features;  then customizing it or integrating it with other packages to satisfy unique requirements. to measure earned value and estimate  profit and loss. Order Management.  §  Enterprise Resource Planning. These are the most frequent:  §  Defined routines. This standardization makes  Oracle products efficient for their customers to learn and efficient for them to support.  Several requirements are common to control processes in various operations. Payment terms are an example: Should a given customer have to pay its bills in 30 or 45 days?  Although it must be possible to set the terms customer by customer. The project needs to stay on schedule.  §  §  §  Oracle uses more or less standard devices across all the Applications modules for these control functions. Sales. ERP activity is  focused on Finance. Information on organizations and hierarchies is  maintained here to support other applications such as Projects and Purchasing. to get maximum  use out of them. It means monitoring the performance of suppliers and people to keep their attention focused on  supporting the company's mission. require moving a transaction and the  associated paperwork from person to person within an organization. The project dimension serves both  control and accounting ends.  Defaulting Oracle Applications makes processing decisions about individual records according to the value of field  settings at that level.  §  The Oracle Manufacturing modules shown in Figure 1­2 are limited to those that affect product design and  manufacture. It is not that Oracle is indecisive; rather. It is vastly less expensive to  handle transactions by rote than to invent procedures for each new case. the effort made to install the packages . Payables.Operational Control  A company must control its operations to achieve optimal financial results. They rely on  a standard set of processes to bring exceptions to the attention of a human being as quickly as possible. and Service functions that face outward  toward new business and servicing your existing customer base. the packages are so well integrated  that natural affinities exist between almost any two of them. and it means that enhancements  are available across all of the packages. However. Many businesses will find that they  can use most of the Oracle functions without changing them at all. Oracle makes broad use of defaulting hierarchies to allow you  to control operations by setting field values for broad sets of records and override them for subsets or individual  records.  Workflow processing Many transactions. It means controlling assets. The trade­off is most batch processes and reports require a series of parameters for exact control  each time they are invoked. Manufacturing. or ERP. or at least by customer groups.

 It is always a good idea to identify the main reasons before you  embark. You will also need to  know why your organization is implementing packaged software. Therein lies the value of  proprietary software.  To implement simplified processes.  These reasons should be clearly and objectively defined in business terms before the start of the project.  Business Objective ⇒ To be fully euro compliant by 31 December 2001. The "why" behind the project is often crucial to  distinguishing among many otherwise similar alternatives.  What Are Your Objectives? Setting Parameters and Expectations  Although taking full advantage of Oracle E­Business Suite can transform a business. most companies have more prosaic  objectives. These might include efforts to accomplish the following:  §  Standardize on integrated.  Reengineer—Now or Later?  One of your first decisions as you implement Oracle E­Business Suite is whether to change your business procedures at  the same time.  Identifying your particular business goals and then keeping them in focus will help your organization throughout the  implementation process.  Business Objective ⇒ To reduce head count in internal administration departments by 20 percent over two years.  Business Objective ⇒ To reduce cost of acquiring new business to less than $35 per customer.  §  To roll out shared service centers established on "single server" architecture. To make the right  decisions for your organization you will need to fully understand the implications of the alternatives.  §  Ensure that your systems are ready for the single European currency; this is a critical goal for businesses operating  within the European Monetary Union. function for  function. or to implement a new chart of accounts structure.will be minimal compared to the effort involved in developing those bits that must be unique.  Business Objective ⇒ To reduce software license and support fees by 40 percent over five years. you will be making many far­reaching decisions. Some companies opt for a two­phase approach. with no redundant dual keying of transactions.  Business Objective ⇒ To reduce the cost of processing POs to less than $50 per requisition. usually in the indefinite future. They need to be ready for the euro. Phase I is to replace their legacy systems. is to use the features available in Oracle to reengineer . Navigating a  successful course through the project will ultimately depend on having clear business objectives to measure and assess  any number of alternative and dependencies. to  integrate their applications.  §  Enable your organization to conduct business over the Internet using Oracle's Self­Service Web Applications and  iStore. single­vendor solutions and move away from mix­and­match. Every organization is different; your organization will have a variety and mix  of different reasons for implementing Oracle Applications.  The Benefits of Implementing Oracle E­Business Suite  While implementing Oracle E­Business Suite.  Note  §  Oracle Applications Releases 11 and 11i are certified to be fully euro compliant. with Oracle; and Phase II. to replace a few archaic systems that have become totally inadequate.

 In most cases.  Conclusion  Oracle Corporation. and you realize the full benefits of Oracle much  sooner. and how to meet the unique demands of the global business environment. During  implementation. However. and a management plan.  Chapter 2: Implementing the E­Business Suite—Essential  Concepts  Overview  Organizations implementing the Oracle E­Business Suite must make important decisions about hardware configuration  and application setup. . The majority. highlighting decisions that will be difficult to  change later on. long the dominant vendor of database software. they also put themselves in a position where inadequate software is no longer a major impediment to  progress. those that merely convert to  Oracle.  and retraining. and cost reduction. the speed and ease of  the process depend crucially on decisions made early in the implementation cycle and on the degree of customization you  plan to make. has increasingly emphasized applications software  as the field in which it can offer the most value to its customers. Long known for their functional strength. personnel actions. All the forms and reports are  designed to be flexible and accommodate many kinds of business rules for a wide variety of situations. reengineering is an even tougher job than software conversion.  Oracle E­Business Suite truly is an enabling software product. This chapter introduces these concepts. Companies that fully exploit the features available in the  Oracle modules put themselves at the forefront of modern business practice. You can avoid  inappropriate decisions if everyone involved in the planning process has an early understanding of the concepts essential  for implementing Oracle Financials. A successful implementation will require knowledge of the individual modules. The Oracle E­Business Suite provides a vast array of features and business rules that can greatly  improve your organization's productivity. knowledge of how to adapt them.  and Web support gives Oracle formidable advantages. Each flexfield can be configured to  capture and display the specific information you want. your users are disrupted only one time. Flexfields are important building blocks in the Oracle E­Business Suite: They  allow screens and reports to contain data that is uniquely relevant to your organization. Having developed its own database. It turns out that just defining the current business processes involves more work than expected. realize significant tactical benefits in reliability. programming tools. but certainly  much less than reengineering the business.  Every business is different. On the other hand. Here you'll learn how to capture the level of financial information that you need. Oracle E­Business Suite is quick to implement and easy to adapt. Those are the primary themes of this  book. Each company has a unique  answer to this question. most screens accommodate the entry of additional  information through the use of flexfields.  Reengineering the business as you install can make a lot of sense. how to set up Financials  within complex organizations. Oracle is ready to support improved processes as quickly as the organization can absorb them. enabling it to conduct business in ways not previously possible.  Do not allow shortsighted implementation decisions to hamper the long­term effectiveness of the software.the business. the ways in which  they work together. integration. Oracle's products have  become the industry leaders in their use of technology. The question for you is not whether the Oracle E­Business Suite works—that has been  proven—but rather how your company can best achieve its objectives using the Applications.  Capturing the Financial Information Relevant to Your Business  Oracle Financials can be configured to a remarkable extent without custom programming. you take advantage of its built­in flexibility by tailoring the standard features of the package to meet your  specific requirements. You are spared the effort of defining your existing  business processes in Oracle. For the first time in the history of  data processing. Along with the  innumerable predetermined fields that appear on each screen. It takes lots more time and  requires dedicated management to keep the staff inspired through the accompanying reorganizations.

 There is a delicate trade­off between  capturing and validating data on each and every transaction and the potential insight the extra data will give into your  business. an organization will need between 5 and 10 segments. as shown in Figure 2­1. When you navigate to a flexfield in a form. the greater the range of segment reporting available to you. Region. and Account. fixed assets. and Subaccount. The Accounting Flexfield.. Account. A typical organization might set up the flexfield to have six segments called  Company. . whereas Key Flexfields are held in  segment columns.  The Accounting Flexfield is the Oracle name for the account key used to record and report accounting information. Product. The more segments you have.ATTRIBUTE15.  The following examples are intended to provide an idea of the Accounting Flexfield. However. You can set up the Accounting Flexfield to have any number of segments.  Tip  In the database Descriptive Flexfields are stored in attribute columns. and other entities that every business  needs to keep track of. the flexfield appears on your form  as a pop­up window containing a prompt for each of your established segments. as shown here:  The data you enter here will appear in the Account column of the Enter Journals form. Most companies will use at least three segments:  Company. Descriptive Flexfields likewise are  named ATTRIBUTE1. Chapter 3 explains in more detail how  to design a suitable Accounting Flexfield for your organization. inventory items. a Key Flexfield is stored in the GL_CODE_COMBINATIONS  table in the columns named SEGMENT1. Key Flexfields are used throughout the Applications to uniquely  identify information such as General Ledger accounts. During data entry. Cost Center.  Descriptive and Key Flexfields share common features. SEGMENT2.  Typically..  a pop­up window appears; you enter appropriate values for each segment or choose values from a pull­down list.. up to a maximum of 30. the Accounting Flexfield appears as shown in Figure 2­2. not practical  maximum. more  segments can mean extra effort to code and categorize financial transactions. The  application validates individual segments according to value set rules and ensures that the combination of segments  makes sense using cross­validation rules.Flexfields  There are two types of flexfields: Key and Descriptive. Descriptive Flexfields (DFFs) enable you to capture additional pieces of information from  transactions entered into the Oracle E­Business Suite.SEGMENT30. The  Accounting Flexfield is a Key Flexfield; it uniquely identifies General Ledger accounts and provides a flexible structure for  any chart of accounts. When you  generate reports... You should aim to design your chart of accounts to have  as few segments as possible for ease of use; the 30­segment limit should be seen as a theoretical.. They are multisegment fields; the number of segments and the  length of each are totally under your control when you set up each application. Department.

Figure 2­1: The Enter Journals form showing the Account Flexfield .

 These balances form the basis of the balance sheet. Transaction­level reports showing what went into a  GL account balance must come from the systems that feed the General Ledger. The management reports it  produces present totals by code combination and accounting period. profit and .Figure 2­2: A sample Detail Trial Balance report showing the Accounting Flexfield  A combination of segment values. This is the finest granularity that Oracle General Ledger can record and report on. Each account  code combination has a balance at the end of each period. known as an account code combination. uniquely identifies the Oracle General Ledger  account. monetary amounts are posted as debits and credits to account code combinations.  In Oracle Financials.

 Do not modify a frozen flexfield definition if existing data could  be invalidated. These balances are readily available either from online inquires  or on printed reports. and the name and order of the account code  structure. The Accounting Flexfield segment structure determines the  lowest level of detail for which account balances are held. liability. so be sure to manually disable or redefine these rules and aliases to  reflect your changed structures. and all other reporting in the Oracle General Ledger. used for identifying inventory item numbers. Also consider the other applications you will  be using now and in the future.  As soon as you are satisfied. because an incorrectly defined Accounting Flexfield can adversely affect your accounting  data. or in some instances from the Web. save. and other features. The balancing  segment usually is the legal entity or company that Oracle E­Business Suite uses to balance journals for each value of the  segment.loss. Changing your structures after the fact  may create data inconsistencies that could impact the behavior of your application or require a complex conversion  program. the Accounting Flexfield can contain as many as 30 segments and you are required to define a minimum of  2 segments (one qualified as the balancing segment; the other qualified as the natural account segment). owner's equity. the length of each segment. The natural account segment is classified with an account type of asset. The  philosophy of a relational database is that every table contains a group of columns known as the primary key columns.  Key Flexfield Features  The combinations of a Key Flexfield.  As mentioned. uniquely identify a record in a database table. and the Items Flexfield. Other examples of Key Flexfields are the Asset Key Flexfield. you must assign an additional cost center  segment. An alteration of the flexfield structure once you have any flexfield data can create serious data  inconsistencies. There are 22 Key Flexfields  in Oracle E­Business Suite; they are listed in Table 2­1. revenue. It is easier to build  flexibility into your account structure during setup than to try to change your account structure later. The Accounting Flexfield is the lowest possible reporting detail  attainable in General Ledger.  that uniquely identify records in that table. and compile each structure separately. shipping. Cost centers indicate functional areas of your organization. If you have more than one flexfield structure you  must freeze. facilities. and so on. or  expense. such as the Accounting Flexfield.  You also should consider creating additional segments to anticipate future reporting requirements or organizational  changes. freeze your Accounting Flexfield structure to prohibit unnecessary modifications. You must  freeze and compile your flexfield definition before you use your flexfield. chart of accounts structure. Changing your existing structures also might adversely affect the behavior of any cross­validation rules or  shorthand aliases you have for your structures.  Table 2­1: The Key Flexfields in the E­Business Suite  Flexfield  Account Aliases Flexfield  Accounting Flexfield  Asset Key Flexfield  Bank Details KeyFlexField  Category Flexfield  Cost Allocation Flexfield  Grade Flexfield  Item Catalogs Flexfield  Code  MDSP  GL#  KEY#  BANK  CAT#  COST  GRD  MICG  Owning Application  Oracle Inventory  Oracle General Ledger  Oracle Assets  Oracle Payroll  Oracle Assets  Oracle Payroll  Oracle Human Resources  Oracle Inventory . you should carefully plan your organizational needs. and possible changes in your organization and reporting needs. It also is difficult to change your Accounting Flexfield after it has  been frozen and has been used to capture data through transaction processing. The Accounting Flexfield is flexible enough to accommodate the needs of your organization by allowing you to  specify the number of segments you want.  Before you set up your Accounting Flexfield. such as accounting.  If you intend to use other modules. Consider future  expansion. such as Oracle Assets or Oracle Projects. used for  identifying fixed assets.

 Oracle E­Business Suite will support different Accounting Flexfield . dynamic  insertion for any specific Key Flexfield. When you report on a parent value. You can allow. For example. and cross­validation rules to prevent users from creating new flexfield combinations  that contain values that should not coexist in the same combination.  Accounting Flexfield Design  You should put considerable thought into the design and structure of your Accounting Flexfield before beginning your  setup. or intentionally prevent. Usually summary accounts are set up so that a total for each  financial account is available irrespective of region. cost center. and contents of your report.  You can define shorthand aliases to speed up data entry tasks. You can define a hierarchy of parent and child  values within each segment.  You can readily consolidate balances up through the account hierarchy using tools such as summary accounts. as its name implies. parent  accounts. These tools are described in more detail in Chapter 3. and so on. flexfield value security to ensure that particular users can  enter only particular segment values. You should question up front  whether this is what your organization needs. You can  define reports online with complete control over the rows." A user should not be able to create a new product item while taking an order for product items using the Enter  Orders form. and rollup groups. product.  The Accounting Flexfield incorporates all the generic features of Key Flexfields and some features that are not found in  other flexfields:  §  Multiple rollup groups are used to produce management summaries. Sometimes it doesn't make sense for the application to allow a user to create a new combination "on the  hoof.Table 2­1: The Key Flexfields in the E­Business Suite  Flexfield  Item Categories Flexfield  Job Flexfield  Location Flexfield  Oracle Service Item Flexfield  People Group Flexfield  Personal Analysis Flexfield  Position Flexfield  Sales Tax Location Flexfield  SalesOrders Flexfield  Soft Coded KeyFlexfield  Stock Locators  System Items Flexfield  Territory Flexfield  Training Resources Flexfield  Code  MCAT  JOB  LOC#  SERV  GRP  PEA  POS  MKTS  RLOC  SCL  MTLL  MSTK  CT#  RES  Owning Application  Oracle Inventory  Oracle Human Resources  Oracle Assets  Oracle Service  Oracle Payroll  Oracle Human Resources  Oracle Human Resources  Oracle Receivables  Oracle Inventory  Oracle Human Resources  Oracle Inventory  Oracle Inventory  Oracle Receivables  Oracle Training Administration  All Key Flexfields share the same features; indeed. Companies use the implementation of the Oracle E­Business Suite as a catalyst for introducing a  new chart of accounts or a common chart of accounts across their entire organization. Many companies put together a special project team to come up with a new chart of accounts structure before the  implementation project. Summary accounts are useful for  responding to questions like "what was our total revenue in the last period?"  §  The Financial Statement Generator (FSG) allows you to easily build custom reports without programming. the flexfield concept is fully generic. or flexible. Oracle General Ledger automatically displays the  total of the balances on all the children for that parent.  §  Summary accounts provide online summary balances.  Dynamic insertion is the creation of a new valid combination from a form other than the Combinations Form. columns.  a user could create the combination representing "telephone expense for a new cost center" without leaving the Journal  Entry form.

 is one example of good Accounting Flexfield design. Oracle Workflow extends the reach of office  automation beyond the finance department. Finance and  operational staff are relieved of the regular workload to concentrate their time and expertise on other issues. a letter from a customer. Before  proceeding with subsequent phases of the implementation. Oracle Workflow lets you automate and continuously  improve business processes by routing any type of information to decision makers. A  report such as the Oracle General Ledger Account Analysis.  The project team assigned the task of designing a new chart of accounts needs to consult widely within the organization  to cover the reporting needs of all business areas. .  The logical grouping of values in ranges. as described above. will be considerably more useful if your account codes have been logically grouped into meaningful ranges. For example. even if different parts of your  organization use different Accounting Flexfield structures. several standard Oracle General Ledger reports use a range of accounts as a selection parameter. by grouping all current liabilities in an account range from. faxes sent from one company site to another. If there were no logic built in to the account codes and ranges. Although the design process is not an exact science. it would take considerably  longer to obtain a list of all current liability accounts and would likely require custom report development at a later stage. Oracle Workflow lets you model business processes using a  drag­and­drop process designer. a report could easily  be run on current liabilities. and so on. The billing  department has to contact the account manager before assigning sales commissions to a salesperson. seemingly always in flux. The accounting  department must talk with the corporate tax department before deciding whether to capitalize an asset. and  allocations can be defined to visit every cost center in a range in order to calculate an allocated cost for the cost center. cross­validation rules.  By delivering electronic notifications. Customers pass a credit check and goods are supplied. The team must be aware of the statutory accounting requirements and  should be familiar with the mechanics of Accounting Flexfields within Oracle Financials. You will still be able to use the native  consolidation features in Oracle General Ledger to produce group consolidated accounts.  Information can be routed to managers for authorization.  The finished design of the Accounting Flexfield is a milestone in the implementation of Oracle E­Business Suite. Processes can result in financial transactions and journals being generated. Often  decision­making workers have e­mail and Web access but no access to finance systems. ensure that the chosen design has the acceptance of people  who will be working with it: the finance department. and auditors. With a well­planned account structure. summary accounts. Processes can be triggered by goods arriving. A well­  designed Accounting Flexfield is vital. People act on the information and respond in a variety of ways. a  statement from your bank. Perhaps company policy is changed so that purchase orders less than $100 no longer  need manager authorization—you can redefine the purchase order approval activity in Workflow to approve low­value  purchases automatically.  For example. Account  Generator. they have not reduced the burden of  documentation sent by internal mail. Consider whether you can separate the two projects and minimize the  risks.  Until now finance systems have automated head office processes; however. there are a number of  heuristic rules to help; they are described in detail in Chapter 3. according to business rules. Stock levels  fall below a reorder level and are replenished.  Caution  The upheaval an organization experiences when introducing a new chart of accounts is similar in  magnitude to that you'd expect when introducing a new accounting system; introducing both at the same  time can be particularly traumatic. say account 2000 to 2999. and rollup groups depend critically on the structure of your  Accounting Flexfield. Such features as journal allocations. It is a mistake to think that the  chart of accounts design is independent of the features of the Oracle E­Business Suite. Data must be delivered to people according to  the type of data and the role of the individual. which takes a range of financial account codes as a  parameter. you will be better positioned to take full advantage of these  built­in features. the accounts  payable people must track down a project manager to get a project code before they can process invoices. are many and varied.  Workflow  Businesses thrive by acting on all sorts of information in a timely manner. Purchase  orders get authorized and are routed to the supplier. These  key people can be internal or external to your organization. It generates notifications out of Workflow activities and the responses are  sent directly back into the Workflow process by e­mail or the Oracle E­Business Suite Notification Web Page.  For example. You should design your  Accounting Flexfield to make full use of standard application features. through e­mail or a Web page. operational departments.  Business processes. It is a good idea to ask Oracle  Consulting Services or an experienced Oracle Financials consultant to validate the chosen design. and perfunctory telephone calls.structures for each business unit in your organization that needs its own structure.

 its simplicity does not preclude its effectiveness. and Oracle Projects use Account Generator to create . and provide coding consistency across the  organization. unearned revenue. select them from a  hierarchy of defaults.  At an early stage in the implementation.  freight. Oracle Order  Management. Understanding the logic behind  account assignments is part of mastering Oracle Financials. These mechanisms reduce errors. In Release 11i. The way Oracle Financials accounts for any particular event must be predefined  during the setup of the system. and revaluing foreign currency  reserves at month end.The correlation of your business processes with the pre­built flows within Oracle Workflow is a critical part of an E­  Business Suite implementation. A  revenue account thereby can be set up to default the natural account according to the type of sale (Transaction type).  Applications need to construct Key Flexfield combinations automatically for a number of reasons; primarily speed and  accuracy. depreciating an asset.  Accounting policies vary from company to company; sometimes even within a company. Accounting  Flexfields can either be defaulted as constants or be derived from one of several data sources related to the invoice. tax. Getting the structure of the predefined codes right  during the implementation phase is a major objective of your pre­implementation testing.  Some are entirely under the user's control when the transaction is entered; others are entirely under the implementer's  control and hidden from the user when the transaction is entered. AutoAccounting  works on a relatively simple lookup table concept; however.  Taxes Account values associated with the tax code are used. AutoAccounting and the Account Generator bring business logic and commercial rules of thumb to bear on  account code derivation. further reaching successor to the Release 10 Flexbuilder tool. issuing a sales invoice. The features of Oracle Workflow and the purpose of the pre­built processes are described  further in Chapter 15. Oracle Purchasing. finance charges. unbilled receivables.  Accounting for Transactions  Oracle Workflow is also used in the Account Generator—a feature that constructs account code combinations  automatically using user­defined criteria.  Note  The capability to reference the customer bill­to site in AutoAccounting rules is a new feature introduced in  Release 11i will not be available in prior releases.  Transaction types Account values associated with the transaction type are used. receivables.  Account Generator  The Account Generator constructs account code combinations automatically using predefined criteria and is a  generalized. and  the cost center and region segments can be set up to default according to the particular salesperson.  Standard lines Account values associated with the standard memo line item or inventory item are used.  To allow for all eventualities and provide a packaged solution that does not need reprogramming. Oracle Assets. The user can enter codes directly.  AutoAccounting enables you to default each segment for each account from a different data source if necessary.  Bill to site Uses value taken from the customer's bill­to site (the address where the invoice is sent). Oracle Financials  provides a variety of different methods to derive the account codes. it is important to realize that there are a variety of methods for the assignments. and clearing (suspense) accounts. The  specific rules that Oracle Financials uses to assign accounting codes to transactions are described module by module in  the chapters that follow. First you must catalog all the events in your organization that give rise to accounting  entries such as raising a purchase order. or find them with AutoAccounting (used for assigning  accounts to invoices in Oracle Receivables) or the Account Generator (a feature used elsewhere in the applications).  AutoAccounting  AutoAccounting is used in Oracle Receivables for generating default Accounting Flexfields for revenue. Oracle Receivables. The  data sources available to choose from are  §  §  §  §  §  Salesreps Account values associated with the salesperson are used. speed data entry. look them up based on transaction type. For each situation you need to understand in detail how account codes should be assigned.

  Currently the Account Generator is used only for the situations described in Table 2­2.  Projects  Self­Service Expenses.  Generates the balancing segment  values when you create finance  charges or post exchange rate gains  and losses. Enter  Receipts window or the Payables  Invoices window. Order  Management  . The Account Generator obtains data from sources such as Key Flexfield segments. variance  account. You can use the  COGS account as a basis for cost of  goods sold analysis in Oracle Inventory. variance  account.  Generates accounts for expense  reports entered in Self­Service  Expenses or the Invoices window in  Payables. and Mass  Transfer. the category level account. it is an extremely  powerful tool and likely will be steadily introduced for situations within the Applications in which Accounting Flexfields are  needed. Calculate  gains and losses.  The Account Generator dynamically  creates a COGS account to transfer  from Order Management and Oracle  Shipping Execution to Oracle Inventory  for each order and return line when it  completes the Inventory interface cycle  action.  Table 2­2: Use of Account Generator within the Financials Application  Application  Projects  Account  Generator  Project Supplier  Invoice Account  Generation  Project Web  Employees  Account  Generator  Purchase Order  Account  Generator  (POWFPOAG)  Requisition  Account  Generator  (POWFRQAG)  Substitute  Balancing  segment  Assets Account  Generator  Description  Generates accounts for Supplier  Invoices. budget account. Used effectively. application tables.  value sets. Process  for Order Management builds the  COGS account using the Cost of  Sales account for the item and  organization for each inventory  transaction line and inserts the  COGS account into Oracle  Inventory through the inventory  interface program. budget account.  and the asset level account.  The Account Generator. and accrual account.  Initiated From  Payables Invoices window.  Initiated from Depreciation run.  Initiated whenever you create  finance charges for a transaction  or post transactions to the  General Ledger.  Generates the purchase order charge  account.  Generates the requisition charge  account. accrual account. and constants; applies the customized business rules; and produces an appropriate account code  combination.combinations.  Oracle Assets uses the Account  Generator to derive the book level  account.  Create Journal entries.  Purchasing  and Projects  Purchasing  and Projects  Receivables  Assets  Inventory  Generate Cost of  Goods Sold  Account  Generate Cost of  Goods Sold  Account  Order Management and Oracle  Shipping Execution insert a cost of  goods sold (COGS) account for each  inventory transaction line into Oracle  Inventory through the Inventory  Interface program.

 Do not expect "organizations. You can set up multiple sets of books within a single  instance. including jointly owned subsidiaries.  Set of Books  A set of books is composed of a chart of accounts.  or charity. In addition.  §  Purchase products through one legal entity and receive them in another legal entity. even within the same legal entity. government agency. ." as used in  reference to the Oracle E­Business Suite. Multi­Org has become a standard part of the package. Because the corporation in the United States  accounts in dollars.  Some terms have an everyday meaning as well as a very specific Oracle E­Business Suite meaning. thus providing a high level of security. or inventory organizations. It also has a specific meaning in the Oracle E­Business Suite model.  subsidiaries that use a different calendar or a different chart of accounts each need to be set up as separate sets of  books. a simple company will have only one set of books and will not make use of the Multi­Org functions  (discussed in the following section). accounting calendar. corporation.  The multiple organization architecture determines how transactions flow through different organizations in Oracle E­  Business Suite and how those organizations interact with each other.  §  Sell products from one legal entity and ship them from another legal entity. Part of the process of implementation involves planning how your organizational  structure maps to the general organizational model within Oracle E­Business Suite. Multi­Org requires only one installation of the software and only one database instance to support an unlimited  number of sets of books; thus it provides viewing across multiple sets of books and easier administration of software  upgrades. An enterprise must be able  to perform the following functions:  §  Record any number of organizations and the relationships between them. operating units.7. Multi­Org is defined by a hierarchy: A business group consists of sets of books. Since Release  10. legal entities.  Consider an American corporation that has a subsidiary in Germany. The German company must report statutory returns  to the German authorities in the local currency (deutsche marks or euro). Legal entities that share the  same chart of accounts. and at the same  time support all possible organizational structures. and a functional currency. the  term organization serves a double purpose. commercial or nonprofit. to correspond exactly to the everyday meaning.Meeting the Varied Needs of Complex Organizations  Before you can embark on an Oracle E­Business Suite implementation you must plan how your computing power and  accounting data will be distributed among all the people who need access to financial systems.6.  §  Secure access to data so that users can access only the information that is relevant to them. which are made up of operating units. users can be assigned to different operating units so  they cannot see or use data from other operating units. In particular.  Note  The multiple­organization architecture (Multi­Org) first became available with Release 10. Operating units were first introduced with Multi­  org and there are no references to operating units in any releases prior to 10. The systems architecture has a subtle and pervasive impact on the features that can be readily delivered to  users. Organizations in Oracle E­Business Suite can be  sets of books. and automatically record the appropriate  intercompany invoicing. Similarly. PO.  The Organizational Model Within Oracle E­Business Suite  Oracle E­Business Suite is designed to be implemented in any organization. with each set of books having its own subledgers. which consist of inventory organizations. For instance. The biggest advantage is the capability to support different  logical business entities. which are explained in the following sections. With Multi­Org you can sell and ship products across different legal entities spread across  different sets of books. and functional currency can be accounted for in the same set of books.  An organizational model is needed to support fundamental business requirements. the design of Oracle E­Business Suite contains a general organizational model that can be  customized to fit any actual organization. The following sections will help you determine how your company fits into the Oracle  E­Business Suite organizational model. Similarly. Because the range of possible organizational structures in  organizations is limitless. Its everyday meaning refers to a company.  Multi­Org is not required where one set of books has AP. OE and another set of books has none of these but  only GL. This is not a simple  decision. even if those organizations report separate  sets of accounts.  Multi­Org is not required where subledger processing is centralized or where there is only one set of books.6. the German subsidiary has to be created in Oracle Financials as a separate set of books. which are made up of legal  entities. Multi­Org is a feature that supports  multiple organizations within a single instance of the database.  §  Support any number of legal entities. a calendar. AR.

 all the  transactions for an operating unit must appear on the balance sheet of only one legal entity. all parts  that are in stock waiting to be assembled into finished products. The inventory of an organization consists of the finished products that are ready for sale. even  if the same vendor or customer is involved.  The customer and vendor lists are shared across operating units.  Legal Entity  A legal entity is a company for which. payments.  The Oracle Manufacturing modules. The minimum configuration is a server supporting one Financials database  instance. and receipts—are partitioned by operating unit. and receipts for another operating unit.  Inventory Organization  The inventory organization is a unit that has inventory transactions and balances. the user would need the appropriate Responsibility privileges. You do not need to  split an inventory organization across two or more legal entities. and  work progresses on assembly lines. are partitioned by inventory organization. For nonprofit organizations the legal entity is equivalent to a fund. To access another set of books. such as banks. The transaction data that  these modules hold—purchase orders. The address sites are partitioned by operating unit. and time. That is to say  that one operating unit cannot see the purchase orders. by law.The financial transactions and balances in Oracle General Ledger belong to one set of books. In accounting terms.  Operating Unit  Operating units represent buying and selling units within your organization. payments. and Oracle Payables. with one set of books. inventory is a balance sheet item and therefore belongs to one legal entity. and possibly manufactures or  distributes products. expertise. A company's inventory changes continually as products are sold. you must prepare fiscal or tax reports. From an  accounting perspective. and a single operating unit related to one inventory organization. invoices. hospitals. The user of one set of  books sees only the journals that relate to that set of books. as  shown in Figure 2­3. . Some organizations. new parts are purchased. More complex organizations can be modeled by introducing multiplicity at any level. invoices. There is no reason to split the  liabilities and receivables of one operating unit across two legal entities. do not have  tangible inventories; they sell their services. one legal entity. Oracle Purchasing. and all the assemblies of parts that are currently being  assembled in the factory. The data within  Oracle General Ledger is secured by sets of books. Consequently. and consultancies. Legal entities  consist of one or more operating units. Oracle Receivables. The operating unit concept is most apparent in  Oracle Order Management. All other journals are hidden from the user on screens and  reports. including a balance sheet and a  profit­and­loss report.  Purchasing and selling give rise to liabilities and receivables that are balance sheet items. including Oracle Inventory. the legal entity is the smallest business unit for which you need to be able to  produce a balanced set of accounts.  described in the following sections. Within each set of books you can define one or more legal entities.  The organizational model is a strict hierarchy.

  Information held in the Applications is protected from unauthorized access. Access is restricted to authorized users. the user names. is installed in the database  once—as the first application module created when you install Oracle Financials—and it controls user access to all  organizations within the database. the Applications Object Library. A global organization might implement one database instance for operations in America. Oracle Financials databases therefore are essentially standalone database systems; they form islands of  data. Oracle Financials does not support  databases distributed across machines. The distribution of the processing load provides fault tolerance in case one or  more nodes fail.  Although it is possible to distribute the processing across nodes in a network system. the number of logical  Financials databases has a bearing on the intercompany capabilities you will be able to deliver readily to the end users. and  currencies will not be shared by those three database instances. The repository for the user list. a second database  instance for Europe and Africa.Figure 2­3: The organizational model  Logical Financials Database  Although not explicitly part of the Oracle E­Business Suite multiple­organization architecture. The accounting setup. Each logical Financials database has a  single list of authorized users. accounting calendar. and a third for Asia. who  are able to log in and work through an application's screens with their passwords. .

 GCS  can upload financial data from a spreadsheet as well as through a dedicated open interface.  Financials in the Global Businesses Environment  Hardware and network configurations can be complex. Keep in mind that reporting hierarchies might not match  physical locations; for example. The configuration is not determined by the size of your organization; rather  it is the complexity of your organization. local servers allow independent operating units a great deal of  autonomy to run their businesses the way that suits them. In addition. and implementers to build up confidence and understand  how Oracle E­Business Suite works. The corporation has a choice: Run one centralized server and link all  users by high­speed data connections (called a wide area network. the structure of a chart of  accounts. A large multinational organization with several operating units has  finance users in many countries around the world.  Centralized servers are excellent for allowing regular and fast consolidation of financial data to produce groupwide  accounts. Pilots can be implemented rapidly and used to validate new business  processes and procedures. after you have fully researched the structure and needs of your business. and personnel departments run at the group level. A large multinational company might  choose to implement Oracle E­Business Suite in one business unit as a prototype and later roll out the system to its other  units. The hardware strategy has a subtle and pervasive impact on the software features that can be  delivered readily to each user. the analysis of the business should consider all business units. because there is a  trade­off between network communication cost (which is higher for a centralized server) and machine cost (which is lower  for a centralized server).  The final decisions about the hardware configuration and about organizational structure cannot be made independently of  each other; both areas have to be considered.  Prototyping  The prototype might be a full implementation in a single business unit or it might be a pilot implementation of a subset of  the functionality across the whole organisation. the level of autonomy in different parts of your  organization. GCS caters to data collected from any source and any number  of subsidiary accounting systems. local independence might be seen as a bad business practice because it can degrade the  data being uploaded to corporate reporting systems. If you are converting to Oracle E­Business Suite from an existing or legacy system. do . Businesses have to adapt the hardware strategy to their  corporate culture.If you do decide to run multiple database instances. and the similarity between their lines of business. model your entire business and determine your actual organizational structures.  marketing. Each option should be costed. before choosing multiple financial databases  or servers. consider the overhead of maintaining reference data. staff organization.  The hardware configuration and the implementation of organizational structure are subtly related. accountants. each database catering to multiple organizations and each organization  consisting of multiple legal entities. However. such as currency conversion rates.  How many legal entities do you own? Where are your warehouses and manufacturing plants located? Are the finance. you can easily consolidate General Ledger transactions using the  Release 11 feature Global Consolidation System (GCS). a centralized server allows simplified creation of a common chart of accounts and common  categories and classifications for all users. Even so. They allow managers. the marketing manager for Asia and the Pacific might operate out of group headquarters  in New York. The global effort can be broken down into smaller manageable chunks. and other setup issues have to be made with the needs of the entire organization in mind. From the start.  Prototyping is a very powerful way to get up to speed fast and show some immediate return for the prototyping effort. These accounting systems do not need to be Oracle General Ledger systems. in separate  databases. or by each business unit individually? Determine your  reporting needs and the levels of autonomy in your business. GCS makes it unnecessary  to organize a consolidation mechanism outside Oracle Financials.  Creating a Model of Your Business  Before you implement Oracle Financials. or WAN) or to install smaller machines in each  operating unit and connect the users by a local area network (LAN). its geographical spread. The  prototype must be seen in perspective. By contrast. Decisions about hardware distribution.  Modeling Process  The modeling process can be likened to a process of mapping your actual organizational structure onto the implied  organizational model of logical databases. and not just those of  the pilot business unit. The strategy for each  should be chosen together.

  Business requirements for national and multinational users have been built into the applications for 44 countries  worldwide. or from a feeder system if the data is imported  directly into Oracle General Ledger. and Consolidation and Budgeting  reports. forecasting. spreadsheet. and released centrally in one global Applications product.  packaged. per Accounting Flexfield combination. . in addition to your  primary set of books. Oracle's ultimate aim with globalization is to put all features into the core product.  Each module provides several reports. You do this by defining one or more reporting sets of books. It does not report on transaction detail. and text—all from a single  user interface. Through a spreadsheet like window users can browse data in the database and construct their own query  reports to pull out the data elements that interest them. Companies need dual reporting currencies when they either operate in high­inflation economies or  need to be able to report in both euro and a local currency.  Oracle's earlier approach was to deliver the package in American English. The FSG reports on account  balance. either actual or budget. a centralized report management tool from which you can submit. There has to  be a corporate wide plan for financial reporting. It provides a complete set of tools for budgeting.  monitor.  The Application Desktop Integrator started life as a quick and simple way to import budgets and actual journals in Oracle  General Ledger.  Financial Reporting  The Accounting Flexfield segments support statutory and management reporting from the General Ledger.  their content can be focused each time the report is submitted by specifying selection parameters. other tools are associated with Oracle General Ledger for reporting financial data in a  way that exceeds the intention of the standard reports. Determine how many databases are needed to support your business. Refer to  Chapter 3 for more information on defining FSG report formats.  Many customers are using Oracle Discoverer to deliver custom and ad­hoc reports. each one detailing a specific type of financial transaction data. and publish any type of report to a variety of different formats—Web. These standard  reports can be requested by an authorized user at any time. It now includes the Request Center.not make the mistake of simply reimplementing your existing model; instead start the modeling process at the database  level. several Account Analysis reports. local statutory reports—that could be  applied on top of the base package. Not only does the Request Center support publish­and­subscribe Web publishing; it also allows you to  download a spreadsheet version of the report on demand for analytical analysis. with accounting features that closely  corresponded to the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) of the United States. Discoverer is a standard Oracle  database tool. Transaction data is exported out of Oracle General Ledger  and imported into Oracle Financial Analyzer. and  reporting corporate financial data. extra software features. which  can be used for producing any financial report such as a balance sheet or income statement. The same features are now developed. which is used to produce complex analysis reports.  Global Financial Applications  Oracle's globalization strategy is simple: Provide one global product that meets local. regional and global requirements.  Oracle Financial Analyzer is a separate module with an OLAP (On Line Analytic Processing) multidimensional database  at its core.  In addition to the standard reports. Reporting needs that are not covered by a segment in the Accounting  Flexfield have to be satisfied by a report from one of the other modules. analyzing. You then can model upward to decide how  many servers are needed and which database instances will reside on each server. driven directly off the underlying table  structures or using an end user layer. together with extensions—  additional languages versions of screens and reports.  Multiple Reporting Currencies  The Multiple Reporting Currencies (MRC) feature allows you to report and maintain accounting records at the transaction  level in more than one functional currency. Oracle called these extensions localizations. One such tool is the Financial Statement Generator (FSG). such as the Business Intelligence System. For each database instance you can  model downward to determine the organizational structure implemented within each database. Standard reports have a fixed format and layout; however. The standard reports in  Oracle General Ledger include Trial Balance reports.

 the American English  translation of the forms and reports can be used simultaneously with a data entry character set that allows local language  characters to be entered. a limitation that could be a determining factor in the number of database  instances you end up installing at your site. For example. appearing on screens and in reports. and remit­to addresses in country­specific  formats. localizations used in both Europe and Latin America are classified  in the Global region.  Character sets are grouped according to the number of bits and bytes needed to uniquely identify each character. The Japanese character set requires 16 bits (2 bytes).National Language Support  The National Language Support (NLS) permits you to run Oracle E­Business Suite in languages other than American  English. most  countries have their own special formats for checks and electronic correspondence with banks. The default character set is WE8ISO8859P1. . For example. all the forms. This would be necessary for a Dutch  company that intends to use electronic payments with both French and German banks. you can enter German addresses in the format required by the  Bundespost (the German mail service) and enter addresses for customers in the United Kingdom in the format  recommended by the Royal Mail. you may use only one  character set on any given database instance.  Address Styles  Oracle E­Business Suite enables you to enter customer. This feature enables users on the same system to view fixed text. and reports appear in the selected language. help text. Most localizations are necessary  because the local laws or accounting practices differ from those that are common in the United States. but none of the Italian localizations. especially within multinational companies. When you install Oracle E­Business Suite in a language other than American English. currently you could not store both Japanese and German in the  same database. You then would be able to  issue commands in French but all your screens and reports would remain in English. Both of these configurations  are possible and common. If you need to view this information in more  than one language (not including American English) within a single database instance you can install Multilanguage  Support (MLS). it  probably will be included in the localization for your country or territory. There are two distinct categories of NLS: the language character set that users are able to use when they key  data into forms and the language translation of the fixed text on forms and reports. in which one language must be chosen  as the base language. it is possible to install the localizations for several territories. For instance. and  Africa (EMEA); or the Americas (Canada plus Latin America). ü. If you want to work in German you need an 8­bit character set to store extra characters  such as ä. supplier. Or. because they use different character sets. An additional region. but the input screens format  and syntax will be specific to your country instead of always reflecting the United States Postal Service requirements. the Middle East. For example. suppose you  wanted all screens and reports in Italian. if a process is a generally accepted practice or is government required. called Global. check.  Each territory that has localization modules belongs to one of three regions: Asia Pacific; Europe.  Localizations  Localizations are designed to meet the specific needs of certain territories or countries. and ß. Regular  ASCII is a 7­bit character set. bank. messages. suppose you  were to install the French localization software. The character set available for user  data need not correspond to the language of the fixed text on forms and reports. if you have customers in Germany. Your database administrator will need to know which character set you intend to use before the  database is created. but not the French translations. Future releases will allow you to do this through the use of the  UTF8 character set.  Translations The Oracle E­Business Suite forms and reports are available in more than 29 languages in addition to  American English.  You can always store data in American English with any of the available character sets. is for localizations that  apply to territories throughout the world. For example. in  different languages according to their user setup designations. whereas others might have  wider reaching effects.  The effects of localizations vary widely; some could have only a minor effect on one module. The data will still be stored in the same database columns.  menus.  Note  Translations and localizations are separate from and independent of each other. Unlike translations. For example.  Foreign Character Sets Choose a character set that includes all the printable characters you are likely to need. However. The electronic payment  formats for each country also are included in the localizations. As a general rule.

  This chapter has provided an overview of these concepts. Oracle General Ledger enforces absolute budgetary control. Oracle General Ledger handles currency  conversion rates.Conclusion  Implementing the E­Business Suite is a major undertaking for most organizations. and tracks and reports balances in multiple currencies. the organizational model. Pilots and prototypes  are effective devices to enable your organization to quickly get up to speed with the structure and behaviour of the E­  Business Suite; they allows key users to design an optimal configuration of critical set up like business organizations and  charts of account—decisions which will pervade the fully implemented system forever. and regional features early on in order to be able to close out  important implementation decision that have to be parameterized in the initial set up of the application.  consolidating group­wide accounts. . Oracle provides a comprehensive  financial management solution that enforces financial controls and enables data collection and financial reporting  throughout an enterprise. It is a tool for integrating subledger activity. Business managers have to appreciate  concepts such as flexfields. provides support for the euro. and once made are difficult to change later. Most of these  decisions have to be made once for the entire company. For businesses operating in a global environment.  Part II: The Financial Applications  Chapter List  Chapter 3: Oracle General Ledger  Chapter 4: Budgeting and Allocations  Chapter 5: Oracle Payables  Chapter 6: Oracle Receivables  Chapter 7: Oracle Cash Management  Chapter 8: Oracle Assets  Chapter 9: Oracle Purchasing  Chapter 10: Oracle Inventory  Chapter 11: Oracle Order Management  Chapter 12: Foreign Currency Operations  Chapter 13: Oracle Self­Service Web Applications  Chapter 14: Oracle Projects  Chapter 15: Oracle Workflow and the Implementation Wizard  Chapter 16: New Applications in Release 11i  Chapter 3: Oracle General Ledger  Overview  Oracle General Ledger is the collection point for all financial transactions. Each is described and expanded in the chapters that follow. For companies  operating in a strict spending regime. and producing the statutory financial reports.

 A  company using Oracle Assets would key the asset information into Oracle Assets; Oracle Assets would prepare a journal  entry that is transferred into Oracle General Ledger. maintaining  the highest summary level of financial information from the transaction details supplied by its subledgers. Oracle Payables sends information to Oracle Assets to capitalize the  equipment and initiate depreciation.  Figure 3­1: Sample journals shown in the Enter Journals form .  The Heart of Your Accounting System  General Ledger is at the heart of any accounting system. For example. Business Intelligence System  and Discoverer—the implementer's task is to match the appropriate tool to the circumstance and. the purchase order is closed and  a liability is recorded in Oracle Payables. or financial  transactions. To purchase office equipment. Finally. For example. transactions are entered into  Oracle subledgers. Provided with an abundance of native reporting tools—  Financial Statement Generator. Not all companies implement all the  Financials modules.Reporting drives everything you do in the General Ledger. by judicious planning of  the accounting Flexfield. and depreciation information directly into Oracle General Ledger. When the equipment arrives and the invoice is received. Normally. It is the central repository of all subledger activity. Oracle Financial Analyzer. All events that  have a financial or monetary impact are ultimately reflected in General Ledger. ensure that a companies reporting needs are met simply and efficiently. The data in all of these subledgers is then transferred to Oracle General Ledger  through a standard transfer program. Applications Desktop Integrator. A control mechanism outside the accounting system should be in place and  maintained to ensure that accounting entries are entered and not duplicated. a customer invoice is entered into Oracle Receivables after Oracle Shipping has notified  Receivables that a product has been shipped to the customer.  Anything that has a financial impact on the company has to be accounted for. are entered only once.  Transactions that are not entered into any other subledger can be entered directly into Oracle General Ledger using the  Enter Journals form (see Figure 3­1 for sample journal entries). whether in General Ledger or its subledgers. a purchase order is  recorded in Oracle Purchasing. Oracle Applications is built on the principle that such events. Companies must ensure that all financial transactions are  represented only once in the ledger. a company with a small number of assets can choose not to implement Oracle Assets  and will have to enter asset additions. disposals.

 Every accounting transaction  results in one or more debits and credits that always remain in balance. and a closing balance. which encapsulates your chart of  accounts structure.  Double­entry Accounting  Double­entry accounting requires constant symmetry; total debits must equal total credits. Oracle General Ledger will either reject the transaction or force the transaction to  balance by posting the difference to a suspense account. Oracle General Ledger requires that all journals balance. the AFF usually identifies who incurred the cost (for example.  Multiple Charts of Accounts  Companies that operate globally might require the use of multiple charts of accounts. which show an opening balance. The balance sheet summarizes accounts and financial activities in three broad categories:  assets. for every organization or customer the  company does business with. such as Oracle Payables and Oracle Projects. a company using Oracle Assets and Oracle Payables would have asset information already available  in Oracle Assets if an invoice was created in Oracle Payables. Across the entire E­Business  Suite. which company or department)  and what the cost was for (for example. into Oracle Assets.  The first step in capturing your transactions is to set up your chart of accounts. a $5. revenue.  For expense transactions. which show how much money the company owes to  others; and capital and retained earnings. categorized. For example. you can design your AFF structure to include that information as well.000 purchase of office  equipment would result in an increase to the asset account. Either way the financial  transaction finds its way into Oracle General Ledger. such as which region.  Accounts and Periods  You can enter transactions only in an open period. In addition. A  company keeps an account. One full  Accounting Flexfield is called a combination. or expense. all accounts are identified by a unique Accounting Flexfield (AFF) combination. and product incurred the cost. cost center. accounts are kept for all the revenues and expenses of the company. owner's equity. which show the total cash invested in the business by the owners or  shareholders. a company with  subsidiaries in different geographical regions might have to adapt to different account structures based upon various laws  for that region or base currency requirements. adjustment periods can overlap. you should close the period to prevent accidental entries into that period. This later behavior is controlled by a parameter that is  configured when General Ledger is first set up (on the Define Set of Books form). Many times. Oracle General Ledger allows you to define as many charts of accounts as  desired all within a single installation of the product. such as those for company. If you  try to enter an unbalanced journal. AFF is used throughout all Oracle Applications whenever a transaction is entered into the system. These accounts are  summarized in an income statement. which represents the performance of a  company over time. Each journal entry line is tagged with an Accounting Flexfield combination. You choose the names. You assign each account the qualifier of asset. cost  center. If you want more detailed information.  Periods are identified by names such as FEB­2004 or WEEK12­2005 and represent non­overlapping consecutive date  ranges. Because total  debits must always equal total credits in every transaction. from Oracle Assets. posted as a debit and an increase to a liability account. you can send asset journal entries to Oracle General Ledger. and account. transactions that occurred  throughout the period.On the other hand. . That statement is a snapshot of your account at a particular point in time. two or three periods are open at once to allow for prior  period transactions and future period transactions. The Mass Additions feature in Oracle Assets allows you to  transfer asset information from any feeder system. Once you know that you no longer need to keep the period open to  enter transactions. Your chart of accounts determines how  your accounting information is collected. travel expense). liability. which represent everything the company owns; liabilities. The  structure and design of the AFF is one of the most important aspects of any E­Business Suite implementation. FEB­2004 would include the date ranges 01­FEB­2004 to 29­FEB­2004 and would be followed by MAR­2004  starting on 01­MAR­2004. and stored for reporting purposes. Unlike ordinary periods. For example.  Then. also called a profit and loss (P&L) statement.  Overview of General Ledger  Most people are familiar with their own bank statements. Guidance  on how to go about the design and what to avoid is included later in this chapter in the section on Accounting Flexfield  Design. following whatever convention you devise; and assign the date ranges.  The Accounting Flexfield consists of multiple segments.  posted as a credit. like the records the bank keeps of your bank account.  You can also set up adjustment period for year­end adjustments.

 CREATION_DATE.  Tip  Most every transaction table has who/when columns. and uses these totals to keep a running total of  the account balance for each period. and the date and time these events happened. This limitation is required in order to produce year­to­year comparisons. and periods. giving better quarter­to­quarter comparisons. dormant companies.The transaction is dated in the accounting system according to when it actually occurred; not according to when it was  entered into the system or processed. which have to show day end balances for  regulatory compliance. which is favored by auditors who otherwise have a resource problem dealing with all  the companies with December 31 year ends. LAST_UPDATED_BY. or any other chosen day. the actual date and time a transaction was entered is not an important factor in controlling functions or report  selection criterion. Transactions in an OLTP system are dated with the day and time when they were created. at a later time to post a group of journal batches.  and five weeks each  52 periods of one  week each  Calendar  Quarter  Month  4­4­5  Usage  Rarely used except by low­transaction. This is in contrast to the way Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) systems tend  to work.  because it fits with the United Kingdom's fiscal year. because it fits in with the calendar year; March 31. Users  normally put odd days into the first and last weeks of the  year.  AutoPost uses criteria sets that are a combination of journal sources. or automatically using AutoPost.  Posting is simply the process of updating the account balances of your detail and summary accounts. which runs from April 6 to April 5; September 30 for the U. which displays the audit trail for the currently selected record on your  screen. The financial year can also  end on any chosen day. A month is too long to wait for critical figures. Common year ends are December 31. and posts them automatically at specific times and  submission intervals defined by you.  government fiscal year; and June 30. and the start and end days can differ from year to year; but the number of periods each year  must remain constant. The accounting period in which a financial transaction falls is likewise determined by  the date when the transaction actually occurred; not when it was entered into the accounting system. These columns are  CREATED_BY. An important role  delegated to the system administrator or a key person in the finance department is opening and closing the accounting  periods. balance types. However.  Favored by retail companies that require rapid feedback on  sales figures.  Odd days at year end are usually swept into the dead time  around the holidays. A one­ or two­week time scale is a reasonable closing schedule for companies that operate on calendar month  periods. In an accounting  system.  Standard business calendar.  Week  52  Day  260 ± 25  Each trading day is a  separate period  the total debits and the total credits posted to each account in the period. the  user who last updated the record. Each time you post journals.  When you run this program it selects the journals that meet the criteria. Financial year ends on  December 31. Posting can be  done at the time of journal entry. and LAST_UPDATE_BY. In fact it is stored in Oracle E­Business Suite as part of the who/when audit trail associated with every  data record (see the following tip).  Alternative to calendar month. four.  Finance and accounting departments often have targets for the prompt closure of accounting periods. Provides equal­length  quarters. The accounting periods in Oracle Financials can start and  finish on any day of the year. They are referenced by  the menu option Help | Record History.  Favored by banks.  Various common accounting calendars are shown in Table 3­1.S. the number and timing of the periods can be chosen to suit your company's local accounting practice. the system keeps a record of  Table 3­1: Common Accounting Calendars and Usage  Number of  Periods  4  12  12  Duration of Each  Period  13 weeks  Calendar month  Each quarter is three  periods of four. The following formula shows how the account balances are calculated:  §  Account Closing Balance = Opening Balance + Total (debits) − Total (credits) . which record the user who created each record. journal categories. so fiscal years are directly comparable.

 Box 1 shows the account balances.§  Account Opening Balance for One Period = Closing Balance for the Previous Period  These two rules determine how the balance of each account develops over a period of time. Box 2 shows the posted journal. . The journal in this case is simply a salary payment to employees from a bank account with some other  administration cost. and Box 3 shows the updated account  balances. An example of this is shown  in Figure 3­2.

.

  The two rules. Oracle General Ledger has significant  advantages for larger organizations. the Financial Statement Generator  (FSG)  §  Account for multiple currencies  §  Create and maintain budgets  §  Consolidate groups of companies or subsidiaries  §  Provide a spreadsheet interface for entering journals. and it is based on the account type defined for each Accounting Flexfield combination. creating budgets. This audit trail helps accountants validate their reports and ensures data  security. the profit or loss for the year is calculated and transferred to the balance sheet as retained  earnings. The processing logic needed to run a computerized ledger system is not complex. The mechanics of the system has its origins in paper­based lists of accounting records. completely describe the processing logic encoded into  General Ledger. and owner's equity) or vice versa will inevitably result in an incorrect profit figure  carried forward into the next financial year. and spreadsheet entry using the Applications Desktop Integrator. plus the variation of the second rule at year end. Large  organizations must be able to perform the following tasks:  §  Process high volumes of data  §  Provide transaction processing through journal approvals and secured access to journal posting and reversal  §  Create custom and standard reports using Oracle General Ledger's reporting tool. subledger entry using the  Journal Import interface.  For this reason it is important to set up the account types in Oracle correctly when the segment values for  each account are defined.  Journal Entries  Journals can be entered into Oracle General Ledger using various methods: manual entry. Small companies and sole  traders can run a perfectly adequate general ledger system on a spreadsheet. The following illustration shows  a typical journal entry.Figure 3­2: Account balances develop over time as journals are posted  There is a variation on the second rule for revenue and expense accounts at year end.  Note  Oracle General Ledger calculates the profit figure and transfers it to the account designated as the retained  earnings account for that set of books. liability. which need several users to access the system at the same time. Revenue and expense accounts  are part of the profit and loss for the company. The revenue and expense accounts start the new financial year with a balance of zero. The calculation takes effect when you open the first period of the  new accounting year. known as  ledgers. Mixing profit and loss accounts (revenue and expense) as balance sheet  accounts (asset. Tampering with accounts and figures is much more difficult with proper controls in place. or creating and analyzing reports using the  Applications Integrator (ADI)  §  Provide Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) capabilities using Oracle Financial Analyzer to further analyze  information and expand reporting capabilities in a multidimensional environment  Auditing and Security  Oracle General Ledger maintains an audit trail for every financial transaction to allow you to go back to the original entry  for purposes of reconciliation and auditing. The definition of profit (or loss if the profit is negative) is this:  §  Profit = Total Revenues − Total Expenses  At the end of the financial year. .

 and select the rules for General Ledger to use to determine the effective  date or period of the reversal. inserts them into the GL_INTERFACE table. The Journal Import interface is the common tool for importing transactions into Oracle General Ledger.  The Journal Import Interface  Journal transactions can originate in the subledgers or in an external feeder system. You choose the reversal method (either switch the debits and credits or  change sign of each entry) for each category.  from which the journal import process captures its data. You can use automatic journal reversal efficiently to reverse the effect of accrual journals in  the following accounting period.Automatic Journal Reversal  As a new feature in Release 11i. the steps necessary to reverse a journal have been automated. . Each Oracle subledger that transfers  transactions prepares the journal entry records.  Integration with Other Financials Modules  Unless you opt for a manual solution using only General Ledger. When  you transfer data from Oracle subledgers. General Ledger will  reverse journals for specified journal categories. or to wind out the effect of depreciation journals after the management accounts have  been produced. and starts the journal import  process. the system automatically populates the database table called GL_INTERFACE. you will inevitably need to import data from your  subledgers. Figure 3­3 shows the main accounting transactions that flow from the Oracle subledgers and a few symbolic  external feeder systems.

  Alternatively. Figure 3­4 diagrams the process. if the journal data set is beyond repair.Figure 3­3: Integration of Oracle General Ledger using the Journal Import interface  The Journal Import interface uses the GL_INTERFACE table as a bridge between external systems and the Oracle  General Ledger base tables where journals are stored. the errors are listed in the execution report. Each of these errors  needs to be corrected using the Correct Journal Import Data window; then the journal import process must be restarted. The journal import process is started and an execution report shows what has  processed. For each journal line that needs to be imported. . a single record is  inserted into the GL_INTERFACE table. all records can be deleted using the Delete Journal Import Data  window and the data prepared again from the feeder system. If journals are not imported successfully.

 they do happen; so it is advisable to check each and every process to ensure it has completed  successfully. open the  period and rerun the import.Figure 3­4: The Journal Import process  For transfers initiated from Oracle subledgers. the system automatically populates the GL_INTERFACE table; then starts  the journal import process. Although  errors are rare. . The journal data transferred from Oracle subledgers seldom shows data errors. The most common and easily rectified error is attempting to import into a closed period. To correct.

 or Oracle Forms. precisely because they  advise users when exceptions occur. sources. Data records  are inserted into the GL_INTERFACE table; then the journal import process is started. You can use SQL*Loader. ensuring that all the accounts are valid and that  attributes like the journal category are appropriate. Journals in Future Enterable periods can be imported but not posted.  Importing from External Systems Importing financial transactions from external systems is very simple.  Table 3­2: GL_INTERFACE Data Needed by Journal Import  Column  SEGMENT1 through  SEGMENT30  CODE_COMBINATION_ID  ACTUAL_FLAG  REFERENCE1  REFERENCE4  ACCOUNTED_DR  ACCOUNTED_CR  ACCOUNTING_DATE  STATUS  SET_OF_BOOKS_ID  USER_JE_SOURCE_NAME  USER_JE_CATEGORY_NAME  CURRENCY_CODE  Purpose  Identifies the Accounting Flexfield segment values of the journal  Used as an alternative to the SEGMENT xx values  A for actual amounts  Used to create a journal batch name of the format <REFERENCE1><Request  ID><Actual Flag><Group ID>  Used to format the Journal Entry name  A debit amount  A credit amount  Determines in which accounting period the journal appears  The value NEW  Determines in which set of books the journal appears  Determines which source the journal has  Determines which category the journal has  Determines which currency the journal has  The interface program that populates the GL_INTERFACE table can also submit the concurrent request to run the journal  import process. Journal Import validates batches. Programmers can  initiate concurrent programs by calling the submission routines from the operating system. and  journal lines. If there are  errors in your import process. categories. you can review the error codes in the Journal Execution report. the GL_INTERFACE columns shown in Table 3­2 must be populated.  Transferring from Other Modules The journals from each module are clearly identifiable according to their batch name  and journal name. as shown in Table 3­3. Each subledger transfer is tagged with a unique identifying number. This is intended to ensure that  all journals entered into Oracle General Ledger are right and proper.  Each time the routine is called. an  Oracle utility to insert data read from files directly into a database table. journal entries. and dates are valid. . or Future  Enterable. Oracle uses  the journal source to identify the subledger (such as Oracle Payables); the category represents the type of transaction. Refer to the Oracle Applications Object Library Reference Manual for more details. are a good device for performing checks such as these. The data attributes of the journals are checked in detail. Doing this is particularly useful for regular or overnight imports from feeder systems.  Journal Import Validation The Journal Import interface performs validation on all journals. You can import into any period that is either Open.  Additionally. the appropriate parameters (such as the name of the concurrent program) and the  parameter values should be passed. A list of all the error codes and their meanings can be found at the end of the  Journal Execution report. Error codes are printed in the Journal Execution report next to the  GL_INTERFACE data that is in error. the journal needs to balance. PL/SQL. The validation ensures that all accounts.  such as Adjustments.Alerts. managed from Oracle Workflow. or you can use more complex import programs  written using any programming language that supports embedded SQL. You can write an alert to send a simple e­mail to the accounting manager (or  whoever is in charge) when a process such as this—which is expected never to fail—actually fails. The Journal Import program allows you to select what you want to import by the source. Whatever the mechanism for inserting the  records.

 budget balances roll forward  through the end of the latest open budget year. General Ledger adjusts your retained earnings balance for  the effect on your revenue and expense accounts. details taken from the imported journal lines can be  retained in the GL_IMPORT_REFERENCES table. For example. To retain the audit trail back to the subledger. billable hours from  Projects. enter the value B or E in the ACTUAL_FLAG  column and the appropriate budget version ID in the BUDGET_VERSION_ID column or the appropriate encumbrance  type ID in the ENCUMBRANCE_TYPE_ID column of the GL_INTERFACE table. and of course statistical journals can be imported from non­Oracle subledger systems as well. Activating this feature increases the clarity and visibility of the audit trail and is  strongly recommended. Common practice would be to write a simple script to generate a  statistical journal to post to the ledger. journal category (such as manual year end adjustments). and encumbrance balances roll forward through the end of the latest open  encumbrance year. several drill­down inquiry screens are available to trace  transactions back to the subledgers.)  Purchase invoices transferred from Oracle Payables.  Summary mode is good for performance. (CUR is the currency of the  payments and user­ref is the reference given to the transfer by the user who  started it. the amount of disk space required. department.  Sales invoices transferred from Oracle Receivables.  Other Uses for Journal Import Journal Import is used internally by the standard consolidation process to transfer  account balances or detail transactions from one set of books to another. Conversely. and the time it takes to retrieve the data. but the direct one­to­one correspondence between General Ledger and the  subledger is lost. both entities may post the intercompany journal.  user­ref Payables  AR control­id  Receivables  AR control­id  Receivables  Purchase  Invoices CUR  Sales Invoices  CUR  Trade Receipts  CUR  When you submit the Journal Import program. you can post them in Oracle General Ledger to update the account balances. If you post a journal entry into a prior year. Summary mode produces one journal entry line per  distinct Accounting Flexfield combination (for example.  If you have chosen to implement multiple instances of Oracle Applications. GIS  takes care of intercompany transactions that are distributed across multiple application database instances. When you  post to an earlier open period. The mechanics of the drill down are described in more detail in Chapter 23. To do this. and effective date combinations at different intervals . company. By default this feature is deactivated.  Journal Import can be used to import budgets or encumbrances. detail  mode imports the journal with as many journal entry lines as there are transaction lines in the GL_INTERFACE table. The company  that initiates the intercompany transaction enters and submits an intercompany transaction to a receiver company for  review. you must specify  whether the import should operate in summary mode or detail mode.Table 3­3: Naming Conventions for Journals Transferred from Subledgers  Batch Name  user­ref Payables  Journal Name  Payments CUR  Transactions Included  Payments transferred from Oracle Payables.  The import process is often useful for statistical journals. or any of the transfer programs from the subledgers.  You can also set the criteria for the Automatic Posting program to post transactions based on journal source (such as  Payables). Much of the routine  tasks involved in multi­instance consolidation have been annexed within the Global Intercompany System (GIS).  Posting  After importing your journals. You can automate the posting process by scheduling the Automatic  Posting program to periodically select and post batches.  Summary mode reduces the size of journals. use Journal Import to consolidate account  balances from the remote databases into one central database that holds a consolidated set of books. but it can be activated from the  Define Sources window. Provided this feature is activated. the manufacturing system might control the units­  of­production figures that GL needs for allocations.)  Trade receipts transferred from Oracle Receivables. Once the receiver approves the transaction. actual balances roll forward through the latest open period. The consolidation process can take account of  mapping account codes and period names between the source and destination set of books. The same would apply to head counts from Human Resources. Journal Import can  load or convert opening balances from a legacy system when you first go live with Oracle General Ledger. and natural account). (control­id is a  sequential number assigned to each transfer by the system.

 or in the subledger  and arrange for the batch to be re­transferred. New transactions posted to a reopened period will  invalidate subledgers and cause you to re­create financial statements and consolidation reports. Journals Report with Subledger Detail.  10.  Set the status of the first accounting period in the new fiscal year to Open. or manually from Oracle General Ledger.  Close the period for each subledger.  12. you should restrict access to  this form to a few select individuals to protect your accounting data. and run Journal Import again.  Generate all recurring journals and step­down allocations.for different transaction groups.  9.  (Optional) If your business rules require you to create reversing entries at the beginning of every period. . However.  you can do so in Oracle General Ledger using the Open and Close Periods form.  13.  8. GL_JE_HEADERS. With the Journal Approval System. You must run the posting process from General  Ledger to update the GL_BALANCES table. When they do you ought  proceed with caution and log a TAR with Oracle Support. On no account delete the journal data.  Posting from the subledger systems transfers data to the General Ledger interface and journal entry  tables.  Run the Journal Import process to populate the GL_JE_BATCHES. Account Analysis with Subledger Detail.  Note  5. all companies go through a closing process to close the period and produce final  financial reports. If your company's policies and procedures allow for the reopening of closed periods.  Note  If you allow suspense posting in your set of books. Most companies have  strict closing procedures that prohibit the possibility of reopening closed periods. The tasks do not have to be  performed in the exact order described:  1.  Some companies allow for closed periods to be reopened so staff can add any missed journal entries. except in concert  with Oracle Support. If you encounter a large number of errors. General  Ledger Report.  and Unposted Journals Report.  (Optional) If you did not generate and post your prior period reversals at the beginning of this period.  Review the Journal Import Execution Report to check the status of all imported journal entries. If you do not choose this run option. Posted Journals Report.  11. companies use current period  journals to make prior period corrections. this  practice should not be taken lightly. The corrections can be made in the GL_INTERFACE table using the Correct Journal Import Data  window. and Accrual Reconciliation Report.  The following list outlines the events required to process transactions and close your period. who will have a considered whether to fix the data in GL_INTERFACE.  6.  Journals imported from external systems can be corrected at source and re­imported or corrected in Oracle  General Ledger. many companies  will leave this step as a period­end procedure. and the GL_JE_LINES  tables. you can require that journal entries from any source be  approved before posting. Transactions will have been flagged as posted in the subledger to  prevent double transfers and these flags have to be reset by script. generate  and post accruals from the prior period now. This can be done automatically from the subledger systems. but does not update general ledger balances.  Journal Import will reject any source/group ID combination that contains account errors.  The Closing Schedule  At the end of an accounting period.  Note  Although it is customary to post reversing entries at the beginning of a new period.  Perform reconciliations of subsidiary ledgers by reviewing and correcting balances.  2.  3. These reports are considered final because once the period is closed. the figures for that period can no  longer be changed.  Journals imported from another Oracle Application are a special case; they rarely error. However. be sure to  generate reversals now. delete the Journal Import data from the GL_INTERFACE table.  Transfer data from all of your subledgers and feeder systems to the GL_INTERFACE table. Instead.  correct the information in the feeder or subledger system. You can review them online or in reports. you can choose a Journal Import Run Option that  will post any journal import errors to a suspense account.  4. This prevents future subledger transactions from being posted to General  Ledger in the same period. Oracle General Ledger offers security to control which users can post and reverse journals. The following reports will  be useful at this stage: Journal Batch Summary Report; General Journal Report; Journal Entry Report; Journal  Line Report; Journal Source Report; Journals by Document Number Report (when document sequencing is used). The following reports are useful  to help you reconcile: Account Analysis with Payables Detail.  Review and post the imported journal entries.  7.  Revalue balances to update foreign currency journals to your functional currency equivalents.

 Opening  the first period of a new year automatically closes your income statement and posts the difference to your retained  earnings account.  The period end reports include a balance sheet. and the Business Intelligence  System both allow for report output to be broadcast directly to an intranet Web site.  25. does not have  any useful significance for the company or its managers. Discoverer  workbooks.  19. including Oracle. It is  convenient to group period­end reports in a report set to maintain a consistent audit trail.  Open the first period of the new fiscal year to launch a concurrent process to update account balances.  Consolidate your subsidiary sets of books if you have multiple companies. and reversals.000  40.  Run General Ledger reports.  16.  Translate balances to any defined currency if you need to report in foreign currencies. and statement of cash flow. In addition. The Grand Totals line at  the bottom shows that the debits do indeed equal the credits. The sheer volume of report output  for a large organization would be overwhelming. and Journal reports. are migrating rapidly from a  push organization. $1.  24.  Review your posting results. step­down allocations. These reports.000  120.  Table 3­4: A Simplified Trial Balance for a Manufacturing Company  Natural Account  Cash and Receivables  Other Current Assets  Plant and Equipment  Land  Investments  Liabilities  Common Stock  Other Contributed Capital  Debit  100. Account Analysis reports.  22.652.  If you are performing a year end close and your accounting calendar includes an adjusting period that represents  the last day of the fiscal year.000  140.  Run Trial Balance reports and other General Ledger reports in the adjusting period after adjustments are made. It  tells you whether or not your accounts balance. are not available as standard  reports in Oracle General Ledger; they must be defined as Financial Statement Generator (FSG) reports.  23. Some big organizations. posting to unopened periods.000 in the example.  Update any unpostable journal entries and then post them again.  Close the last period of the fiscal year using the Open and Close Periods window. to a pull organization.000 Credit  . The figure itself. companies  produce a suite of management reports showing actual sales against budgeted sales and any other key indicators that  managers need.000  250. Common reasons for unpostable batches include  control total violations.14. and having unbalanced journal entries. Posting Execution Report and Error Journals Report are helpful. This is the basis of the double­entry bookkeeping system.  Post all journal entries. The Application Desktop Integrator. recurring.000  60. If managers' had their  wishes.  Create and post adjusting entries and accruals in the adjusting period. whose layout and content are specific to your organization.  It is important to manage and rationalize the number and volume of reports produced at period end.  Financial Reports  The trial balance ensures that total debits equal total credits. or possibly defined in Oracle Financial Analyzer if you are using this tool. A simplified trial balance is shown in Table 3­4. close the current period and open the adjusting period.  All errors in the journal entry batches must be corrected and resubmitted for posting. in which managers look in a  data warehouse to retrieve the figures they need.  15.  17. you probably would have to produce three or four distinct reports per manager.000  76. Be sure to generate and  post the step­down allocations in the correct order.  21. in which FSG reports are distributed to managers. such as the Trial Balance reports.  18.000  47.  20. including: manual. income statement.

Table 3­4: A Simplified Trial Balance for a Manufacturing Company  Natural Account  Sales  Investment Income  Other Revenue  Salary and Wages  Cost of Goods Sold  Exchange Rate Losses  Depreciation and Amortization  Administration  Provision for Bad Debt  Grand Totals  100. and creditors. The  income  Table 3­5: The Balance Sheet for the Same Manufacturing Company  Debit  Assets  Cash and Receivables  Other Current Assets  Plant and Equipment  Land  Investments  100. The totals on a balance  sheet.652.000  1.000  2.000  40. is usually included as a current period net income. As described earlier. is to show all assets of the company with a total. in contrast to those shown on a trial balance.000 Credit  .000  47. The balance  sheet demonstrates the following accounting principle:  §  Assets = Capital + Liability  Whereas the content is similar.000  1.000  The balance sheet is a snapshot of the financial position of a company.  the retained earnings are calculated at the end of the financial year by calculating the profit (or loss) for the year.000  Debit  Credit  1.000  76. Like most financial reports. It is one of the key reports included in regulatory  reporting. it is used for external purposes by investors. shown in Table 3­5.290.000  140. have major significance to the business and its managers.000  119. customers.000  120.  The simplified trial balance shown in Table 3­4 has been recast as a balance sheet in Table 3­5.000  5. The essence.000  3.  The Retained Earnings line.000  900.652. and to show all capital and liabilities of the company with a total.  though.000  5. the format and layout of the balance sheet vary from company to company.

000  3.000  47.000  900.000  250.295.000  60.  Table 3­6: Basic Income Statement.000 1.000  47. or profit and loss report.000  2.000  5.000  119. or Profit and Loss Report  Debit  Revenue  Sales  Investment Income  Other Revenue  Total Revenue  Expenses  Salary and Wages  Cost of Goods Sold  Exchange Rate Losses  Depreciation and Amortization  Administration  Provision for Bad Debt  100.000  476.000  1.Table 3­5: The Balance Sheet for the Same Manufacturing Company  Debit  Assets  Total Assets  Liabilities  Common Stock  Other Contributed Capital  Retained Earnings  Total Capital and Liabilities  476. is the worksheet used by accountants to perform the following computation:  §  Profit = Total revenue − Total expense  A very basic income statement is shown in Table 3­6.000  5.000  Credit  .000  Credit  statement.000  119.290.

 a cash basis. or a combined basis.  General Ledger Setup  With Oracle General Ledger and the entire E­Business Suite. The  mantra is "Don't modifying the software; simplify and standardized business process flows instead.  You can translate average balances to any reporting currency and consolidate average balances between accounting  entities. For  example. and the average and standard balances can be stored  in the same set.  Oracle Financials has been developed to meet GAAP requirements as well as the special needs of different countries. any changes you make are preserved through subsequent software upgrades—  automatically. different companies  may account for transactions using different accounting methods based on their own countries' laws and regulations. or Profit and Loss Report  Debit  Revenue  Total Expense  Profit  1. every  company ought to have an accounting procedures manual that spells out how to create manual journals. in Oracle Payables you can choose whether to record journal entries for invoices and payments on an accrual  basis. revenue is recorded even  though the goods were shipped two months earlier. Also. regardless of when the  transaction takes place. You can also reference average balances in formula journals.  Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) require companies to use the accrual method for financial reporting  purposes; it is considered a more accurate depiction of a company's income and expenses. General Ledger stores Period Average­to­Date. It should also explain the period closing process and year­end activities. such as recurring journals and  Mass Allocations. take advantage of user­definable flexfields to add new types of  information to your database. Quarter Average­to­Date. Average balances can be reviewed online or in standard reports. As part of cutover. Averages are calculated from actuals.000  119. you do not need custom programming to tailor your  applications to reflect your enterprise's operations and policies or to keep pace with your changing business needs. and the General Ledger Financial Statement  Generator (FSG) can be used to create custom financial reports that comply with the Federal Reserve's statutory  reporting requirements. the manual must be  intimately tied to the Oracle processes. The cash basis method records transactions when payment occurs. when the company receives the customer's check. and archive and purge average balances for any range of accounting periods. use General Ledger's Account Hierarchy Editor to  reorganize account structures with drag­and­drop ease. and  allocations. However.  Average balance processing can be enabled for each set of books. Needless to say. Year Average­to­Date. For example. the transition phase from legacy accounting to Oracle E­Business  Suite.000  Credit  Accounting Methods  There are two main accounting methods. For example. It  explains all the mandatory and optional steps. and make your windows reflect the way you do business—using folder technology—all  without programming.  The Oracle Implementation Manual is an essential source of information to help you implement Oracle Financials. and  End of Day balances for every day. In addition. Average balances are updated each time journal entries are posted. you can create an unlimited  number of charts of accounts to reflect the way you do business." Plenty of tailoring and  customization can be accomplished through standard setup of the application. including those with dependencies on other setup steps. . and are needed by some financial institutions for regulatory reporting. You should continually modify a draft of the manual throughout the setup process;  it is especially important in testing.Table 3­6: Basic Income Statement. For example. With combined basis accrual.  Average Balance Processing  General Ledger can automatically maintain average balances on an account­by­account basis for all balance sheet  accounts. journal entries are posted to one set of books and  cash basis journal entries are sent to a second set of books. The accrual method records revenues and expenses when they are incurred;  not when payment is received. a sale on account would be recorded as revenue even though the customer  has not paid the bill.176. make sure there is test data to check every procedure in the manual. accruals.

 and Summary Accounts  Value sets can be more than one­dimensional validation tools; especially in General Ledger. The Financial Statement Generator (FSG) and the Global  Intercompany System (GCS) use the concept of rollup groups to simplify reporting. It must be succinct—top management needs only the  aggregate numbers. Then close all the prior periods to prevent accidental entry into a  prior period.Open and Close Accounting Periods  Once you have defined the calendar with accounting periods. Open that period; then open all  subsequent periods up to and including the current one. manufacturing can no  longer transact. When the conversion of history is ready to take place. and  journals can be imported or keyed in.  rollups go across all segments of the Accounting Flexfield. The user can define  hierarchies of values through parent­child relationships. you can never open a prior period. and then attempt to convert historic balances into prior periods. you are invited to open an accounting period. Figure 3­5 depicts the relationships graphically.  To avoid this pitfall. Unfortunately. A common mistake is to open the current  period during the setup. Unlike parent­child relationships. If accounting accidentally opens and then closes the period. Be aware that  once you have opened the very first period. This is an extremely important point; you should take great care to ensure that accounting be very careful  not to open or close a period prematurely. When the GL period remains future enterable. get agreement on the earliest period that is ever likely to be used.  Management reporting is the ultimate objective of General Ledger. .  Setting Up Parents. Rollup Groups. Oracle General Ledger uses several different devices to adapt its relational database—essentially  flat in structure—to companies' hierarchical reporting needs. a department such as manufacturing  has no problem transacting against it. by that stage it is  too late to open any prior periods. the pertinent prior periods can be reopened.

Figure 3­5: Rollup group mechanics .

  Define parent­child relationships over the individual segments within the Accounting Flexfield.  6.  Define summary accounts as required for the rollup groups. All report definitions use Accounting Flexfields; not rollup groups. However.  Define value sets for the flexfield values. The Oracle  structures will support almost any reporting requirements that have been defined. which users own.  Ideally.The sequence needed to define rollup groups is as follows:  1. See the discussion of parent­child relationships and rollup groups in the Flexfields Reference  Manual. they take advantage of the  summary accounts that have been defined through rollup groups and wildcards. assuming the reporting requirements are known in advance. They are needed to support online inquiry and for  performance purposes.  It is a user's responsibility to define parent­child relationships and rollups because they are wedded to the account and  department number data. to as many levels as  appropriate. define rollup groups before defining key  segment values.  8.  4.  2. but Oracle cannot be structured  to anticipate requirements that have not been defined. The Accounting Flexfield  may include parent segments. which fit the Accounting Flexfield structure.  5.  Determine what summaries will be required for reporting and online inquiry purposes. Each  hierarchy serves a different purpose:  Figure 3­6:  Account parent‐child rollup .  Define the flexfield segment format.  Set up your set of books. Three are shown in Figure 3­6.  3.  Define FSG reports.  7. This is essential.  Several independent hierarchies can be laid over the department structure.

 The location hierarchy is used to  consolidate and compare plant operations. First­ and second­level parents can be combined in any  combination into rollup groups. Each department belongs to only one company; thus  companies can be used for balance sheet as well as profit­and­loss reporting. This rollup is useful for tax purposes. To track transactions and account balances in multiple currencies. Doing this reduces the effort involved in  specifying certain reports.  Locations equate to plant locations. You can enter daily conversion rates between any two  currencies. . Chapter 12 carries a more detailed discussion of multiple currency accounting.§  §  §  §  §  Divisions are used for sales analysis.  Figure 3­7:  Department segment. supports  the euro. representing the management structure at higher levels.  Figure 3­7 shows the parent­child and rollup groups defined on the account segment. you  can automatically replicate journals from your primary functional currency set of books into one or more foreign currency  sets of books used for reporting purposes. Every staffed department belongs to a location. Many departments belong to the default division. regardless of your functional currency.  Management is a second rollup of companies.  Companies represent the formal structure of the corporation. 00. which can be used in specifying summary accounts. Reports  produced within this hierarchy are used for management purposes. which indicates no  division. FSG reports can be set up to print  only summary accounts within the account range specified for reporting. and rollup groups  Currency  For businesses operating in a global environment. parent‐child. These first­level parents roll into  second­level parents used for more summary reports. Oracle General Ledger handles currency conversion rates. and tracks and reports balances in multiple currencies.  Legal entities are one matrix rollup of companies.

 the  important point is that you know in concrete terms which parts of the enterprise you are analyzing. operational units. and then the rules are assigned to a Responsibility. the chart of accounts belongs to the set of books level in the organizational structure. If you have not worked with Oracle Applications before. and region. Some of these aspects are  discussed in the following sections. The design and use of your chart of accounts is crucial. Similarly if you will be using Oracle Assets.Accounting Flexfield Design—Best Practice  The accounts tracked by General Ledger are collectively referred to as the chart of accounts.  What to Consider  To arrive at an optimal design for your organization. So whether you are considering the entire enterprise or a subset of it. there are many aspects to consider. do not track  asset categories within the General Ledger. but small enough to  be manageable and meaningful. a simple account  structure with only two segments—one for account and one for department—might suffice. and inventory organizations that the  Accounting Flexfield is going to support. The primary level of data security within Oracle Financials is the Responsibility.  Reporting Needs  The setup of flexfield segments should support your reporting requirements and be part of a corporate­wide plan for  financial reporting. product. You will bounce back and forth without any objective way of choosing between alternatives. collected. and the number of servers and number of  databases.  The segment­level security feature is intended to restrict the range of accounts that users can post to. Each  set of books has only one Accounting Flexfield structure. you need a more robust structure that includes additional  segments for company. which means when you set about designing an Accounting  Flexfield. When defining your chart of accounts.  §  Define an account structure large enough to reflect the important aspects of your organization. The chart of accounts  defines how your accounting information is categorized.  Security  Often you will want to restrict which accounting transactions users can see and the range of accounts that they can post  to. The Oracle Applications Flexfield Manual is a good  source for detailed instructions.  Tip  If you intend to use Oracle Projects.  §  Define an account structure that accommodates and properly classifies information from your other financial  information sources. It is far  better to get agreement on the planned use of the organizational features. do not have a Project segment in the Accounting Flexfield. However. Remember this major principle: Do not include segments that do not get fed from most subledgers. . if your company is small. Security rules  define ranges of account code combinations that are excluded. you are strongly advised to seek  help in the initial design and implementation of your Key Flexfield.  Organizational Structure  As mentioned in Chapter 2. Once a user chooses a Responsibility. Project  reporting should be driven from Oracle Projects. and then venture forward from this solid foundation to design the Accounting Flexfield for each set of books. consider the following suggestions:  §  Define a flexible account structure that accommodates your current organization and anticipates the way you will run  your organization in the future. It should fit  the needs of your organization and allow for meaningful analysis.  §  Create an account structure that provides a logical ordering of values by grouping related accounts in the same range  of values.  Also consider the corollary to this principle: Determine in advance which reporting will be done in subledgers and which  will be done in Oracle General Ledger. This takes care  of which accounting transactions a user can see. you will already have in mind the legal entities. The discussion is intended as a road map so that you can assess which areas are of  relevance to your situation and focus further research on these topics. and reported. if you are a large  corporation with multiple products and sales organizations. For example. in a way that does not depend on the design of the Accounting Flexfield.  he or she will only see the accounting transactions for the operating unit connected to that Responsibility. All  users of that Responsibility are restricted from entering or viewing that range of accounts. This task should be taken on by an experienced Oracle  Financials functional consultant. create an account structure that allows for expansion and development of new categories. The first step in implementing Oracle  General Ledger is setting up your chart of accounts. Additionally. Unless you know this  you are liable to vacillate between the planned use of the organizational features in Financials and the proposed  Accounting Flexfield.

 Because management reporting needs to be  succinct.  Some segments have a limited life span.  Plan how you will take segments and code combinations out of use. such as those for project. Accommodate change in this area through reporting  devices and consolidations; not in the ledger itself. Your Central region could split into the Quebec and Ontario regions. you can require that journal entries from any source be approved before posting with the Journal  Approval System. You disable posting on a combination­by­combination basis.  Values that Change over Time  The Accounting Flexfield is the basis for year­to­year comparisons. because assets are owned by companies; not departments. There are many places in the system where you  specify default segment values to be used by Automatic Account Generation. However  paradoxical it might seem. It creates significant difficulties for your  users if you disable one of these default values.  Code Combination Validation  Not every Accounting Flexfield (AFF) combination makes sense. summarization plays a very important role in Oracle General Ledger. some reorganization is inevitable. For asset accounts.  Complex cross­validation rules can be an early warning sign that your proposed flexfield design is not optimal. If you change it the comparisons become invalid. There are two ways to take an  existing account code combination out of use. A security rule can be set up for each Responsibility. when a project ends. When you disable a segment value. For example. needs to be decided when the Accounting Flexfield is set up. although you can still post to combinations that have already been created using it. it might not make sense to put a  department number on an asset account. However.  although it could be proper to post adjustments for a while. Plan  your departments in such a way that the rollups can be used for year­to­year comparisons even as the organizations  within them are redefined. It  makes a simple rule. Plan  your natural account segment so that it changes little over time. You set up cross­validation rules  in Oracle to prevent creation of AFF combinations that do not make sense. Doing so ensures that  confidential payroll data is not freely available to all users. Oracle will no longer create code  combinations using that value. dependent segments. Suppose  you have two segments: one for sales region and another for Canadian province department. and you can also control which users can post and reverse journals in Oracle General Ledger. for all your planning. Top  management needs only the aggregate numbers to make their decisions. You would need complex  rules to indicate that the combination of British Columbia and Eastern Region was invalid. The rules block out permissible and  impermissible ranges of numbers.  As mentioned earlier. For  instance. To understand this. set the Disabled flag for every combination using that project value.A common use is restricting the salary and wages accounts to the personnel department. you must decide which mechanism to use. each segment  (other than dependent segments) is reasonably independent of the others. and funding. In a good flexfield design. restricting the  range of company codes that can be entered to the companies that belong in that set of books. do not restrict your attention to dependent segments; rather plan how the other techniques are  going to be used while you design your Accounting Flexfield. Moreover. Another use is for companies that have one chart of accounts  but many sets of books or legal entities. These companies want to ensure that users do not inadvertently make a cross­  company posting by using the wrong company code. some  explanation of the five mechanisms is needed. The reason for this is that parent segment values can often  provide a more straightforward way of achieving the same result as dependent segments. . The following five mechanisms are  available for summarization:  §  Dependent segments  §  Parent segment values  §  Summary accounts  §  Rollup groups  §  Explicit calculations in FSG reports  Only the first of these. See Chapter 14 for more  on flexfield validation and security. the rules could  change. It might not make  sense for an overhead department such as plant security to post to a revenue account. you might assume it would be an error to create new code combinations using that project. program. If  you want no activity against a project.  Summarization  Summarization can be accomplished with the Accounting Flexfield using several different mechanisms; assuming your  analysis of reporting needs has revealed some need for summarization. the typical range of allowed departments is 000 to 000 (none).

  Dependent segments are the only form of summarization that reaches into the subledgers. Seat 14B (coach) is a center seat. A designation of seat alone is not sufficient to mark out a single seat on  the aircraft.A dependent segment is a segment whose meaning depends on a previous segment. or aisle seat. Use dependent account segments when you want a context­sensitive segment whose values have  different meanings when you combine them with different values of the primary segment. Reporting segments such as regions made up of many districts. The codes are easier to learn and they convey a meaning—before  too long accountants and users no longer need to see the description to recognize the account. Some accounts fall neatly into  the hierarchy of account and subaccount; other accounts do not. but then passengers would have no easy way of verifying if  they have a window. Dependent segments are an  integral part of the Accounting Flexfield.  Table 3­7: The Account Codes with a Dependent Subaccount Segment  Account Code  2800  2800  2800  2800  3060  3060  3060  3060  Description  Cash at Bank  Cash at Bank  Cash at Bank  Cash at Bank  Fixed Assets  Fixed Assets  Fixed Assets  Fixed Assets  Subaccount Code  29  30  31  32  10  20  30  40  Description  Standard Chartered Bank  Royal Bank of Scotland  ING Bank  Citibank  Machinery  Buildings  Office Furniture  Vehicle Fleet  Subaccount 30 is both the Royal Bank of Scotland and Office Furniture; of these two meanings.  Often the dependent segment approach works well for some segment values but not for all. window seat. It becomes laborious to enter the dependent segment  value when in fact no value is appropriate. center. are more likely to be successful candidates for implementation as dependent segments. or projects  composed of subprojects.  Structured keys with hidden meanings such as these are frowned upon by relational design purists. A common example of dependent  segments comes from airplane seat numbers. Table 3­7 shows a basic chart of accounts using a subaccount­dependent segment. and from an application implementation perspective there is no overriding reason  to avoid building structure into a list of segment values.  The account and subaccount schema shown in Table 3­7 has been recast as an amalgamated account code in Table 3­8. having a  dependent segment is an elegant way of achieving it. Account and subaccount segments are good  candidates for amalgamation. that which is relevant in  any particular circumstance is determined by the account code.  center. Increase the length of the primary segment and incorporate the dependent segment  into the primary segment. That way. If you need reporting summarization within a segment value from a subledger. users prefer structured codes. and if you use a dependent segment you must enter it at any point that you enter  an account code combination. The total Cash at Bank is the balance on the account  2800; the total Fixed Assets is the balance on the account 3060. Dependent segments are useful in this respect because they convey more meaning than an arbitrary  numbering scheme. Seat 14A is unique on the aircraft—row 14. Airlines number the seat rows and allocate letters to designate window. A common use for a dependent  segment is account and subaccount. whereas 1B (first  class) is on an aisle. The  same effect can almost always be achieved using a single segment and parent accounts. The summarization is implicit in the scheme. Common sense tells us  that only pairs of segments with a similar meaning are amalgamated.  One could give a unique number to every seat on the plane. do not use dependent segments. . In Oracle terminology 14A is two  segments; the seat segment depends on the row. From a practical point  of view. or aisle seat until they board the plane. whereas cost center and project are not.  Note  A dependent segment can always be redesigned to avoid using the dependent segment feature of the  Accounting Flexfield. Unless  the segment/subsegment hierarchy can be applied rigorously to all segment values.

Table 3­8: Account Codes Designed Without a Dependent Segment  Amalgamated Account Code  280029  280030  280031  280032  306010  306020  306030  306040  Description  Cash at Standard Chartered Bank  Cash at Royal Bank of Scotland  Cash at ING Bank  Cash at Citibank  Fixed Assets—Machinery  Fixed Assets—Buildings  Fixed Assets—Office Furniture  Fixed Assets—Vehicle Fleet  The problem with dependent segments is their all­or­nothing hierarchy. The hierarchy is maintained in a simple drag­and­  drop form called the Account Hierarchy Editor. as shown in the following illustration. Account Hierarchy Editor is accessed  through ADI. You cannot switch it on for some values and  switch it off for others. Parent segment values are like any other  segment value. this capability is exactly the forte of parent segment values. except they have other values defined as their children.  Parent segment values and their children form a hierarchy within a segment. However. .

 processes such as generating FSG reports or  generating consolidation batches can be processed faster if summary accounts have been used. summary accounts do have stored balances in the  system.  Summary accounts are account code combinations.  Table 3­9: Account Codes with the Introduction of Parent Accounts  Account Codes with Parents  280000  280029  280030  280031  280032  306000  306010  306020  306030  306040  Description  Cash at Bank (Parent)  Cash at Standard Chartered Bank  Cash at Royal Bank of Scotland  Cash at ING Bank  Cash at Citibank  Fixed Assets (Parent)  Fixed Assets—Machinery  Fixed Assets—Buildings  Fixed Assets—Office Furniture  Fixed Assets—Vehicle Fleet  306001–306099  Child Range  280001–280099  The balance on a parent account is equal to the sum of the balances on all its children. . which  would show the total Fixed Assets for the entire enterprise.  Summary account templates can be created or removed at any time. The system would then maintain one summary account for each separate value of the  Account segment. The child values do not need to be consecutive and they do not need to be  ranges. they will already contain an implicit structure;  and the child ranges.  A company with the Accounting Flexfield defined as Company­Account­Department could set up a summary account  template Total­Detail­Total. Rollup groups are a shorthand entry for a particular group  of accounts.  A rollup group is a collection of parent or child segment values. Parents can be defined with  any child value or range of child values. summary accounts create a hierarchy of  flexfield combinations. That way it would be possible to inquire about the balance of the summary account T­2800­T online. and that a parent itself can have a parent. The hierarchy can be as deep as you like. and there is no limit to the number that you can  maintain at any one time.  which would be the total Cash at Bank for all companies and departments; or the summary account T­3600­T. If the segment values have been assigned according to some logic. Because summary accounts have stored balances. will fall neatly into consecutive ranges. This shortcoming of parent  segment values is overcome by summary accounts.  Table 3­10 shows a comparison of features provided by the different methods of summarization. You cannot post to summary accounts; the account balances  associated with them are calculated by the system during posting to be the sum of other account code combinations.  Exactly which accounts are summarized is determined by the summary account template; the template specifies whether  to summarize all segment values into one value (which appears as T for Total) or whether to retain the detail for each  segment of the Accounting Flexfield. Be aware that a child value can  belong to several parents. as in this case.Table 3­9 shows how parent accounts might be introduced into the account code segment. Whereas parent segment values encode a hierarchy within a segment. For this  reason the account balances of parent segment values are not available for online inquiry. In contrast to parent segment values. Oracle  General Ledger does not store the balance of a parent account; the balance is calculated each time it is needed.

  The natural account qualifier determines which segment is categorized as asset. or fund. Many application features add value to a particular Accounting Flexfield  design. General Ledger ensures that all journal entries  balance for each value of the balancing segment that is referenced. liability. legal entity. . two  different segments have to be qualified as the balancing segment. the intercompany segment is automatically populated  with the balancing segment of the trading partner. Many reports. The balancing segment is reserved  for the segment that holds your company code.  It is not only the segment qualifiers that have a distinctive effect on application features; there are many mechanisms for  generating default values for Accounting Flexfield segments. AutoAccounting is used in Oracle Receivables to automatically assign Accounting Flexfield codes  for transaction accounts. many reports make hidden use of the natural account qualifier—the Trial Balance reports use it to  determine which segment to report on; dozens of reports have an account segment range in their list of parameters. By including  an intercompany segment in the accounting flexfield. As mentioned in Chapter 2. There is also a cost center  qualifier and you can designate a segment as the intercompany balancing segment.Table 3­10: Comparison of Various Mechanisms for Summarization  Parent  Segment  Values  Yes  Easy  No  Yes  No  Explicit  Calculations in  Reports  No  Not without  reprogramming  No  No  No  Dependent  Segments  Is the feature only  visible in GL?  Is reorganization of the  hierarchy possible?  Are summarized  numbers stored in GL?  Is posting possible at all  levels of the hierarchy?  Are account balances  available by online  inquiry?  Are account balances  available using FSG?  Are account balances  available in Allocation  formulas?  No  No  Yes  Yes  No  Rollup  Groups  Yes  Easy  No  No  No  Summary  Accounts  Yes  No  Yes  No  Yes  Yes  No  Yes  Yes  Yes  No  Yes  Yes  Yes  No  Application Features  The Accounting Flexfield pervades Applications. such as the General Ledger Trial  Balance reports. natural account segment. The intercompany segment shares the same value set as the balancing  segment and is used in the account combination General Ledger creates to balance intercompany journals.  Four qualifiers single out three segments for special treatment by the Applications. The effectiveness of these mechanisms often hinges on the  design of the flexfield. Here again. or  expense.  New in Release 11i is the Intercompany qualifier. Anyone planning to use these  features should be aware of the implications while designing their Accounting Flexfield. For example. or revenue. Every time an intercompany transaction is generated. owner's equity. Your ability to use these features easily is closely related to your Accounting Flexfield design. The year end  process that calculates retained earnings does so once for each value of the balancing segment. if you disable a particular cost center in your chart of accounts. freight. you can track the trading companies involved in an intercompany  transaction. such as receivables.  Segment Value Maintenance  To simplify maintenance of the chart of accounts changes to segment value attributes are automatically replicated to the  accounts that contain that segment value. revenue. either break on the balancing segment or have the balancing segment as a parameter. The Account Generator tool can be used in an  increasing number of circumstances to intelligently generate Accounting Flexfield values.

 those subledgers must have a sense of the French accounting  structure. you can review consolidated balances online and drill down to the subsidiary  balances that you consolidated. However. no  matter how many intermediate parents it contains. if  some reports can be satisfied only from the subledgers. so it is reasonable to expect that the  same sort of business dimensions will apply to different companies. based on the  statutory chart of accounts. statutory set of books using Oracle General Ledger's Global  Consolidation System (GCS). Each of these dimensions will become a  separate segment in the Accounting Flexfield. produce tax reports from the French books. such as France. impose a chart of accounts. Most reporting requirements can be satisfied by Oracle General Ledger in  the following way: two sets of books are set up—one with the company's own chart of accounts and one with the statutory  French chart of accounts.  An Externally Imposed Chart of Accounts  Some countries. All accounting entries are made and processed in the first set of books.  Good Design Principles  It is easier to build flexibility into your account structure during setup than to try to change your account structure in the  future. the valid values for each  one. You can also prevent selected  accounts from being affected by segment value attribute changes. for reporting  purposes. The statutory reports are then produced from the second set of books. Nonbusiness organizations operate in similar if  not identical circumstances. you are in a good position to start designing your Accounting Flexfield. You would post to the French set of books. Table 3­11 lists  common business dimensions for both business and nonbusiness organizations. and then  consolidate to another set for management reporting. enabling you to immediately visualize and analyze the entire consolidation structure. their order and length. and the separator symbol that will appear between them. The  design will be complete when you have finalized the number of segments.  Table 3­11: Common Segments in Business and Nonbusiness Organizations  Dimension  Legal entity  Natural account  Responsibility  Sales analysis  Geography  Business  Company  Account  Cost center or department  Product Distribution channel  Region or district Nonbusiness  Fund  Account  Program  .  Legacy System Analysis  You should consider which data was collected by the old system.  The Number of Segments  Commercial businesses all face similar accounting and management challenges. Was it adequate or were there gaps that prevented  certain sales analyses? What gaps were there? Gaps in the old system should be filled by reporting segments in the new  system. They need to track the same sorts of things. but often name them differently. After considering the preceding topics. Because it gets its AFF structure from the ledger. you must support it with a French­structure General Ledger  chart of accounts. the balances are transferred to the second. but the underlying dimensions are the same. You can use the GCS to consolidate between any chart of accounts structure.you can choose that all accounts that contain that cost center are automatically disabled. Whereas a French company might want to use the nationally imposed chart of accounts throughout its  organization. or at least an account numbering scheme. The Consolidation Hierarchy Viewer displays multilevel consolidation structures in an  expandable hierarchical format. a multinational company with its own chart of accounts frequently needs to meet the reporting requirement  of the host nations where it conducts business. You might find that the classifications are different  from company to company.  After period end.  After completing your consolidations.

 you can reuse value sets when defining  multiple charts of accounts. can be set as  alpha characters. Using the same value sets allows two different sets of books to reference the same segment  values and descriptions for a specified segment. all facilities projects are in the 200–299 range. Ideally. for the detail accounts that are used day to day. which sooner if  not later would have to be explained. the segment values you actually use should be numeric. Application tuning is a large topic that falls outside the scope of this handbook.  §  You can tune Journal Import control parameters in the Define Concurrent Program Controls window. meaning None or Not  Specified. Parent accounts.  you will run out of values within this segment.  Some claims have been made that the order of the segments has an effect on performance. and improves the performance of  long­running programs such as the FSG. In a well­tuned application the order of the segments should make no difference to  the application performance. and so on. it is usual to implement the  segment with the validation Value required = Yes. setting details as numeric and parents as alpha is a handy way to distinguish each type. 00000. on the other hand. This might be true. and ranges are extremely  useful in rollup groups. but only  in a badly tuned application database.  however. Segments that are frequently defaulted should appear toward the end of the flexfield. that the following tuning parameters should be set within the application before a DBA tunes the database by  creating new indexes and such:  §  In Oracle General Ledger you should run the Optimizer after you create a large number of segment values or add or  delete summary templates.Table 3­11: Common Segments in Business and Nonbusiness Organizations  Dimension  Intercompany  Project  Fiscal reporting  Business  Intercompany  Project  Tax code  Funding vehicle  Appropriation year  Nonbusiness  The Order of Segments  The order you assign the segments of the Account Flexfield will determine their order of appearance on reports and  screens. For example. It is unwise to allow a Not Specified value for either the segment you specify as the natural account or the  company (balancing) segment.  For each segment you must define a value set. when you set  up a new set of books you should consider how you will map your new Accounting Flexfield segments for consolidation. Such values allow users to post to a ghost account in a ghost company. you will use up cost center values quickly; therefore. You might want to add an extra character to the size of each segment to  anticipate future needs. Numeric segment values can be keyed far faster than  alphanumeric values. if at all  possible. the values in your natural account segment. parent­child relationships. You should set up alphanumeric value sets. if you disable old cost centers and enable new ones  frequently.  Length of Each Segment  Consider the structure of values you plan to maintain within the segment. For example. which restricts the valid values that can be entered.  To reduce maintenance and maintain consistency between sets of books. and to create a segment value of zeros. However. such as 1000  for Cash and 2100 for Accounts Payable. and FSG reports. For example. This will increase data  entry speed. Note. you might use a three­character  segment to capture project information and classify your projects so that all administrative projects are in the 100–199  range. you should allow for  enough digits to avoid having to recycle values. Indeed. It is also much easier to specify ranges with numbers than with letters. The Optimizer stores statistics and creates indexes. Posting. because (as mentioned before) summary  accounts use the value T to represent Total. .  If you anticipate frequent restructurings. If you develop more than ten classifications of projects. you should use a larger maximum size for your cost  center value set. The value set can be  either numeric or alphanumeric. three digits would allow you to create 1.000  different cost centers (numbered 000–999). which require you to disable values and enable new ones. so that you can have more available values. might be equally applicable to each of your sets of books. For example. and MassAllocations.  Defining Valid Segment Values  Is a value required for a segment? Even if a particular dimension cannot be assigned a value.

 For example. If you  incorporate a spare segment for fear of having missed something critical in your business analysis they are a bad idea; go  complete the analysis more thoroughly. In this author's experience that is rarely the case. define it as character and hide it from ordinary users.0000  is significantly faster to enter than an alphanumeric combination such as  USA/NYC/420/4110/NON/NONE  Maintenance  Your account structure and Accounting Flexfield must be maintained as your business grows and changes. Because regions are simply groups of districts.  For Future Use Segment  Spare segments that might one day be activated are considered good design by some and unnecessary by others. with up to 30 segments.420. you can easily create regions within a district  segment by defining a parent for each region. Seldom would an extra segment be sufficient to administer  new with old. Use these parents when defining  summary accounts to maintain account balances and when reporting hierarchies to perform regional reporting. That way the entire Accounting Flexfield can be  entered from the numeric keypad on the keyboard. Businesses do  change. You might expect a spare segments would become useful if the company  develops a new line of business or acquires a rival.]; full­stop in British English). For example. For example. In addition. Some reports in Oracle General Ledger  report only the first 30 characters of the Accounting Flexfield. To prevent users from entering invalid combinations of segments. it is easier to map account balances from your  subsidiary sets of books to a consolidating entity. This . but when change comes it is rapid and far reaching. it makes sense to define your Accounting Flexfield to be fewer than 30 characters. You can also automatically create new account  combinations based on existing combinations. choose numeric  segment values followed by a period ([.  Two Segments Used for the Same Thing  Group similar business dimensions into one segment. which allows you to move  balances from one account to another or merge balances from multiple accounts into a single account. the numeric account code combination  01. Oracle General Ledger allows you  to set up cross­validation rules. Oracle  General Ledger reduces the effort of maintenance through the Mass Maintenance Workbench. A practical limit is much  smaller. Oracle General Ledger allows you to create new mass  allocations and mass budgets by copying existing definitions and then making incremental modifications.  Accounting Flexfields That Are Too Long  The maximum length of the Accounting Flexfield is 240 characters. if your organization manufactures both computer  equipment and trucks. For quick data entry. you need only one segment to record and report on  both districts and regions.  What to Avoid  Good design is like elegance and beauty—it is hard to define but everyone recognizes it when they see it.320. as a long Accounting Flexfield becomes unwieldy and tiresome to enter. Cross­validation rules define whether a value of a particular segment can be combined  with specific values of other segments. these reports will be less useful to your organization;  therefore.000.When a common natural account segment is used between sets of books.4110. with the relevant districts as children.  The Separator  The choice of a suitable symbol to separate the segment values is not trivial. and maintain  financial integrity between Oracle General Ledger and its subledgers. If you must create a spare segment. It is easier to be  specific about what contributes to a bad design.  Cross­validation Rules  Not every Accounting Flexfield combination makes sense. you might want to prevent the creation of hybrid part numbers for objects such as truck keyboards  or CPU headlights. If the length of your flexfield (all the segments plus the  separator between the segments) is longer than 30 characters. The following pitfalls should be avoided.

 and the maintenance costs charged to the Middle East. a salesperson for Gas Turbine Limited (GTL) based in the U. The revenue is accounted  for against the U. Consider geographic location. Oracle General Ledger has its own integrated report generator: the Financial Statement  Generator. FSG security prevents users from viewing data for  accounts to which they have no access. General Ledger reports. revenue.K. The marketing manager will want to see the effectiveness of  the campaign by monitoring sales by customer location.  Poorly Defined Segment Usage  Ensure that the use and meaning of a segment is well understood. two distinct  business dimensions should never be combined. the native reporting features of Oracle General Ledger will probably not be powerful enough. high­volume reporting capabilities.  A rich range of reporting techniques can be brought into action in concert with Oracle General Ledger. interchangeable report components. What exactly is being recorded? Is it the  location of the salesperson who made the sale or the location of the customer? The two might not be the same.  Financial Statement Generator  The example balance sheet in Figure 3­8 is typical of the style of report that the Financial Statement Generator (FSG) can  produce. irrespective of customer location.K. Ensure that people are referring to the same thing  when they say "Southern region" or "headquarters cost center. redefine your parents so  that Berlin rolls up into the East German region. and powerful server­based processing. There are many standard reports. and Consolidation reports. Failure to optimize the structure of the Accounting Flexfield is a primary reason  implementations do not deliver the benefits that were originally envisioned. The U.  There has been a recent Middle East marketing campaign.  General Ledger Reporting  Oracle General Ledger increases your decision­making capabilities by ensuring that the right business information  reaches the right people at the right time. makes a sale to a customer in the Middle  East. including Trial Balance reports. It would be very difficult to determine whether  conducting business in the Middle East is a profitable venture for GTL. desktop extensibility for  customizing standard reports. The cost of providing the support is allocated to the Middle East region. If your organization demands "what­if" reporting or  forecasts. This method also avoids excessive cross­validation rules. At the same time.  For example. Does the choice of segment  value seem arbitrary or are there two equally good choices and no objective way to choose between them?  Two segments that genuinely represent the same dimension should be combined into one segment; however. or you can try downloading balances to a spreadsheet through the Applications Desktop  Integrator (ADI). .method accommodates reorganizations. Look for early warnings that a segment definition is unclear or ambiguous.K. which provides multidimensional financial analysis that is beyond the intended scope  of Oracle General Ledger. The design and use of  the Accounting Flexfield is crucial. Business people should be able to define and run their own finance reports  without intervention from the MIS department. but these  can be created rather easily from the FSG tool within General Ledger. Insight into the business is lost by the lack of clarity  in the segment definition. but confusion can lead to  a rapid decline in the usefulness of stored data. In addition to a  suite of standard reports. staff had not realized that they were dealing with two geographic splits—salesperson location and  customer location." This concern might seem trivial. The marketing manager will not see the expected increase in  Middle East sales if that sale is accounted for as U.K.  In the GTL example. Oracle provides sophisticated operational and financial reporting tools that  include proven. even if they appear superficially to be the same. If you want to move Berlin into the East German region. There are no predefined balance sheet or income statement reports. Journal reports.  Budget reports. You can consider  exporting data to Financial Analyzer.  Suppose the company that bought the gas turbine calls the local representative office of GTL in the Middle East for  engineering support. This is an end user report generator. regional sales manager will want to see total sales for all salespeople.

Figure 3­8: A sample FSG report .

 recycle­and­reuse activity.The FSG is built on two premises: It reports only on data in General Ledger. row order. or display set to enhance the report or refine the information in the  report.  Why Use the FSG?  Oracle realizes that it would be impossible to design one version of the financial reports that would meet the needs of all  its customers. Oracle Financial Analyzer involves the overhead of transferring data and keeping a duplicate  copy; Oracle*Reports programs have to be written from a zero start point and all the business logic. The reporting period is supplied by the user at run time. Within the bounds of these two premises. ADI's Report Wizard provides a spreadsheet­based interface to the FSG. and accounts to show in detail are often stored in the program and not as data. report generation with the FSG is not as simple as using PC desktop  tools. If what you need is similar to what you had previously.  Reporting with the FSG is a mix­and­modify. Oracle has provided the FSG. you can define almost  any report data and layout you want. you can define your own custom  column set. columns. and formulas. On the other hand. Also any calculated result can be analyzed to reveal the account  balance entries from which they were derived. simply copy the column set and modify it to include a column for  budget and a column for variance. and type of balance. These fine distinctions could not be covered by one or two standard balance  sheets. the Accounting Flexfield dimension becomes a row set. the Applications Desktop Integrator  (ADI) is a more appropriate tool. Some accountants include in the cost of a fixed asset not only its net invoice price. Accounting data can be visualized as an array of cells. whereas the type of balance is encoded into the  column set. and the final result might not be as elegantly formatted. The next time you need the same report layout. accounts to  summarize. Instead. A new report can be defined simply by mixing an  existing row set with an existing column set.  FSG Components  The components of an FSG report are similar to spreadsheet rows. Optionally.  The FSG Concept  The Financial Statement Generator is a tool for reporting on account balances by period. but you now want  comparison­to­the­budget figures as well as actuals. you can add a content set. That means that modification  can be a programmer task and not an end user task. If report presentation is a major concern. Report generation proceeds in  a two­step process: define the report components; then run the report. The alternatives  to using the FSG are to export data to Oracle Financial Analyzer and use the reporting tools that Oracle Express provides.  to program custom reports in Oracle*Reports. Also. as shown in Figure 3­9. You will not find a balance sheet or income statement in the list of standard reports within Oracle  General Ledger. A report includes the following independent components:  §  Row set  §  Column set  §  Content set  §  Row order  §  Display set  The simplest reports are defined by a row set and a standard column set. The way report components can be recycled and reused is a big advantage that FSG has over custom  programming.  you do not need to define the report components again; you can simply run the stored report definition for a new  accounting period. or to use ADI to apply format themes to your reports and publish them to a  Web site or spreadsheet. and provides granularity only down to the  account balance per Accounting Flexfield combination.  FSG report output is not always the most attractive and sometimes it is important for reports to look good. That said. In FSG  terminology. The three  dimensions that make up the array are the Accounting Flexfield. each one holding an account balance according to its position in the structure. but such reports can be produced with FSG. . It cannot report on individual  journal entries in General Ledger. For this reason the FSG often falls short on the original  promise to be a business manager's tool. The  array is like a large pile of dice. but also its acquisition  and installation expenses; others do not. ADI integrated directly with FSGs so that report  output can be published directly to spreadsheet format. a complex and powerful report generator that can produce tabular reports  on any account balance. accounting periods. The new report layout reuses the old row set without any extra effort from you.

 slice. However. because compromises had to be made during the design and. A better approach. such reports will not satisfy all the users. a finite number of  reports are designed with a fixed layout and purpose. None of the dice can be broken down into smaller units. and the type of  balance. follow these steps: .  A report is defined by specifying the report objects FSG should use to build the report. as the  business develops and grows. is to provide adequate training to end users and delegate the responsibility for defining reports to  the people who actually work with the report output.  Inevitably. and no transaction detail is available. some central coordination can be provided for allocations and standard row sets. Intended to meet as many user requirements as possible. or copy and save it as a new report. After an extensive effort to analyze all user requirements across the company. the reports are either never used or fall slowly into disuse. such as individual journal transactions within a period. accounting periods. and summarize the dice in all ways imaginable. sort. the  reports are created as FSG reports and made available for the users.  Account balances are balances. Once you define and save a report. To prevent users from going off on their own and duplicating each  other's work.  you can use it any time—to run the report. and the  chart of accounts cannot be split by attributes that are not contained as segments. for which the  FSG is ideally suited. Periods cannot be split into weeks or days. define a report set.  Defining Reports  Many users commit the error of approaching FSG the same way they approach custom report development with a regular  programming tool.  Running FSG Reports  To run an individual report.Figure 3­9: Visualization of the three reporting dimensions  Reports generated with the FSG can cut. the FSG  cannot show more detail than allowed by the three dimensions: Accounting Flexfield.

  Enter the name of a predefined FSG report. the numbers can be made visually distinctive using the text formatting  tricks and graphics that are available in a spreadsheet but not in the FSG. The ADI request center has further simplified  the process of publishing report output to the Web or a spreadsheet. Single Report Set. If you press the Define Ad Hoc Report button. to avoid needless duplication of calculation. choose Spreadsheet as the output option.  Producing Spreadsheet­compliant Output You can download FSG report output into a spreadsheet on your personal  computer.  Click the Submit button. FSG produces the report in a tab­  delimited format. you will want to build the business logic into parent values and  not FSG formulas. and Rounding Option.  More on FSG Techniques  Building a basic FSG report is straightforward.  Tip  Define ad hoc financial reports as necessary to meet one­time reporting needs. The tools used can be extended to produce delimited output that can be  transferred directly to a spreadsheet. Segment Override.  Navigate to the Run Financial Reports window.  you can specify a row set and column set to be used to generate a report.  The report is submitted as a job on the Concurrent Manager request list. or Multiple Report Set from the pull­down list.  4. If you build new FSGs regularly. Once imported into a spreadsheet. without first having to link these two as a  predefined FSG report. Currency. you will want to reuse report components such as  row sets and.  3.1.  Figure 3­10: The Run Financials Reports window  2. These advanced techniques are explained next.  5. shown in Figure 3­10. .  Specify the report parameters such as Period. so that report columns get interpreted as spreadsheet columns when you load the report file into a  spreadsheet. When you define or run the report.  Choose Individual Reports.

 This attribute derives from the fact that the row set specifies which accounts appear  and in which sequence and which detail accounts are summarized into headings. On the  other hand. business logic should be built into parent values and not contained within the FSG setup. The Financial Analyzer uses a separate database from the Oracle General Ledger database. If you change the profile option to Full. contribution analysis. This overhead has to be weighed against the advantages of the additional tools. With the Oracle Express  multidimensional database at its core.  Oracle Financial Analyzer  Oracle Financial Analyzer is an Online Analytical Processing tool used for planning. This  creates unwanted opportunity for your reports logic to miss segment values in calculated aggregate results. They all are masters of their own sphere of interest. an  arrangement that necessitates the overhead of periodically transferring the data and creates the possibility of the two  databases getting out of sync. or percentage figures. or report set can be copied between databases.  column sets.  variances between actual and budget.  This capability eliminates the need to rekey report definitions in multiple databases. you get detail memory figures. which  might be an incorrectly specified range of accounts or a wrong calculation. However. Initially. Oracle Financial Analyzer lets you set up a customized system that reflects your  corporation's unique organizational structure and facilitates the management of your financial data at all business levels. even though  the underlying numbers are correct.Reusing Row Sets Row sets contain knowledge and logic about your company in a way other components such as  column sets and content sets do not.  For this reason. For example.  Report Listings on FSG Components A range of report listings of FSG components helps you debug and fine­tune  report definitions.  It handles organizational consolidations across multiple hierarchies and automatically performs line item and time  aggregations. These formulas cannot be put into parent accounts. report. Financial  Analyzer provides some very powerful functions for analyzing and presenting financial data capabilities that are beyond  the intended scope of Oracle General Ledger. which  cater only to summation; not subtraction or division. You can still generate several different balance sheet reports—by combining the single row set with different  column sets. However. and so on. For example.  FSG Transfer Any Financial Statement Generator report object. The logic available in parent values is available for all reports without having to be repeated in each row set  definition. inviting them to do  whatever they like. you can define FSG  reports in a test system while implementing General Ledger; then automatically transfer those reports to your production  system. The default value for this profile is Minimal. If you have many row sets.  which prints only the error messages in the log file. Therefore.  FSG­related Profile Options Three user profile options control the behavior of the FSG:  §  FSG: Allow Portrait print style  §  FSG: Expand Parent Values  §  FSG: Message Detail  FSG: Message Detail can be useful if your report did not produce the output you were expecting and you want to figure  out why so you can fix it. or overlaying a content set to produce a  balance sheet for each cost center.  This might seem to contradict earlier advice to delegate the report definition task to the end users. source and application of  funds. which are useful for report debugging. and reporting corporate  financial data. If you are considering changing the use of an account code or redefining a parent value in  the account segment. It uses a multidimensional data model that is ideal for online analysis. you can access the FSG: Message Detail profile option.  detail timings. This profile option controls the  degree of detail that appears in the message log file while your report runs. and content sets. . you can use this report to quickly tell you which predefined FSG reports will be impacted; then use  this information as the basis for modifying these reports. it needs to be changed in only one  place. the math capability behind each row of a row set can legitimately be used for calculating report totals. avoid the temptation to have several balance sheet row sets. normally a single financial accountant will probably be in charge of the balance sheet row  set; a treasury manager will be responsible for the cash flow report row set; and a cost accountant will be taking care of  contribution reporting. it makes sense to reuse each row set in as many report definitions as is feasible. or specifying that parent values should be expanded at run time. If you have examined the report components  and still cannot find the problem. income statement. the Where Used report shows where specific segment values are used in row sets. cash flow. all of which are similar but not  identical.  Where to Store Business Logic Maintainability is key. and SQL statements. Define a row set for  each distinct report family: balance sheet. a visual check of the report components might be enough to identify the problem. analyzing. If business logic changes. if necessary. each  containing the same logic. you increase the maintenance workload that kicks in when your business logic changes.

 or you can use search and replace to make changes  to account descriptions within an entire branch of the structure. a spreadsheet. You can transfer summary balances.  The Account Hierarchy Editor.  The integration between Oracle General Ledger and Oracle Financial Analyzer has been enhanced in Releases 11i and  6. An  oil industry executive might want a like­for­like comparison with a previous period when the crude oil spot price was at the  same level. and define and publish reports to a Web site. You can create budgets and use a flexfield pop­up window to enter and validate new  budget accounts. After reports are completed. and GL_ JE_LINES. you can perform data pivoting and account drilldown to  analyze your financial results in a multidimensional user interface. ADI  includes theme formats you can apply to your reports as well as custom formatting you can apply to individual cells in both  spreadsheet and Web report output.  The Applications Desktop Integrator (ADI)  The ADI gives users an alternative spreadsheet­based front end to perform full cycle accounting.  After you have uploaded budget data from Oracle General Ledger into Oracle Financial Analyzer for analysis and editing. If you need to  write custom extract scripts or GL reports. or current period versus previous. the normal time comparisons in Oracle General Ledger are year to date. so you can drill to summary account balances. There is more information on Oracle Financial Analyzer in Chapter 24. Imagine you  need to produce an inverted report with periods down the page and account codes across the top. Oracle General Ledger can  relatively easily produce a report with accounts down the left­hand side and different periods across the top. Drilldown works with summary  and detail financial data in OFA. Each journal in a batch gives rise to a  separate record in the GL_ JE_HEADERS table. and detail balances.  Oracle General Ledger Data Model  This section contains a brief description of the transaction tables in the Oracle General Ledger module. Dimensions and the different values that  dimensions might take on are referred to as meta data in Oracle Financial Analyzer.  segments and periods in Oracle Financial Analyzer become dimensions. For example. encumbrances.Whereas data in Oracle General Ledger is cataloged according to Accounting Flexfield segments and accounting period.  Table 3­12 lists the transaction tables in Oracle General Ledger and their contents. The period in which the journals belong is stored at batch level.  Imagine an industry that is cyclical but has a natural rhythm that is something other than a straightforward yearly cycle.  The elegance of Financial Analyzer comes from its ability to treat all dimensions as equal. accessed from ADI. you should have an understanding of the GL database layout and how the  accounting data is stored. This type of work is  where Oracle Financial Analyzer shows its strength. detail account balances. GL_ JE_HEADERS. Journals are stored in the three tables  GL_ JE_BATCHES.  you can use the Budget Writeback feature to write the revised budget data back to the original GL budget. A journal batch is a group of related journals that are  posted together. average balances.  Similarly. OFA can drill  down from financial data items in OFA to balances and transactions in General Ledger. or a standard text document. Most functions can be  performed in a disconnected mode. even though it rose to over $26 in between) would be quick and simple with Financial Analyzer. An income statement comparison of the periods April 1994 and January 1998 (when oil was about $16 per  barrel. the  dimensions can be further aggregated using hierarchies and models in Oracle Financial Analyzer. and  enables—with drag­and­drop simplicity—easy modification of the account names and structures. and journals in  GL. Yet again. You can record  journal transactions. statistics.3 respectively.  Table 3­12: Transaction Tables in Oracle General Ledger  Table Name  GL_ JE_BATCHES  GL_ JE_HEADERS  GL_ JE_LINES  Contents  Journal batches  Journals  Journal lines . When you first install Financial  Analyzer there are no dimensions or dimension values defined. gives a visual overview of your chart of account structure. you can  copy branches of the hierarchy and maintain the same substructure. Segment value security is enforced for accounts included in your budget worksheet. The Financial Analyzer meta data is transferred from  Oracle General Ledger automatically when you first transfer account balances.

  Table 3­13: Account Balance and Related Tables  Table Name  GL_SETS_OF_BOOKS  Contents  A row for each set of books . The currency  code is stored at journal level.  A journal is a group of journal lines that balance. The sum of the debits is equal to the sum of the credits. A record in the  GL_BALANCES table is the balance for a specific account code combination for a specific period and currency; therefore  balances belong to a set of books. and GL_  JE_LINES are referred to as journal lines.  Chapter 2 explains how a set of books is defined as an Accounting Flexfield.Table 3­12: Transaction Tables in Oracle General Ledger  Table Name  GL_BALANCES  Tip  Contents  Balances for every code combination. The lines record the  accounted amounts—either debit or credit—and the account code combination that the amount will be posted to. The GL_JE_ LINES table holds a record for each journal line. Here again. the  table structure is simple. and a calendar. and period  Whereas GL_JE_BATCHES are called journal batches on the Oracle General Ledger forms. the records stored in GL_ JE_HEADERS are simply referred to as  journals on the application forms. currency. In Figure 3­11  you can see the intricate relationship between a set of books and the GL_BALANCES table. a currency.  Figure 3­11: Oracle General Ledger data diagram  FSG reporting and much of your own custom reporting is driven by balance rather than transaction data. Table 3­13 lists the major tables you need.

 Once the  journal batch has been posted. Therefore. You can easily migrate from your legacy system to Oracle Applications. back to the start of the financial year. Without a balances tables the system would have to recalculate the balance each  time it was needed by summing the journal lines.  Many processes. and  extensibility.  Conversion from Legacy Systems  The strength of Oracle's General Ledger and the Oracle Applications lies in their superior technology and software  architecture. or you can integrate Oracle  Applications with your existing third­party products through numerous open interfaces. so that it cannot be posted a second  time. or  back through prior years; be guided by your reporting needs. You might need to map accounts between legacy and new systems.POSTED is set to Yes.  Converting Historical Data  There are three basic options for how much balance history to convert: none.  Unless you are using Oracle General Ledger from day one of operations. and period combination  The first four tables help you select what you need out of GL_BALANCES. the attribute GL_BATCHES. high performance. The following techniques are for mimicking a one­  to­many mapping: . Complexities arise if there are  multiple sources of legacy systems (both a legacy financial system and a legacy cost accounting system. for example). If the mapping is one to many (as is the case if the new chart of accounts carries more detail and finer  graduations than the old). Each of the balances stored in GL_BALANCES has been calculated from summing the relevant records in GL_  JE_LINES. It might be useful to put them into spreadsheet or desktop database systems to help accountants  access them more easily.  Conversion will need to merge both systems. bear in mind that once you have a program in  place to convert any historical period. it is uncommon to bring them forward through  automated conversion scripts. If you are really lucky. require the use of account balances that are  contained in the GL_BALANCES table. such as standard reporting and all FSG reporting. before you perform your  conversion make sure you have an audit trail of prior years' data.  The Posting Process  The posting process takes a journal batch and updates the account balances in GL_BALANCES according to all the  individual debits and credits that are contained in the GL_ JE_LINES tables belonging to that journal batch. the repository where the actual balance  numbers are held. currency. It is not always possible to  split them precisely in half; most end users will be pragmatic about this. The GL_BALANCES table is used to improve performance. you will have some form of conversion to  perform—for example. transferring account balances or transaction history from a legacy system. you can pretty much convert as many periods as you want. you must inject some logic into the conversion to split the balances. Your conversion plan  needs to recognize the requirement to retain an audit trail of prior years' data. Calculating the balance once and then storing the value makes much  better use of CPU processing power.Table 3­13: Account Balance and Related Tables  Table Name  GL_PERIODS  GL_CODE_COMBINATIONS  FND_CURRENCIES  GL_BALANCES  Contents  A row for each calendar period  All the Account Flexfield segment values  A row for each currency  Balances for every account code. The base data in all cases is an account trial balance from the legacy  systems. Oracle products are built according to open industry standards that provide flexibility. However. the accounts will  map one to one or many to one—in either case it is simply a matter of sorting and summing to produce the new account  balances. Most users are content to import what they need into Oracle from the spreadsheets in  which they are developed. such as hard copy journal reports and archived copies of  the legacy system files.  Although the budgets of prior years can be converted as easily as balances.  A conversion program uses legacy data to generate one journal per accounting period.

§  §  § 

Posting legacy balances to parent accounts, when parent accounts in Oracle are a closer one­to­one match to the  legacy accounts.  Injecting the splitting rules into the conversion by allowing users to explicitly enter a splitting factor in transit between  the legacy and new system.  Coding the logic into the conversion programs using whatever extra data or algorithms are necessary. 

The maximum extent of transaction conversion is usually this: The user will want to translate and repost current­year  journals in Oracle. It is useful to have a whole year's journals available under a single system. 

Balances versus Transaction Detail 
Most users convert little or no transaction history. It is really useful only when the Oracle system will post in detail, when  there are subledgers to exploit drilldown, and when transactions can be converted for the subledgers as well. This  combination will almost never happen. Exceptions exist, of course; for example, clearing accounts will need their detail  transaction history in order to be useful after conversion. For the vast majority of situations, transferring balances is  sufficient and users do not need the transaction history. 

Opening Balances and Movements 
Whether you are transferring balances or transaction history, the same method is used: You import journals through the  Journal Import interface. To that extent, even if you are loading balances, nothing is loaded directly into the  GL_BALANCES table (there is no interface for that); the balance amounts are cast into the form of a journal and loaded  and posted in the normal way. The balances journal is constructed to have a journal line for each distinct Accounting  Flexfield that you intend to load. The amount for a line within the journal is the current period balance less the prior period  balance (called the movement), so the year­to­date numbers are always right.  The exception is the first period you choose to convert. Into this period you must post an open balance as well as a  movement. Open balance plus movement is equal to closing balance, so you can also choose to post only a closing  balance into the first period and a movement in all subsequent periods. Either way, the ledgers will balance because the  legacy ledger was balanced.  Tip  Clean up the data in the legacy system as much as possible before a conversion. At least make sure that the  legacy ledger balances and reconciles internally. Turn off suspense accounting temporarily and continue  attempting to import your conversion journals until you are confident that all segment values are defined and  the cross­validation rules permit creation of the needed combinations. 

Bridging—An Extension of Conversion 
Until now, we have considered conversion a one­off process at the point of cutover from legacy to Oracle systems. A  phased cutover, in which Oracle General Ledger goes live first and subledger modules are cutover some time later,  introduces the need to have bridging programs—conversion programs that run on an ongoing basis translating account  postings from legacy subledger systems into Oracle General Ledger. Whether you consider these programs as bridging  conversion programs or full­blown interfaces depends on how long you plan to use them. The function they perform is  identical; however, an interface should be elegant and robust, as it will probably need to be maintained at some stage in  its life. A conversion program is a one­off, throwaway piece of code—it needs to work and no more. It makes no sense to  build it to the same quality standards as an interface.  Either way, bridging programs and interfaces need a more permanent lookup table to hold the account mappings.  Implementing the mapping in a table makes it easy to maintain the mapping, make corrections, or add new mappings if  new codes are created in the legacy system. 

Other Methods for Loading Legacy Data 
Another method to transfer balances and transactions from legacy systems involves using Oracle General Ledger's  Global Consolidation System. Even though GCS was created to perform consolidations, you can use this feature to load  transactions or balances contained in a legacy set of books to a new set of books in Oracle General Ledger. GCS  provides exceptional flexibility in allowing you to transfer data across any chart of accounts structure, any source, any  calendar, any currency, and any level of detail. Because GCS offers an open interface, including a spreadsheet interface,  it can be accessed by non­Oracle systems through programs that load data from legacy systems. GCS does this by

providing sophisticated features for mapping data between accounting entities. For example, you can automatically map  source accounts from the legacy system to destination accounts in the new system.  You can also use the Mass Maintenance Workbench to automatically create new account combinations based on existing  combinations. 

Coordination with Subledger Conversion 
General Ledger conversion has to be carefully coordinated with other subledger conversions. Open items imported into  Payables and Receivables are treated by Oracle Financials as fresh transactions; these will post to General Ledger. Left  unchecked, the fresh transactions could give rise to journals that duplicate legacy journals or account balances imported  directly into Oracle General Ledger. There are three common strategies for avoiding duplication:  §  After performing the subledger conversion, transfer subledger balances to General Ledger and then reverse the  resulting journal batch in General Ledger. You must take care to ensure that this batch contains only conversion  items.  §  Segregate the chart of accounts into GL accounts and subledger accounts; ensure that the GL conversion references  only GL accounts and the subledger conversions reference only their accounts. A complete and watertight  segregation is not as easy as it might sound.  §  Fudge the open item conversion in the subledgers so that, when posted to General Ledger, they create a net  movement of zero. This can be achieved by coding Payables invoices with the same account code combination for  the liability account as for the expense distribution account. Likewise, for AR invoices the Receivables account code  combination is used for both the receivables account and revenue account.  Be especially careful that the same account mapping is used for General Ledger and subledger translations. In particular,  receivable account balances converted to General Ledger will, in the fullness of time, be reduced to zero by postings from  Oracle Receivables. A mismatch between the translation mappings could cause problems for many months to come. 

Loading and Copying Segment Values 
There may be thousands of natural accounts and thousands of organization codes for General Ledger. The accounting  staff almost always pulls them together in a spreadsheet. As most organizations use the Oracle installation as an  occasion to change their chart of accounts structure, the spreadsheet also might include a column for the old account  value. It usually includes parent­child relationships as well, showing the reporting hierarchy or hierarchies.  Transcribing all this data from the spreadsheet to Oracle even one time is a major job—but once is never enough. While  the data processing staff is working to bring up the Financials environment, the accounting staff is invariably engaged in  the never­ending task of perfecting their account structure. The same can be said for other flexfields: item numbers, fixed  assets, locations, and jobs. For the sake of accuracy, all these values need to be loaded fresh at conversion time. That, in  turn, means they need to be loaded for each dry run of the conversion process.  Generations of users facing this requirement developed scripts to insert values directly into Oracle Applications. Because  of the flexibility they offer, such scripts might still be valuable in an 11i environment. A sample script (upload12.doc) to  load from a spreadsheet is available on the Osborne/McGraw­Hill Web site (www.osborne.com). 

A Novel Way to Create New Account Code Combinations 
The GL interface will create code combinations dynamically if they are needed. To enable this feature, check the Allow  Dynamic Insertion box in the Key Flexfields Segments window. That done, you can prepare a journal import that has all  the new code combinations that you need to create and zero amounts everywhere. Once this has been loaded, the code  combinations will have been created. The dummy journal can be deleted later. The same principle can be applied with the  GL Desktop Integrator. 

Conclusion 
Oracle General Ledger is the heart of your accounting systems and allows your business to respond proactively to  changes in today's business climate. Oracle Applications provides quick and easy implementation; painless migration  from existing financial systems; accurate and timely processing of all your transactions; improved decision support  through better reporting and analysis; and quick, automated closing procedures. It can greatly increase the operational  efficiency of your business—an advantage crucial to success in today's fast­moving corporate arena.

Chapter 4: Budgeting and Allocations 
Overview 
Different groups within your organization require various levels of detailed information regarding performance. And while  financial accounting is well defined and commonly used, it cannot always address the informational needs of day­to­day  processing. Management accounting, also referred to as cost accounting, is an optional accounting discipline used by  internal managers to help manage assets, reduce company costs, perform financial analysis, and plan for future goals.  This chapter will describe the differences between financial and management accounting, detail the budgeting and cost  allocation functions of management accounting, and explain how Oracle Financials can help you perform those functions  efficiently and effectively.  The four main branches of accounting are financial accounting, management accounting, tax accounting, and nonprofit  accounting. Public companies are required to implement financial and tax accounting to report results of their operations  to outsiders. Nonprofit accounting, also called fund accounting, is used by colleges and universities, hospitals, and  governments. Terms such as encumbrances, budgetary control, and available fund balance are common in nonprofit and  government organizations. 

Differences Between Financial and Management Accounting 
Financial accounting information is used primarily by external users, such as investors, creditors, customers, and  government agents, who are far removed from the day­to­day activities of an organization. These users rely on financial  reports to help them make decisions. For example, investors use financial statements to determine if they should buy, sell,  or hold their investments in a company. The main purpose of financial accounting is to record and report on the economic  transactions of a company in a consistent and objective fashion. All public companies are required to issue regular  financial statements that conform to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).  Management accounting is used by managers and other internal users who are involved with the day­to­day activities of  an organization. It addresses management's need for current, detailed internal operating information, such as unit of  production costs or sales by department.  Because financial accounting is regulated (by the Securities and Exchange Commission in the U.S. and the Registrar of  Companies in the U.K.), and management accounting is unregulated, most corporations pay more attention to quarterly  and annual financial reporting requirements than to management accounting or reports. 

The Limitations of Financial Accounting 
You cannot run a business relying on financial accounts alone. Financial reports are prepared after the close of an  established period and tend to look backward through time. They provide information about economic events that have  already transpired and are highly aggregated, showing very little detail about any particular product line or inventory item.  For example, in a typical income statement, there is one Cost of Sales line item that may represent ten different product  lines. This information is of little use to managers who want to know which product line incurs the most costs or what the  unit costs of each product are. Managers need this detailed information to help them analyze the profitability of each  product line for making decisions on setting prices, switching suppliers of raw materials, or improving the assembly  process. Managers cannot wait several days after the close cycle to obtain this information; they require detailed, up­to­  the­minute information to help them make daily, even hourly, operating decisions. 

Different Types of Reports 
The underlying numbers and the fundamental transactions for both management accounting reports and financial  accounting reports are basically the same, the difference being that the reports themselves show different levels of detail.  The two sets of reports can be seen as two different windows on the same data. There is no Oracle "Management  Accounting" module, but simply the ability to design and construct a variety of different reports, each one taking into  account the divergent business rules of financial and management accounting. The Financial Statement Generator,  included in Oracle General Ledger, is just one tool that helps you build and customize reports for your financial and  management accounting needs.

The first step in designing an effective reporting framework is to carefully design your chart of accounts. A well­  constructed chart of accounts can provide meaningful reports. For companies just starting out, an account segment that  specifies whether it is an asset, revenue, or expense account is usually sufficient. However, if you want to be able to track  costs by department and by the products produced by each department, you need a more sophisticated account structure  that includes a Department and Product segment in your chart of accounts. Of course, as your company grows and your  reporting gets more sophisticated, the more complex your chart of accounts becomes. The term that Oracle Applications  uses to refer to your chart of accounts is the Accounting Flexfield. The combination of account, department, product, and  so on is called the Account Code Combination. From the Accounting Flexfield, Oracle General Ledger can produce both  your management and financial reports with as much detail as you require. When you start your analysis of financial and  management reporting requirements, keep the following in mind: financial accounting reports reflect the results of the  business as a whole, while management accounting reports tend to break down a business into its constituent parts, such  as costs by company, cost center, department, and/or product. 

Bridging the Gap 
Companies that operate separate systems for financial and management accounting are operating inefficiently. No matter  how strong your financial accounting system is, it is not a substitute for effective management accounting. Just collecting  data and issuing highly aggregated reports are insufficient for running your business. In order to operate your business  efficiently, you must implement both management accounting and financial accounting and integrate them with one  another.  Oracle Financial Applications can replace disparate systems with an integrated financial solution, capable of supplying  both financial and management figures. 

Budgeting 
Two key functions of management accounting are planning and budgeting, both of which help companies establish goals,  set direction, and identify potential problems and opportunities in a timely fashion. Plans and budgets are also powerful  control tools that set milestones for measuring progress, allowing managers to track the variance between actual results  and planned results.  A budget can be thought of as a planned level of expenditure. In the U.K., the Institute of Cost and Management  Accountants has defined budgeting as "a plan quantified in monetary terms prepared and approved prior to a defined  period, usually showing planned income to be generated and/or an expenditure to be incurred during that period and the  [1]  capital to be employed to obtain that objective."  A budget should reflect the goals that an organization plans to attain in a  future period by means of expenditure. A budget always refers to a specific time period, such as one year or five years.  With Oracle Financials you can define your budget periods as months, quarters, half­years, or full years. Generally, your  budget periods should coincide with your accounting periods to ensure proper matching of budget balances with actual  balances. 

The Budgeting Process 
Some companies conduct a formal budget approval process, while others take a more relaxed approach. The number of  managers involved in the budget process can also vary. Budgets can be set at the board level as part of a high­level  business strategy or developed by shop floor managers to help them control their own operational spending. The range  and style of budgets defy simplistic description. A great strength of Oracle Financials is that it does not constrain the  methods and techniques of budget approval and entry. The wide range of methods for entering and modifying a budget in  Financials matches the limitless variety of methods used to derive and approve budgets.  Whichever budgeting process you choose, Oracle Financials give you the freedom and flexibility to set your own rules. A  wide array of methods and tools are offered to help you enter, modify, approve, analyze, and report on budgets in  whatever way you see fit. You can mix and match budgeting methods to accommodate different needs by different  departments or managers. 

Ongoing Budget Review 
Simply collecting budget data and issuing the final budget report is meaningless unless there is a continual review  process that takes place inside your organization. Managers must continually review budget targets to ensure that they  are close to actual amounts. If they are not, corrective action should be taken. Again, in many organizations this is a

formal review process, and actual versus budgeted expenditures are often used to judge the performance of individual  groups within the organization.  Budgets are used in the following ways:  §  As day­to­day operational tools to control spending  §  As yardsticks to measure actual performance against planned performance  §  As warning signs that allow you to act quickly (for example, to change the direction of a particular business unit or  product line that is not meeting its targets) 

Budgetary Control for Nonprofit Organizations 
A topic related specifically to budgets in nonprofit organizations is budgetary control. Budgetary control refers to the  process of recording budget data and preventing expenditure above the budgeted limit.  Budgetary control is a major concern of nonprofit and government organizations, because laws mandate that such groups  spend only what has been allotted or budgeted. These organizations work for the public and operate without a profit  motive, so there are limitations on the funds they have available. Often, a donor to a public organization will designate a  specific purpose for the donated funds, such as building a library or a new hospital. In such cases, the law requires that  the organization spend only the amount of money that has been assigned to that particular expenditure. A nonprofit group,  for instance, is not allowed to use money from the hospital fund to complete construction of the library; money for the two  projects must be maintained and used separately.  Note  With Oracle Financials, you can track budget or encumbrance data using budgetary accounting or  encumbrance accounting. 

Funds checking is a feature of budgetary control that verifies available funds online before processing a transaction, thus  helping to prevent overspending. With funds checking, you can verify transactions online against available budgets,  immediately update the funds available for approved transactions, and control expenditures at the detail or the summary  level. 

Budgetary Control in Oracle Subledgers 
When you enable budgetary control and enter a purchase order or an invoice, Oracle Purchasing and Oracle Payables  check to ensure that there are sufficient funds available. The system then displays a status message: either Passed  Funds Check or Failed Funds Check. If the transaction passes funds checking, the funds are set aside until they are  expended.  You can implement budgetary control in Oracle General Ledger to check funds for manual journal entries. You can run  budgetary control in two modes: Advisory or Absolute. Select Advisory if you want to receive a warning message when a  transaction exceeds its budget limit but still want the ability to save your work. Select Absolute if you want the program to  prevent you from saving transactions that exceed their budget limit. 

Types of Budgets 
There are several types of budgets that are used by companies: the operating budget, capital budget (for fixed assets),  master production schedule (for manufacturing companies), variable budget (for example, percentage of production), and  time­phased budget (for capital projects).  Budgets are derived from Oracle General Ledger balances. The following is a list of balance types used by General  Ledger:  §  Actual balance  §  Encumbrance balance (used by nonprofit organizations)  §  Average balance (used by financial institutions)  §  Statistical balance (such as headcount or square footage)  Oracle Financial Applications provide three different methods for entering and reviewing budget amounts:  §  You can enter budget amounts or budget journals using Oracle General Ledger.  §  You can use the Budget Wizard, a budgeting tool within the Oracle Applications Desktop Integrator, to enter budget  data within an Excel spreadsheet. The Budget Wizard automatically builds a budget spreadsheet based on the  budgets you define in Oracle General Ledger. Budget balances can be downloaded from Oracle General Ledger or

§ 

uploaded from the spreadsheet. The spreadsheet interface allows you to automatically graph your budgets and then  to use the graphs for comparing budgeted costs against actuals.  You can use Oracle Financial Analyzer—a distributed application for financial reporting, analysis, budgeting and  planning—to enter new budget data or update budget amounts already created in Oracle General Ledger. With  Oracle Financial Analyzer, you can easily analyze any financial data already collected by Oracle General Ledger  using state­of­the­art OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) tools. 

Budgeting with Oracle Financials 
Oracle General Ledger provides a variety of powerful and flexible budgeting tools to help you facilitate better planning and  control without the drudgery often associated with budgeting. With Oracle General Ledger, you can spend your valuable  time analyzing budgets, not just entering and capturing data. Oracle Financials provides many features designed to help  you perform budgeting in your organization.  Unlimited Budget Versions You can have as many versions of your budget as you want. You can use any budget  version in any report, and you can even compare different versions of your budget. This last feature allows you to create  multiple "what if?" budgets and use them to plan business strategies.  Decentralization To decentralize the budgeting process within your organization, you can define a budget organization  along department, division, or cost center lines. Or, you can centralize the process by having only one budget  organization. In either case, you have the power and flexibility to determine who enters budget data by assigning  passwords to budget organizations within your enterprise.  Flexibility You can enter budgets according to your planning needs: weekly, monthly, quarterly, or annually. You can  create budget journal entries to provide an audit trail for your budget.  Spreadsheet Integration The Budget Wizard tool in Oracle Applications Desktop Integrator (ADI) provides a  spreadsheet­based budget entry screen that facilitates simple data entry and modeling in a disconnected environment.  You can enter your new budget balances manually, use budget rules, or use formulas and models. The spreadsheet can  be saved on your desktop and worked on at any time. When you are satisfied with your budget, you can upload the new  balances into Oracle General Ledger.  Budget Formulas and Allocations Budget formulas enable you to build a complete budget using any combination of  fixed amounts and account balances, including actuals or budget amounts. For example, you could draft an entire budget  using the previous year's actuals for overhead costs and applying a 15 percent increase in sales revenue. Then you can  use allocations, called MassBudget, to distribute the budget amounts across departments, divisions, and so on. The  formulas used in MassBudget can be simple or complex, and you can allocate to parent accounts without having to  enumerate each child value separately.  Budget Translation You can translate foreign currency budget balances as well as actuals. This capability allows you to  create "budget versus actuals" reports in your reporting currency using the Financial Statement Generator.  Oracle Financial Analyzer Integration Oracle General Ledger's integration with Oracle Financial Analyzer lets you easily  identify, analyze, model, budget, forecast, and report on information stored in your general ledger. You can use the  sophisticated budgeting capabilities of Oracle Financial Analyzer (OAF) to develop your budgets within a multidimensional  analysis framework. Once you have completed your budgets in OAF, you can automatically write your budget amounts  back to Oracle General Ledger. You can either enter your data into a new budget in General Ledger, separate from the  original budget, or store several versions of a budget for comparative reporting purposes. 
[1] 

From Principles of Cost Accountancy by Alan Pizzey (Cassell, 1987). 

Allocations 
Another function of management accounting is allocations. Allocations spread costs or revenues from one source to other  sources. This function allows a more granular estimate of the true cost or revenue source. For example, a typical cost  allocation might be to spread overhead costs, such as utility costs, across departments or products, based on square  footage or number of employees.

There are two mechanisms within Oracle General Ledger that allow you to create allocations: MassBudget for allocating  budget amounts, and MassAllocation for allocating actual or encumbrance amounts. Both features require that you create  batches that contain one or more formula entries. One formula may generate allocation journal entries for a group of cost  centers, departments, divisions, and so on. For example, you can allocate total benefit costs to all cost centers based on  headcount. You can allocate a pool of marketing costs to several departments based on the ratio of department revenues  to total revenues. 

Allocation Formulas 
MassAllocation uses a generic formula to calculate allocation amounts:  cost pool × (usage factor / total usage)  In each MassAllocation formula that you define, you specify fixed amounts, fractions, or general ledger accounts for the  cost pool, usage factor, and total usage. In addition to the formula, you must enter a target account and an offset account.  The target account specifies the destination of your allocation; the offset account is used to post the offsetting debit or  credit entry from your allocation. Extremely sophisticated allocations can be set up quickly and simply, using parent  accounts and the looping feature. The looping feature visits all child accounts of a specified parent and calculates the  appropriate allocation using the generic formula just shown. 

An Allocation Example 
Assume there are three departments in your company: Departments 101, 102, and 103, which occupy 45 percent, 30  percent, and 25 percent of the company's floor space, respectively. These departments are children to the parent  Department 100 which is used as the offset account. If rent expense for an accounting period is $100,000, you will  produce the following allocation journal:  §  Type  Target  Target  Target  Offset  Account  Rent Expense − Dept 101  Rent Expense − Dept 102  Rent Expense − Dept 103  Rent Expense − Dept 100  Debit  $45,000  $30,000  $25,000  $100,000  Credit 

The allocation feature is a powerful accounting tool, and it can be used with actual or encumbrance journal batches.  Nevertheless, MassAllocation does require some initial setup and planning efforts to ensure proper implementation. With  recurring journal entries and allocation formulas, you can perform many types of allocations:  Net Allocations Net allocations are made on an incremental basis over previous allocations. The allocated amounts  reflect changes in the cost pool. Rather than reallocating the entire revised amount, a net allocation allocates only those  amounts that update the previous allocation. Net allocations allow you to rerun allocations, without overallocating, as  many times as you want to in the same period.  Step­Down Allocations Step­down allocations occur in groups, and they cascade in such a way that the target of one  allocation becomes the cost pool of the next. For example, you might first allocate a portion of your overhead costs to the  Finance department, then allocate total Administrative costs to other departments (after including in the Finance  department cost its portion of the overheads).  Rate­Based Allocations These are made using allocation formulas based on current, historic, or estimated rates. For  example, bad debt may be budgeted at 1 percent of turnover.  Usage­Based Allocations Usage­based costs are allocated according to statistics such as headcount, units sold, square  footage, number of deliveries, or computer time consumed. Rent, for instance, is typically allocated on square footage  usage per department.

Standard Costing Allocations In standard costing, allocations are based on statistics such as sales units, production  units, number of deliveries, or customers served. For example, you might want to calculate your cost of sales according to  this formula:  number of units sold × standard cost per unit 

AutoAllocations Workbench 
The AutoAllocations Workbench is a new feature in Release 11i. It simplifies the exercise of defining and producing  allocations, and, because the Workbench is also available to Oracle Projects users, project accountants can access it  directly from Oracle Projects to create step­down and parallel allocation sets and combine Projects allocations with  General Ledger allocations. The benefits of the Workbench are  §  Step­Down Allocation Sets Each allocation journal in your set is dependent on the results of the prior allocation  journal. This feature is integrated with Oracle Workflow, which monitors each journal batch through each process,  including journal batch validation, generation, and posting.  Parallel Allocation Sets Each allocation journal in a Parallel Allocation Set is independent of the others in a set. The  AutoAllocation Workbench groups any MassAllocation, MassBudget, Recurring Journals, or Project Allocation  journals to run simultaneously. These can be submitted immediately or scheduled to run at any time in the future. 

§ 

Conclusion 
Management accounting is not a byproduct of financial accounting; it is a separate discipline that deserves much  attention. Without a sound management accounting system in place, managers cannot make thorough internal decisions  regarding business operations. Long before the end of any accounting period, managers need detailed, timely reports that  act as early warning signs of any potential cash crunch or inventory shortage. Financial reports provide only a scorecard  of the past results. Managers want up­to­the­minute, customizable reports that can be obtained from Oracle General  Ledger's Financial Statement Generator.  Oracle Corporation's suite of financial applications seamlessly integrates your management and financial accounting  systems without the need for double maintenance or duplication of effort. Oracle General Ledger, coupled with the ADI's  Budget Wizard, allows you to perform the budgeting process using a familiar spreadsheet environment to create and  modify your budgets. The budgets are based on the same chart of accounts and accounting calendar used for your  financial accounting information. The integration of Oracle General Ledger and Oracle Financial Analyzer allows you to  quickly identify, analyze, model, budget, forecast, and report on information stored in your general ledger without rekeying  information. Oracle General Ledger's MassAllocation and MassBudgeting features allow you to perform allocations by  defining formulas that you can reuse again and again. 

Chapter 5: Oracle Payables 
Overview 
A payables system is the last stage of supply­chain management. It allows companies to pay suppliers for merchandise  and services. There are several opportunities in Oracle Payables for automation, because the terms and conditions are  known at the purchase order (PO) stage and, assuming that the goods are accepted, payment follows at a fixed time later.  The goal of supply­chain management is keeping stock levels low but having sufficient stock to meet demand. Stock  sitting in a warehouse equates to money tied up unproductively—but only if you have paid for that stock. The goal of  payables management is to postpone payment as long as possible and at the same time ensure that invoices are paid by  their due date.  Payables controls are equally applicable to paying employee expenses and paying vendors for expensed and capitalized  items. It is no more than prudent management to pay invoices only when they are due and, invoice or not, to be sure that  payment is not made before delivery unless it has been explicitly agreed.  Receiving goods and paying for them weeks later amounts to an interest­ free loan from your supplier. Supermarkets are  champions at using the good terms offered by suppliers. Supermarkets might be operating on wafer­thin margins, but they  regularly sell their stock days—if not weeks—before they pay for it. They have a surplus working capital, which they invest

for profit. Supermarkets are an extreme exponent of investing other people's money wisely; however, managing suppliers'  payment terms is a business practice from which all commercial organizations can benefit. 

Purposes of a Payables System 
The purpose of a payables system is to help you manage your procurement cycle, allowing you to process high  transaction volumes and keep control over your cash flow. It also enables you to better manage your supplier  relationships and make price comparisons. Oracle Payables can be configured to save your company money by enforcing  your payment policies, such as  §  Paying suppliers on time, but no earlier than necessary  §  Taking discounts when prudent  §  Preventing duplicate billing/invoice  §  Avoiding overdrafts of your bank accounts  Because payables is only part of a complete cycle, it must be integrated with other modules. Oracle Payables shares  purchase order information with Purchasing so that you pay only for goods you ordered and received and do not pay more  than the price quoted by the supplier. It shares receipt information with Purchasing so that you do not pay for items that  are faulty, broken, or substandard. Oracle Payables is fully integrated with Oracle Assets in a way that allows you to  account for fixed assets purchased. It is integrated with Human Resources to ensure that employee expenses are paid  efficiently and with Oracle Cash Management to enable you to reconcile your payments against a bank statement.  Payables also integrates with Oracle Property Management to process lease payments to landlords as they fall due. 

Innovative Uses of Oracle Payables 
Many software features that once were considered "bells and whistles" are increasingly becoming standard business  requirements. Oracle has responded to this trend by adding functionality to the payables application and by creating some  completely new modules that interact with payables. These include Web­enabled commerce, electronic data interchange  (EDI), evaluated receipt settlement (ERS), and procurement card integration. 

Web­enabled Commerce 
Web­enabled applications give access to any user with a Web browser and the appropriate security clearance. Oracle has  termed these Self­Service Applications, as they allow users access to data directly instead of filling out a paper form and  then having a payables clerk do the actual data entry, as previously required. Using a standard Web browser and the Self­  Service Expenses application, described in more detail in Chapter 13, employees can enter their own expense reports.  Mobile employees can use the Expense spreadsheet to track expenses offline in disconnected mode; then upload their  expense records into the Self­Service Expenses application to submit for approval. Once an expense report is submitted  using Self­Service Expenses, Oracle Workflow routes the report for approval and automatically enforces company policies  and business rules. Oracle Payables then processes the expense report and issues a payment to the employee. 

E­Commerce Using Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) 
Electronic data interchange uses electronic messaging to communicate with trading partners. Instead of printing paper  documents such as purchase orders, invoices, and remittance advisories, Oracle Applications uses the Oracle E­  Commerce Gateway to send these documents to your trading partners. Oracle Applications uses international standards  X12 and EDIFACT to ensure that recipients will be able to read the message, regardless of whether they are using Oracle  Applications or not. These two standards are commonly used: X12, which is sponsored by ANSI and used in the United  States and EDIFACT, which is sponsored by the United Nations and primarily used in Europe. The Oracle E­Commerce  Gateway, previously known as the Oracle EDI Gateway, extracts the data from Oracle Applications and delivers it in a  common format to an EDI translator. The translator converts the common format supplied by Oracle Applications to either  X12 or EDIFACT.  The actual mechanism for transferring the electronic document to the other party is not prescribed. In the same way that a  paper document can be faxed, mailed, or sent by courier, electronic messages can be sent in a variety of ways:  §  Through modem links across phone lines  §  Across the Internet using ftp or http put  §  On floppy disk sent through the postal service

EDI transactions can be either inbound (data coming in from a partner to be loaded into Oracle Applications) or outbound  (data that's been extracted from Oracle Applications and is now being sent to a partner). Support for new transaction  types is continually being added; an outbound purchase order EDI has been available since Version 1 of the Oracle EDI  Gateway product, and Release 11 of Financials introduced support for inbound invoices. Although you can write custom  programs to fulfill any EDI need, the EDI transaction sets are available to use in combination with Oracle Payables are  shown in Table 5­1. 

Table 5­1: EDI Transaction Sets in Oracle Payables  Transaction  Invoice  Payment Order/Remittance advice  X12 Standard  810  820  EDIFACT Standard  INVOIC  PAYORD  REMADV  Application advice  Shipment and Billing notice  824  857  APERAK  No equivalent  Outbound  Inbound  Direction  Inbound  Outbound 

The outbound application advice (824/APERAK) can be used to inform a supplier of a duplicate invoice or an invoice that  does not refer to a valid purchase order. It can be used to notify a supplier of invoice data rejected for any reason or to  confirm that you have accepted an invoice. 

Evaluated Receipt Settlement (ERS) 
Traditionally, payment has been based on receipt of the supplier's invoice. However, recent innovations in workflow have  led to evaluated receipt settlement. The receipt of goods drives payment under ERS; no paper invoice is sent to the  accounts payable department. Evaluated receipt settlement enables a user to automatically create standard, unapproved  invoices for payment of goods. The invoices are based on receipt transactions that have been processed through Oracle  Purchasing.  Creation of an invoice can be triggered by an Advance Shipment Notice (ASN) from the supplier (processed by  Purchasing/Receiving under Oracle Purchasing) or a third­party receiving process. Invoices are created using a  combination of receipt and purchase order information; this process eliminates duplicate data entry and ensures accurate  and timely data processing. Evaluated receipt settlement is also known as payment on receipt or self­billing.  Under the ERS system, you choose which suppliers participate, and enforce matching rules to ensure that the proper  payments are made to your suppliers. The system creates invoices with multiple items and distribution lines, and  automatically accounts for sales tax. The amount on the invoice is determined by multiplying the quantity of items  received by each item's unit price on the purchase order. The payment terms on the invoice default to the purchase order  payment terms. The payment currency defaults from the supplier site. Sales tax is calculated based on the tax codes on  each line of the purchase order.  The ERS process saves the supplier the expense of generating invoices, and saves your expense of matching invoices to  receipts and processing payments. ERS imposes a measure of control in doing so. As the customer, you must be careful  to accurately record what is received. Your business processes must absolutely minimize discrepancies between the  purchase order and the receipt. The supplier must be equally vigilant in comparing your remittance advice with its  shipments to you. 

Procurement Cards 
To simplify the administration of employee expenses, companies can offer their employees use of a corporate credit card,  which can be used to make purchases on the company's behalf. With the procurement card integration feature, you can  import the transaction detail from statement files provided by the card issuer. Employees are notified automatically of any  transactions appearing on their card; they can use Oracle Self­Service Expenses to verify those transactions and override  default transaction accounting. Once the transactions have been verified, invoices that represent the employer's liability  will be automatically created to pay the card issuer.  Procurement cards reduce transaction costs in several ways:  §  Obligations to many suppliers are consolidated into a single payment to the card issuer.

 the accrual journal has to be reversed in the following period. when they need to. you need to be able to list how much money is owed to each  supplier and prove that the total money owed equals the liability shown on the balance sheet. the  number of choices usually is quite limited.  Timing Your Liability  Companies differ on when liability is first measured.  The accounting distribution often can be fully determined by identifying the employee and the supplier. the encumbrance converts to a liability to  pay the agreed price for the goods. Once the invoice has been paid. Once the backlog of invoices has been  individually keyed into Payables. you  pay the invoice. and makes the information readily accessible. Doing  this would allow you to archive the paper copy and rely entirely on the application data and the stored image to resolve  any future queries.  For example. If not. Items  purchased using procurement cards generally are expensed. As the goods or services are received. if you use payables without the purchasing system.  The employee is identified automatically. and Assets interfaces are not present  to support purchase of capital items. The liability remains on the company's balance sheet until the goods or services have  been paid for. and the supplier should quote these terms when  sending an invoice for the goods. Organizations that automate purchasing and  payables processes are in a better position to record liability for goods ordered but not received and for goods received  but not invoiced. The latter means the full amount is due by the 90th day but there is a 1 percent discount if the invoice is  paid earlier. This allows the accounts  to show an accurate liability figure and the accounting period to be closed on time. or any of a range of cash  and non­cash payment methods.  This process can empower employees to buy what they want. and video files.  Attachments  You can link invoices to related data files. This new feature enables your payables department to build a better profile of your suppliers and  trading partners. approvals. This reconciliation of the  Payables subledger with General Ledger (GL) should be performed regularly—at minimum once each accounting period.  Payment terms will have been agreed upon at the purchase stage. There is no limit to the range of possible payment terms; terms are separately negotiated either by individual  supplier or by purchase order. Typical payment terms might be 30 days net; better terms would be 90 days net or a 1  percent discount. in the line detail provided by the card issuer. so it would be impractical to buy for stock; and the budgeting. and are accessible through the  Payables screens. In essence. The invoice due date has no bearing on the  eventual liability—the due date is for operational control; not accounting. Payment can be made by check. This method is particularly suitable if you use a paper­based procedure for invoice approval and  account coding. bank­ to­bank electronic funds transfer (EFT). such as images. you could attach to the invoice record in Payables a scanned image of the original supplier's invoice. spreadsheets. word processing documents. Some companies record their liability from the day the invoice arrives  or the date on the invoice; not from the day the goods were received.  To explain the figures that appear on the balance sheet. the best approximation is to record the  liability when the invoice is received. compare the standard Oracle Payables Trial Balance report with the payables liability account  line in the appropriate Financial Statement Generator (FSG) balance sheet report. However. it has an encumbrance—whether the  company chooses to account for it or not.  To start the reconciliation.  Companies with a backlog of purchase invoices at period end will calculate the total amount owing from all the invoices  that have not been keyed; then enter this single figure as an accrual journal in General Ledger.§  §  §  The transaction description is already automated. Bear in mind that the decision on when to recognize a liability is a commercial  accounting decision and should not be driven by system considerations. After waiting as long as possible before sacrificing the discount or going into default.  An Overview of Payables in Your Business  As soon as a company agrees to purchase goods or services from a supplier. it enables them to be more  productive without creating additional paperwork or bypassing the business approval and audit procedures. The invoice image can be scanned after it has been forwarded to the buyer for approval and account  coding. The accrual journal also . to some degree. the liability in the balance sheet is reduced to zero. The card issuer knows nothing of your Inventory Item  Numbers.  These attachments are stored within the Oracle Database or a secured network drive.

 including the following:  §  Automatic or manual checks  §  Wire transfers  §  Electronic funds transfer  From the payables point of view. tracking. Your business processes should specify how to deal with  invoices from suppliers who are not in the system. and  their actual payment dates. and the date on which the check was cleared by your bank) is a  powerful way to quickly set the record straight. and  estimated procurement card charges. utility bills. their due dates. This occurs commonly. even with a purchasing system in place. In these cases. and maintain better supplier relations. and with Cash Management for enabling  checks and payments issued out of Oracle Payables to be reconciled with your bank statement. If the check has been presented. including withholding tax and property tax payments. with Oracle Fixed Assets for tracking fixed asset purchases. You can bring up a record of the supplier's account online and identify previous invoices. such as telephone. Having crucial information at your  fingertips (that is. the invoice is available for payment.  Oracle Payables posts accounting transactions to Oracle General Ledger. Cash  Management's reconciliation feature is powerful because it enables you to handle queries from suppliers much more  effectively.  and payment terms match those on the original purchase order. or billing; and lease obligations can be imported  from Oracle Property Manager. The close integration is  dictated by workflow: Purchase orders in Purchasing give rise to invoices in Payables; invoices give rise to payments. the  user might have to do either one or both of these extra steps:  §  Identify and set up a supplier record in Oracle Payables.  §  Determine which expense account codes the items should be charged against. the check number. Integration with Oracle Inventory helps reconcile inventory movements with European  Union Interstat cross­border material movement reporting requirements. quantity.  If you are not using ERS.  The bank reconciliation functionality is part of Oracle Cash Management. Payables can be installed on its own  without Purchasing or Cash Management. the payment date. Many  obligations.will typically include recurring expenses that have been incurred but not yet invoiced. Cash Management creates postings from a cash  clearing account to correspond to the reconciled payments.  which will show as bank statement entries in Cash Management. In addition. suppliers will send you an invoice for the goods you have received. at which stage it should be reconciled within Oracle  Cash Management. If necessary. avoid making duplicate payments. Reconciling the payment removes it from the list of payments issued but not yet cleared. .  Sometimes suppliers mistakenly believe that a particular invoice has not been paid. expenditures  can be transferred to Oracle Projects for project accounting. An overview of the integration is shown in Figure  5­1. Physical payment can take place in many different  ways. Bank reconciliation is described in more detail in Chapter 7. you can see the date it was reconciled.  Once entered and approved. the invoice is considered paid and you have reached the end of the payables cycle. originate without a purchase order. but you might not be able to take advantage of the full range of automation that  otherwise would be available. It also integrates with Oracle Purchasing for  invoice matching. The  payment eventually will appear on the company's bank statement. These invoices will be  processed by your accounts payable department. which ensures that the supplier is known and that the price.  The Payables Workflow  Oracle Payables is tightly integrated with Oracle Purchasing and Oracle Cash Management.

Figure 5­1: Oracle Payables Integration  The Payables Cycle  All payments pass through the same four­step Payables cycle. as shown in Figure 5­2. while still keeping all your controls in  place. An objective of your Payables  setup is to reduce overhead costs by automating the cycle to the extent possible. .

 (This process may or may not include matching each invoice to a purchase order.  Enter invoices.Figure 5­2: The Oracle Payables Cycle  The Payables cycle consists of the following four steps:  1.) .

 received.  Prepayment An invoice used to make advance payments for expenses to a supplier or employee. If a discrepancy appears between the figures on the supplier's invoice  and your figures. This form is at the heart of accounts payable  processing. and accepted. The various types of  invoices are listed here:  §  §  §  §  §  §  Standard A regular supplier invoice. or batch options.  §  Creates one or more AP_INVOICE_DISTRIBUTIONS. or QuickMatch invoice. The employee is the  supplier.  The first three steps are discussed just ahead. The General Ledger  Transfer process is described later in this chapter. Oracle Payables completes the match automatically for each shipment line. By matching to receipts. Mixed. Purchase invoices must be matched  to a purchase order and. payables options. The details of the form—the data that must  be entered and the cross­validation of related data—depend on the type of invoice you are entering.  Note  Once you have saved an invoice with the type of PO Default. The invoice usually includes line item details.  §  Updates QUANTITY_BILLED in PO_LINE_LOCATIONS.  3.  You can enter either a positive or negative amount for a Mixed invoice.  The matching process is highly integrated with Oracle Purchasing. or both. supplier number. allowing you to process all types of invoices. receipts and inspections. distribution. Bank reconciliation is described in more detail in Chapter 7. or QuickMatch  invoices in the Invoice Workbench.  Reconcile the payments with the bank statement (part of Oracle Cash Management). before they can be approved for payment. and the currency.  Debit Memo An invoice that notifies a supplier of a credit you recorded for goods or services purchased. Yet  other fields are purely optional and might never be used by some companies.  Approve invoices for payment. three­. you  might not have actually received the goods or services yet.  4. or receipt you want to match  and the quantity and price you are matching. optionally. and accepted. which records the QUANTITY_INVOICED.  Mixed A standard or credit/debit memo invoice that you want to match to a purchase order.  Credit Memo An invoice you receive from a supplier representing a credit for goods or services purchased. or ordered. and maintain accuracy and control over what you pay. another invoice. the invoice should be put on hold and not paid until the difference has been clarified with the supplier. Payables fills out as much  information from the purchase order as possible: supplier name. where the quantity  ordered is greater than the quantity already billed against that shipment line.  Step 1: Enter Invoices  Invoices are entered in Oracle Payables using the Invoice Workbench. If you are populating the purchasing tables with  imported data. you also must populate the invoice and line­level match flags that allow the invoice to be paid. You then choose the shipment.  §  §  Invoice Matching Payables provides extensive purchase order matching features to ensure that you pay only for goods  and services you ordered.  When you match during invoice entry. you can more accurately  capture and record costs for your material items. you indicate whether you want to match to the purchase order shipment. or to one or more receipt transactions. You cannot later search and find PO Default.  Expense Report An invoice you enter to record business­related expenses for employees. The  Invoice Workbench contains many different fields. Some of these are required for approval; others are derived or  defaulted from supplier purchase order information or from the supplier record. Invoices and  Payments generate accounting entries that need to be transferred to General Ledger and posted. to specific  purchase order distributions.  You have the option of setting up two­. the UNIT_PRICE.2. including a description and price. in addition to other Payables information. Payables performs the following for each matched shipment:  §  Updates QUANTITY_BILLED and AMOUNT_BILLED in PO_DISTRIBUTIONS. and four­way matching to ensure that you pay only for goods and services  that have been ordered. ordered and received.  and the PO_DISTRIBUTION_ID. In this case. supplier site. received. .  Select and pay approved invoices.  PO Default An invoice for which you know the matching purchase order number.  QuickMatch An invoice you want to match automatically to a specified purchase order and all the shipment lines on  the purchase order. Mixed. Payables will  change the invoice type to Standard.

. For example. The approval procedure applies system holds to invoices.  Invoice Import The Invoice Import process allows you to create Payables invoices through an automated process.Oracle does not provide an open interface for purchase orders. Online approval is done on an individual invoice basis and initiated from the Invoice Workbench screen. and distribution information for  invoices; holds are applied to exception invoices. tax. Payables can be set up so that most invoices flow  straight through to payment. Some pre­validation is enforced by the form in the fields that use List of Values. Holds. which require someone to act before the invoice can be paid. If you  are using Batch Control. It can include either the accounting distribution or the information needed to have Account Generation  determine the distribution. For efficiency. a large number of invoices would require manual intervention at a stage in the cycle  where it was not necessary to do so. You then submit the Payables Open Interface Import program to validate your invoice records and create invoices  with distributions and scheduled payments in the Payables system. It produces a  report showing which invoices have new holds placed and which invoices have holds released.  Invoice Gateway The Invoice Gateway window is designed for fast entry of large numbers of invoices. or launched by batch from  the batch screen. Otherwise. An invoice cannot be paid or posted if the sum of its invoice lines (called  distributions) does not equal the total invoice amount (DIST VARIANCE is nonzero) or if the tax for a line does not equal  the net amount multiplied by the tax rate (TAX VARIANCE is nonzero). period status. For  existing invoices with holds. the approval procedure assesses whether any holds are needed; if so. The data constraints necessary for successfully  operating AP invoice matching are significantly less restrictive than those necessary for Oracle  Purchasing to correctly pick up and process the data you import. The Import captures descriptions and prices  at a line level. Fields that are not needed for input can be hidden to make data entry easier. The Invoice Gateway window stores invoice header and line information in the Payables Open Interface  tables. validation occurs for matching.  This is best used if you have a particular invoice that needs immediate approval and payment. the Approval Process. using  standard folder technology.  During approval. System holds are used to enforce certain data  integrity and business reality checks. you also can run Approval By Batch by using the Approval button on the Batch Control header  window. You  would typically use this feature for established suppliers with a large business volume. Clearing invoice holds on a batch of invoices is an iterative process. the  approval process places a distribution variance hold. exchange rate. you should be much more cautious importing purchase order information  into these tables for use in AP invoice matching. when a tax variance hold is  corrected. Some holds prevent the invoice from  being transferred to General Ledger. the procedure assesses whether the existing holds are still appropriate and whether any new  holds are necessary as a result of changes that have been made to the invoice. For new  invoices. the holds are placed on the invoice.  Holds Holds are placed by the system or a user on invoices that are not approved.  The approval process inspects all new invoices or invoices with holds and places new holds or removes holds that are no  longer relevant; it can be run either as a concurrent program (called Payables Approval) or online for each invoice. should be the  exception—not the rule. Users can place holds for any reason.  but user holds are always left unaffected and must be removed manually. However. The invoice  validation and generation of default values are not performed by the form; they happen later when the invoices are loaded  into Payables. if after that change the invoice lines no longer add up to the invoice total. but you could take advantage of matching by importing  pertinent PO information from another purchasing system into the following tables through customizations:  §  PO_HEADERS  §  PO_LINES  §  PO_LINE_LOCATIONS  §  PO_DISTRIBUTIONS  §  PO_DISTRIBUTIONS_AP_V (view of PO_DISTRIBUTIONS)  §  PO_RELEASES (blanket purchase orders)  §  PO_LOOKUP_CODES  Caution  If you use Oracle Purchasing.  Step 2: Approve Invoices  Invoices must be approved before they can be paid. and usually is set up to  run in the background or run manually immediately before the payment process. Most validation and defaulting of invoice values  occurs during the import process.  An invoice can be approved one of three ways: through online approval. The Approval Process is a  concurrent program that scans all payable invoices and reassesses the system holds on each invoice. It can capture and carry supplier­specific information in Descriptive Flexfield (DFF) attributes. for interfacing with external  systems you might have or for the initial data conversion to Oracle Payables. the tax hold is released.

  Select Invoices are selected if they fall due on or before the "pay by" date you specify and they meet all the other  criteria you specify (such as pay group.  Wait for the match to be satisfied. If you are still unable to resolve the hold and the  period must be closed.  Invoice amount exceeds amount  specified for the supplier site.Tip  For sites with a high volume of invoices. or add an invoice that  Payables did not originally select. All payment batches for a single bank  account can be initiated with a single payment batch submission. all invoices with holds that prevent them from being transferred to General Ledger have to be cleared. an  alert can be programmed to e­mail the buyer if there is a matching hold. and generate the appropriate payment documents.  Step 3: Pay Approved Invoices  Once the invoice has been entered and approved. . if appropriate. For instance. The complete  Table 5­2: Types of Holds and Examples of Invoice Problems  Type of  Hold  Account  Funds  Invoice  Matching  Variance  Example  DIST ACC INVALID  NONSUFFICIENT  FUNDS  AMOUNT  QTY ORD  DIST VARIANCE  Reason  Invoice distributed to an invalid  account. it must be paid in a timely manner to take advantage of available  discounts and retain good relations with your suppliers. prevent payment of a particular invoice. set up the Payables Approval process to run two or three times  during the day.  Manually override the hold or put  more funds into the account. who demand a one­to­one  correspondence between payments and paperwork. and currency).  and the invoices posted.  Remedy  Change the transaction or make  the account valid. The buyer then can research the hold  and release it. Once you enter the pay run  parameters and selection criteria you are guided through the following five­step sequence:  1.  Tip  Oracle Alert can be integrated effectively with Payables to streamline the approval process.  list of holds along with their suggested actions can be found in the Oracle Payables reference manual. according to your  criteria. Table 5­2 gives an example for each of the  different types of holds. This approach can be important for tax authorities. or once during the night on new invoices.  Approve payment manually. for example.  Invoice distribution amount exceeds  funds available. you must remove the hold before the invoice can proceed to the next stage in  the cycle. before the accounting period can be closed.  Quantity billed exceeds quantity  ordered × (1 + percent of tolerance). Certainly. This relieves the burden of invoice entry staff  approving each invoice one by one online. You can choose the Pay Alone feature to make sure that only one invoice is paid per  payment document.  2. The pay run will select all invoices that need to be paid.  You must resolve the discrepancy  before the invoice can be paid.  Modify You can prevent payment to a supplier. you can sweep the invoices into the next period; then close the period after the sweep has been  done.  Sum of distributions is not equal to  the invoice amount. In Oracle Payables you initiate payment runs on a regular basis. method of payment.  Holds are categorized according to the general reason for placing the hold.  or approve payment manually.  Whenever you have an invoice with a hold. A single payment will be sent covering all the supplier's  invoices that are due to be paid.  say weekly or every second working day.  The steps necessary to complete a pay run are initiated from the Payment Workbench.

 it can be relatively simple to copy the standard program.3. outside of a payment batch run). you can issue a manual payment (generated wholly outside the  system but entered into Oracle Payables to ensure the correct accounting entries are generated) or a Quick Payment (a  payment for a single supplier generated within Oracle Payables. re­register it under a different  name.  Each transaction that has accounting impact is called an accounting event. in which case Payables produces a print file  containing remittance advice information and the formatted check information; or as an electronic payment file. or a bank file is transmitted to the bank over a  modem link. The accounting process is being brought in line with the philosophy of the Global Accounting Engine. time. and  electronic documents such as EFT or EDI. In addition to the payment document itself.  The Transfer to General Ledger process was enhanced in Release 11i to provide better visibility of the journal lines as  they are created within Oracle Payables.  Transfer accounting entries to GL Submits the Payables Transfer to General Ledger Program to transfer them to  the GL_INTERFACE table .  Review accounting entries Uses the View Accounting Lines window. as your bank might impose different charges for various payment methods. invoice  batches. The two most  commonly used are  §  Checks Although check payment is readily accepted. printed transfer slips.  Deliver Checks are posted to the supplier or a bank file is delivered to the bank. it is also relatively expensive considering the fees.  Payment Methods There are a number of possible payment methods. Many country­specific formats are provided by Oracle; if your bank uses one that is not supported.  4.  §  General Ledger Transfer (Posting)  All subledger modules have a program that reviews all new or changed transactions (such as invoices. and  material required to print. and  payments) and creates a batch of journal entries in the interface table that is ready to be imported into General Ledger as  a journal. including printed checks.  Confirm You confirm to the system that each check has been paid. if you are late with your payment and the supplier is pressing for payment before the next regular payment  run.  Checks are printed onto the company's check stock stationery. Either method is useful;  for example.  On the whole.  Electronic Funds Transfer Consists of a formatted file with payments information sent to your bank so it can  disburse the payments directly into each supplier's bank account. you will  need to write a customized EFT payments program to generate the appropriate file layout. A remittance notice is a letter informing the supplier of an imminent  payment; it includes details of the invoices that are being paid. The steps involved are  §  §  §  §  Create accounting entries Submits a batch program or from the transaction window for individual invoices. payments. and reconcile checks. and an opportunity to check and modify these entries before they are finally  transferred to GL. the Deutsche Bank DTA (Datenträger Austausch) format is widely  accepted. You will need to work with your bank  to determine the required format. manual checks and Quick Payment should be discouraged because the administrative costs associated  with a single payment are far higher than for payments issued in a regular payment run. the BACS (Bank Automated  Clearing System) is commonly used; in Germany. in  which case a data file containing the payment information is formatted according to a particular bank or EDI format. Confirm also  releases the bank account so it can be used for a subsequent payment batch. Some countries have well­established EFT  standards that are accepted by all its banks. Payables can be  configured to generate remittance notices. The aim is to choose a payment method that the supplier accepts and that is  inexpensive to operate. In the United Kingdom and United States.  Format & Print The selected invoices are formatted either as checks. Confirmation releases a concurrent process  that records the invoices as paid and marks the payments to be transferred to General Ledger. Oracle Applications recognizes  that there will be circumstances in which a manual check is needed; the applications are flexible enough to cope with  these exceptional situations. debit memos.  Update accounting entries Changes accounts or corrects invalid accounts. and make the necessary layout changes in the Oracle Reports designer. These programs are called Transfer to General Ledger. If the layout differs only  slightly from a standard layout.  5.  At any time independent of your regular payment cycle. or payment batches. mail.

  Chapter 9 addresses the considerations involved in converting supplier information when you go live with Oracle  Applications.  A schematic diagram of the supplier master tables is shown in Figure 5­3. The accounting distributions for an invoice typically debit the expense or asset accounts and credit the AP  liability account of an invoice. When you submit the program.  Table 5­3: Payables Journals in General Ledger  Batch Name  user­ref Payables  user­ref Payables  Journal Name  Payments CUR  Purchase Invoices CUR  Transactions Listed  Payments transferred from Oracle Payables  Purchase Invoices transferred from Oracle Payables  The View Payables accounting lines window can present the journal lines in a graphical T­account format. Pay sites.  Processing Refunds from Suppliers or Employees  Using the Payments window you can record a refund from a supplier or employee. or all (both invoice and payment)  transactions. When you record a refund you link them to the  associated invoices. The supplier master tables (often termed vendor master tables at the database level) are shared with Purchasing.  The journals created from Payables are clearly identifiable in General Ledger according to their batch names and journal  names.  When you use accrual­basis accounting and submit the Payables Transfer to General Ledger program. payment. Payables can  transfer accounting information for both your invoices and payment transactions to the Payables General Ledger interface  table. referred to as sites. Only the most important fields have been  shown here; many more exist.§  Import and Post Journals in GL Import creates the journals in GL; Post updates the account balances to reflect the  debits and credit in the journal. Defaults are held at supplier level and supplier site level to speed up invoice entry.  Incidentally.  The defaults held at supplier level are used when you create a new site. A Pay  site is where you send payment for an invoice. You can view  all the details in a T­account (or just the net total) and view T­accounts in detail by full accounting flexfield or summarized  by account segment. defaults are also held in the Payables Options form; these defaults are used when you define a new supplier. You cannot enter an invoice for a supplier site that is not defined as a Pay  site. When you create payments. This enables you to close an open  credit balance and maintain a full transaction history for the supplier.  and foreign currency exchange gains or losses incurred between invoice and payment time. The accounting distributions for a payment typically debit the liability account and credit your  cash or cash clearing account. The defaults at site level are used when you  create a new invoice. The logic behind the batch names is shown in Table 5­3. credit memos.  Supplier Data  The supplier data is made up of your list of suppliers and their address and bank information. where CUR is the currency of the payments and user­ref  is the reference given to the transfer by the user who started it. Sites are classified as Purchasing sites; RFQ Only sites; and. you can choose to transfer invoice. expense reports. Refunds are restricted to suppliers and employees; refunds  do not integrate with Oracle Receivables. and debit memos. Payables may also create distributions for discounts taken. These  suppliers are uniquely identified by a supplier number (which can contain characters and numbers) and are associated  with any number of supplier sites. most important for Payables. A site basically is an address from which the supplier conducts some or all of its  business. Refund transactions appear in the supplier  transaction history and are reflected in the supplier balance. .

 The defaults at site level are  used when you create a new invoice. Alternatively. and payments or payment reversals) that affect that supplier. you can enter your suppliers' bank account information in  the Banks window. the Accounts Payable Trial Balance Report shows the account balance separately and in −  −  +  . If you do not enable this option.  prepayments. The account is a record of all the transactions (such as invoices. which will show the  original.  you can continue to enter a single bank for each supplier or supplier site in the Suppliers and Supplier Sites windows. When you create an  electronic payment. The supplier accounts have  little to do with the accounts stored in Oracle General Ledger or the Accounting Flexfield.  The Supplier Account  Each supplier in the supplier database has an account. The supplier account balance is  calculated as follows:  Inv (invoices for this customer)  +  +  DM (debit memos)  CM (credit memos)  Pre (prepayments)  Pay (payments)  Refund (refunds)  Resulting Account Balance  You can view the supplier's account balance on paper by running the Invoice Aging Report. which can be submitted for a  single supplier. unchanged bank details. and then assign bank accounts to your suppliers and supplier sites. This arrangement might become confusing if you change the  supplier's bank details at supplier level and then pay an invoice for that supplier. the system will upload the bank details from the site level.  Caution  The defaults held at supplier level are used when you create a new site.Figure 5­3: The supplier master tables  If you enable the Use Multiple Supplier Banks Payables option. debit memos.

 The  payment distributions typically debit an expense (or asset) account and credit the cash or cash clearing account. and payment distributions are recorded in both your cash and your accrual set. the corresponding . During posting. if it is a fixed asset. When you apply the prepayment to an invoice. you cannot change your primary accounting method.  Combined You maintain one set of books for cash accounting and another for accrual accounting. where you will be required to  choose an expense (asset) and tax accounts for each invoice line. A snapshot of the supplier's account is available online from the Find Invoices window. they impact GL account balances only after you have run the  Payables transfer process and posted the resulting journal within Oracle General Ledger. You choose which  will be your primary set of books and which will be your secondary set of books. there is an explanation of how Oracle Financials assigns account codes to the various accounting  entries. Here are the journal lines that would be generated by a $20  prepayment:  Account  Liability  Prepayment  (asset)  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Defaulted from the supplier site; can be overwritten during invoice  entry. Invoices are entered in Oracle Payables either  through the Invoice Workbench window or through the Invoice Open interface (Imported).  Accounting Methods  When you set up Payables. if it is a fixed asset. The following sections describe the accounting entries that are generated for different transactions entered  in Payables.  Defaulted from the supplier site; otherwise entered during invoice  entry.  $20  Debit  Credit  $20  Invoices  An invoice increases the supplier's account balance by the invoice amount.  Accrual When you purchase an item. Payables creates distributions that debit your prepayment  account and credit the supplier's liability account. To make such  a change. ready to be imported into Oracle General Ledger. you recognize the expense (or. the increase in asset value)  when you receive an invoice from the supplier. you choose a primary and an optional secondary accounting method in the Payables Options  window. Invoice distributions are recorded in  your accrual set of books. The remainder of this chapter assumes that accrual basis accounting is  being used.  Accounting Entries for Payables Transactions  There are two main events in Payables that give rise to accounting transactions: entering an invoice and issuing payment. Once the invoice is completed. Choose the  Calculate Balance Owed button to see how much you owe a supplier and how many unpaid invoices you have in the  system for the supplier.total for all suppliers. creating expense reports. A prepayment  could be sent with the purchase order as a deposit for goods or services. The accounting method determines the number and nature of the journal entries Payables creates when  transactions are transferred to General Ledger. Be aware that although transactions in Oracle Payables update  the supplier's account within Payables immediately.  Prepayments  A prepayment is a payment of a certain amount before you have received an invoice from the supplier. There are three available accounting methods:  §  Cash When you purchase an item. You post  accounting distributions for both invoices and payments.  §  §  Accrual basis accounting is used most often. The invoice distributions generally debit an expense (or  asset) account and credit a liability account.  you reduce the amount due on the invoice. and processing prepayments also trigger accounting  transactions. For prepayments. In addition. you would have to define a new Accounts Payable organization and start over. You post only payments to General Ledger; not liability information for invoices. entries are created as journal lines and batches; then they are placed in the GL_INTERFACE  table.  Caution  Once you have posted transactions. At that point you also record a liability to pay the invoice.  Other activities such as adjusting invoices. the increase in asset value)  when you have paid for the item. you recognize the expense (or.

 Payments can be generated in a variety of  ways depending on the urgency of the situation and whether you want to computer generate the payment document or  initiate payment outside of the Financials system. this transaction  might not always take place.  Debit Memo Negative amount invoice created by you and sent to a supplier to notify the supplier of a credit you are  recording; usually sent with a note explaining the reason for the debit memo. or  expense. they are credit memos in his or her accounts. In broad terms. the net result of which is a liability to pay the supplier and a debit distribution to stock. Credit memos and debit memos both have the  same effect from an accounting point of view: They reduce the amount that you owe the supplier. fixed asset. Both credit memos and  debit memos are used to record a credit against an invoice for goods or services purchased. External debit memos are called credit memos because.  Although the distinction between these two types of transactions is a reasonable one. The available methods are summarized in Table 5­4. Reductions  to invoice amounts are distinguished according to their origin; either received from the supplier or created internally. Once entered to Oracle Payables. Because it is not required to use Oracle Purchasing with Payables.journal entries will be posted to General Ledger in the next GL transfer. Here is a comparison of sample entries that might be generated for a $47 credit memo and  a $47 debit memo:  Account  Liability  Expense or  asset  Tax  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Defaulted from the supplier site; can be overwritten during memo entry.  Can be defaulted from the purchase order; otherwise. entered during  invoice entry. there will be a liability for goods received related to the purchase as well. Credit and debit memos are  netted with the original invoice at payment time. resulting in a payment being issued for the reduced amount.  Debit  $47  $40  $7  Credit  Payments  A payment decreases the supplier's account balance by the payment amount. there is no  difference between credit memos and debit memos; both are processed in an identical fashion. Both transactions post a debit entry to the supplier's liability account and should perhaps be more correctly  called external debit memo and internal debit memo. The invoice will trigger accounting  transactions.  Entered during memo entry or defaulted from the invoice if the memo is  matched to an invoice during entry.  Credit Memos and Debit Memos  A memo decreases the supplier's account balance by the memo amount. whether you have used Oracle Purchasing to initiate the invoice.  §  §  Credit Memo Negative amount invoice created by a supplier and sent to you to notify you of a credit.  The nature of accounting transactions for an invoice depends on whether you have posted liability for goods received and.  Defaulted from the Tax Name setup; can be overwritten during invoice  entry.  $200  $35  Debit  Credit  $235  Note  There might be multiple expense (or asset) accounts on an invoice if the invoice contains  many invoice distributions.  Defaulted from the Tax Name setup; can be overwritten during invoice entry  or defaulted from the invoice if the memo is matched to an invoice during  entry. If the purchase order and receipt were processed in Oracle  Purchasing.  consequently. the terminology is counterintuitive  and confusing. and the liability for goods received  will be replaced by an invoiced liability. Here are the entries that would be created if an  invoice amount of $235 were entered:  Account  Liability  Expense or  Asset  Tax  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Defaulted from the supplier site; can be overwritten during invoice entry. . as far as  the supplier is concerned. their effect  is opposite that of an invoice. depending on the nature of the purchase.

 and it debits the liability account  associated with the invoice being paid. For instance. Here are sample journal entry lines  generated by a $235 payment:  Account  Liability  Bank cash account  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Taken from the invoices being paid. This interaction and sharing of information is what enables Oracle Applications to be a full .  Convenience. from the  Payment Workbench  Quick. the two liability accounts would  now be the same.  Derived from the bank associated with the chosen payment document. (In any real  situation. You can reclaim or recover tax based on a variable recovery rate. you  can reclaim only a proportion of the tax you paid. Paid invoices show a liability of zero.  Debit  $235  $235  Credit  Payments do not generate tax postings. Most payment information is entered for  you and you skip the invoice selection step needed in the  Payment Workbench. The invoice would now be paid and  there would no longer be a liability to that supplier.  Computer  Computer  Advantage  Mass payment of all suppliers who are owed money. record  the taxes for which you are liable. and ensure that you are recovering all allowable taxes.  Ability to make immediate payments when speed is  important.Table 5­4: Methods Available to Pay Invoices  Method Used to  Enter the Payment  Automatic. Therefore they credit liability and debit the bank cash account. when a large proportion of your own sales are tax exempt.  Derived from the bank associated with the chosen payment document. from the  Payment Workbench  Quick. force businesses to collect tax on the goods and services they provide  and then reclaim the tax they paid to produce those goods and services.  No matter how the payment is generated or entered into Oracle Payables. even when the supplier invoice carried VAT or Sales tax. For example.  Account  Liability  Bank cash account  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Taken from the invoice(s) being paid. such as Valued Added Tax in Europe. In some cases the tax paid is either not  recoverable or is only partially recoverable.  Debit  $235  $235  Credit  Recoverable Tax  Since Release 11i Oracle Payables can automatically account for recoverable and partially recoverable taxes. It credits bank cash or cash clearing. and the balance on this account in General Ledger would be zero. Tax  regimes. from the  Invoice Workbench  Method Used to Generate  the Payment  Computer  Check is handwritten or typed. Payables is integrated with several other Oracle modules to complete the flow of the procurement cycle and  prevent duplicate data entry.  or bank transfer is initiated by  wire. there would be other supplier liabilities posted to the same GL account and it would be unlikely that the account  would balance to zero.  Flexibility to record payments initiated and completed  outside of Financials. in a  payment batch  Manual. if the  preceding sample payment were based on the sample invoice entries described earlier. assuming that this were the only activity on this account.)  Refunds  Refunds are accounted for as negative payments. the postings it gives rise to when it is  transferred to General Ledger are the same.  Integration with Other Financials Modules  This chapter has already discussed Payables integration with Oracle General Ledger and Oracle Cash Management in  detail.

  For example. the standard approach is to generate  the payment stream in another system; then load the Invoice interface table with appropriate distributions. you will need to do so in two separate screens. There  is no duplication of data; any changes made to the supplier details in one module are immediately available for use in the  other module. they  also purchase goods or services from you) are considered both suppliers and customers. The information they enter  online is entered directly into the AP_EXPENSE_REPORT_HEADERS and AP_EXPENSE REPORT_LINES tables. The customer entity is managed through Oracle Receivables and has  almost no exposure to the supplier entity.  Integration with Oracle Purchasing  Payables shares supplier information with Oracle Purchasing.  Integration with Oracle Self­Service Web Applications  The Self­Service Applications allow users to view and update data from a Web browser.  Although it has no logic to compute them. adjust. and other companies pass along  some of the costs of providing service. Oracle  Projects also can be used to pass charges from suppliers through to customers. Data and processes flow into payables from other modules;  then back out of payables into still other modules. are easier to handle.  A Customer/Supplier Netting Report is provided. Payables can discharge payment obligations for amortized loans. The two modules completely share the  database tables PO_VENDORS and PO_VENDOR_SITES. Payables creates  invoice distributions using the purchase order distribution accounting information.  Workflow ensures that these expense reports are approved and routed according to the business rules that you define. with an unchanging distribution. You can enter a supplier in either application and use that  information to create purchase orders in Purchasing and invoices in Payables. Payables will accept and store future transactions. captures the . Web Suppliers gives your trading partners controlled access to review the status of Payables information  within your database.  Integration with Oracle Assets  If you enable the Track as Asset check box in the Invoice Workbench or the Invoice Gateway. The asset value and date placed in service  are derived from the invoice information. audit. Oracle Projects identifies recoverable expenses at purchasing time. The  distribution must be charged to a GL asset­type account and assigned to an asset category; by doing so you can create  assets in Oracle Assets from the invoice distribution information in Payables.  Integration with Oracle Projects  Project­related information can be entered in payables during invoice entry at the header or distribution level.  Lease payments. you can set up Payables to require a justification for specific expense types (for example. you can match Payables invoices to one or more  purchase order shipments or purchase order distributions. The number of units comes from the purchase order.working application instead of several standalone modules. The Applications often simplify  these processes; for instance.  You also can use Payables to review.  Self­Service Expenses enables employees to do their own data entry for expense reports. entertainment). but exact naming. currency. Application security enables you to control access based on  supplier or supplier site. When you do this during invoice entry. and tax codes must exist for both the  customer and supplier side before Oracle considers them to be the same trading partner.  Once you have created and approved purchase orders in Purchasing. When you  must account separately for the principal and interest elements of loan payments. Many companies are explicitly in the consignments or brokerage businesses. in the case of Web Suppliers your trading partners actually will become users of the  application. a process that is a recurring task in  business. If information regarding this type of trading partner needs updating in Oracle  Financials.  known as recurring invoices. This often is not the case. including invoices and payments. In the Oracle Applications these  are treated as two completely separate entities. Payables transfers this  invoice line distribution to Oracle Assets when you submit the Create Mass Additions for Oracle Assets Program.  Integration with Oracle Receivables  Trading partners who have a reciprocal relationship with you (meaning that along with selling you goods or services. so  this process is usually handled manually or through custom development. to enter into the payment cycle as they are due. and approve expense reports. although Purchasing is the actual owner of the tables.

 Export the lease payment information from Property Manager by using the Export Payments to Payables  window in Property Manager. Here you can  record the data associated with the movement of goods that is needed. depending on your business needs.  Instead. generate an invoice for the amount due. It has extensive logic for applying markups. and payments—the data that makes up  the supplier's account. straightforward customization that will work with any release of the products.  insurance. The transaction tables fall  into two groups: the Invoice Group. A common approach for paying the taxes is to set up the taxing  entity as a supplier.  Figure 5­4 depicts the main Payables transaction tables and their relationships to one another. which corresponds to payments raised either through the Payment Workbench or by an automatic payment run.  Other Integration  There are additional processes that can conceivably be integrated with Payables. such as those used to compute corporate income taxes. You then can write a script to populate the interface tables  for import by Receivables' AutoInvoice process.payment transaction. Other systems. generally current need is not compelling. and thereby create sales invoices for each re­chargeable expense. retirement. which stores all the data entered through the Invoice Workbench and the Payment  Group. and usually it is not worth the effort of installing it simply to rebill recoverable expenses.  Oracle Fixed Assets computes the obligation for property taxes. adjustments. . you can institute a simple. Oracle Projects is a major system unto  itself. Reference data refers to supplier information. This loads the invoice information into the Oracle Payables Open Interface. such as the order number.  These processes can be incorporated into future releases of Payables; however. and passes the expenses on to Receivables. Transaction data refers to invoices.  The Oracle Payables Data Model  Oracle Payables maintains data in a large number of tables. The purpose of this section is to describe the transaction tables and how the accounting data is stored and  processed. and other outside payees. The data can be categorized as either reference or  transaction data.  usually present the payment obligation in report format.  Oracle Inventory Integration  From the Payables Invoices window you can access the Oracle Inventory Movement Statistics window.  Oracle Property Manager Integration  The Payables Open Interface Import program is used to import approved scheduled lease payments from Oracle Property  Manager. To import this  information into Payables and create Payables invoices. You can  structure a Descriptive Flexfield (DFF) to capture the customer data. and static  information. a large number of lookup codes. and presenting such charges on an invoice.  Transaction volumes typically are small enough that they can easily be processed manually. use the Source of Oracle Property Manager when you submit the  Open Interface Invoice Program. and let Payables generate the check. as you process either a  purchase order in Purchasing or a supplier invoice in Payables. accruing  and grouping recoverable expenses. Oracle Payroll withholds money for income tax. credit memos.

  Technical Overview of the Automatic Payment Process  The payment process described earlier has five stages: Select. and two account code  combination IDs. It keeps track of each  payment batch by updating AP_INV_SELECTION_CRITERIA. . either Preliminary or Final. Two  important concurrent processes underlie these steps: the standard Build Payments program and a Formatting program. the ACCOUNTING_DATE. to FORMATTED (after the format program has  generated the payment documents or checks). and the AMOUNT and CHECK_DATE. Modify. The invoice lines.  Oracle Payables handles the first four stages of the payment process. There is one row  per document; the table stores information about the supplier who received the payment (VENDOR_ID. as diagrammed in Figure 5­5. and finally to CONFIRMED.  The AP_CHECKS table holds payment documents.  there is a one­to­one relationship between AP_INVOICE_PAYMENTS and AP_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES. credit memo.  and so on). or wire transfers. Format & Print.  AP_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES holds one row per invoice unless the invoice is due to be paid in installments. Confirm. Each installment is characterized by a due date and an amount. Once a scheduled payment has been made. including checks. VENDOR_NAME. depending on the stage in the cycle.Figure 5­4:  The main Payables transaction tables  AP_INVOICES stores invoice header information; it has one row per invoice. including tax lines if there are  any. These are the asset account related to the bank account on which the payment is drawn and the  accounts payable liability account of the invoice that is being paid. and Deliver. The Build Payments program generates the  Payment Register report. in which  case there will be one row per installment. the bank account that was drawn on (BANK_ACCOUNT_ID). and its behavior at each stage is different. or debit memo. As you would  expect. The status lifecycle progresses from NEW through  BUILT (after the Build Payments program has built the payment batch). EFT payments. AP_INVOICES carries the VENDOR_ID and invoice AMOUNT.  The Build Payments program is called several times during the cycle. If you need to account for a payment that is less than the total amount.  The AP_INVOICE_PAYMENTS table holds a permanent record of all payment documents that have been issued to pay  invoices and invoice installments. you must create  additional invoice installments in the AP_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES table. The  AP_INVOICE_PAYMENTS table holds the AMOUNT of the payment.status. Each distribution carries an amount and an account code combination ID. are in AP_INVOICE_DISTRIBUTIONS.

 the build process ensures that the maximum  number of invoices that can appear on the remittance advice area of the check is not exceeded. (These are inserted into AP_SELECTED_INVOICES. .  The processing logic to assign document numbers determines whether you have specified one document per invoice.  During a check run.Figure 5­5: The automatic payment process in Oracle Payables  Select You initiate each step from the Payment Batch Actions window. The Build program is submitted in order to build the payment batch. The final check for each  supplier carries the full amount of the payment.)  §  Generating the Preliminary Payment Register report. the  BATCH_NAME is entered into the AP_INV_SELECTION_CRITERIA table.  §  Allocating document numbers to each selected invoice. if a single check is issued to pay multiple invoices. If the remittance advice  area is full. Building means  the following:  §  Selecting the invoices and invoice installments for payment. the check is voided and the excess invoice details are printed on the next check. along with the selection criteria you specify  and the payment limits for the batch. When you create a payment batch.)  §  Calculating how many documents are needed. (Document information is inserted into  AP_SELECTED_INVOICE_CHECKS.

 The forms that allow you to view and update accounting events are built on these tables. and debit memos. It updates each transferred transaction as transferred and  submits the GL Journal Import process. . For each new  transaction. AP_SELECTED_INVOICE_CHECKS carries both the bank account code combination and the accounts  payable liability account code combination. A batch can  be CANCELLED at any stage up to CONFIRMED. the Standard build program is resubmitted to reallocate document  numbers. Each program will format checks to be printed or generate an EFT text file containing the payment  information.1824). even though the two can be submitted together. global. Oracle Payables calls the program associated with the  payment format you have chosen. For  payments. Oracle can accommodate all the  major international standards for both check layouts and EFT formats. a currency. AP_AE_HEADERS_ALL and  AP_AE_LINES_ALL. This step is very important because it generates  the document and invoice payment records.  The APACCENG program searches the AP_INVOICES. and updates the payment  history of invoices paid in a payment batch. It is the last link in the supply chain. In accounting terms.  Technical Overview of General Ledger Interface  Transaction records that give rise to accounting events will record the essentials of the financial information. The formatting program takes invoice and check  information from AP_SELECTED_INVOICES and AP_SELECTED_INVOICE_CHECKS. you cannot close a period or  use the same payment document for any other payments until you confirm the payment batch. The  GL_TRANSFER_FLAG in the AP_AE_HEADERS_ALL table indicates whether the accounting event has been transferred  to GL Possible values for GL_TRANSFER_FLAG are Y (has been transferred). and E  (indicates that an error was encountered during the transfer to GL process). N (has not been transferred). the two  relevant tables are AP_INVOICES and AP_INVOICE_DISTRIBUTIONS. For invoices. the total supplier liability is  held in AP_INVOICES; and the expense. respectively. or add an invoice that Payables did not  originally select. supplier­customer model to an open. As both of these trends strengthen.  Confirm Confirmation is the last step performed within Oracle Payables. you can optionally modify the payment batch.  The two programs APACCENG (Payables Create Accounting—a PL/SQL stored procedure) and APGLTRANS (Payables  Transfer to General Ledger) are required to post transaction. which later are posted to Oracle General Ledger. Two trends in commerce are making payables even more central to a business: The growing  dominance of supply­chain management in manufacturing industries and the gradual shift of commerce away from a  static. Oracle delivers several payment format programs with Oracle Payables; you can also  write your own. After the batch has been modified.  Conclusion  The payables system is responsible for the payment of trade creditors. prevent payment of a particular invoice. asset.  AP_SELECTED_INVOICE_CHECKS tables for new rows that have not yet been accounted for. change the invoice amount. credit memos.  The output file is stored in the Payables output directory. OSBORNE. Its name is created by appending a period and the Concurrent  Manager request number to your Application Object Library user ID (for example. It takes invoice  and document information from AP_SELECTED_INVOICES and AP_SELECTED_INVOICE_CHECKS and inserts  confirmed documents and invoice payments into AP_CHECKS and AP_INVOICE_PAYMENTS.  The APGLTRANS program searches the accounting event tables for headers and lines that have not been transferred  and creates journal entry lines in the GL_INTERFACE table. in which trade is initiated on the Web and  conducted by electronic commerce. a date. You can prevent payment to a  supplier.  The Confirm program is submitted from the Payment Batch Actions window to confirm a payment batch.Modify At any time before formatting. Oracle Payables will prove an invaluable core  application. AP_INVOICE_DISTRIBUTIONS.  an amount. If you have any unconfirmed payment batches. You can choose from many check layouts and several bank file formats. or tax distributions are found in AP_INVOICE_DISTRIBUTIONS. and a corresponding code combination ID. This used to be done by the single program APPOST. networked economy. accounting events are inserted into AP_ACCONTING_EVENT_ALL.  Improvements in the visibility of accounting data introduced in Release 11i have necessitated dividing this single process  into two. The  importance of an effective payables system derives from its key position both in traditional cost control and in  management accounting.  Format & Print When you format your payment documents.

 Effective customer management is achieved through its sophisticated data  model.Chapter 6: Oracle Receivables  Oracle Receivables is a full­function accounts receivable system that allows you to manage your customer base and  invoice and payment processes effectively. After the  order has been satisfied. and Customer Service—its open design supports non­Oracle systems and  customer extensions within the Oracle product line. online memo pad for tracking customer interactions.  Powerful cash application tools and strong invoicing controls allow accurate processing of high transaction volumes with  minimal manual data entry. Projects. user­defined correspondence. The Oracle Receivables workflow is shown schematically in Figure 6­1. In addition to supporting every Oracle module that generates customer payment obligations—  notably Order Management. . They also review established customers' credit in the process of accepting new orders. the receivables function includes invoicing customers for sales and following up to ensure  prompt payment.  Oracle Receivables and Your AR Business Processes  Most companies' policy is to take on new customers only after their accounts receivable department completes a  satisfactory credit check. and comprehensive reports.

Figure 6­1: An overview of the Oracle Receivables workflow .

 Access is  available to anyone with a Web browser and the appropriate security details. It shows all open transactions.  however. vary  depending on whether the customer is an organization or a person. In fact. AR_SITES. A partial payment will reduce the amount owed. The financial health of a company depends on  keeping track of its customers and ensuring prompt collection of the money owed. customers are associated with any number of site addresses. . and they may agree with established customers to rely  exclusively on electronic documents. The Oracle Receivables customer repository can hold and share an extensive  range of customer data. It may also show  payments made within the period. By this  technique.  Creating and Managing the Customer Database  Accurate and up­to­date customer information is essential to many aspects of running a business: marketing. sales. as detailed in Chapter 11. the terminology and structure of  the customer model visible to a Receivables user is unchanged from prior releases.  most companies retain the ability to produce all three document types in a paper format.  The customer can choose to pay the invoice in a variety of ways: by check or bank transfer. The process usually begins with a telephone contact. You can designate contacts for each function. Oracle's sophisticated data model. and collections. finance charges may be applied and the account can be referred to a debt collection agency or the  company's legal department. or bill of  exchange. such as marketing. Each site can be designated for one or more functions. and  customer services as well as receivables. Invoiced sales create a receivable in the balance sheet  (General Ledger). and the customer information you enter. many now send invoices by EDI.  §  A statement is a summary of the transactions over a period of time. because they are legal documents. overhauled in 11i to support the needs of CRM. It states the obligation and provides details. and review their current account balance. The overall customer data scheme is shown in Figure  6­2.  Receivables produces three legal documents to notify customers of their obligations:  §  An invoice is usually sent shortly after a sale has been made. When payment is received from the customer.  In Receivables.  §  A dunning notice informs the customer of past­due obligations. and so on) have been recast as views based on the underlying HZ_ tables. The amount  owed by each customer can be seen on the Aging Report and Account Detail screen.  invoicing. Also. dispute bills they don't agree with. which represents the money due to the company. Companies need to balance the risk of  losing customers against the risk of being unable to collect debt. All transactions accessible via iReceivables  are protected by Oracle's standard application security as well as user authentication and the ability to define and limit  user access. However.  iReceivables  Using iReceivables customers get immediate secure access to their account details over the Internet. and as a last resort. shipping. Backward compatibility of the new customer model (characterized in the  database by tables having the prefix "HZ_") is achieved with views in Receivables. In the interests of efficiency. if the  debt remains overdue. you apply the cash to the customer account. Statements of a customer's account can be sent out periodically. There is a Customer Type attribute that can be  either "organization" or "person. fax. but not to zero. The Oracle Receivables customer  tables (AR_CUSTOMERS.Companies sell their products either for cash (immediate payment in the form of a check. credit card. or notes and coins)  or as invoiced sales on credit with specific payment terms. The description that follows of the  customer model is as customer data appears to a user." The customer searches you perform. They can print  copies of invoices or credit memos. direct debit. reducing the  amount owed and generating journals in GL. Developers need to bear in mind that the underlying table  structures are different. the program code in Receivables has been isolated from any changes.  Company policy establishes the steps to take when customers do not pay on time.  Companies can choose not to use both statements and dunning notices.  followed by dunning letters. and each address can have a list of contact  names and telephone numbers. handles the  many forms in which a company can relate to its customers. or e­mail. Oracle Receivables now  uses only a simplified view of the total schema.

 including credit rating. The customer profile is an essential concept  in Receivables. and a  specific customer may not necessarily fit exactly into any one of the profile classes that you have set up. whether statements or dunning letters are sent. payment terms. You can alter the  characteristics of a particular customer's profile without modifying the profile for all the customers in the same profile  class. each is given a customer profile. Default data values are taken from the profile during data entry. whether finance charges are calculated on  overdue invoices. A profile class reflects several  characteristics of each customer.Figure 6­2: Customer data  As customers are entered into the system. it is clear that each customer is unique.  While you should maintain a small. When you make a change to a customer's profile and save your changes. and many of Receivables' reports use  customer profiles as a selection parameter. known as profile classes.  Customer Profiles  Customer profiles let you categorize customers into groups. manageable number of profile classes. the system asks you whether you want to . and the customer's credit limit.

 receipts. province. or area code.  The Customer Account  Oracle Receivables enables you to find customer information using the customer name or various other criteria. which is completely  flexible. postal code. country. Using the  Find Customers window. but not a mix of both. state. county. Each customer in the customer database has an account. Although it is not enforced by the structure of Oracle Receivables. and so forth—that affect that particular  customer. or you can view it online with  the Account Details window. as shown in Figure 6­3.  Figure 6­3: The online Account Details window . it makes organizational sense to establish a policy of tracking customer profiles at customer level or customer bill­  to address level.apply the change to only this customer's profile. Because the credit limit is  defined in the profile. or to all customers in the profile  class who have not had their profile individually modified. to all customers in the same profile class.  The customer account in Oracle Receivables is not the same as the financial accounts stored in Oracle General Ledger. you can look up a customer on the basis of a phone number or view all customers within a given  city. it can make a significant difference whether you monitor credit compliance at customer level or  customer bill­to address level. The account balance is calculated as follows:  Inv (invoices for this customer)  +  +  −  −  −  DM (debit memos)  Adj (positive adjustments)  CM (credit memos)  Rec (receipts)  Adj (negative adjustments)  Resulting Account Balance  You can view the customer account on paper by running a statement or the Aging Report.  The customer account is a record of all the transactions—invoices.  Customer profiles can be assigned at either customer level or customer bill­to address level.

 Paid invoices and their corresponding receipts are of no long­term interest in Receivables and disappear from the  Aging Reports. systems  integrator. Some have centralized accounts payable and offer one invoice address irrespective of the delivery  address.  Defaulted from the transaction type; can be overwritten during invoice  Debit  125  100  15  10 Credit  . such as the freightforwarder. or in­country agent for an overseas shipment. One typical  use would be to carry additional addresses for shipping information. and certain customers may demand that you quote the purchase order number on their sales  invoice.  a company's invoice must state the company name. Credit control.Transactions in Receivables have an impact both on the customer account and on the financial accounts in General  Ledger. customs agent. Over  time the customer's account evolves as new invoices are raised. are entered against a customer account. Here are the accounting entries that would be created for a sample  invoice amount of $125:  Account  Receivables  Revenue  Tax  Freight  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Defaulted from the transaction type; can be overwritten during invoice  entry. Law dictates that certain data must appear on invoices—in the United Kingdom. such as invoices. An invoice increases the  customer's account balance by the invoice amount. and revenue and tax accounts for each invoice line. The standard printed invoice. have no  effect on the customer's balance but do alter financial account balances in the GL. for delivery at several other locations. is commonly  customized to alter the format and layout. or  they are imported through the AutoInvoice open interface.  Defaulted from the specified tax rate; can be overwritten during invoice  entry. A customer could be ordering goods or services  from many different offices. Customers can ask for the invoice to be sent to any  address they choose. the  receivables account and freight account. Oracle Receivables provides.  Transactions  Transactions.  Invoices are entered in Oracle Receivables through the Transactions window or the Transactions Summary window.  revenue. which may include tax and  freight charges. credit memos. statements. tax. and cash balances. each transaction will be posted to General Ledger and will have contributed to the receivables. while others want invoices sent to the relevant local administrative office. while containing all the pertinent data.  Invoices  Each invoice lists what the customer has received and explains how the total invoice amount. There is no straightforward connection between the effect of a transaction on the customer account and on the  postings to financial accounts. However. its registration number. credits and receipts are applied and adjustments are  made. receipts and adjustments. Tax requirements  have to be observed. Some transactions.  Business Purposes  Business Purposes identify the role played by each of the customer sites.  §  §  §  §  §  Bill­to Address to which invoices are sent  Ship­to Address to which goods or services are delivered  Statement Address to which statements and dunning letters are sent  Marketing Address to which marketing materials are sent  Dunning The address to which reminder letters are sent  Receivables offers the flexibility to define additional Business Purposes to assign your customer addresses. among  others. has been calculated. the following predefined Business Purposes. and its registered address. like the application of an on­account receipt to an invoice. You must provide the customer number and bill­to address.  Defaulted from the item; can be overwritten during invoice entry. and dunning  letters can all be produced at either customer level or customer bill­to address level.

 Both types of tax can be set up so that specific items or customers are exempt. Any VAT paid on a vendor invoice is referred to as input tax. and you can enter sales credit  information to compensate the salesperson.  Single Copy. You have a choice of letting Receivables compute taxes or importing tax lines through the  AutoInvoice import function. irrespective of whether the customer has paid the invoice or not. All of the  dates for the copied invoices (for example.  Debit  Credit  Tip  You can use batch controls to ensure accurate data entry.  You may specify any one of the following copy rules: Annually. monthly or quarterly. an invoice from a hardware reseller for a PC server and  installation shows two separate lines on the invoice. Bimonthly.  Value Added Tax  VAT is imposed on the value added to goods or services at each stage of their supply. Though Oracle Receivables includes logic to compute taxes. set up Receivables for sales tax and define VAT  rates. a maintenance contract. or Days. and then pay  the tax to the local fiscal authority. There is a provision to reclaim VAT if the customer persists in not paying and  the debt is written off. Monthly. Order Management shares the Receivables tax tables. Thailand and Singapore). you may well end up paying the VAT to the tax authority before you have  collected the money from your customer. VAT is a fixed percentage rate and is primarily used in the European  Union and parts of Asia (for example.  Tax Considerations  Tax is relevant in Oracle Receivables as companies must bill their customers tax on sales. Semiannually. The PC sale and the installation service are posted to different  revenue accounts. while sales tax is levied in the United States and is based  on the location of the customer. so once the setup has been performed  you cannot calculate and process the other tax type.  An invoice often has multiple revenue account lines. The VAT charged on a customer  invoice is referred to as output tax; it is calculated by multiplying the value of the goods or services by the appropriate tax  rates. The two methods of tax calculation are not interchangeable.  Oracle Receivables also provides a flexible tax defaulting hierarchy that you can define at the system options level. You can set up Receivables to use one of two basic types of tax: value added tax  (VAT) or sales tax. or lease repayments once a quarter for three years. The amount due each period.Account  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  entry. based on the number of days you specify. It has the capability to display taxes  in customer quotes and orders. For example. Then choose the appropriate VAT rates when you enter invoice lines.  but you do not want to manually create a new invoice every time. The  Days rule creates invoices at a fixed interval of days. Such sales have a short­term negative impact on your cash flow; you pay the  government before the customer pays you. This  hierarchy determines the order in which Receivables derives a default tax rate when you manually enter transactions or  import them using AutoInvoice.  Recurring Invoices  Recurring invoices are useful for situations where you regularly deliver the same goods or services to a customer. You can quickly create a group of invoices that share  the same characteristics using either the Transactions Summary window or the Copy Transactions window. Depending  on the payment terms you offer your customers. Quarterly. the calculation may be  performed in other packages.  Tip  If you need to process both sales tax and value added tax. is  calculated as follows:  §  Amount Due = Total Output Tax − Total Input Tax  VAT becomes due when the sale is invoiced. Weekly. . GL date.  The Single Copy rule creates one copy of your model invoice for the day you enter in the First Invoice Date field. You  might need to bill for insurance premiums. transaction date. and due dates) are determined using a copy rule. collect the tax.

 receivables. In  the U. This extension lets you perform complex tax calculations while retaining the full power of Receivables to  create and store all other tax data. freight. However. while children's clothing and heating fuel are low­rated. This liability should be entered manually in Payables. The rate is based on the type of goods sold. and sales tax rates (AR). Elsewhere in the applications.  Revenue Recognition  Accounts receivable is designed to be the single source of revenue transactions for the General Ledger. Sales Tax Report.  VAT rates vary from country to country. and Oracle General Ledger following  country­specific rules that you define. zero­rated  and low­rated. companies  that do business on a national basis usually find it well worth the price to subscribe to a service such as Vertex to obtain  automatic updates. You use the Tax  Codes and Rates window to define appropriate tax codes and rates. The wisest policy for companies is to debit advance payments to a  separate account.  The assignments must be accurate for the financial reports to be meaningful. for instance.  Receivables may be set up with an aggressive revenue recognition policy—billing orders as they are accepted and  accruing revenue upon billing—or it may be set up with a conservative policy of not recognizing revenue until the money is  in hand. and each country has exceptions for exempted sales—for example. you can use the Sales Tax Rate interface (described later in this chapter). payroll tax rates (HR/payroll). the process of keeping it populated with accurate data is  truly onerous.  Sales Tax  Sales tax is based on the location of the customer receiving your goods or services. Some businesses call for even greater restraint.  Taxware and Vertex Integration A tax vendor extension integrates external tax calculation programs with Oracle  Applications. to specify the information to include in your report and print it in a suitable format. The tax information service should be one of the Superusers' earliest considerations. The calculation of sales tax is based  on the state.K.  Oracle Receivables provides a flexible tax defaulting hierarchy that you define at the system options level.  Oracle provides a full schema for tax rate structures. for example. to be journaled into earnings at the time services are actually delivered. one Payables invoice is created monthly or quarterly. keying a multisegment Accounting  Flexfield for every transaction would be incredibly time­consuming. Account .  sales compensation. provides a single tax  reporting solution to satisfy complex global tax requirements on sales and purchases by summarizing tax information from  these applications and storing it in an interface table. U.S. such as Oracle's Report  Exchange (RXi). the liability to pay the tax to the  fiscal authority is not created in the Oracle Payables module. This hierarchy  determines the order in which Receivables will derive a default tax rate when you manually enter transactions or import  them using AutoInvoice. and you can compile periodic  sales tax returns using the U. Groceries. and city components of the customers' addresses and the tax rates assigned to each of these  components. a new feature in Release 11i. It is not a secondary matter. with low rates frequently targeted to support social ends. and to encourage the use of  natural gas. Oracle Payables. that is.. Receivables uses AutoAccounting. the state of Maryland exempts gas appliances from sales tax. Universities collect tuition in advance of delivering instruction.  Alternatively. However. You can override any tax rate through customer and product exemptions.S. It involves all kinds of taxing jurisdictions: states. but in a more flexible and generic way. You can then use a reporting tool. AutoAccounting and Account Generator are not interchangeable. a mechanism for  generating default Accounting Flexfields—for revenue. These vendors usually provide scripts to automatically post their data to the Oracle tables. books are zero­rated.  and a landlord may collect rents well in advance.Whereas Oracle Receivables provides standard reports showing the total tax charged. A single set of numbers—amounts actually invoiced and received—drives the General Ledger.  Tax Reporting Ledger  Taxable transactions are accounted for in Oracle Receivables. Many jurisdictions have different sales tax rates for different types of  goods as well. county. and special jurisdictions. sales analysis. It  typically takes about three months to select a vendor and install the software. a task  that is normally done at fixed intervals. The Tax Reporting Ledger.  Automatic Account Generation  Assigning Accounting Flexfield combinations to financial transactions is a major function of all the Financials packages. cities. Account Generator performs exactly the same  role. are often taxed lower than other consumer goods. Usually it is best to use a single service for  property tax rates (fixed assets). and tax—based on other parameters  associated with the invoice you are entering. counties. and marketing compensation. It simplifies the  accounting.

  if you want the natural account for revenue to default from the Standard Line. AutoAccounting can be directed to look up values in any of the following tables:  §  Salesrep  §  Transaction Types  §  Standard Lines  §  Taxes  §  Customer Bill­to­site  Here are some examples of standard AutoAccounting table assignments:  Account to Be Generated  Receivables  Revenue  Freight  Tax  Table  Transaction Types  Standard Lines  Transaction Types  Taxes  Remember that each segment of each account can be generated according to a different rule. for example. In the second situation we would define a "Line of Business" segment in the Accounting Flexfield. and the balancing segment of your finance  charges account is 10. but for the isolated task of assigning the correct balancing segment value  for finance charges and realized exchange gain­and­loss accounts. For example. your customization will probably include removing . and unearned revenue accounts. In the first case. but you want the cost center to be derived  from the Salesrep.  In addition. you indicate whether to use a constant value for each of the account segments or to  look up the value from another table.  While setting up AutoAccounting.  Derivation of the accounting information from the customer's bill­to site is a new feature of AutoAccounting introduced in  Release 11i. on­account. unbilled receivable. and so forth. or Account Generator for that matter. This is useful. The  finance charge account and the exchange rate gain­and­loss accounts are set up only once. Since the standard report  already prints nearly all data that is relevant for these transactions. You cannot use AutoAccounting. and instruct  AutoAccounting to use the customer bill­to­site for the derivation of the Sales Region segment in the Revenue Accounting  Flexfield combination.Generator cannot be used in place of AutoAccounting in Receivables to generate default accounts for revenue. You will likely need to alter the layout to fit your organization's specific needs.  Printing Transactions  The following three programs are provided as standard for printing Accounts Receivable transactions:  §  §  §  §  RAXINV_SEL Prints selected invoices. as no single invoice layout would satisfy all companies that use Oracle  E­Business Suite. freight. and the less  frequently used AutoInvoice clearing.  The Account Generator is used in Receivables. if you assess finance charges for an  invoice that has a receivables account with a company segment value of 20. allocate appropriate region codes to the default revenue accounts in the customer bill­to­site setup. freight.  so it is not possible to set up different accounts for each company that is handled within one installation of Receivables. then Account Generator sets the balancing segment of the finance charges account to 20. tax. to  generate accounts used during receipt entry. in the System Options form.  receivables. based on parameters you enter  RAXINV_NEW Prints all transactions that have not been printed previously  RAXINV_BATCH Prints a batch of invoices  RAXINV_ADJ Prints transaction adjustments  The standard layout is intended to be a template. receivables.  Limitations of AutoAccounting  AutoAccounting is limited to deriving the Accounting Flexfield values for revenue. Oftentimes a company accounts for revenue based on the geographic location of its customers. and tax. such as unapplied receipt. or it uses  lines of business to segment customers. These are all the accounts  required during invoice or debit memo entry. we would set up a "Sales Region" segment in the Accounting  Flexfield. AutoAccounting can create accounts based on the warehouse and inventory item you specify when you enter  transaction lines. unidentified.

 such as transaction class. . when the freight cost has been left off of an original invoice because it was not known at the time of  the earlier billing.  Tip  If possible. A debit memo would be  handy.  A credit memo is also a legal document that you need to send to the customer. transaction type.  Tip  Developers should use the Transaction Printing Views rather than the Receivables base tables because  changes in the underlying tables structures from one release to the next will be hidden in the views; the views  join complex data structures correctly—reducing the debug and testing time.  AR_INVOICE_ADJ_V Retrieves the details for an adjustment.  AR_INVOICE_LINES_V Retrieves the line items of each transaction.  The programmer filters the pertinent information by entering parameters in the WHERE clause for each SQL statement in  their custom report. That way you can assure that the proper GL accounts will be hit.elements you don't wish to print and changing the layout. RAXINV_NEW.  AR_INVOICE_TOTALS_V Retrieves the total amounts for all lines and associated charges for a transaction (for  example. The Transaction Printing Views select all Receivables transaction information from the database.  A debit memo is a legal document that you send to the customer.  AR_INVOICE_COMMITMENT_INFO_V Retrieves commitment information.  The Receivables Print Invoices programs (RAXINV_SEL.  AR_INVOICE_INSTALLMENTS_V Retrieves installment information for transactions with multiple installments.  AR_INVOICE_TAX_SUMMARY_V Retrieves tax summary information. Your invoices look smarter. Be sure to use a programmer experienced with Oracle Reports. it is important to tie the CM back to the  original invoice.  §  §  §  §  §  §  §  §  AR_INVOICE_HEADER_V Retrieves the transaction header information.  Transaction Printing Views  For more refined control over which transactions to print and the format and layout. freight. and it must comply with the same legal and tax  requirements that are relevant for an invoice.  Credit Memos  A credit memo (CM) is used to alert a customer to a reduction in charges related to a previously invoiced sale. lines. A debit memo increases the customer's  account balance by the debit memo amount and is used to bill a customer for additional charges in relation to a previously  invoiced sale. Whenever possible. and tax). transactions assigned to  split payment terms).  as the data model and functioning of the software is quite extensive. You create a credit memo when a discount is given at the end of a quarter for customers who  have bought in excess of a discount threshold. and RAXINV_BATCH) print selected  transactions based on parameters that you specify at runtime. An on­  account credit memo is a reduction in charges that is not tied to a specific previous invoice. however. and you will maintain a better audit trail.  Debit Memos  Oracle Receivables handles debit memos (DM) the same way it handles invoices. and program the invoice print program to print your  company logo and the invoice boilerplate text with a TrueType laser printer. use the bitmapped version of Oracle Reports. and  the programmer will avoid the time­consuming problem of lining up printed text on preprinted stationery. you should build your own print  program (using any SQL­compliant reporting tool) to assemble the data using the transaction printing views provided in  Oracle Receivables and format it as required. There is a whole range of situations where such additional billing is necessary.  AR_INVOICE_COUNT_TERMS_V Retrieves the number of terms for a transaction (that is. for example. or a range of  transaction numbers. There are many situations in  which this is necessary.

  Applied Receipts  An applied receipt decreases the customer's account balance by the applied amount.00  1.  Enter Receipt Actions  Oracle Receivables provides a powerful feature that lets you create item­level actions while you enter and apply your  receipts. or it is  imported through the AutoLockbox interface. Such receipts are referred to as on­account or  unapplied.  Defaulted from the tax rate; can be overwritten during CM entry. a continued effort  is made to find the customer and record this in the system. Lastly. the receipt is entered and applied to the  customer's account. and apply receipts to credit memos and  on­account credits to reduce the customer's balance. These are known as unidentified receipts. but not to specific transactions in the account.50  Here are the accounting entries that would be created for a sample on­account credit memo of the same amount:  Account  Receivables  Revenue  Tax  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Defaulted from the transaction type; can be overwritten during CM entry.00  1.50  Receipts  Credit cards.50  Debit  Credit  11. The acid test that all receipts have been correctly accounted for is the bank  reconciliation. The ideal situation occurs when the  customer clearly identifies the invoice or invoices being paid. Here are the journal entries that  would be generated by a sample on­account receipt for $125: . A receipt is entered via the Receipts Workbench or the Receipts Summary window.50  Debit  Credit  11.50 were applied to an invoice. These receipts are called applied receipts. When it is not possible to  establish the invoice numbers. direct debits and all other forms of payment received from a customer are  collectively called receipts.  Same tax account(s) as the related invoice. and then the receipts are applied to those transactions. Here are the journal entries that  would be generated by a sample applied receipt for $125:  Account  Cash or Bank Asset  account  Receivables  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Taken from the payment method; cannot be overwritten during  entry.A credit memo decreases the customer's account balance by the credit memo amount.  Defaulted from the item; can be overwritten during CM entry. On­account receipts are also researched to determine which  invoices the customer had intended to pay.  10. With item­level actions you can create adjustments.  Accounting for receipts depends on the extent to which the receipts can be identified. issue chargebacks. Here are the accounting entries  that would be created if a sample credit memo of $11. but it is clear which customer has sent the money. and no further research is necessary. in terms of both number and  value. Such receipts are entered and applied to the respective  invoices. The quantity. bank transfers. of unidentified and on­account receipts should be kept to a minimum. With unidentified receipts. if it is not possible to determine which customer made the payment. checks.  Same revenue account(s) as the related invoice.  Account  Receivables  Revenue  Tax  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Same receivables account as the related invoice.  The receivables account(s) of the applied invoice(s).  10.  Debit  125  125  Credit  On­Account or Unapplied Receipts  An on­account receipt decreases the customer's account balance by the receipt amount. the receipt is entered without  specifying a customer account.

. Here are the journal entries that  would be generated by a sample on­account receipt for $125. There is no need to enter a customer account for miscellaneous receipts.  125  Debit  Credit  125  Miscellaneous Receipts  The term miscellaneous receipt refers to cash received in respect to revenue that has not been invoiced. The debit posting hits the account that was previously posted in  credit. When you create a debit memo reversal. Oracle Receivables automatically updates your General Ledger and reopens the invoices you closed  with the original receipt. This is represented by showing a liability in the balance sheet equal to the value of the unidentified  receipt.  The unapplied or unidentified account from the payment method;  cannot be overwritten during entry. When you create a  standard reversal. and credit memos that belong together.  Until the customer is known.  Application of On­Account Receipts  Receipts that were on­account when they were entered should be applied to their invoices once it is clear which invoice  the customer wants to pay. all previous receipt activity remains unchanged. The Applications window can be used to apply a receipt to an invoice or several invoices—or  any combination of invoices.Account  Cash or Bank Asset  account  Unapplied  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Taken from the payment method; cannot be overwritten during  entry.  Account  Receivables  Unapplied or  Unidentified  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  The receivables account(s) of the applied invoice(s).  Liability account taken from the payment method; cannot be  overwritten during entry. The credit posting is always to the  Receivables account of the invoice that is being applied.  Taken from the payment method; cannot be overwritten during  entry. and a credit to the receivables account of the applied invoice. To enter a miscellaneous receipt. you can create either a standard reversal or a debit memo reversal. the unidentified or unapplied account is  debited to cancel the credit that was posted when the receipt was originally entered. the possibility remains that an unidentified receipt was sent in error and that the money may  have to be paid back.  Debit  125  125  Credit  Receipt Reversals  Oracle Receivables lets you reverse receipts when your customer stops the check or when the receipt comes from an  account with insufficient funds. navigate to the Receipts window  and choose the Miscellaneous receipt type.  Whichever route the receipt has taken through being unidentified or unapplied. To reverse a receipt. You can also reverse a receipt if you want to re­enter and reapply the receipt to another  debit item. This ensures that once a receipt reaches its final resting state as fully applied.  Debit  125  Credit  125  Unidentified Receipts  Unidentified receipts have no effect on customer account balances because the customer is not known. Typically this is  revenue such as investment income or bank interest. debit memos. the postings generated are always  the same: a debit to the cash or bank asset account. Miscellaneous receipts are accounted for on a cash basis; the  revenue is recognized when the money is received. Here are the journal entries that would be generated by a sample unidentified receipt for $125:  Account  Cash or Bank Asset  account  Unidentified  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Taken from the payment method; cannot be overwritten during  entry. but the  customer account is charged with another receivable. The  accounting for miscellaneous receipts is determined by the payment method and receivables activity you choose from a  list of values. You can enter any receivables activity that has previously been defined as a Miscellaneous Cash receipt  type.

 Many more formats are in use around the world and an  increasing number of these are covered by Oracle's Globalizations. or Checkfree. in which case you will need to  develop customized http messages that conform to the standards of that particular payment provider.  Here are the postings that would be generated by a sample miscellaneous receipt for $342:  Account  Cash or Bank Asset  account  Revenue  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Taken from the payment method; cannot be overwritten during  entry. Used in this way. where the checkout process can complete or fail politely. you must  notify the customer that you intend to take a certain amount in respect of certain invoices. This is achieved using Oracle iPayment.  authorization.  §  Create a batch of Automatic Receipts to close transactions flagged for credit card payment. and settlement. If it is originally entered as a miscellaneous receipt.  Debit  342  342  Credit  Automatic Receipts  Automatic receipts are either bills of exchange or direct debits.  §  Approve the Automatic Receipts batch to reserve the payment amount from the card holder's account.  §  Create and approve a remittance batch to request transfer of funds from the credit card issuer to your bank. Oracle Receivables provides this ability and thus allows your staff to be more  efficient. credit card payments are treated in the same way  as direct debit or bills of exchange. and  the card holder's name—your customers are accepting that their credit card issuer will be asked to transfer funds to your  acquiring bank (or service provider who has agreed to process your credit card transactions).Note  An unidentified receipt should not be entered as miscellaneous simply on the grounds that the customer  number does not need to be entered.  Multiple­Invoice Applications  You must be able to create complex cash applications that involve many transactions and that have the capability to either  fully or partially apply to each transaction. except there is an extra authorization step. Each country tends to have its own standard for bank files: the  United States uses a U. The "shopping basket" and "checkout" sections of  the Web site are coded by the Web developer. The following steps are required to process credit card payments in Receivables:  §  Flag transactions to be paid by credit card. you can debit the bank account in the same way as for direct debits.  or failure. such as Cybercash.  Credit Card Receipts  The procedure for processing credit card payments in Receivables is similar to the procedure for creating Automatic  Receipts. which obtains authorization of the credit card details. you will not be  able to apply the unidentified receipt once you determine the customer and invoice number. Treasury Format; the United Kingdom uses BACS (Bank Automated Clearing System);  Germany uses the Deutsche Bank DTA (Datenträger Austausch). or take money before it is due from a customer's bank account. Once the customer has  provided authorization. You do this by sending your bank a  datafile. a possibly the start date. Before you debit your customer's bank account.  Taken from the receivables activity selected during entry; can be  overwritten. Worldpay being a well­known one). To a certain extent. Direct debits are a method of payment in which the  customer authorizes you to debit the amount due directly from his own bank account. is passed back to the eCommerce application. navigate to the Receipts window. bills of exchange and direct  debits rely on trust; if you habitually take too much money. Bills of exchange are processed in the same way  as direct debits. By providing a credit card number as payment—you will also need an expiry date. iPayment conducts an electronic dialogue with  the computers of an electronic payment partner. To apply customer receipts to a group of transactions at once.  the customer or the bank will withdraw your authority to directly debit the account. companies selling products via eCommerce Web sites have driven the demand for online credit card capture. on tape or disk or via the Internet. The format of the  electronic file has to be agreed upon with your bank. control is  passed to iPayment. and from there into your  bank account as payment for their open debit items. You may chose to partner  with another payment provider (there are several.S. Bills of exchange are clearly  distinguished from other Receivables transactions to help with management and tracking. Verifone. query or enter . The authorization. Transaction numbering enables  you to link bills of exchange to the associated invoices and debit memos. which the bank processes.  Bank File Formats  The transfer of funds occurs when your bank processes the remittance datafile you send to them. If the customer chooses to pay by credit card (or bank transfer).  Lately.

the receipt to apply. You can also apply multiple payments in any predefined currency to a single invoice. then the remaining payment amount to the  associated tax amount. revenue line. The customer's open items appear in a window.  check or uncheck the Apply check box next to each transaction. according to their type (for example. Within each rule set. Oracle Receivables allows you to apply a cash receipt in one currency against one or more invoices in  different currencies. you can specify the exact order in which Receivables applies the payment. The Applications window is shown in Figure 6­4. . freight and  charges).  Line first ­ Tax Prorate Applies a proportionate amount of the payment to the open line and the tax amount for each  line. Alternatively.  you can define how the receipt will be prorated among line types.  Application Rule Sets  Oracle Receivables supports a user­defined hierarchy of payment application rules.  Figure 6­4: The Mass Apply window for applying receipts to multiple transactions  Cross­Currency Receipts Application  In Release 11i. You can define a set of rules to  control how a receipt is applied against invoice lines. The following application rule sets are predefined in  Receivables for use with manual receipt applications or the Post QuickCash program:  §  §  Line First ­ Tax After Applies payment to the open line amount. Receivables support the  processing requirements of currencies that are fixed­rate denominations of the euro. and then click Mass Apply. Companies that  invoice or receive any of the euro currencies need to manage cross­currency receipts. To apply the receipt. Cross­currency applications between  two euro currencies do not generate exchange­rate gain or loss postings. tax.

 If it does. On the other hand. In addition.§  Prorate All Applies a proportionate amount of the payment to each open amount (such as line. but it first groups past­due invoices by their payment term. Oracle Receivables offers five receipt application rules that you can use to create AutoCash  rule sets:  §  §  §  §  Apply oldest debit items first This rule matches receipts to debit items. The two interim cash receipt tables are used by the AutoLockbox interface  when receipts are imported from a bank file.  AutoCash Rules  AutoCash rules are used by the Post QuickCash program to determine how to automatically apply cash receipts against  open customer transactions. or chargeback that  has a remaining amount due exactly equal to the receipt amount. making life easier  for your accounting staff. with a minimum amount of information. the receipt is applied to all open transactions on the account. The  more applications that can be performed automatically.  Match receipts with debit items This rule applies the receipt to a single invoice.  It is well worth spending time on designing your AutoCash rule sets during the implementation of Oracle Receivables. matching receipts to debit items tends to minimize the number of open items.  Tip  Because records are continually being inserted and deleted from the two interim QuickCash tables.  QuickCash  QuickCash lets you enter your receipts quickly. For example. This may be a driving factor in  setting your DBA's schedule to periodically rebuild these two tables.  freight. Posting QuickCash batches updates the customer  account balances and causes the receipts to appear on reports and inquiry forms within Oracle Receivables; it also  realizes the applications specified during receipt entry.  Clear past­due invoices grouped by payment term This rule is similar to the preceding "clear past­due invoices"  rule. the relevant invoices  will appear as closed in Oracle Receivables. debit memo.  Adjustments  Adjustments are alterations to debit items (invoices. or receivables amount of a debit item. You do not  need to inform the customer about adjustments; they are internal corrections that do not materially affect the legal  documents—invoices and debit memos—that have already been sent to the customer. QuickCash receipts are  temporarily stored in two interim tables called AR_INTERIM_CASH_RECEIPTS and  AR_INTERIM_CASH_RECEIPT_LINES. then uses the oldest transaction due date within the  group as the group due date. this rule applies the receipt only to items that are currently past due. Once QuickCash batches have been posted. debit memos. taking care to keep all the records in the  tables at the time of the rebuild.  QuickCash online entry may slow down as the tables become fragmented.  Apply receipts to past­due items Money received goes to overdue bills first. or  charges) associated with a debit item. tax. and chargebacks). Batches of QuickCash receipts must be posted to transfer them from these  interim tables to the regular receipt tables within Oracle Receivables. lines. You can separately adjust the tax. and the adjustments can be either positive or negative.  Clear the account Post QuickCash uses this rule only if your customer's account balance exactly matches the  amount of the receipt.  Clear past­due invoices This rule is similar to the preceding "clear the account" rule because it applies the receipt to  your customer's debit and credit items only if the total of these items exactly matches the amount of this receipt. a customer who just paid a recent bill might see finance charges for an old  item that would not appear if the money had gone to the old item first.  However. the less tedious work for your staff. starting with the oldest debit item first. freight. Adjustments are commonly made  for the following reasons:  §  Correcting a data entry error  §  Writing off a receivable item .  §  §  The rules you select affect the ease with which your receivables staff can apply cash and finance charges for your  customers. fast and accurate  application of cash dramatically reduces the number of payment inquiries from your customers.

 Analogous to the account  balance. Setting up finance charges is  an important aspect of setting up Oracle Receivables. it ebbs and flows according to customer commitments and transactions. freight. a frequent subject of adjustments.  Adjustments have to be approved. The  general formula for calculating the balance of a commitment at any given time is as follows: . In the case of an overpayment. provided their authorization limit  exceeds the value of the adjustment; otherwise adjustments are authorized later by another user whose limit is sufficient. Many  collectors will waive finance charges in exchange for prompt payment of past­due amounts. They give rise to unbilled receivables and unearned  revenue account postings. A common cause of  overpayment is the customer paying the same invoice twice—such double payments should always be refunded. the invoice is left open for the customer  to pay the remainder. The postings  generated by an approved adjustment depend on what was adjusted—tax. This can result in either  an underpayment or an overpayment. a manual  invoice.  Unapproved adjustments do not get applied to the customer balance or transferred to General Ledger. while a guarantee commitment is a contractual  guarantee of future purchases. the difference is refunded to the customer. or receivables—and the  contra account supplied by the user when the adjustment is entered. for positive or negative  amounts. as such. An unpaid invoice of $125 that was being written off  as a bad debt would generate the postings shown here:  Account  Receivables  Adjustment  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  The receivables account of the adjusted invoice.§  Adjusting sales revenue credit to your salespeople  You create an adjustment in the Transactions Summary window by querying the transaction.  Taken from the receivables activity entered by the user; can be overridden. so a degree of restraint should be  instituted before underpayments are written off. and then clicking  the Adjust button. You set the finance  percentages in each currency and give your rules for grace periods. Some common causes of small differences are listed here:  §  The customer rounds the amount down to the nearest whole number.  In receivables.  If the overpayment or underpayment amount is small (in the subjective judgment of the person accounting for the receipt). You can  see the balance for a particular commitment when entering an order (if you are using Order Management).  Commitments  A customer commitment takes the form of either a deposit or a guarantee.  Finance charges are a frequent bargaining chip in collections and. by clicking the Adjustment and Chargeback buttons from the Applications window. A deposit commitment occurs when the  customer agrees to pay a deposit for goods that they have not ordered yet. Both of these are handled by Oracle. You create chargebacks and adjustments against each transaction. Within Receivables. or a credit memo against a commitment or by running the Commitment Balance Report. there is a cost associated with chasing every last cent. a separate commitment balance is maintained. In the case of a substantial underpayment.  Finance Charges  The Statement and Dunning Letter programs apply finance charges to past­due amounts.  Experience shows that underpayments are more common than overpayments. and  most companies accept that it is not economical to pursue small underpayments.  §  A bank or correspondence bank has taken a handling fee for a bank transfer. revenue lines. you handle these small differences by making adjustments and chargebacks against transactions to which  you are applying a receipt.  125  Debit  Credit  125  Writing Off Small Amounts During Receipt Entry  Often the receipt amount that the customer has paid does not exactly equal the invoice amount. selecting it.  §  The customer remits the wrong amount by mistake. However. The person entering the adjustment can approve it. All transactions that  reference a commitment or reference an invoice that references a commitment affect the balance of that commitment.  the difference can be written off. The customer commitment balance is  available in several places within Receivables and is also available if you are using Oracle Order Management.  §  The customer pays a foreign currency amount that does not exchange to the required amount of the invoice.

 Receivables might create these sample journal entries:  Account  Receivables (invoice)  Revenue  Tax (if you charge tax)  Freight (if you charge  freight)  Receivables (deposit)  Unearned Revenue  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Defaulted from the transaction type; can be overwritten during  invoice entry.000  1.  Taken from the commitment. are due a refund. Receivables would create this journal entry:  Account  Unbilled Receivables  Unearned Revenue  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Derived using AutoAccounting structure.000  Debit  1. but if customers demand refunds.000  1.000  Credit  If you were entering an invoice against this deposit. as they will no doubt do for larger  amounts. Receivables creates a receivable adjustment against the invoice.000  Credit  When you apply an invoice to a deposit.  Debit  1.Com (original amount of commitment)  −  −  +  Inv (invoices against commitment)  CMI (credit memos that reference invoices that reference commitments)  CMC (credit memos against the commitment itself)  Resulting Commitment Balance  If you were to enter a deposit of $1. companies must be able to pay them. Receivables  uses the account information you specified in your AutoAccounting structure.  1.000. If cash were received against the preceding  deposit.100  900  100  100  1.  Defaulted from the tax rate; can be overwritten during invoice  entry.  Defaulted from the item; can be overwritten during invoice  entry. Receivables would create the journal entry shown here:  Account  Bank Cash Account  Receivables (deposit)  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Derived from the payment method.  Defaulted from the transaction type; can be overwritten during  invoice entry.000  Credit  Entering an invoice against a guarantee and applying cash to a guarantee work in the same way as deposits; the  receivables (deposit) account is replaced with the unbilled receivables account.  Debit  1.  Derived using AutoAccounting structure. or pay one invoice twice. It is often easiest to simply absorb the  overpayment as income if it is a small amount. There are essentially three approaches for handling customer refunds: . Receivables would create the journal entry shown here:  Account  Receivables (deposit)  Unearned Revenue  Derivation of the Accounting Flexfield  Derived using AutoAccounting structure. if you were to enter a guarantee.  Derived using AutoAccounting structure.  Taken from the commitment.000  Credit  Finally.  Refunds to Customers  Customers who overpay an invoice.000  1.  Taken from the commitment.  Debit  1.

 Then. immediately change his or her profile to "Bad Debt" to prevent further credit sales to that customer. This would appear as  follows in the customer Account Inquiry:  Receivables Transaction  Cash receipt  Debit  Credit  12.  Doubtful debt. Be sure to nominate a suitable cross ledger  clearing account to post through.000. is somewhere between a healthy receivable and a bad debt write­off.000  The next step is to create a correlated pair of transactions.  Transfer to Doubtful Debt  Most companies track their overdue receivables diligently. on the other hand. Sometimes payment is unlikely. reducing the amount due on the invoice to zero. Doubtful debt  accounting—invoices remain open and show on the customers account. a Debit Memo in Receivables to clear the customer's account  and a quasi­invoice in Payables to represent the fact that the customer (who must also be set up as a supplier) is owed  $12. Other times it will be written off completely as a bad debt. The clearing account should always show a zero  balance. The third option is more labor intensive. In Oracle Financials.  To create cross ledger postings to Oracle Payables. and match the memo to the cash receipt. meaning there is good reason to believe it  will never be collected.000  Debit  Credit  12. no longer posting to the normal Trade  Receivables account. to record it in Receivables as a Debit Memo. one in Receivables and the other in Payables. In order to create the cross ledger postings you will need to  create a pair of transactions. and issue a  check out of payables in the normal way.000  Finally. and the debt is classified as doubtful. Doing  this does not of course move the receivables from Trade Receivables to Doubtful Debt in General Ledger.  Which approach you choose will depend on considerations like the volume of refunds you have to administer and the  impact on your bank reconciliation. requesting that customers provide full payment on the overdue  amounts.  Tip  Set up a Bad Debt customer profile with a zero credit limit. Some companies are  content to change the customer profile to Doubtful Debt Customer and then use reports to track these customers. One way to  move the receivables to Doubtful Debt is to close the original invoice with a credit memo and enter a new debit memo for  the customer with the Doubtful Debt receivables account.000  Debit  Credit  12. the Payables invoice would be picked up and paid in the normal way by Oracle Payables. handling bad debt  is straightforward: you create an AR adjustment against the invoice. .  To persuade the customer to leave the cash "on­account" and apply it to the next open invoice. as all checks will be found in the same place. whenever you must write off a customer's  invoices. Manual controls must be put in place to ensure that the credit  memo and debit memo are always created in pairs and that the same revenue account is used for both memos. set the customer up as a supplier in Payables. but it will make bank reconciliation a good  deal easier. The Account Inquiry would now appear as follows:  Receivables Transaction  Cash receipt  Debit memo  Payables Transactions  Invoice  12. and  then select an appropriate Bad Debt Write­off expense account to which you post the amount. This requirement can be enforced by posting  the contra posting of each through a clearing account.  Tip  The Debit Memo/Invoice combination must be created in pairs. Imagine starting off with an overpayment in Oracle Receivables. but rather to a Doubtful Debt account—is hard to mimic in Oracle Financials.§  §  §  To issue a manual check.

 The first of these." whereas the third  letter may say.  Customer Calls  The Customer Calls window is used to record the results of your conversation with customers. or that they have  already sent payment for the invoice. the Dunning Letter Print program (ARDLP).  Table 6­1: Letters in a "Days Overdue" Dunning Letter Set  Dunning Letter  First letter  Second letter  Third letter  Days Overdue Low  10  21  31  Days Overdue High  20  30  999  Using the staged dunning method. That way you can control the severity and content of each dunning letter.  statements can be generated and sent to customers (so that they can check their records against yours). error­prone. The second. Until  your account is settled. we are unable to supply any further products to your company. Oracle Receivables can use two methods to  determine which letter to send:  §  Days overdue  §  Staged  Using the days overdue dunning method.  Dunning Letters  Dunning letters are sent to remind customers of overdue invoices. customer calls should be logged and the appropriate action determined at the time of the  original telephone conversation. The Dunning Letter Generate program increments the  dunning level of each debit item it selects. and slow to respond to  customers. While you talk to the customer. Customers may tell you  that their invoice was wrong. as shown in Table  6­1. Oracle Receivables looks at the oldest debit item for the customer and  compares the dunning level of the transaction with the dunning­level ranges of each letter in the dunning letter set. It is good business practice to encourage a "one­stop" approach to  customer service. and reminder  letters can be sent to chase past­due invoices. the Dunning Letter Generate program next determines  which level (1. determines which customers should receive a dunning letter and indicates the invoices that should  appear on the dunning letter. "These invoices are now overdue. you assign a dunning­level range to each letter in the set.Customer Follow­Up  Collectors work constantly to collect debt promptly. to ensure that the customer account balances in the system are up to  date. that they did not receive the goods. 2. produces a letter for each of the  customers selected in the first step. you can quickly review all customer information and verify that the customer's record  of the open transactions agrees with your record. or 3) of dunning letter the customer should receive. That is. Within Oracle Receivables. Please remit your payment as soon as possible. You can enter follow­up actions on the basis of what you and your customer agree  on. and to chase past­due invoices. "Invoices that are more than six weeks overdue will be passed to our legal department for collection. as  shown in Table 6­2."  Creating Dunning Letter Sets  Having determined that a customer will receive a dunning letter. A dunning run is submitted in one step in the Reports­  Collections window. The layout of the letter and the text that appears on it can be customized as described  later in this chapter. but the dunning letters are produced in two stages. . the Dunning Letter Generate  program (ARDLGP). You also assign a minimum number of days that must pass before a  transaction can appear again on a dunning letter. customer phone calls can be tracked and logged. The dunning level of a debit  item is the number of times it has appeared on a dunning letter. that they dispute some of the charges. The first dunning letter  might simply say. Any department that relies on written memos of the conversation or a procedure for  passing action to other people within the organization is inherently inefficient. Oracle Receivables looks at the oldest debit item for the customer and  compares the number of days it is past due with the date ranges of each letter in the dunning letter set.

 For example.  Figure 6­5: The dunning process  Dunning Letter Customization  Many aspects of dunning letters can be customized without programming. and footer text. Once customers and their overdue items  are identified. The program identifies the  overdue items for each customer and selects an appropriate letter to send them.  Within the text you can embed field variables. Receivables can interpret the four field variables shown in Table 6­3. A dunning letter is constructed of header text. the Dunning Letter Generate program inserts appropriate records into the two tables  AR_CORRESPONDENCES and AR_CORRESPONDENCE_PAY_SCHED. .txt.  body. to enter body text for the dunning letter  USER1.Table 6­2: Letters in a "Staged" Dunning Letter Set  Dunning Letter  First letter  Second letter  Third letter  Dunning Level Low  0  2  3  Dunning Level High  1  2  999  Minimum Days Before Reselection  15  5  5  The Dunning Letter Generate program sieves out customers who need reminder letters. These tables form the link between the  generate program and the print program. you edit the file $AR_TOP/srw/ardl1b. With Releases 11 and 11i the letters can be created in the Dunning Letter window.  Implementations of Oracle Receivables that are set up with multiple organizations can create centralized statement and  dunning sites for customers. which get interpreted and replaced with the appropriate information when  the dunning letter is printed. as shown in Figure 6­5. The Dunning Letter Print program produces a dunning  letter for each record in AR_CORRESPONDENCES that has the REQUEST_ID of the Generate Program Request ID. In prior releases.  the header and footer text could be edited using a regular text editor.

 The selection criteria for choosing which transactions are shown and whether a letter is  sent at all were described in the preceding sections. each customized with your own header and footer text. and footer—are shown in Figure 6­6. The body of the dunning letter contains  a list of customer transactions. The three  sections of a standard letter—header. Jayne McGraw  555­1860  Monolith Motor Company  1009  You can create an unlimited number of dunning letters. . The switches determine whether unapplied receipts are included. The exact logic that is applied can be modified by using switches  defined as part of a dunning letter set. body. and whether disputed items are included.Table 6­3: Field Variables in Dunning Letter Text  Field Variable  &F_collector_name  &F_collector_telephone  &F_customer_name  &F_customer_number  Value  Collector name  Telephone number of collector  Customer name  Customer number  Example  Mrs. whether all  customer transactions are included or only those that are overdue.

Figure 6­6: The construction of a dunning letter .

 debit memo. The seeded dunning letter set called STANDARD consists  of three dunning letters of increasing severity. and a host of other control parameters.A dunning letter set is simply a group of three dunning letters.  commitment. on­account credit.  Statement­aging buckets Show how much of the debt is overdue and by how many days. 16–30 days. receipt. and can be set according to your preference. Because on­account or unapplied receipts are not associated with a site.  The statement differs from a dunning letter in that it shows all account activity (invoice. .  The following components of the statement can be customized:  §  §  §  Statement cycles Determines the frequency with which particular customers receive statements. Statements are often  sent as an alternative to dunning letters. Oracle Receivables produces one statement for the  statement address. and adjustment) and not just the overdue items that appear on  letters. whether the  letters have to be sent in sequence. the system produces a statement for each different bill­to  address on the customer's invoices. chargeback. they will not  appear on any of the statements.  You can define only one active statement address for each customer. If you do not define a statement address. although some companies send both statements and letters. or over 31 days. The dunning letter set also controls when each letter is sent. credit memo.  Figure 6­7: The Dunning Letter Sets window  Statements  A customer statement shows all account activity in a particular time frame since the last statement. The buckets are date  ranges. such as 0–15 days.  Standard messages Printed text on the bottom of the statements. as  shown in Figure 6­7. each of which can be individually set.

 (Note that the straight arrows represent data that is  interfaced from one module to another. and other adjustments made in the  collection process.  Order Management  The shipping process within Order Management records products shipped to customers and updates the inventory. and they can be maintained from any modules. while the curving arrows indicate common data that modules share by referencing  each other's tables. Projects. The sales records don't reflect discounts. AutoInvoice creates the invoices for the sale in Oracle Receivables and  accounts for the sales revenue. selling prices. The same customers are available in  all modules.)  Figure 6­8: An overview of Oracle Receivables' integration with other modules  Receivables shares customer data with Order Management. Updates made in one are immediately available in  Receivables. are transferred into  Receivables via the AutoInvoice interface. Invoices that originate in Order Management are printed in Receivables. payment terms.  Shipment information. and transaction dates.Integration with Other Modules  Oracle Receivables integrates with several other modules in a way that reflects the fact that customers are at the center of  your business.  Creating Invoices from Orders  The AutoInvoice interface is a one­way process; there are no interfaces to post Receivables transactions back into Order  Management or Projects. write­offs. such as quantities. An overview of the integration is shown in Figure 6­8. . and Services.

 credit memos. Rejected invoices remaining in the Oracle Receivable  interface tables are updated so you can correct them and transfer them again to Oracle Receivables. telephones.  Despite the fact that it is a one­way passage. For  successfully transferred invoices loaded into Oracle Receivables. as it cannot be automated. and on­account credits. Summary mode produces one journal entry line per distinct Accounting Flexfield  combination.  Projects  Project invoices are imported into Receivables via the AutoInvoice interface. A further process then runs to tie back the invoices in Receivables to the original invoice in Project Billing.  Customer Used for loading customers. But the other  three are designed to allow you to build ongoing interfaces with external systems or for initial data conversion. the tieback process updates the project accounting data  to reconcile invoices in Oracle Projects to Oracle Receivables.  This process ensures that all the project billing invoice data is loaded successfully into Oracle Receivables. When it is submitted.  Sales Tax Rate Used for loading tax rate information. to uniquely identify invoice headers and lines in the import process. if you plan to use Oracle's standard invoicing programs. which is used for the sales order line ID. The sales invoices imported from Order Management into  Receivables also share the inventory information. the operator must choose  to post in detail or summary mode. All Oracle products that reference  inventory items do so by referencing the System Item Flexfield. The operator  should choose either one mode or the other. This interface is extremely powerful and complex. Receivables maintains somewhat informal links back to Order Management  through the open AutoInvoice interface.  Receivables Open Interfaces  Oracle Receivables provides four standard open interfaces:  §  §  §  §  AutoInvoice Used for loading invoices. Detail mode creates at least one journal entry for each transaction in your posting submission. allowing the import of credit  memos and debit memos as well as invoices. contacts.Set out your business processes to require that reversing transactions originate in the same place as the original  transaction. The standard invoicing programs link back  to the Sales Order tables through INTERFACE_ LINE_ATTRIBUTE6. debit memos. but must at minimum define the invoice or sales order number. addresses. All the data Receivables needs to create  PA_INVOICES is supplied by Oracle Project Billing and is then processed by AutoInvoice to create invoices in  Receivables. a 15­column  Descriptive Flexfield (DFF).  AutoLockbox Used for loading bank receipts. is used by other standard Oracle modules to import data into Receivables. it is  best to make the fields consistent with the fields in Oracle Order Management.  The content of these columns is totally up to you. The benefits of  each have been discussed in Chapter 3.  AutoInvoice  The AutoInvoice interface lets you import invoice information from financial billing systems or invoices from Oracle Order  Management and Oracle Project Billing. as a mix of summary and detail creates confusion for users. Because you can import only at the transaction level. AutoInvoice requires that you use the Transaction Flexfield. grouping rules are . AutoInvoice.  The first interface. The GL transfer  process must be started by a human operator. and  INTERFACE_LINE_ATTRIBUTE7. However. Each  line identifier has to be unique; each unique combination of header DFF segments represents one invoice. Customer returns need to be entered into Order Management as RMAs (Return Material Agreement) to  handle the inventory and sales compensation and other implications. You do not have to  specify all 15 segments.  General Ledger  The GL transfer process reviews all new transactions in Receivables and creates the appropriate journal entries in Oracle  General Ledger. which is used for the picking line ID. and invoice line number. These journal entries are imported to General Ledger via the Journal Import interface.  Inventory  Inventory items are necessary in Order Management to identify what has been sold. and profiles.

 The  business users are the ones who typically know what values the data should take on. You should not plan to update or insert data. It is convenient to let the membership system collect member data and then  import it into Oracle Financials as needed to support customer billing. The records that you load into Receivables  through the Sales Tax Rate interface program update your existing sales tax rates with the most current tax rates for each  location.used to determine which lines will be placed together on the same header level transaction once they have been  imported. The Interface Lines window  displays all records in the interface tables that failed validation during AutoInvoice. Data corrections tasks.  The interface is quite general. The interface program lets you load one or more tax rates  for the same location that cover different date ranges and postal codes.  even if the data is not strictly a bank lockbox. matching on amount.  Sales Tax Rate Interface  The Sales Tax Rate interface lets you load sales tax records—new locations and tax rates—into Oracle Receivables from  a sales tax feeder system. The transaction tables and their usage are listed in Table 6­4. can now be performed by business users without programming. The interface can be used on an ongoing basis when custom or third­party  systems are the first to collect data on customers. When an invoice  is adjusted. allowing you the flexibility to apply  credit card sales by exact match on amount. freight. while applying customer cash receipts on an oldest first basis.  AutoLockbox  The AutoLockbox interface is used to load receipt information in Receivables. and AutoLockbox can be coaxed into use for importing receipts from any external system. or matching any user­  defined hierarchy of rules.  Table 6­4: The Transaction Tables in Oracle Receivables  Table  AR_ADJUSTMENTS  Purpose  Storing adjustments to invoices. The AutoInvoice Errors window  displays any errors associated with each failed record. The purpose of this section is to provide  a high­level overview of the data structures and processing used by Oracle Receivables. or if you want to define alerts against actions or events  triggered in Receivables. You can define payment application rules to control how the receipt is  applied against line types (tax. Members of organizations such as labor unions are often customers in  that they buy subscriptions or supplies. Oracle Order Management also uses the Sales Tax Rate interface. unless you do so via one of the standard  interfaces. The use of the  automatic Lockbox interface to boost the hit rate of receipt applications is described in Chapter 23. Application rules can be assigned to each transaction type. You  choose among a variety of rules. .  Two new windows have been introduced in Release 11i to simplify the AutoInvoice process.  Customer Interface  The Customer interface lets you import new and update existing customer data from any feeder system and ensures that  the data that you import is accurate and valid within Oracle Receivables. The primary purpose is to provide an  automatic interface for receipts communicated to your organization electronically by your bank on a Lockbox tape or file. The Customer interface is essential during  cutover for high volume data conversion. the activity  name. Refer to this section if you are  planning to write custom reports based on the Receivables data. such as matching the oldest invoice first. You insert records into the AR_TAX_INTERFACE table and then run the interface to validate  and transfer the records to the underlying Receivables tables.  The data model in Receivables has to cope with the conflicting needs of posting to General Ledger and providing  customer account balances. and these new windows bring the  power to act closer to those who have the information to decide. and invoice lines) and to predefine a sequence for closing transactions. the AMOUNT_DUE_REMAINING in  AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES is updated.  The Receivables Data Model  This section briefly describes the transactions in the Oracle Receivables module. which in the past had to be performed by  technical staff with programming experience. The Sales Tax Rate interface program can adjust the active date range of existing tax rates as new tax rates are  loaded into Receivables. The amount of each adjustment. and the accounting information are held in this table.

 as well as unit  price. debit memo (DM).  Storing sales credit assignments for invoice lines. The  CODE_COMBINATION_ID column stores the accounts that are debited and  credited as part of these steps. credit memos. tax lines. deposit (DEP). Each step creates rows in this table.  Recording the quantities ordered. Each transaction line relates to just one transaction in  RA_CUSTOMER_TRX. such as customer. and control  totals. or charges. the bank account.  Receipts go through a cycle of steps that include confirmation. . which can be invoice  (INV). Lines may be either revenue item lines. deposits.  Linking the receipts applied to invoices with the credit memos applied to  invoices. debit memos. unbilled receivable.  AR_CASH_RECEIPT_HISTORY  AR_CASH_RECEIPTS  AR_MISC_CASH_DISTRIBUTIONS  AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES  AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS  RA_BATCHES  RA_CUST_TRX_LINE_GL_DIST  RA_CUST_TRX_LINE_SALESREPS  RA_CUSTOMER_TRX  RA_CUSTOMER_TRX_LINES  At first sight the data model seems complex. invoiced. transaction type. or  freight. and receipt reversals. receipt history. The  ARGLTP program uses GL_DATE and AMOUNT to post the correct  amounts to GL for each transaction.  Different transaction types are identified by the CLASS. receivable.  Storing information such as the batch source and control totals.  Storing header information for invoices. credit memo (CM). The table  contains one record for each invoice installment. tax. chargeback (CB). such as  stock dividends or bank interest.  Storing the current status of a receipt. Each row includes general  information.Table 6­4: The Transaction Tables in Oracle Receivables  Table  AR_BATCHES  Purpose  Grouping individual receipts; this table is optional. as  shown in the data model in Figure 6­9. or one row per receipt.  This is a fundamental table in Receivables. and credited. remittance. It is based on a transaction view of Receivables and not an accounting or  customer reporting view. a batch holds  information about the batch source used. If used. and printing instructions. This table holds the amount applied.  revenue.  Miscellaneous cash is income that does not relate to a customer. which have a double bar. guarantee  (GUAR). Invoice­related receipts have payment  schedules and applications. while miscellaneous receipts (not related to the  invoice) have distributions stored on AR_MISC_CASH_DISTRIBUTIONS.  Storing all accounting records for a transaction. the status.  Storing two types of records: invoice­related and receipt­related.  chargebacks. These are distinguished by  the ACCOUNT_CLASS designation.  and clearance. Invoice  batches are optional. The accounting information is spread across five distinct tables.  Storing one row for each receipt. or receipt (PMT). and the accounting  distribution for the application.  Storing all the accounting entries for miscellaneous cash applications. unearned revenue. which can be freight. and guarantees.

 which is the central Receivables report. the balance is calculated whenever it is  needed. The sum of the AMOUNT_DUE_REMAINING for a customer for all confirmed payment schedules gives the  current customer balance. while credit transactions decrease the customer's balance. As noted earlier. Debit transactions increase the  customer's balance.Figure 6­9: The Receivables data model  The Receivables Aging Report.  Table 6­5: Classification of Transaction as Either Debit or Credit  Debit Transactions  Invoices  Debit memos  Chargebacks  Deposits Credit Transactions  Receipts  Credit memos  . Instead. The AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES table is used for many  things.  Technical Overview of the Application Process  Application is the process in which you match debit transactions with credit transactions. the most important of which is the record of the customer account. Refer to Table 6­5 to see how  transactions are classified into debit and credit transactions. It is a single table created from two subentities. the Oracle Receivables  module does not store the customer's account balance anywhere. reflecting the fact that the  AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES table is used for two distinct purposes: invoice installments and cash receipt payment  schedules. is large and complex.

 if you request summary posting from  AR to GL. On­account receipts do not relate to any  particular transaction. the summarization is performed by the Journal Import program. The normal situation is for a receipt to be applied to an  invoice. invoices.  Caution  Because the transaction date is used for the customer account. The CASH_RECEIPT_ID column stores the receipt ID of receipt  transactions. you should ensure that these two dates are always identical; otherwise. customer . an amount.  Technical Overview of the GL Transfer  The GL transfer process reviews all transactions in AR and creates the appropriate journal entries in General Ledger. Doing so results in none of the on­account receipts being selected. Each subsequent application creates two new rows. Transaction tables that give rise to GL journal postings all have a  currency. AR_DISTRIBUTIONS. and AR_MISC_CASH_DISTRIBUTIONS (this table holds the  accounting distributions for miscellaneous cash).  On­Account Receipts and AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS On­account receipts are handled in a special way by  Oracle Receivables. and credit memos can also be envisaged. When an invoice­  related receipt is first entered. ARGLTP updates each transferred transaction as posted (by populating  POSTING_CONTROL_ID. Invoices also have a  transaction date. a row is created in the AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS table with a status of APP and application type of CM.Application is the term for matching credit transactions to debit transactions in order to create a group of transactions that  taken together have a zero effect on the customer's balance. The rule for determining a  valid application is simply  §  (Inv + DM + Chargebacks + Deposits − Rec − CM) = 0  You can apply all or part of a receipt or on­account credit to a single debit item or to several debit items. However. and another with UNAPP status for the negative of the amount being applied. For each new transaction. The transaction date determines when the invoice shows  up in the customer account.  Advanced Features  Receivables accounting periods control the dates that can be transacted. AR_ADJUSTMENTS. and together they cancel each other out. the date that appears on the top of the invoice. while the CUSTOMER_TRX_ID column stores the transaction ID for credit memo transactions.  There is no record in RA_CUSTOMER_TRX that corresponds to the PAYMENT_SCHEDULE_ID = −1 row in  AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES. Interestingly. There is a seeded shadow row in AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES identified by  PAYMENT_SCHEDULE_ID = −1. there is no payment schedule to link the record to. All on­account receipts are linked to this shadow row. and the GL date is used for postings to  General Ledger. one with APP status for the amount  being applied. More complex  applications involving multiple receipts. The  APPLIED_PAYMENT_SCHEDULE_ID and APPLIED_CUSTOMER_TRX_ID columns reference the transaction to which  this record applies. When a credit memo is  applied. GL_POSTED_DATE) and optionally submits the GL Journal Import process.  Both the receipt and the invoice are for the same amount.  Accounting distributions are stored in RA_CUST_TRX_LINE_GL_DIST.  The rows in AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS are a link between the transaction you are applying and the transaction  to which you are applying. and not by the ARGLTP. The PAYMENT_SCHEDULE_ID column links the receipt or credit memo to its payment  schedule in the AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES table.  The GL transfer process (registered as ARGLTP in the concurrent manager) searches for new transactions that have not  been transferred previously (POSTING_CONTROL_ID = −3).  POSTING_CONTROL_ID uniquely identifies in which GL transfer the record was transferred.  AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS. When an on­account receipt is entered. journal entry lines are inserted  into the GL_INTERFACE table. but do not affect how transactions appear in  General Ledger. do use an outer join to link AR_PAYMENT_SCHEDULES tables  with the RA_CUSTOMER_TRX table. a row is created in AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS in  the usual way.  Tip  If you write reports on receipt applications. The AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS table resolves the many­to­many relationship between  receipts and transactions as well as the many­to­many relationship between credit memos and invoices. a row is created in the AR_RECEIVABLE_APPLICATIONS table with a status of UNAPP  and an application type of CASH. and a corresponding code combination ID. and the time stamp in the  GL_POSTED_DATE column signifies when the record was transferred. a date. The GL date given for each transaction determines the GL period into which it falls.

 and the balance due on the receipt is shown as zero. credit memo.  Customer account balances are not calculated at period­end and brought forward to the next period. and the remaining $830 to partially pay invoice 10174. Without this capability.  As noted earlier.50. The receipt R1780 has been fully applied.  adjustment. outstanding amount.00  4707. and enter it initially as  unapplied. Account balances are calculated each time they are queried. You have perhaps noticed that the account balance has not changed as a . The balance due tells them when a transaction is fully applied: either  the obligation has been paid in full. R1780. which has two open invoices.50. The balance due for both of these invoices is the same as their original amounts. They need  a way of knowing when a transaction is complete. The rightmost column shows the balances due. One advantage of Receivables working on a daily basis is that it is possible to request customer  account reports for any day of the year. These three terms aresynonymous. Invoice 10177 has been  fully paid. or receipt. whereas standard reports work on an as­of­  date­supplied parameter. Here is how the customer account would now appear:  Number  10174  10177  R1780  Monolith Motor Company Account Balance  Class  Invoice  Invoice  Receipt  Original  5537. the result does not change. whether it is an invoice. We might assign the receipt a reference. The customer account would now appear as shown here:  Number  10174  10177  R1780  Monolith Motor Company Account Balance  Class  Invoice  Invoice  Receipt  Original  5537.00  4707. the other for $1170;  the balance is $6707. all statement and dunning  cycles would be restricted to an accounting period cycle. Period statuses in  Receivables can be opened and closed independently of General Ledger. but it has no month­end process.50  Balance Due  4707.  There are no account balances stored in Receivables. The remaining $830 has been used to partially pay invoice 10174.50  Notice that none of the original amounts has changed; they never do. Online account balances are always as of today's date. or the credit has been totally applied to other obligations or refunded.  some of which are zero. One is for $5537. Look again at Figure 6­3. Monolith Motor Company.50.50. the  $2000 has been "used up" paying invoices.00  2000.00  2000. If at some stage we established that the $2000 receipt were intended to  fully pay invoice 10177.50  0  0  4707. There is another  powerful reason for working with balances due rather than original amounts.50  Balance Due  5537.50  1170.00  2000.balances in Receivables will not equal the accounts receivable balance in General Ledger. you find another amount alongside the original amount; it is called  the balance due.00  4707. not just for period­end balances. Throughout Oracle Receivables. which is the old balance minus $2000. Note that the balance due for each  transaction is the same as its original amount.  which is left with a balance due of $4707. accounts receivable departments spend considerable time researching and applying receipts. which is reflected by the zero balance due.50  The new account balance would be $4707.  which shows the account details for the Worldwide Enterprises customer. A transaction cannot be entered unless the  Receivables period is open.  The Customer Account and Balance Due  The following formula is used to calculate a customer's account balance at any point in time:  §  Inv + DM ± Adj − CM − Rec  The calculation uses the original full amount of each transaction. If you replace the original amounts  throughout the formula Inv + DM ± Adj − CM − Rec with the outstanding amount. Suppose that  Monolith then sent us a check for $2000. debit memo. either  online or in reports. Customer  account balances can be calculated from either the original amount or the outstanding amount of individual transactions. The period cannot be closed unless all transactions have been transferred to General Ledger.50  1170.  Imagine a customer.50  1170. we would enter the receipt applications in  the Applications window. or amount remaining. Oracle Receivables  uses the same accounting periods that General Ledger uses.

  internal reconciliation.  §  §  The timing of these reconciliations can be problematic.  Internal reconciliation The process of ensuring that the customer balance for each customer is the same  irrespective of whether it is calculated using original amounts or outstanding amounts.  GL reconciliation The process of ensuring that the transactions in Receivables have been accounted for correctly  and of verifying that the journal entries in General Ledger that have come from the subledger are all present and  correct. and then the GL reconciliation. Not all companies are prepared to  hold Receivables open long enough to rigorously complete all three reconciliations. further invoices can be  generated after you start the reconciliation. The archive process satisfies legal requirements imposed by various taxing authorities that accounting  documents must be kept for a certain number of years before being disposed. you will have to import it into Receivables. no one would need to purge data at all. the subledger receivables total is reconciled to the Receivables  accounts in General Ledger.  Transactions with a balance due of zero are referred to as closed; otherwise. which is similar to Closed but does not validate for unposted items. But. and that will force you to repeat the internal  reconciliation. The work in a receivables department is directed towards reducing the balance due  on all transactions to zero and closing each transaction. are referred to generically as external reconciliation. The types. and then you identify an Order Management invoice that belongs in the period but  has not been imported. A complete Receivables to General Ledger reconciliation is normally replaced by the reduced scope of a  receivables "control" account reconciliation. However.  Applications are customer­account neutral. Remember.  Table 6­6: The Effect of Different Transactions  Increase Balance  Invoice  Debit memo  Decrease Balance  Credit memo  Applied and on­account receipts  Neutral  Unidentified receipt  Application of a receipt  Reconciliation  There are three types of reconciliation in addition to the bank reconciliation mentioned earlier. the formula Inv +  DM ± Adj − CM − Rec would give the same result whichever amount was chosen.  followed by the internal reconciliation.  before doing the external reconciliation. any corrections  you make will force you to repeat one of the previous reconciliations.  The Purge Feature  Oracle Receivables includes an archive and purge feature. The purge is to recover disk space by archiving closed  transactions. That means that all three reconciliations  should be completed after closing the feeder systems. That is. It makes no sense to start the external  reconciliation until the external feeder systems have completed their period end. which are  distinguished according to what is being reconciled with what. Although the logical sequence is clear. Table 6­6 summarizes the effect of various  receivables transactions on the customer's account balance. Closed transactions do not  contribute to the customer balance. closed transactions can be reopened if. If performed in some other order. the timing is not so obvious. they are open. machine capacity is limited; after a certain amount of time your disk will be full . "soft close" the period by changing the period  status to Close Pending.  The total revenue reported from your sales systems must equal the total revenue reported out of Receivables for any  comparable time period. you must keep Receivables open during the reconciliation. so that if  discrepancies are found they can be corrected in the period in which they belong.result of the receipt application; the sum of the original amounts is the same as the sum of the balance due column.  If disk storage were unlimited and machine processing power arbitrarily fast. for example. and GL reconciliation.  Tip  If you want to close the period to prevent further data entry. The logical sequence is to do the external reconciliation first. Otherwise.  §  External reconciliation The process of ensuring that all invoices have been correctly imported from feeder systems.  presently and for the foreseeable future. but before closing Receivables. For example. if you do the internal reconciliation first. However.  applications are deleted (a check bounces) or if a closed invoice is adjusted.

. The customer should not be  able to detect that you have migrated from one system to another. After the last month­end in the old system. credit  memos.and response times will suffer—no matter what size system you have. or receipts—is generated.  Groups of interrelated transactions are purged if all transactions in the group are closed and if the youngest transaction is  older than a certain age. Removing the records releases disk space for current data. This means that statements or dunning letters cannot be produced throughout the duration of the "run­  down. so  no aging of debt is possible and the customer statements and dunning letters will contain no history. because each transaction in Receivables eats up more space  than a comparable transaction in the other modules—for example.  Minimal conversion has the advantage that you can stop data entry into the old system immediately and switch all entry  tasks over to the new system. and new invoices are keyed into Oracle Receivables. At that point you will inevitably have some open  items. These can be copied onto tape or any other storage  device and then deleted from the online database. assess if you really need to do so by balancing the cost of buying  more hardware with the cost of implementing and testing the purge.  at least you'll have the benefit from day one. A customer is  created in the Oracle Receivables system.  Open­item conversion is the authors' preferred conversion strategy because it is transparent to the customer and provides  more detail than a minimal conversion. and you will need to decide what to do with them. and it  is difficult to put an economic value on the extra procedural effort needed to research an archived transaction compared to  an online transaction. With this in mind. The minimum  effort is no conversion: Customer accounts are "run­down" or "run out" in the old system. Each open item is then transferred into the new system.  Eventually you will want to switch off and archive your legacy system. as all financial accounts will have  to be summarized from the two systems. a list of  customer balances is generated from the legacy system and used to create data for the Customer interface. a journal in General Ledger or an invoice in Payables. credit memos. debit memos.  No Conversion  Not converting has serious drawbacks for users.  Another reason is that companies tend to have a higher volume of Receivables invoices than other business transactions. Users prefer having transaction history online. the group of  records that is purged must have the following property:  §  Inv + DM ± Adj − CM − Rec = 0  Receivables Conversion Issues  Conversion strategy is a trade­off between the effort involved and the completeness of the converted data. The customer's actual balance at any point in time has to be assimilated  from both systems. Space is more  often a problem in Receivables than the other modules.  chargebacks. adjustments. a list of open items—invoices. A "no conversion" strategy often turns into a "minimal  conversion" strategy.  Open­Item Conversion  The next step up is to convert open items. Customer receipts for old  invoices are entered in the old system. and commitments—from the database. invoices. you may as well anticipate doing some sort of conversion when you go live; then. You might want to purge all closed transaction groups that are older than one year. The ground  rule for purges is that after the purge none of the customer account balances will have changed; therefore.  Minimal Conversion  A minimal conversion involves converting only outstanding balances. The disadvantage is that there is no detailed accounting information in the new system. with one open invoice to show the outstanding balance for that customer. After the last month­end in the old system. This is when a purge is needed." Running two systems concurrently is particularly difficult if you cross a year­end. Statements and dunning letters will show all open  items with the correct reference numbers and outstanding amounts.  The purge works by removing records of historic transactions—receipts.  Before implementing the archive and purge process.

 This involves doing a full conversion of all transactions  (open and closed). using a custom­built data load program. marketing. while programmatic conversion  is justified with high volumes.Full Conversion  The last option is to convert all transactions from the old system. and so on. what if you wanted to convert only  open items? Suppose your old system has a large number of customers and open invoices. collections.  Table 6­7: The range of interfaces depends on what you choose to convert  AutoInvoice  Interface Data  No conversion  Convert only customer balances  Convert only open items  Convert open items and history  ü ü ü ü  ü ü ü ü ü  ü ü  Customer  Invoice  Credit Memos  AutoLockbox  Receipts  Applications  Note  Make sure you convert the receivables account for each transaction correctly. according to an agreed  mapping between old and new systems. Consider the effort required for  each route: Manual conversion costs are determined by (time needed to manually key one data record) × (number of data  records). ship­to. the more interfaces you will need to program and test. Although the transactions themselves do not need to be posted  within Receivables. testing.  The more detail and history you decide to convert. The legacy system may not make the distinction.  Customer Conversion  Customers are the heart of corporate life. Interface. or Mix  The choice of mechanism is independent of your decision on what to convert.  §  Defining which customer locations belong to each operating unit in a Multi­Org implementation. and life goes on during conversion preparation. Doing this will  force you to express relationships that are implicit in your legacy system. and then reapplying receipts and credit memos to close items and re­create the account history. Using uppercase and lowercase makes more attractive invoices and order  confirmation letters for your customers. The least disruptive approach to  customer conversion usually involves some mixture of cleaning up data in the legacy system beforehand and using  automated scripts to simplify the conversion process. The following factors are best addressed by knowledgeable people  in advance of conversion:  §  Dividing customer records into customers and customer locations. The  extra effort required to bring across the closed items and the history is seldom worthwhile. or with a function.  §  Defining the activities at different locations. You need  not choose between an entirely program­based or a manual conversion.  §  Entering address and contact data. with a site. You can decide to convert any particular  data element either manually or via an interface. The same is true with addresses and telephone numbers. . such as bill­to. For example. Table 6­7 shows  exactly which interfaces you will need to implement depending on the range of data that you want to convert. You can convert customers and invoices using a program. and running a migration from  old to new. and you can  convert receipts and credit memos manually. Manual conversion works well when dealing with a low volume of transactions. An inaccurate conversion of Receivables accounts can cause  headaches long after the conversion is completed.  Automated scripts can handle or at least support the following kinds of conversion activities:  §  Converting to uppercase and lowercase.  Choice of Mechanism—Manual. The customer database is remarkably flexible; it can associate contacts with the  company. while program conversion takes the total effortinvolved in programming. but a low number of receipts  and credit memos (as would be quite normal). any applications that reference converted transactions automatically give rise to GL  postings to their receivables accounts.

 There are three integrated workbenches with which you can perform your day­to­day accounts receivable  operations. addresses. chargebacks. Transaction efficiency  with high payment volumes is promoted with cash application features like AutoLockbox. monitor.. credit. next quarter. Third­party mailing list data is helpful for this task.  As noted. and so on). and adjust invoices. contacts. Cash Management is an  enterprise­wide solution. Srta. and  iPayment. It can import the same data into a number of  different table structures. Mlle.. and to maintain up­to­date invoice information. Its powerful online collection tools  help you track. next month. the Oracle Customer Interface process is remarkably flexible.§  §  Validating postal codes. The import process handles this with ease.  The legacy system will almost invariably include some data items that do not appear to map to Oracle. Herr.. sticking them in a comma­  delimited format into one of the many Descriptive Flexfield attributes (Attribute n) that you will not need for use with a real  DFF. You may not know  immediately what they are for. as a strategy. M. Consider. You can always set the items to null when you are sure they won't be needed. debit  memos. Mr. and up­to­date cash balance information. and collect your receivables. thereby reducing your delinquent accounts. By implementing regular collection cycles you can improve cash flow.. Sra.  Chapter 7: Oracle Cash Management  Overview  The purpose of Oracle Cash Management is to help you manage and control the cash cycle of your enterprise to ensure  liquidity and improve profitability. The Transactions workbench provides the functions you use to enter. providing comprehensive integration with other Oracle applications and open interfaces for  integration with external systems. A fully integrated application  suite is needed because cash flows are generated or identified elsewhere in the ERP system. efficient bank  reconciliation. The Collections workbench simplifies communication with  customers by providing information on outstanding balances.. The key benefits of this module include enterprise cash forecasting. Cash Management draws  flows from the sources shown in Table 7­1.. It is wise to choose a few representative customers and import them repeatedly into the  Conference Room Pilot instance in order to confirm that the data is being stored as you expect. and phone numbers and also to update existing data. and adjustments. credit memos. on­account credits. The Receipts workbench is used to record and  apply receipts. and getting the names of the towns  spelled completely and correctly.. extensive multicurrency capabilities.. but it is unwise to leave them behind. Cash Management supports two distinct but related business functions:  §  Bank reconciliation  §  Cash forecasting  Bank reconciliation determines whether the balance on your bank accounts in Oracle Financials is equivalent to the  balance shown on your bank statements; cash forecasting uses the results of this reconciliation—a known and proven  cash position—to predict your balance for next week. Self­Service Expenses and Oracle Projects  Cash Transaction Source  Supplier payments (future)  Supplier invoices  Supplier payments (historical)  Expense reports . Mrs.  Table 7­1: Transaction Sources for Cash Forecasting  Application  Oracle Payables  Oracle Payables  Oracle Payables  Oracle Payables. Then the data will be available for reference or as the source for SQL  scripts if you need it in the future. Frau. and so on.  Conclusion  Oracle Receivables is a complete accounts receivable system for managing your invoicing tasks and keeping track of  customer data. The interface allows you  to create new customers. and by generating dunning letters and aged balances. Ms. automatic receipts.  Standardizing your use of salutations (Dr. getting the full code (ZIP plus four in the United States).

 allowing for prompt  adjustment. Managing cash in this way offers several benefits:  §  §  §  Improved overall profitability Surplus cash is quickly located. and thus can be promptly resolved. Cash forecasting  functionality has been continuously enhanced during the product cycles of Releases 10 and 11. Cash Management dealt primarily with bank reconciliation; it consolidated a range of banking  features from Oracle Payables and Oracle Receivables and made them available in one place. The capability to draw on  relevant financial transactions from external systems on local and remote databases means international companies that  have several Oracle databases around the world are no longer constrained to local cash forecasting.Table 7­1: Transaction Sources for Cash Forecasting  Application  Oracle Receivables  Oracle Receivables  Oracle General Ledger  Oracle General Ledger  Oracle General Ledger  Oracle Payroll  Oracle Projects  Oracle Projects  Oracle Projects  Oracle Projects  Oracle Purchasing  Oracle Sales  Oracle Treasury  Oracle Treasury  Any external system  Cash Transaction Source  Customer invoices  Customer receipts (historical)  GL budgets  GL cash position  GL encumbrances  Payroll expenses (historical)  Project billing  Project inflow budgets  Project outflow budgets  Project transactions  Purchase orders  Sales opportunity  Foreign exchange  Money market transactions  Expected cash flows  When first introduced. period by period.  Early predictions of insufficient cash flow give managers time to react. and Oracle  Treasury was introduced in Release 11i. Large currency imbalances must be avoided to prevent exchange losses. Oracle  Treasury is described in Chapter 16.  The Need for Cash Management  Treasury managers are continually monitoring cash flow details to ensure that the net cash inflow will cover the company's  cash requirements. and can then be invested.  Reduced risk of currency exposure Currency imbalances are quickly detected. Integration with Projects. spot contracts. and so on) could  consider the use of Oracle Treasury as an alternative to the more basic functions available in Cash Management. There are a variety of ways to steer a company  away from a cash crisis—herein lies the expertise of the treasury department—but no department can respond  appropriately or swiftly without having a sophisticated liquidity analysis tool to prepare accurate cash forecasts quickly.  Companies that undertake a large number of high value treasury transactions (bonds. . Sales.  Organizations that trade internationally have to manage their currency exposure by balancing their future inflow and  outflow currency by currency.  Prevention of finance charges Insufficient cash flow situations are anticipated ahead of time. A company­wide  forecast can now be compiled within a distributed database environment.

 The accounting process used to prove a cash  position is bank reconciliation. Release 11 has the capability to reconcile bank corrections against the original bank  errors. timing differences—but once the legitimate differences have been eliminated. but not in Financials  Items in Financials. All transactions that appear the same on both lists  are checked off. Bank reconciliation goes further than an audit and can reveal fraud as well as errors.  Bank Reconciliation  Bank reconciliation is an audit requirement; bank accounts are an asset of the company; and you must be able to explain  all balances on the balance sheet. Both sets of entries require  analysis to determine whether the source of the discrepancy was an error or a legitimate difference.  Legitimate differences occur when the Cash Management bank account differs from the actual bank statement for the  following reasons:  §  Timing differences due to checks in transit or other uncompleted items  §  Bank charges and items that are unknown until they appear on the statement  §  Fees for currency conversion  §  Transactions that haven't yet been processed. but the essential  purpose is to reverse the original (error) transaction and to enter a new transaction. but not on bank statement  Bank Statement Balance  At the most basic level. We are left with two sets of entries: bank statement entries that  are not listed in Financials and Financials entries that are not listed on the bank statement.  The best method for dealng with entries that require correction is determined by the circumstances. such as payroll deductions from a service bureau  The differences have to be eliminated; you do this by making appropriate account entries to explain them.The starting point for an accurate cash forecast is a proven cash position. This distinction is  important; errors must be corrected. These are the reconciled transactions. We take an extract of the bank account in Oracle  Financials and compare that to the statement provided by our bank. you should reconcile  your bank accounts each time you receive a bank statement. −  . bank reconciliation is an exercise in comparison. The  reconciliation process is diagramed in Figure 7­1. Basically. the  balances should be the same. There are legitimate reasons for two  balances to be different—for example. bank reconciliation uses the following formula to ascertain that the balance on  the bank accounts in Oracle Financials is equivalent to the balance shown on the bank statements:  Bank account balance in Oracle Financials  +  Items on bank statement.  To ensure that your transaction records match and that neither you nor the bank has made an error. Errors on the bank's behalf must be  reported to the bank and corrected.  Reconciliation is the process of explaining the difference between two balances.

Figure 7­1: An overview of bank reconciliation  The Reconciliation Process  Oracle Cash Management is a collection point for bank transactions.  Oracle Cash Management distinguishes between clearing and reconciling. Receivables. Reconciliation itself implies  clearance. You clear a transaction as soon as you have  documentary evidence from your bank that it has processed the transaction and the funds have been moved into or out of  your account. regardless of where in the system they may have  been entered. The automatic reconciliation looks for certain "match" criteria .  where the bank statement lines are reconciled automatically. When you reconcile a transaction. such as an EPOS (electronic point of sale) merchandising system.  Loading the Bank Statement  You can reconcile transactions manually or load an electronic bank statement directly into Oracle Cash Management. You reconcile a transaction once it has appeared on your bank statement.  Salary payments to employees are recorded in Oracle Payroll. and other bank transactions that may have been initiated  from external systems. Payments made to suppliers and recorded through Oracle  Payables generate credit entries in the bank account; customers' receipts entered in Receivables post debit entries. also can be stored in Cash  Management. Bank transactions entered directly into Oracle General Ledger or generated from Payables. Transactions then can be reconciled either manually or automatically using the Reconciliation open  interface. or  Payroll can be reconciled within Oracle Cash Management. the transaction is first cleared (the statement itself is the documentary  evidence) and then matched to a bank statement line.

 subsidiary of an international company uses a PC banking package from NatWest call BankLine; most clearing  banks provide something similar. You can download statements and transaction histories from the bank's mainframe  computers to a text file on a PC. In this case study we see how a text file created out the BankLine package can be imported  directly into Cash Management. The company manually keys the bank statement lines into Cash Management before  they can be reconciled. .  Bank Statement Interface Case Study  Bank Statement Load  The U. The process flow is  diagrammed in Figure 7­2.to determine whether a transaction and a bank statement line indeed are one and the same. flat file statements are uploaded into the Cash Management tables quickly and easily. Some of the reconciliation will be performed automatically. When using the Bank  Statement open interface.K.

 and you can.Figure 7­2: Loading bank statements  If your bank provides statements in a flat file format such as BAI or SWIFT940. This interface validates the bank account and currency  code in the header information. During  implementation the mapping will be easier if the bank provide either BAI or SWIFT940 format.  Statement lines with errors can be corrected in the Statement Interface window. You always use the bank statement interface to load files of  bank transactions. It is highly recommended that you negotiate a flat file statement with your bank if you plan  to reconcile your accounts within Oracle Cash Management. cross check against control totals. you can use the Bank Statement open  interface to load this information directly into Cash Management. The procedure to load the bank statement is the same whatever format is loaded. if they are available in the bank file. . This feature can save hours of manual  data entry and error correction.

.25"."00".."InToday"."CQ"."Details"."IN"."600001 76702251"."TR"."00"."MSC".. as detailed in Table 7­3.  "1998­12­17". Bank statements are not always CSV but often  ASCII fixed format...  "1998­12­18".."−70004."INTEREST"."33."RFR"."Amount".50"."255117.."003980"  "1998­12­17"."00".70".  Table 7­2: Mapped Fields  Column Name in File  TransDate  ValueDate  Amount  Details  TransCode  RFR  CheckNo  Explanation  Transaction date  Blank  Transaction amount  Source or recipient of funds  Transaction code  Text information about the transaction  Check number  Mapped Column in Interface Table  Trx_date  Effective_date  Amount  Customer_text  Trx_code  Invoice_text  Bank_trx_number  The InToday field in the source text file does not map to any column in the destination table.Format of the BankLine Statement file  The following code listing shows an example bank statement format.51".  "1998­09­29"."ValueDate". Logic in the SQL*Loader control file selects only the "00" statement lines to be loaded to the interface  table."−459.1) .09"... For  the purposes of this case study I have used the format supplied by the BankLine software from the Nat West Bank."TESSAFE UK ­ MANUAL".44". The mapping of the fields in the file to those in the interface table is set out in Table 7­2..  "1998­12­17"."00"."00"."DD".. Suitable values  have to be assigned to these columns during the load process.  Table 7­3: Unmapped Fields  Column Name in Interface  bank_account_num  statement_number  Line_number  Explanation  The account number of the bank account  The statement number  The statement line number  Constructed Value  98702245 in this example  SYSDATE  SEQUENCE(MAX. and some reference text."00".."−8614."−294. The bank  statement interface relies on two tables being loaded: a header table and a lines table; the bank statement file contains  only statement lines. a transaction type. amount."MRX987479".. This field contains one of two  values: "00" means the transaction belongs to today's statement balance; "01" means the transaction does not belong to  today's balance."−82."00".  "TransDate". The SQL*Loader program you develop will need to distinguish correctly between CSV and ASCII..  Field Mapping  The file contains vital fields such as the transaction date."TransCode"..  "CheckNo"  "1998­12­17".."003978"  "1998­12­17".54"."RENTAL HIRE".  There are columns in the interface table for which no corresponding data is available in the source file."SO"."CQ".

 Receivables Receipts). In particular. which is the location and  file name of the source data file. which determines where the autoreconciliation looks for the corresponding  transaction.ctl  $CE_TOP/bin  The bank account probably will already be set up as part of the Payables or Receivables implementation setup steps. The program has one parameter."  2.  Define a concurrent program based on this executable. A code of payment can be a transaction that originates in GL or an AP Payment.  Table 7­4: Transaction Codes  Code  CQ  DD  SO  TR  CC  CHG  IN  Description  Check  Direct debit  Standing order  Transfer receipt  Credit card  Bank charge  Interest Source  Payables payment  Receivables receipt  Payables payment  Journal  Payables payment  .  The codes have a type (Payment.  The type is to be set to Internal.  Set up Transaction Codes in the Application  Transaction codes for the bank should be set up corresponding to all the codes that might possibly appear in the data file.  2. These are set out in the  Table 7­4.Table 7­3: Unmapped Fields  Column Name in Interface  currency_code  Explanation  Currency code  Constructed Value  GBP in this example  The values assigned in this example are highly specific and are unlikely to be relevant in any other situation. Miscellaneous Receipt. Assuming the executable was registered  under the Cash Management application.  populating the statement number with SYSDATE (today's date) was a reluctant compromise. Stopped. the following copy command.  Set up a bank branch.  Payables Payments. the autoreconciliation program will use them to help locate the source of the  transaction. or one similar. Miscellaneous Payment.  Application Set up Steps  The SQL*Loader control file must be registered within the Application Object Library so that it can be made available to  users. If  not.  Nonsufficient funds). The statement number was  not available in the file; yet statement numbers had to be unique and as meaningful as possible. which determines how the statement line will be reconciled and a source (Journal. Receipt.  Define the BANKSTMT program as an executable with the execution Method "SQL*Loader. When these codes are set up. will copy the file to the correct  place in the file system:  cp  BANKSTMT. here are the steps to set it up:  1.  Define a bank account belonging to this branch. Rejected.  3. Open Interface.  The SQL*Loader control file will need to be available to the concurrent manager. There are three steps involved:  1.  Assign the program to an appropriate Report Group.

SQL*Loader Import Script  The text of the BANKSTMT.1)  . statement_number  SYSDATE  ." OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"'  TRAILING NULLCOLS  (bank_account_num CONSTANT '98702245'  .  The amounts in the bank data files are positive for incoming transactions on the account (cash receipts. customer_text  ." OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"'  TRAILING NULLCOLS  (bank_account_num CONSTANT '98702245'  .txt'  APPEND  INTO TABLE ce_statement_lines_interface  WHEN customer_text = '00'  FIELDS TERMINATED BY ". Therefore the SQL*Loader control  script swaps the sign on all transaction lines. trx_code  . invoice_text  . and negative for outgoing transactions (such as checks and the like). '0')"  )  INTO TABLE ce_statement_headers_int_all  WHEN (2:10) = 'TransDate'  FIELDS TERMINATED BY ". line_number SEQUENCE(MAX. trx_text  . The . direct debits. Today's date is used as the statement number.  Reconciling Journal Entries  Some journal entries in General Ledger will not have originated from another module; instead they will have been entered  directly into General Ledger. amount "TO_NUMBER(:amount)*(−1)"  . bank_trx_number "LTRIM(:bank_trx_number. effective_date  DATE "YYYY­MM­DD"  . currency_code CONSTANT 'GBP'  . The loader script uses the field name row (there should be  only one of these present in any data file) to force the generation of the interface header record. statement_number  SYSDATE  .  One row is created in the ce_statement_headers_int_all table.ctl control file is reproduced here:  LOAD DATA  INFILE  'NATWEST. statement_date   SYSDATE  )  The control file will create a row in the ce_statement_lines_interface table for each line found in the data file that is an  "InToday" statement line. currency_code CONSTANT 'GBP'  . These transactions can be reconciled to your bank statement with Cash Management. The Check Numbers provided in the file are left  padded with zeros; the script removes these zeros. trx_date DATE "YYYY­MM­DD"  . Oracle Cash Management expects to see  the bank statement lines with negative numbers for incoming and positive for outgoing. and  so forth).

 With a  zero tolerance both amounts would need to be the same for them to be reconciled.  Reconciling Payments  Supplier payments entered in Payables can be reconciled to your bank statement lines. Tolerances can be set as either  percentages or amounts.  The AutoReconciliation program matches payments against bank statement lines if the transactions meet certain match  criteria:  §  The currency is the same  §  The Reference or Payment Batch Name matches the statement line Transaction Number  §  The transaction amount is the same as the statement amount to within the reconciliation tolerance  Reconciling Receipts  Receipts created in Receivables also can be reconciled to bank statement lines.  Cash Forecasting  Cash Management helps you analyze liquidity across the entire business. There are two check boxes. There is no matching within a particular tolerance as there is for payments and  receipts. When you reconcile payments  using Oracle Cash Management. In releases before Release 11i you enable  the Allow Reconciliation Accounting option so that Payables will create accounting entries that debit the cash clearing  account and credit the cash account of the bank account that you used to pay the invoice. you can control whether the AutoReconciliation program charges differences (between the amount cleared by the  bank and the transaction amount) to the bank Charges or bank Errors account.  Payables and Receivables can generate reconciliation accounting entries for cash clearing. This type of transaction.  Tip  This matching rule should be observed when entering data into General Ledger journals; otherwise the  AutoReconciliation program will not make any matches. Receivables transaction amount  differences are booked only to the bank Charges account. You no longer enable the Allow  Reconciliation Accounting option in Release 11i. You can quickly prepare accurate cash  forecasts and analyze your currency exposure. Cash Management updates the status of  the receipts to Reconciled and creates appropriate accounting entries to be transferred to Oracle General Ledger. passes  through Receivables as a Miscellaneous transaction and then into the General Ledger.AutoReconciliation program will match the transaction if the journal line description matches the statement line transaction  number. Either way they are relevant only for transactions sourced from Payables or Receivables; all  other transactions have to have identical amounts to be reconciled. and foreign  currency gain or loss. both of which must be checked on the  Account of Payment tab in the Payables options window: When Payment Is Issued and When Payment Clears. You . Using an option set in the Systems Options  window. or when a customer receipt is returned due to nonsufficient funds (NSF). when the bank applies a specific exchange rate on foreign  currency transactions. and the two amounts match. which determine the size of the difference between  the Cash Management transaction amount and the bank statement amount that can still be acceptably reconciled. Oracle Cash Management becomes a subledger in  its own right.  Reconciliation Tolerances  In the Systems Options window you can set reconciliation tolerances.  Payables and Receivables handle the reconciliation differences differently. the payment status is updated to Reconciled. Such is the case  when you are charged bank charges or receive interest. bank charges. Oracle Cash Management  is the primary point of entry for these transactions. enabling you to make informed financing and investment decisions. either positive or negative. Used in this way.  The AutoReconciliation program matches receipts against bank statement lines if the following criteria are met:  §  The currency is the same  §  The Remittance Batch Deposit Number or Receipt Batch Name matches the statement line Transaction Number  §  The transaction amount is the same as the statement amount to within the reconciliation tolerance  Reconciling Other Transactions  Some transactions that appear on your bank statements are not initiated from the Oracle Applications. It is especially important to load the correct data into  journal line descriptions when converting legacy bank account lines into Oracle General Ledger.

 Cash forecasting  is integrated with other application modules and with external systems through the Forecasting open interface.can forecast in any currency across different organizations in your enterprise. Figure 7­3  charts a cash position forecast.  Figure 7­3: A sample cash position forecast  Accurate cash forecasting depends on up­to­date banking information and relevant information from operational systems. The forecast is just that—a forecast—therefore it does not  form part of the statutory accounts of the company.  Table 7­5: Cash Inflow and Outflow  Cash Inflow  Customer invoices due in the intervening period (Oracle  Receivables)  Receipts (Oracle Receivables)  Sales orders that have not been invoiced (Oracle Order  Management)  Budgeted revenue (Oracle General Ledger)  Inflow from external systems  User­entered inflow  Cash Outflow  Invoiced liabilities due in the intervening period (Oracle  Payables)  Supplier payments (Oracle Payables)  Liabilities for goods ordered but not invoiced (Oracle  Purchasing)  Unordered requisitions (Oracle Purchasing)  Expense budgets (Oracle General Ledger)  Encumbrances (Oracle General Ledger) . The cash inflow and outflow figures are derived from the  various sources shown in Table 7­5.  The audience for the cash forecast is the treasury manager.  Cash forecasting takes today's cash position and attempts to roll the balance forward to a future period by adding  predicted cash inflow and subtracting predicted cash outflow. for multiple time periods.

 Provided the source system supports real­time  access from an Oracle database (many databases are ODBC compliant) data integration is simply a matter of setting up a  a view (the External Source Transaction View) that will access the source application's database to include all  transactions that you want to select for cash forecasting. The view will ultimately depend on a database link. You generate periodic cash  forecasts by projecting the cash position for each template. this sum can greatly exceed the normal accounts payable balances. future sales that have not yet been invoiced will not appear in Receivables and a six­  month forecast should include a sales forecast generated either from revenue budgets in General Ledger or from outside  the system. The information about future cash inflows and outflows can come from  any application system. look  for capital expenditure that has been approved by directors but has not yet been put out to contract. and payroll. A template determines whether to forecast by days or General  Ledger periods. but it is  not tracked and accounted for in Oracle Payables because the lender is not considered a trade creditor.  The Reconciliation Open Interface  The Reconciliation open interface is a powerful feature for enterprise­wide reconciliation. You can use the  reconciliation logic in the interface even if the external system data cannot be viewed dynamically across SQL*Net. You can base your forecast on future transactions such as orders and invoices. The money due from customer invoices over the next month can be judged accurately by looking at due invoices  in Oracle Receivables. receipts. During implementation you redefine this view to point to the payment or receipt transaction  table in the external system.  The database view CE_999_INTERFACE_V forms a bridge between Oracle Cash Management and data held in an  external transaction system. To do  this. It need not be an Oracle Applications database. bear in mind the limited scope of the future­dated transactions stored in any accounting  system.  The Forecasting Open Interface  The Forecasting open interface enables cash forecasts to be made using data assimilated from relevant transaction  information in both local and remote databases. once  generated.  Cash Management Interfaces  A great deal of routine and time­intensive work can be avoided by using the Cash Management interfaces. The forecast itself can be in any currency and. create a table called CE_999_ INTERFACE_V in the Financials database; then use SQL*Loader to populate the  table with payment and receipt transactions from the external system. The use of the Bank Statement Open Interface was described in the case study earlier in this chapter. and determines the level of detail.  Forecasting is built around cash forecast templates. a device . it can be modified or exported to a spreadsheet application. Remember to include outflow  generated by repayment of loans. Each view column has to be mapped to the corresponding data field. or historical transactions such  as payments. Interfacing  bank data into Financials is a priority because a high volume of transactions regularly passes through your main bank  accounts. However. The  Reconciliation open interface also is extensible. each must use the same  calendar.  You can use the Forecasting open interface to view cash flows from external systems. You simply define a database  view or a table that Oracle Cash Management can use to access the payments and receipts in your external system. In a multiple organization environment you can  also forecast across organizations. Oracle Cash Management executes your custom reconciliation logic  when reconciling your external transactions. Typically. In addition. specifies which sources are included. To report a consolidated view across several Sets of Books.Table 7­5: Cash Inflow and Outflow  Cash Inflow  Project billing (Oracle Projects)  Project inflow budgets (Oracle Projects)  Sales opportunity (Oracle Sales)  Foreign exchange (Oracle Treasury)  Money market (Oracle Treasury)  Cash Outflow  Payroll expenses (Oracle Payroll)  Outflow from external systems  User­entered outflow  Employee expense reports (Oracle Payables)  Project outflow budgets (Oracle Projects)  When producing a forecast.

 in close consultation with the business managers in the treasury department. is worthwhile to  establish how they propose to operate their cash forecasts. Through the last several releases of Oracle  Applications.  use forecast cash inflows and outflows.  Stores the source transaction information of each cash forecast templates. Bank statement details are held in the two tables  CE_STATEMENT_HEADERS_ALL and CE_STATEMENT_LINES. if several external source systems are to be  integrated. where the consolidated forecast is going to take place. Even if the source system does not support  real­time access. Cash Management has transaction tables of its own. cash management functionality has evolved from a single screen in Oracle Payables to a full­blown module  of its own.  Contains reconciliation history and audit trail. Refer to Chapter 5 Oracle Payables and Chapter 6 Oracle Receivables for an overview of  their data models. a certain amount of setup is required in the  target database. Cash Management uses receipt and payment information held in Oracle Receivables and  Payables. one segment in the descriptive flexfield could identify the source system. Each row represents an action  performed against a statement line. There is one row for each forecast  run submitted.  When payments or receipts are cleared or reconciled. you need to define  external forecast source types (there is a form to do this) and corresponding database links to pull in the data from the  remote databases. and use SQL*Loader or any  asynchronous mechanism to populate the table with information about cash inflows and outflows derived from the source  system. This flexfield provides  you the ability to filter and restrict the particular cash inflows or outflows that are to be included in the forecast. The database objects needed to achieve database connectivity are  §  The table CE_FORECAST_EXT_TEMP  §  The index CE_FORECAST_EXT_TEMP_N1  §  The package CE_FORECAST_REMOTE_SOURCES  The sql script containing the instructions to create these objects are available in the directories $CE_TOP/sql and  $CE_TOP/admin/sql. That way you could run a forecast  selecting only Payroll forecast transactions say.  Table 7­6: Transaction tables in the Cash Management Schema  Table  CE_FORECAST_COLUMNS  CE_FORECAST_HEADERS  CE_FORECAST_ROWS  CE_FORECASTS  CE_STATEMENT_HEADERS_ALL  CE_STATEMENT_LINES  CE_STATEMENT_RECONCILS_ALL  Purpose  Stores the forecast period information of each cash forecast templates. In particular the Forecast Selection Criteria descriptive flexfield needs to be setup.  Holds one row for each separate bank statement. but also transactions entered in General Ledger. . It is now capable of managing bank data. you can create a table for the External Source Transaction View.  The Cash Management Data Model  For bank reconciliation. A certain  amount of planning.  Stores information about cash forecasts.  Hold header information of each cash forecast template. predicated on a precise bank position.  Holds one row for each line on a bank statement. For example.  There are a few steps involved here: once connectivity has been established. no just in Payables. listed in Table 7­6.which allows one database to select and modify the data in another database. Cash Management updates the flags in tables owned by Oracle  Payables and Receivables. to estimate future cash positions. In the target database. Other tables.  Conclusion  Close attention to cash flow in a business is extremely important. relate to the cash  forecast functionality. Cash forecasts.

 along with information from external systems. and other images to asset records.  Issues concerning the physical upkeep of assets include asset location.  Oracle Assets has always been a robust product. and disposal  transactions to warehouse staff and buildings managers tracing the whereabouts of equipment. The concept has expanded over recent decades to include investments in  nontangible assets such as software. which rarely come together in  a single software package. Oracle Assets allows you to  attach notes in the form of spreadsheets.  One reason for this is that there are distinct needs for the different strands of management. and to bring more information into the relational database and  within range of business intelligence tools.  Chapter 8: Oracle Assets  Overview  Fixed assets constitute the durable capital base of an enterprise; traditionally the property. The use of bar codes with Asset Warranty Tracking makes it much easier to take full advantage of the  service due on a product. depreciation.  Asset management encompasses three primary activities: physical upkeep. Importing electronic bank statements will further still reduce the manual burden of processing  statements. Cash Management is the prime point of data  entry for bank charges and interest earned. you can schedule  maintenance activities such as regular servicing for vehicles. The value of the  asset at any point in time—usually the cost minus depreciation taken to date—is called the net book value. and assignments  of asset management responsibility to various people within an organization. The loss of value during any given period is depreciation; it is charged as an expense in that period. Financial administration issues  involve asset value. plant. and Payroll. or you can use the Create Assets feature to prepare the additions in  spreadsheets; then use the Applications Desktop Integrator to import and validate your additions. loaned. what investment tax credits apply. The two main effects of this are to reduce dual keying. For example. The E­Business Suite has pulled these strands together. scanned documents.  In the legacy system environment you will often find several sources of information used to manage all aspects of assets. Users familiar with earlier releases will be pleased to find that now it is a  complete asset management system. Using the cash  forecasting open interface flows can be assimilated from remote databases; databases which need not be Oracle  Applications systems. as well as bank errors. and equipment  necessary to deliver products and services. Capital assets such as buildings and machinery typically lose value over  time. how you treat them in corporate  reorganizations.  The Asset Additions Cycle  Most fixed assets enter the system in batch mode through Mass Additions. depreciation. asset tracking. Such  new areas of functionality combined with the appropriate use of descriptive flexfields bring more of the practical  operational information into the ERP solution. with the  accompanying precision and time saving advantages. There are several available identifiers to  enable tracking from different perspectives—from the financial analyst tracking take­on. and financial administration. and consigned items from acquisition to disposal. and taxation.  Automatic bank reconciliation can significantly reduce the chore of verifying individual transactions against the bank's  statement of your account. You can use a custom program at cutover to  populate the open interface table with legacy data. and how you bring construction in progress (CIP) items onto the books. Tracking stores information to enable asset  managers to follow leased. After cutover the data . The Cash Forecasting feature draws on transaction data throughout the Applications to extrapolate future  cash positions. The calculation is no longer restricted to money flows recorded in the local database. You can also record insurance values against assets.Receivables.  The types of items tracked in Oracle Assets often require specialized financial consideration. Bar code support for physical inventories makes it easy to reconcile the books with  physical reality. Laws from different  jurisdictions dictate how you can depreciate them. It is the best possible  way to associate the online system with your offline business processes. even as it moves from department to department. the condition of existing assets.  Registering and Tracking Assets  The identifiers of the physical items are assigned during the setup of the assets.

 and sources are shown in Table 8­1.flows through existing integration from Oracle Purchasing and Oracle Payables. buyer. AP clerk. You can then give them an Asset Category that will flow  through to Oracle Assets. After  they have been interfaced from Payables. you can develop . You can have Oracle Projects make  entries into the Mass Additions interface as construction is completed on capital projects.  Tagging with Asset Identifiers  Oracle Assets associates four unique identifiers with each asset. The purchase order number and the AP Invoice Distribution line are available within  Oracle Assets. A programmer can follow these items back to Descriptive Flexfield entries in the Purchasing or  Payables system and then use those DFF entries to fill in the required location. and Projects systems. use the Prepare Mass Additions form to fill in missing data. Alternatively. you will need to assign one. Either can serve as a reference in the Transfers form. Their names. and depreciation  information. Inventory.  Run the Create Mass Additions process in Oracle Payables periodically to send additions over to Oracle Assets. moved. Create Assets builds an Excel spreadsheet based on the  needs of your Oracle Assets implementation. or maintained with any frequency. and how much the asset has already  depreciated (for example in a legacy system). It validates your entries against your lists of values and gives you the  flexibility provided by Excel data entry shortcuts such as forms and macro logic. useful life. You can route data files from legacy and  feeder systems into the spreadsheet to complete and refine the data before passing it to Oracle Assets. it is the  same as the Asset ID.  Table 8­1: Unique Identifiers for Various Types of Assets  Identifier  Asset  Number  Tag  Number  Asset ID  Optional?  No  Use  External;  forms and  reports  External; bar  codes  Internal  Source  User assigned or generated; can  be imported. or Oracle Assets administrator.  The tag number relates items controlled by Oracle Assets to legacy and external systems. Oracle imports. You can make the system capture fixed asset data from the best possible source. The master record in Oracle Assets carries  both your unique physical tag and the Oracle Asset Number.  Tip  If you can codify the business rules you use to assign locations and categories.  Scannable tags can be preprinted and positioned in the receiving area to be affixed to items as they arrive. you can save some work by  automating this function. Choosing  scannable tags requires a business procedure to get the tag number into the asset record.  User assigned; usually imported.  To set up Oracle Inventory and Oracle Purchasing to meet the requirements of Oracle Assets you might want to assign  inventory item numbers to things you buy on an ongoing basis. Accounts Payable. uses. and reports on the tag number but does not generate or otherwise process it; there are several tagging systems.  Generated  Purpose  Identifies the asset in Oracle  Assets forms and reports  Provides bar code tracking of  assets  Links asset records with  depreciation and other  transactions  Provides an additional asset  identifier; usually assigned by  the manufacturer  Yes  No  Serial  Number  Yes  External  User assigned  It is useful to affix physical property tags to items for the purposes of asset control. This might include  physical attributes and descriptions. accepts.  You can assign items to a GL asset account as you enter invoices in Oracle Payables. The association actually takes  place at the GL distribution level to account for the possibility that the expense for one invoice line might be distributed to  multiple organizations. whether you  are the requisitioner.  carries.  You might also add other depreciation particulars such as value. Making items scannable saves a lot of  time if assets are to be counted. and the location. If generated. category. If the asset does not originate from an item set up in Oracle  Inventory with an associated Asset Category (which carries a default depreciation method).  The Create Assets feature supports a disconnected environment in which the assets are not fed from the Oracle  Purchasing.

 it might be advantageous to use the asset number as the tag  number. By taking advantage of Oracle flexfield validation features. and the way in which you define it is not constrained by any predefined uses within  Oracle Assets. If you are using preprinted tags. account number. county. If the Asset Number. but is often used as the basis for custom reporting.  The Asset Key Flexfield  The Asset Key Flexfield supplements the asset number with descriptive information that can be used to meet your  organization's individual needs. and retirements to bring the assets book in line  with reality.  The Asset Key Flexfield plays no role in financial reporting. and length of each of them. and product are often already enshrined in the Accounting Flexfield. such as a related project number. The Asset Key Flexfield provides an ideal framework for your custom ADI reporting. Given that important business dimensions such as company.  Oracle Assets includes full support for scanning bar­coded assets. Whereas the Asset Number uniquely identifies an item. For example. For example. so you should be generous with your  designation. staff  members can scan the tag number to a Descriptive Flexfield. transfers. It is  designed to be used with the Descriptive Flexfield for storing information that will be used in custom reports. The process can drive additions.  you could define a Location Flexfield with these segments:  COUNTRY | STATE | CITY | LOCATION_CODE  A data record for one of your assets might use those segments to store the following values:  USA | CA | Los Angeles | Jarvis House  Oracle allows you to define up to seven segments. Oracle Assets can carry each device for depreciation purposes. Going the other way. As they affix the tag during the receiving process. state/province /department/land.  The Location Flexfield  The Location Flexfield is used for recording the physical location of assets and for property tax reporting. ventilating. although it must be set up. the Asset key flexfield can be used for  more asset­specific information. including the capability for reports to reconcile scanned  assets to those in the system. A small bespoke program can get the tag number from there  to the Mass Additions table. you define the number of segments  and the name. which in turn includes compressors and  generators. Decide how Oracle's reports will support your property tax business operations. This leaves you the relatively simple task of preparing custom reports in the format that best supports your unique  needs. Its segments  usually include the country. If you have that luxury. In fact. keep in mind that some trackable and depreciable items might be  enclosed in or covered by other items—that is.  Major capital items often include components that need to be separately tracked and depreciated. You  should include the following factors in your decision: . It has as many  segments as you are likely to need. you  can use the Asset Key Flexfield instead to aid reporting.  Either alternative will require a moderate amount of third­party or bespoke (custom) code. The standard  forms support the complex functions of data capture and validation without the necessity of specific knowledge of the  data. and air conditioning) system. but it will not record any configuration data. Tag. suppose  a building includes an HVAC (heating. it is only a minor programming effort to pull the asset number or tag  number out of the system and send it to a bar code printer.  When planning your asset management system. the Asset Key Flexfield groups  assets by non­financial identifiers.  The Asset Key Flexfield can include up to ten segments. It lets you choose the columns to be displayed and used for selection and sorting in its variable  format reports.a system to print bar code tags. Consider your business  processes for physically tracking assets. format.  consider putting a scanner "wedge" on the receiving area terminal.  including Oracle Assets. As with any Oracle flexfield. The number you decide is final. and Serial Number are sufficient for physical tracking. their tags might not be visible. Plan for the future and define as many segments as you will ever need. and city in which an asset is located. it does not have to be actively  used.  Applications Desktop Integrator (ADI) enables you to create custom reports for a number of Financials packages. you simplify  and refine your data entry process.  department.

  §  §  The Category Flexfield  An asset's category determines its financial treatment within Oracle Assets—that is. the way in which the asset is  depreciated. The derivation process is illustrated in Figure 8­1. You will usually want to set up  categories so that you do not need to override the defaults they establish; this way. As you can see in Figure 8­1. You can preassign the Asset Category for any item you  buy regularly that is set up in Oracle Inventory. leaving you with a rule maintenance headache; so use cross­validation rules  sparingly.§  §  Your outside tax rate services Get the tax package at the same time you buy Oracle. and the depreciation method.  The Asset Category specifies the General Ledger accounts to be used for the following:  §  Asset cost and Asset clearing accounts  §  Construction in progress (CIP) cost and CIP clearing accounts  §  Depreciation expense and depreciation reserve accounts .Which other segments will you want to  edit? You probably will have names for your campuses. the  depreciation life. the full lifetime depreciation treatment of an item can be  established by the cost of the item. or flat rate). Flat rate depreciation is implemented as a straight percentage of cost. you could set up cross­validation rules for your business locations; however. and county. state. Unless you can buy these rules through a service.  Figure 8­1: Derivation of depreciation amounts  Depreciation computations depend on such factors as the type of depreciation (life. as they can validate ranges of codes. units of production.  Segment edits You will want lookup table edits of country.  Your company locations How closely will you track assets? To the city? To a campus? A building? A floor? A  room? Your business processes have to achieve a balance between the value of being able to locate assets and the  cost of recording their movements. and state. If you have decided upon  regional zones these could change. country. Make sure the geography you  define maps to the data you will integrate with Oracle. and the Asset Category assigned to it as it enters the system. items can enter the system through  Mass Additions without your having to deal with them individually. with  no regard to depreciation life.  they particularly lend themselves to numeric codes. having them all available is probably  not worth the effort. but can you anticipate every possible room number?  Cross­validation rules It would be painful to compile and write out the rules for numerous valid combinations of  county. On the other hand.  The Asset Category specifies a default depreciation method to be used with an asset.

  However.  The flexfield combinations for the various asset. However.  Segment 1: Vehicle | Segment 2: Owned­Luxury  or  Segment 1: Vehicle­Owned­Luxury  The advantage of multiple segments is that each segment can be validated independently as new categories are created. which copies new  assets from a closed fiscal year to the open fiscal year period in the tax book; and Periodic Mass Copy. In Release 10. An asset might have a residual value beyond which it will not depreciate. a car is always  worth one hundred dollars as scrap.  Depreciation is a "funny money" expense that lends itself to accounting tricks. the initial cost of the  asset (less residual value) will have been expensed. view. but also decreasing stated income (hence income taxes). The asset is taken off the books when it is sold. The relationship is many­to­one: Many Assets books can be  associated with one GL set of books. depreciation life. For example. you can run the Mass Copy process. in the United States) have standardized the  ways in which companies recognize depreciation.7 and earlier. but it would be impractical to survey the market every year to  determine what each asset is worth. . Minor Categories differentiate different depreciation methods and lives for a given Major  Category. For these reasons.  Often two segments are used: a Major Category and a Minor Category. There are also Initial Mass Copy. You can use separate segments for concepts such as  depreciation type.  To move assets from one asset book into an associated tax book. governments and national accounting  standards committees (the Financial Accounting Standards Board. or modify any business process with simple drag­and­drop operations while the system automatically  derives the proper account combinations.§  Revaluation reserve and amortization accounts  Oracle Assets combines the account information provided in the Asset Category setup with various business rules to  generate the General Ledger journals. and method; or you can put them all together in a single segment. Oracle Workflow Builder and Account Generator now allow you  to create. The depreciated book value appears on the balance sheet as an  asset.  Depreciation  Markets ultimately determine the value of any asset. It generates intercompany journals to move the  assets and associated liabilities between balancing segments within the one General Ledger set of books. It is quite likely that the  major effort in defining Asset Categories will take place at conversion. Oracle Flexbuilder was used to automatically derive  account combinations for certain transactions. Stretching it out can  make a company's book value appear unnaturally healthy. Oracle Assets can easily handle transfers of assets  between organizations when those organizations are in one Assets book.  Oracle provides up to seven segments for the Category Flexfield. and depreciation expense accounts are in the Accounting  Flexfield structure that corresponds to that set of books. accountants generally assign an initial book  value. liability. after which new categories will rarely be added.  Ledger Accounting  The depreciation expense from each Oracle Assets depreciation book flows to a single General Ledger (GL) set of books.  There is an advantage to keeping the relationship one­to­one. The primary objectives of these groups include ensuring fair taxation  and enabling shareholders to make meaningful comparisons between companies. an economic life. which will  automatically migrate all assets and their associated transactions. most companies do not have so many different depreciation plans that this is an issue. and a formula to determine the depreciation and thus the value of the asset at each period during  that economic life.  Each period's depreciation is booked as an expense in that period. The difference between the price received and the book value at  the time of sale is posted to a Gain or Loss on Sale income account. or FASB. When an asset is acquired or built. Taking depreciation quickly has the effect  not only of understating the value of assets. which is run every  period to keep the tax book in line with the corporate one—it just copies new assets. At the end of its economic life. For example. Generally there is one Major Category for each  Balance Sheet Natural Account.

 and cities are  less concerned with whether the asset reports and property tax filings they receive agree in value with the company's  income tax filings. This arrangement  means that it is usually adequate to maintain two depreciation books: financial and federal. As you weigh your various reporting requirements against keeping separate sets of books. the more  revenue will be subject to income taxes.  Note  Even if you do not buy a license for Oracle HR. be sure to  favor the data over rigid adherence to a "pure vanilla" use of Oracle Assets. as long as the two filings can be reconciled and each jurisdiction gets the tax computed by the formulas  it dictates. For example. and in  Oracle Assets are set up to associate organizations with asset books. different taxing entities demand  different depreciation schedules. the Oracle  Assets module serves as a very accessible legacy system. so that in the earlier example just the plant personnel can see the plant assets.  Merger and Acquisition Considerations  Tangible assets are a major factor in valuing corporate reorganizations. The longer the life of an asset. This is because the employee and organization  entities are owned by HR; therefore. the less depreciation expense a company takes. You will minimize maintenance effort if you  keep the data structure simple and keep all of your records in one asset book.  These government entities regulate and monitor the way in which assets are depreciated. it is usually better handled by allocation within the GL than by settings within  Assets.  Oracle Assets is usually not a factor in the design of the Accounting Flexfield (AFF). such as product line or project. cost. These bodies might have their own assessors—common for agencies  dealing with property taxes applied to real estate and fixed plant assets—or they might allow the business itself to  compute the tax based on a legislated formula.  It would be impossible to achieve consistency between depreciation deductions (and the resultant net asset values) in one  set of books and property tax computations in another set. define your  various flexfields in such a way that you can create the necessary reports and journal postings through native Oracle  Assets functions. The  acquiring firm will find all the essential data regardless of whether it uses Oracle Assets. Not surprisingly. It has the  capability to carry one asset in multiple tax depreciation books for different taxing jurisdictions. States. Custom scripts to extract data for export are easy to write. and remaining depreciation. . Purchasing. and Projects. a construction company might have a separate division to manage its plant and machinery.  Some businesses need to use multiple asset books to keep separate the assets of different divisions that share a single  set of GL books. and department. Moreover.  Oracle Assets carries all the data required to generate Mass Additions into a new system. The purpose is usually to  carry varying net asset value figures in accordance with the different sets of laws. In other words. Governments set their own rules governing the depreciable life of different  categories of assets and the depreciation formulas that apply to them. company. Assets are usually associated with  the organizational elements of the AFF. their value can be reported and agreed upon. the Asset Key Flexfield  is useful for grouping assets to be transferred. If the depreciation schedules are different.You can avoid a lot of work by keeping all assets in a single asset book. Once grouped. counties. If depreciation expense is charged out by other  segments. although depreciation and investment  tax credits might figure too. by the taxing authorities themselves) as the basis for computing tax liability. Security hierarchies are a feature of Oracle Human Resources. it would be much more difficult to reconcile state and federal tax returns. there is no difference to the other modules whether HR is a full or  shared install—their use of HR tables remains the same. In the United States. Then responsibilities can be set up to use these  security profiles. such as Payables. the asset values will  also differ.  the more the government will receive in tax revenue. The taxing entities accept the company's own records (which are audited  by outside auditors and. Because it is independent of financial factors. most jurisdictions follow the federal government's lead regarding depreciation  computations; otherwise. During the setup of your book. some shared tables and forms are available in other  modules.  and rent it out to other parts of the corporation.  Oracle Assets helps you compute the most favorable taxation in areas over which you have some discretion. Oracle Assets in the E­Business Suite now makes use of the organization  hierarchy to secure access to data by asset book. Assets that change ownership need to be fully  identified by item. if necessary.  Business Taxes and the Need for Multiple Asset Books  Many government bodies tax business assets.

 such as lease tax and use tax.  Depreciation reduces taxes by reducing taxable income. It  works well to have Oracle serve as the repository for these handmade processes and the data that drives them. Real and personal property are distinguished by the property  class assigned to the asset.  Allowing a company to front­load depreciation schedules (that is. tax books require a separate export/import process using Mass Copy because tax book  depreciation is independent of financial depreciation. to take more depreciation early in an asset's life)  reduces the tax liability that results from a capital investment. is handled by  General Ledger.  Table 8­2: Cash Flow under Straight­line Depreciation  Year 1  Investment  Depreciation  Net cash flow before taxes  Income tax benefit at 40%  After­tax cash flow effect of investment  −5000  1000  −4000  400  −4600  Year 2  0  1000  1000  400  400  Year 3  0  1000  1000  400  400  Year 4  0  1000  1000  400  400  Year 5  0  1000  1000  400  400  2000  −3000 Total  −5000  .  Income Tax Calculation  Tracking depreciation is the primary means by which Oracle Assets can help you calculate your income taxes. The concerns are the location of each  item and the item's value in the eyes of the taxing authorities. or transferred out) must ensure that the same assets appear in the financial and tax books after a  reorganization. It  is simple to use and accurate. identifying data for  the taxable property and your valuation data. the export procedure for deacquired assets (those that have been sold. However.  Taxes  Property tax is the major tax reporting requirement addressed by Oracle Assets. a tax policy device used in the United States to favor certain types of business  investments. affect the tax itself rather than taxable income. The service will prepare property taxes for all applicable filing jurisdictions.000 investment for a  firm in the 40 percent tax bracket. Gains and losses on sales can be viewed as adjustments to  depreciation. The second major tax issue. The  Property Tax report shows assets within a given geography. Investment tax credits. Table 8­2 shows the effect that straight­line depreciation would have on a $5.  scrapped.Tax books shadow the actual asset books. Oracle has been fully integrated with three specialized third­party property tax preparation services. Table 8­3 shows the effect of accelerated depreciation on the same loan. You can use the desktop interface to pull these assets into a spreadsheet to compute tax  liability. Minor taxes can be handled by linking spreadsheets to  asset records but the system lends itself to custom­coded extensions where they are needed.  Property Tax Calculation  Oracle Assets supports real and personal property tax calculations through tax books and the Location Flexfield. Thus. income tax. Oracle Assets also carries the data  to support other types of taxation.  Spreadsheets play a major role in most Oracle Assets property tax computations. which uses asset value and depreciation figures from Oracle Assets. The tax is made up in later years when less depreciation  remains to be taken. Although the rules are complex—  different states and counties have their own rules for property classes and depreciation—the data is not highly volatile.  Depreciation Methods  Depreciation is an instrument of public tax policy; depreciation regulations are designed to encourage investment.  Since Release 11.  You send them data from Oracle Assets in their format: a Location Flexfield in the layout they dictate. and saves significant amounts of time.

  Figure 8­3 shows the effect on total costs: Asset cost net of tax savings from depreciation goes down faster with ACRS.  Figure 8­2: Comparison of cash flow under straight­line and accelerated depreciation . which represents 40 percent off the initial cost; however. the cost reduces to $3. With straight­line depreciation. Figures 8­2 and 8­3 present the same information graphically.Table 8­3: Cash Flow under Three­year ACRS  Year 1  Investment  Depreciation  Net cash flow before taxes  Income tax benefit at 40%  After­tax cash flow effect of investment  −5000  1250  −3750  500  −4500  Year 2  0  1900  1900  760  760  Year 3  0  1850  1850  740  740  Year 4  0  0  0  0  0  Year 5  0  0  0  0  0  2000  −3000  Total  −5000  In both cases the after­tax cost of the investment is $3.000. they come much sooner with ACRS. the  difference is timing. Figure 8­2 shows that  although the total depreciation deductions are the same under the two methods.000 after five years; with accelerated  depreciation it gets there in three.

 there are several tax books; each with  different figures. To account for the differences in depreciation recognized between the two books. Subtract the depreciation  listed in the financial books from the depreciation listed in the tax books to determine additional allowable  depreciation expense. The postings should look something like these:  Account  Depreciation expense  Depreciation reserve  Debit  20.000  Credit  2.  Within Oracle Assets. To take additional depreciation in the current year but show that it  must be paid back in future years. You then can reconcile the tax books with the financial books and compute taxes entirely within  General Ledger. Frequently. Suppose it is $5. Your company might maintain its tax books in General Ledger; if so. follow these  steps:  1. the real­money implications of tax book numbers must ultimately flow  to the GL financial books.Figure 8­3: Cumulative after­tax cost under straight­line and accelerated depreciation  Because tax depreciation does not accurately reflect the true worth of an asset. If the rate were 40 percent. you can post tax journals directly to  the GL set of tax books.000. the company's financial books show  depreciation and net asset value differently from that of the tax books.  Whether you maintain tax books in General Ledger.  the entries would look like these:  Account  Debit  Credit .  Create a manual journal entry for the tax implications of the accelerated depreciation. post depreciation from Assets' financial books to the set of financial books in General  Ledger. create manual journal entries like these:  Account  Net depreciation expense adjustment  Deferred depreciation expense  Debit  5000  5000  Credit  3.  Use the tax books with Assets to compute the depreciation allowed for tax purposes.000  20.

  If the recoverable cost in the tax books exceeds the recoverable cost in the financial books. so the total depreciation just equals the allowed amount. barrels per day for an oil well).  Multiply the tax depreciation in each period by the recoverability ratio. As this account generator method is used frequently  across the E­Business Suite it is an important area in which to have some skills and experience available during the  implementation of the system; particularly if changes to the out­of­the­box default setup will be required.Account  Income tax payable adjustment  Deferred income tax  Debit  2000  Credit  2000  With these steps. This will force the total recoverable cost on  the tax side to equal the total corporate recoverable cost. The taxing authority allows a company to reduce its tax  obligation by a fixed percentage of a qualifying capital investment. perhaps  to take account of a disposal that has happened in the meantime. The default accounts are  retrieved from one of three sources: the asset book. usually the price of the asset minus its salvage value. you now have two options.  Both the financial and the tax books carry recoverable costs. the full depreciation from the  tax books could exceed the price of the item. It is possible to  convert the flexbuilder rules used in earlier releases of Oracle Assets into account generator flows. quicker model? Release 11 saw the  introduction of depreciation what­if analysis; this has been extended to include assets not yet taken on. This will  depreciate all the assets that were not depreciated in that period's previous run. units of production (for example.  reducing balances. General Ledger's financial books fully reflect the impact of tax book depreciation.  Run the Oracle Assets Recoverability report to compute the lifetime recoverable cost in the financial and tax books. The downstream considerations come into play when . because running it no longer automatically closes the period in Oracle Assets.  Note  If you want to make an adjustment to the depreciation after you have run the depreciation program. but the deferred depreciation and tax accounts reflect the  fact that these current benefits will be reversed sometime in the future.  Compute the ratio between the two: corporate (financial) recoverable cost to tax recoverable cost. to keep customized  accounting that is already in place. Accelerated  depreciation will be recaptured within the asset's lifetime. usually front­end loaded.  Recoverability Ratio  Recoverable cost is the total amount of investment that can be recouped through depreciation over an asset's lifetime. Financial depreciation will still have the shape of the tax  depreciation curve.  Accounting for Assets  The workflow­based account generator is the driver for accounting for assets transactions. Alternatively you can roll  back the depreciation run you have already done and rerun it from the start. This will be particularly  useful for the more complex depreciation methods that are sometimes required by industry regulations. the asset category. You specify the  asset category. Should you lease or buy plant and machinery? What is the impact of selling off a vehicle that has become  expensive to maintain. and the asset assignment. you can create formula­based depreciation methods as an alternative to the more normal ones such as straight line. Tax authorities do not allow this. faithful printing press with a new. ACRS. and in­service date; the software calculates the depreciation into the future.  Investment Tax Credit  An investment tax credit (ITC) is independent of depreciation. with more depreciation in the early years. When the recoverable amounts in the tax and financial  books are the same. This  recoverability ratio should be less than one. To accommodate  this. Different segments of  the accounting flexfield can be generated from different sources.  The total lifetime depreciation flowing from the tax books will equal the total flowing from the financial books. value.  3. Each period's depreciation  will just be proportionately less. The Oracle Assets topical essay entitled  Calculating Deferred Depreciation suggests the following steps for handling this situation:  1. and MACRS. there is no problem in computing depreciation. or of replacing the old. Current expense is  increased and current tax liability is correspondingly decreased.  2.  Depreciation Analysis  There might be different options available in the management of the asset base that affect the financial accounting  reporting. You can run  depreciation again.

S. which can be expensed and a  capital lease.  Oracle keeps the two in absolute agreement. a predefined depreciation  method. The standard criterion for success in converting assets is that the totals of asset  value. You will pay in effort and time if you have to exactly match  depreciation between Oracle and the legacy system  Establish a strategy for assets that have remained on their original depreciation schedules These are the easy  ones. If the asset has not been in use for the prescribed period of time. leased items are more an issue for the accounts payable department than for managers of fixed assets. This arrangement offers a finer level of control  than General Ledger budgeting. The major difference is the need to track when  the lease will expire. tax law. Oracle Fixed Assets  applies an FASB13 test to leased assets in order to determine how they would be accounted under U. The  accounts payable department makes the periodic payments.  current cost.  Leased Assets  The physical handling of leased assets is similar to that of owned assets. The test plan will  specify that reports from the two systems match.the asset is sold or retired. capital leases have an amortization structure with  principal and interest elements. Because some  legacy assets and ledger systems are independent of one another. On the other hand. specify the reports that  should match between the two systems. you can reach the required degree  of accuracy by mapping them to one very close. However. so that the lease can be extended or the item returned.  Converting to Oracle Assets  Converting your assets correctly is a major challenge in cutting over from your legacy system to Oracle Assets. recoverable cost.  Establish criteria for success at the depreciation­expense level The standard criterion for success here is that  the future depreciation cash flows are the same in Oracle as in the legacy system. The legacy ledger balances  already reflect acquisitions and the prior year's depreciation.  Oracle Assets budgets follow Asset Books and Asset Category groupings. Oracle Assets includes reports to compare budgets and actual expenses on a yearly basis. Your conversion test plan should  accomplish the following goals:  §  Establish criteria for success at the balance­sheet level Start by comparing the legacy asset and depreciation  reserve accounts stored in General Ledger to the legacy system figures stored in Oracle Assets. which must be done within the Accounting Flexfield structure. Lease expiration dates and lease terms must  be carefully monitored. the figures might not match.  However.  Define depreciation methods and categories to accommodate legacy assets Each asset that enters Oracle  through Mass Additions will be identified with a category and. Reports of  projected depreciation are useful for General Ledger budgeting purposes as well. Again. which is treated as a sale or purchase from an accounting standpoint are subtle. and date the asset was placed in service.  Capital Budgeting  Capital budgets are projections of capital expenditures and the depreciation expense flows that recapture those  expenses. You cannot import a depreciation flow with an item; you must use an Oracle­assigned method. The distinctions between an operating lease. Oracle Assets carries and displays amortization data. and residual value in Oracle match the total in the legacy system. the company might be liable  for ITC recapture upon its sale. depreciation reserve. depreciation plan. There §  §  §  . through the category. so the resulting journals would double the values. Your plan should call for  importing these values; you can use them to run depreciation for the subsequent years. which allows you to view the  amortization schedule on a capital lease. Testing—  through repeated trial conversions—is the key to success. The critical determinants are whether the asset figures (original  cost and depreciation reserve) and the future depreciation stream are correct. Oracle can correctly establish the net book value and remaining depreciation flow given the original cost. If there are  assets in the legacy system that do not have a corresponding method in Oracle. You need to plan for a one­time accounting adjustment to bring assets  and the ledger in line at conversion.  Financially. you can override Oracle's determination if your tax rules are different.

 The Oracle Assets book should reflect the same values as the legacy book.000 asset goes into service on a five­year depreciation schedule.  §  Establish a strategy for assets with depreciation schedules that have changed over time Taking a simple  example. Give it zero residual value.are two strategies to deal with this issue: Delete the journals before they can be posted or post them and reverse  them (which shows a clear audit trail). Figure 8­4 shows the asset's  lifetime depreciation; Figure 8­5 shows the residual value at the end of each year. suppose a $10. with the adjustment to be amortized.  Figure 8­4: Depreciation schedule reflecting a changed asset life  Figure 8­5: Annual residual values of the same asset . but is changed after three  years to a ten­year life.  and it should generate the same depreciation going forward.

.  Variable Format Reports.283 and see depreciation  of $571 per year. one­of­a­kind depreciation plan; so would every  other asset that changed plans or saw an amortized adjustment anywhere over its life. First. Oracle will  record the original cost in the books. Run depreciation against both the financial and the tax  books. The asset would require a handmade.000. it will have a residual value of $2. there is no standard depreciation schedule for a 17.  Asset transfers Because the only way to transfer items between sets of books is to remove them and then add them  back in. and only a few group items by Asset Key Flexfield. more inclusive Asset sets of books within a General Ledger set of books. and  depreciation flow that would apply in the last three years of a $10. These defaults also define the remaining life in years of the asset. is a new feature that works with Oracle  Assets. Defining how to extract data for use in standard variable format  reports is a setup and programming task. $2. depreciation plan.If the asset is imported into Oracle at the end of the sixth year. This is a  good way of reducing the amount of development resources required.5 years.  Trade­offs Between Recordkeeping and Reporting  The one parameter common to most of Oracle's standard reports is the Asset Set of Books. reporting is easiest with multiple sets of asset  books. The issue of deciding  how many sets of asset books to maintain is primarily one of record keeping versus reporting.5­year straight­line plan. Spreadsheets are the most  common. You can also go to the Internet using HTML. Oracle deals only  with integers of years for asset life. First. More significantly. Assets performs both  functions. with this process there is no way of handling an asset that  has a different cost in the asset book and its associated tax books. These amounts include  acquisition cost. the in­service date might be important in the future; changing it  misrepresents reality. However. The easiest way to report on groups of assets within one General Ledger set  of books is to keep them in separate Asset sets of books. The numbers in  Oracle would be exactly correct if the in­service date were pushed back by 7.  Oracle will calculate it based on category defaults. the preferred method is to repeat the tax book depreciation process.  The more than one hundred standard reports in the Oracle Assets system are indicative of the variety of information  needs. this approach poses some difficulty. each with relatively few entries.  §  Oracle provides the tools you need to enter revalued assets directly. residual value.  However.5 years. You can purify and prepare your  assets data in a spreadsheet; then have ADI load the data directly to the FA_MASS_ADDITIONS table. Even a thousand could not satisfy all users; yet each installation uses only a small fraction of those provided. Unless you use desktop functions.  Converting Tax Books  When converting your tax books. which you can access through ADI's Request Center. The master  record is the thread that ties the systems together for audit purposes: The ledger agrees with the Oracle Assets books  and all Assets books carry the same assets. If Accumulated Depreciation is brought over this  way it only applies to the asset book.  Oracle Assets provides the necessary master record of which items the company owns and where they are. As you enter the cost data in the  FA_MASS_ADDITIONS table. Several reports group items  by Category and Location. From that point on. The conversion plan must include procedures for generating balance reports in the Oracle and legacy assets tax  books to show that both sides agree on the amounts being transferred within tax books. You can extract Assets data to be manipulated with whatever desktop tool you favor.000 item depreciated over 17.283.5­year life. but compute future depreciation using the revalued figures.  §  Report structure Because most reports accept only a few parameters. also enter the revaluation reserve and the revaluation amortization basis.  The converted tax books might tie in to a set of tax books in General Ledger. and the asset were depreciated on  a 17. whether there are few or many sets of asset books.  §  There is a Mass Additions Upload feature in the Applications Desktop Integrator. accumulated depreciation. which enables you to concentrate your efforts  on the data cleansing that is usually required. and residual value for tax purposes.  §  The General Ledger interface is straightforward. the system structure favors fewer. add the item  to the financial books; then move it to the appropriate tax books. creating reports is strictly up to the Oracle Assets users. and $571 per year) are the original cost. but not all companies keep multiple ledger  books. but the recordkeeping is arguably the most essential—and favors keeping fewer and larger financial books. When you copy assets to tax books with Initial Mass Copy and run depreciation. your  design of reports and sets of books must take into account two conflicting design points: report structure and asset  transfers. These figures ($10.

 Many of the changes add tighter control. it replenishes your inventory.  For example.  there are a few changes worth noting. You can add processes to manipulate and report on  fixed­assets data through spreadsheets linked to the database. It covers all the steps starting  with requests for materials from requisitioner to supplier (in Self­Service Procurement). services. At the management level the Business Intelligence System brings together the statistics to facilitate and . Manufacturing and inventory departments base their purchasing  recommendations on what goods are being requested and what goods are on order. but it  does not address such strategic questions as which suppliers should enjoy long­term contractual relationships. You can take advantage of  Oracle's partnerships with tax information providers to compute your property tax filings automatically. Purchasing orders the  requisitioned goods from suppliers; Receiving accepts delivery of items and delivers them internally to the requisitioner. Oracle has added the capability to match  an invoice to a purchase order receipt and enhanced the Pay on Receipt process. such as a data warehouse. the accounts  impacted. the amount ordered. as well as when they will arrive.  With the release of the E­Business Suite Oracle has not made any radical changes in purchasing functionality; however. The open design of  the module allows you to easily capture and work with custom data.The alternative to using desktop tools is to modify the standard Oracle reports. It will help you maintain accurate  financial records of assets for financial and income tax reporting purposes. capital goods. In addition. the movement statistics  processor and reports handle Intrastat reporting for the European Union and can be communicated through the E­  Commerce Gateway and there is now support for partially recoverable tax. fulfills  customer demand. The strength of the process lies in supporting operational rather than management decisions. including Purchasing. and the type of material ordered. It captures task and accounting information that will be needed  downstream by Project Accounting. Payables. Oracle Purchasing efficiently determines  the accounting distribution for each purchasing line by applying logic to the input provided by the requisitioner or buyer. third­party software built to work with Oracle. or your own  custom routines. along with the ability to handle leases and warranty information.  Conclusion  Oracle Assets provides the essential record keeping features for property.  The Workflow engine used to guide transactions through the routing and accounting distribution processes provides the  users with excellent guidance and enables you to adapt the processes as necessary. its destination. The document will be routed  through the appropriate approval chain according to the type of document (purchase order or requisition). Fixed Assets. requisitioning. People and systems  throughout the company use requisitions to tell the purchasing department what they need. These are areas of functionality that were  previously customized. and equipment. You can access information directly from the transaction system or from  a central repository.  expendable supplies—everything the company needs.  Approval policies are applied to all purchasing documents before the system acts on them. Its major functions are sourcing. and receiving. and helps control outside processing.  Purchasing handles all acquisition activity within a company: goods and services. plant.  purchasing.  Purchasing Overview  Purchasing is usually considered the first phase in the supply chain cycle.  Improved integration with other systems—notably Projects and Payables—now gives Oracle Assets more physical asset  management functions. and eventually the General Ledger. Oracle's  Business Intelligence System (BIS) product completes the picture. raw materials.  The whole set of purchasing processes is now packaged as Oracle Strategic Procurement. Doing this is a much easier and less expensive task to manage than fragmenting the assets among many  financial books. primarily adding additional selection  criteria. and its design ensures the integrity of the  journals it sends to General Ledger. Among other things. It provides all levels of users with answers to questions  across all Oracle modules. or  stocks the item in inventory.  Chapter 9: Oracle Purchasing  Purchasing is an integral part of the corporate supply chain. it can help personnel determine whether to approve an order or how much of an item to replenish. and extending to incoming supplier  catalogues. combined with the  processing logic required to support almost every conceivable depreciation schedule.

 which is used by the workflow  approvals. The workflows that are  delivered are flexible. you can still use a requisition but the requisitioner can put the card  number on the requisition. and being manufactured). It can communicate by e­mail.  Requisitions  The requisition form begins the procurement process. Employees can verify their transactions.  Description of the needed goods With an online requisition. and a wise one.  Approval policy for requisitions is defined at setup. and challenge any transactions on the  statement that they did not make. As there is not always sufficient detail available from the card issuer about  items bought. rule­based processes that you can tailor to meet specific business needs. This user is the best source for defaulting the following information:  §  §  Requisitioner's identity and organization With Oracle Purchasing. Once the requisition is approved. the requisitioner is the one who will know and care most about his or her budget situation.  The Purchasing module is the repository for all this information. It can automatically route requisitions through an approval cycle and prompt approvers to act. These factors also determine which people appear in the approval chain or hierarchy. although the design should encompass the wider procurement goals. item  category. It holds the documents including requisitions. It says. you can bypass requisitioning altogether." The requisition process traditionally has been a  manual one. the user can either choose the right item from an  online catalog; or enter descriptive information. purchase  orders and supplier price/item catalogs. The generating systems populate all of the required data  fields; these requisitions are usually converted to purchase order releases that you can set up to pass straight to the  suppliers without buyer intervention. Oracle Purchasing is flexible enough to  support all kinds of business procedures.monitor strategic procurement initiatives. Business Intelligence can even provide cross­operating unit reporting. For instance. "I want it.  A manual process works well for some but doesn't take advantage of integration. Because they had to be relatively simple. .  With procurement cards (sometimes known as P­cards).  Information on accounts to charge for the purchase Depending on your setup. and requisitioner. the Web.  §  The Web is a natural vehicle for requisitioning.  Enabling employees to get the materials they need to do the job—without overhead and intervention from management—  certainly makes them more productive. Controls are imposed according to what is being ordered. and how much it costs. the purchase will flow through on the card without the need  for purchase order or release transactions. the manual  approvals procedures were frequently inappropriately loose or restrictive for the requisition in question. Employees use their  procurement cards to make a purchase; Oracle Payables derives the accounting information from data imported from the  card issuer. on order. "Empowering employees" is a mantra of our generation.  The Inventory and Material Requirements Planning modules compute requirements by balancing demand (a combination  of orders and forecasts) against supply (what is on hand. though the  user has the option to override the defaults. most accounting information will  be derived automatically on the basis of the identity of the requisitioner and the item being requested. with a trail of paper forms and written approvals. It is where the approval hierarchy is set up. who is  ordering it. The  requisitioner is a better source for additional data than people further downstream. the use of requisitions can be a way of maintaining control and reporting while reaping the efficiency  benefits of the card model. or directly through the  applications. which is a  useful feature for a shared service center. capturing  accounting data at requisition time is the only way to make sure the input is accurate. It can go live independently of the other parts of the procurement product set—and this might be a useful way  to proceed. such as the buyers and the  payables clerks. capture of this data is automated. The objective of the requisition form is to efficiently capture everything from the  eventual user up front. For  users with lengthy Accounting Flexfields or significant project and task information requirements. Alternatively. it can  approve requisitions automatically and create purchase orders directly on the basis of factors such as the cost.  Approval does not have to be an approval of the cost of the material requested; for example. Also. it can be to ensure that the  technical specification matches the corporate standard. These systems can create  requisitions to fill the difference between supply and demand.  Oracle Purchasing uses workflow technology to incorporate many requisitioning­related functions. and a suggested buyer and suggested supplier for nonstock items  and services. change the accounting data.

 There is usually a  preferred ship to address. Information entered for  the supplier will become the default for all purchase orders entered for that supplier. Buyers' time costs money. and buyers get the advantages of negotiated low prices. specifies items and  prices as negotiated with the supplier. mode of shipment. and unreliable suppliers can cost a company in terms of lost  production. and the reliability that can only be  achieved by sharing planning information with trusted suppliers. Like a standard order.  Contracts  Purchase orders and purchase agreements are the contractual vehicles recognized by Oracle. It  specifies terms and conditions but no items; other types of POs can reference a Contract Purchase Agreement. and where. Payables and Purchasing share the same supplier and supplier  sites and supplier maintenance screens can be made available in either or both of these applications. site. The automated system can have variable routing depending on who is  available. POs might be adequate for all  procurement activity in smaller organizations. long­term supplier relationships usually involve purchase  agreements. Other data elements satisfy  government tax and statutory reporting requirements. is really only an agreement to agree. Other  information can be entered at the supplier level. A BPA usually applies for a given period of time; it also can stipulate minimum and  maximum unit and dollar order amounts. referencing the BPA. terms of payment. (Supplier access  should be a secured process within any organization. Both sides find it worthwhile to invest in establishing  these relationships. and invoice  adjustments. bill to address. which is described later in this chapter; then buyers create purchase  orders with lines referencing both the Contract Purchase Agreement and the approved quotation under it. saving  your employees time and preventing the mistakes and the resulting waste of time involved in searching the entire Item  Master for the parts they need.  Whereas a paper requisition might sit in an inbox for a week. or other types you have set up). and the 90 percent of the suppliers who account for 10 percent of  purchasing volume in larger organizations. there has to be an approved quotation  through the Request for Quotation (RFQ) process. when. yet most groups within your organization order only from a small subset of that large list. Your Item Master might contain  thousands of part numbers.Even though just as many people might have to approve a requisition. complete unto themselves: They specify what to deliver. However. and so on associated with a supplier. Oracle Workflow and Oracle Alerts can automatically generate e­mail to nudge along actions  that seem to be hung up along the way.  Suppliers need to be set up before a buyer can create a purchase order.  Requisition Templates can also be set up to streamline the entry of requisition lines. a Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA). are created as required to tell  the supplier how many to ship and where.  Supplier Relationships  Both buyers and sellers find it most efficient to set up long­term purchasing relationships. Purchase Order Releases. saving keystrokes at the transaction level later on.  A Contract Purchase Agreement. the second type of purchase agreement. credit memos. the paperless approval process is usually quicker. and Oracle Purchasing provides several features that will help you manage them. lost sales. In theory. and Oracle is designed to manage these  relationships. Oracle Purchasing actively pushes actions awaiting approval  to the approvers' attention when they log in. returns.  Suppliers  Successful buying entails satisfying the needs of the company at the lowest overall cost.  Requisition Templates can be created from a list of frequently ordered items or even from an existing requisition. First. and type (outside supplier. As a last resort. The more basic. minimal paperwork. PPOs specify accounting distributions for . A  Contract Purchase Agreement can also support competitive solicitations. Sellers get business they can  plan on.  There are two types of purchase agreements. employee.  Planned Purchase Orders (PPOs) establish a vehicle to satisfy projected material and services needs over a period of  time; they mix features of standard orders and BPOs. all this automation and notification should speed up the requisitioning  process.) Responsibilities and business procedures should be in place to  ensure that the supplier update process is coordinated. Supplier relationships are a key element in purchasing strategy. and that only approved suppliers are entered and any duplication  avoided. Purchase orders (POs) are  one­time affairs. This is often not the same as  getting the lowest price. and the paperwork involved in tasks such as inspections. The essentials of supplier setup include name  and address.

 Its process also represents a  maximum investment in establishing a supplier relationship. optional bid.  For a formal procurement.  Purchasing sends Requests for Information to the identified suppliers. Purchasing sends the bids to all qualified parties who have expressed  an interest and follows up with a bidder's conference.  6. purchasing writes a Request for Proposal or a Request for Quotation. can use a PPO to protect that line of the budget with an  encumbrance. Once an award is made.each line item. Online quote analysis  supports the selection process. Office Max. specifying what and how much is  needed. by item or commodity.  The two parties complete a contract incorporating the RFP and BAFO documents. However.  A competitive procurement can require a lot of time. . Unless the business'  policies absolutely require a competitive process.  Solicitations  The process of establishing a relationship can be formal or informal. The RFP restates  the requirement and specifies the format for a response. If the RFI needs to be communicated to a large  audience. Oracle Web Suppliers is designed to distribute notice of your requirements early and  broadly. There are opportunity costs associated  with the elapsed time. If not.  Purchasing asks the top bidders for Best and Final Offers (BAFOs). U. It also might publish the solicitation. such as erecting a building or constructing a software  system. as the business might not be able to move until procurement is complete.  3. with an RFP/RFQ. not knowing exactly how much heating oil it  will require for the year or when it would be delivered. To save time. the purchasing manager might want to apply a cost benefit analysis and  limit RFQs to larger procurements. It might dictate some terms and conditions (T&Cs) and  specify the format for adaptable T&Cs that must be stipulated in the bid. two­.  A department within the company or agency drafts a requirement document. It alerts suppliers to your need.  5. For example. and three­step processes (contract. An RFQ identifies a few suppliers from whom to  request quotes on items that may or may not have been defined yet in the Inventory Item Master. "Office Supply. it skips to Step 7 of this list and enters into  negotiations with one or more suppliers. the buyers cement the link between the  procurement and the existing purchase agreement.  4.  public agencies use the newspapers and Commerce Business Daily. A company might  have Contract Purchase Orders with Staples. In Europe the solicitation must be advertised  in the European Journal of Purchasing and Supply if the contract is worth over certain monetary limits (depending  on the industry sector).  Purchasing evaluates supplier proposals.  The buyers use their fund of experience and outside databases to assemble a list of potential suppliers. perhaps.  8. which of course is not free. a school system.  7. it could begin at Step 3 by posting the requirement through Oracle Supplier Portal. Seen from another  perspective. Oracle Supplier Portal can decrease the time and  cost involved in a competitive buy. The United States federal government sets the  standard for formal procurements; the European Union does the same for its members. Purchasing  provides line types for each and allows you to define any other line types that make sense. (Items such as non­  production purchases might never become part of the inventory system. It is worth identifying each of the steps in the full process to  see where Oracle's features can be useful:  1. The Approved Suppliers List (ASL) that  Purchasing uses can carry source and price information item by item. it could put those three  suppliers on a list called. By posting solicitations on the Web.  Purchasing decides whether to do a formal procurement. Like BPOs. The request often spells out the criteria  that will be used in evaluating the proposal.  Oracle Purchasing supports solicitations both with and without a prior purchasing agreement. from the basic to the most demanding procurement processes. They can then use Oracle's Approved Suppliers List and Sourcing  Rules to indicate. and optional release) are designed to cover all  ordering. the RFQ itself serves as an RFI.  These one­. A PPO can be used to  reserve funds under encumbrance accounting.  A Supplier List is a predefined set of suppliers that can be referenced when putting together an RFQ. which contracts to source from. you can include detailed specifications  as attachments on the RFQ and these will be available to suppliers through the Supplier Portal) Purchasing provides  forms for defining the RFP and entering bids. You might want to consider  Oracle Projects for managing truly complex services contracts. Purchases of services usually specify a monetary amount rather than an item quantity. They are structured for material and for most  service purchases. and Ginn's Office Supply. You can then print out one RFQ per supplier on the list. and when it is needed.  2." Putting together an RFQ for print cartridges would involve simply  naming the item and the supplier list.  The Purchasing RFQ process starts at step 5.S. the lines are only tentative; a release is required for actual delivery. The suppliers' BAFOs typically firm up terms  and conditions.

  The overview presented here introduces the approval architecture and gives an idea of what can be done with the  product's existing features. It takes a close reading of the User's Guide to fully understand its  mechanics.Approvals  Separating the authority to initiate and approve expenditures is a fundamental accounting control observed by most  organizations. or find the level at which the approval limit is sufficient for the sum at stake. as shown in Figure 9­1. If there are many holders of the position that has the appropriate approval limit. You can either set the system up to  send them the approval anyway. If it goes by position.  A setup parameter determines whether approval goes by individual (supervisor) or by position (hierarchy). the system looks at the supervisor link in a person's record. and which people can  view and modify each document type. . It ties in to  Figure 9­2. the  system will choose alphabetically the first person and send them the approval notification.  approval uses human resources tables. Because an Applications user  is linked to a person record. and then links back to find the incumbent in that position. The security controls define which types of approvals apply to each document type. If it goes by supervisor. which are present regardless of whether you have Oracle Human Resources  installed. The discussion follows the setup sequence recommended in the Installation Guide.  Figure 9­1: Supervisor versus Hierarchy Approval Structures  Of course the next step up still might not be sufficiently senior to sign off a large order. and only  send the approval notification there. Either way. The  incorporation of Oracle Workflow into this process gives you the power to modify the Oracle logic described next. links to the position hierarchy to find which position is next in the pecking  order. when you log on with your user and password and respond to a notification. Some Oracle customers have simply interfaced to an existing signature matrix for approval routings.  The approval hierarchy process is rather complex. the  system finds the position each person occupies. which shows the major tables and the processes that populate them. it is your  electronic signature.

  2. such as those performed by a buyer or a receiving clerk. When both systems are  used. You need to define only those jobs that will be  referenced in your approval process. This relationship is set up in the position hierarchy. whereas  purchase order approvals are pretty much confined to the purchasing department. . The people  who create and approve purchasing documents have jobs.  Define positions This step is necessary if you are defining approvals by position hierarchies rather than  supervisors.Figure 9­2: Relationships among the major forms procedures and database tables in the approval process  You must coordinate Purchasing with Oracle Human Resources if you are using both systems. Selecting requisition approvals can involve most of the company.  Define jobs A job is a set of responsibilities.) Documents will be routed on the basis of the relationship between these  positions. (Organizations and locations have  to be defined earlier in the setup process. A position is a job slot—a job within an organization at a location. you can perform the following steps as part of HR setup:  1.

 and then implement electronic approvals by phases; first for POs and later for  requisitions. everyone. Positions are required if you are using hierarchies but not if you are using supervisor approvals." A set of rules  identifies all types of things in the group. Any company  planning to make serious use of electronic approvals will need to plan and test the setup extensively.000. ASL will answer the  following: Who is the preferred supplier? What agreements are in place? Which suppliers have been debarred and can no  longer be used? The ASL carries practical information. the length of the lead time.  Globally Approved Supplier Lists  The Approved Suppliers List (ASL) relates items to your suppliers and the manufacturers who provide your suppliers. if you are using the position hierarchy you can then run the Fill Employee Hierarchy  process.  Tip  The approval hierarchy and employees should be treated as standing data much like suppliers and  customers. and other constraints.  while providing information about the relationship between you and the supplier. try not to have a large number of people occupying a single position (for example. which makes the process slow. and be set up in each test cycle (with realistic data volumes). Groups can overlap in  instances in which larger orders require more approvals than smaller ones. which populates a database table with the hierarchy links having transformed them into employee­to­employee  relationships.  3. modify.  2.  Tip  If you use the position hierarchy the fill hierarchy process can create a large number of hierarchy relationship  records in the PO_EMPLOYEE_HIERARCHIES_ALL table. such as vendors' part numbers and units of measure. You then give  them a security level that says what they can do (view. . so 900 employees become 900×900 records).  Define position controls This step associates your approval groups with either jobs or positions for each  document type. Higher approval amount groups will be associated with higher­level positions/jobs. so that the  supervisors are already defined when you need to reference them as you set up the employees who report to  them. These groups will later be tied to  positions (if using a position hierarchy).  This approval structure is extremely powerful and flexible. You can define who can access the  document—the people in the hierarchy.  For some key suppliers you can be very specific in the information you hold. item. with correspondingly high risks if the setup is not done correctly. or just the owner and subsequent approvers.3. such as  "Documents associated with Department XYZ for equipment lease expenditures more than $1. Each rule can use a combination of total document amount. you define their actions and  authority levels through a series of setup steps in Oracle Purchasing:  1. For instance. This will highlight inconsistencies  and allow experimentation with position definitions before the system is rolled out to an expectant crowd of  would­be requisitioners. do not have a  default requisitioner position because all who hold the position will reference all others and their approval  managers. or full access). It is also quite complicated to set up and debug.  Enter employees Once you've defined jobs and positions for your employees.  After you have defined the relationships among your employees through these setup steps. General  Ledger accounts. or jobs (if using the employee/supervisor hierarchy) for each document  type. You can specify for each and any item from a  particular supplier how many they can deliver in normal time scales. to keep the number of records to  a minimum. It helps to go from the top down if you are using the supervisor approval approach. The processes will  be widely visible within the company. and location.  Once you've taken these steps.  Define document types This step determines access to each document type. Organizations that  plan to cut over to Oracle on a short deadline (who doesn't?) and don't already have electronic approvals should stick with  their existing procedures through cutover.  Define the position hierarchy Use the Define Position Hierarchy screen to indicate how the positions relate to  one another. item category.  4. Therefore. The groups will be used later on to establish what needs to be  approved and who can approve how much; each group has an approval amount limit. The fill hierarchy  process has to be run every time an employee position changes. it's time to enter their names into  the system. It is this table that the system uses to drive the workflow approval process.  Define approval groups Use this function to give names to groups of things that need control.

 you might be able to substitute Kleenex for Scott Tissues. The process brings a number of efficiencies.  You can use the Purchasing Documents Open Interface to import prices and define the items to your system. Certain substitutions might be allowed only for a given period of time or  for certain purposes. The manufacturer. Inventory produces reports that might be useful in receiving. so the  successful bidder's offerings can be incorporated quickly and smoothly into your business. It cuts the administrative effort  involved in using multiple suppliers and in changing suppliers. but might be  able to substitute boxes of peach­colored Kleenex for boxes of blue­colored Kleenex. you can store the vendor part  numbers on requisitions. Substitutes. When Dell Computer or Staples gives you a corporate discount. such as satisfying an order for  a 5 percent tolerance resistor with only a 1 percent tolerance resistor. This facility can leverage productivity tremendously. Supply Chain Planning also uses it to source supplies. You can automatically add the  items to your price and sales catalogs. For instance. your supplier might have as much to do with the items on a purchase  agreement as you do. Whether you allow the substitution depends on the  context. and Sourcing Rules. You can substitute bottled  water for tap water. unless a certain lead time can be met. they provide a catalog of the items  they cover. The distributor cannot. You offer your employees and customers what the supplier offers you. in an assembly plant where virtually no stocks of expensive components are  held. The Approved Suppliers List helps the buyer select a supplier and use the appropriate vendor  part numbers and vendor units of measure on the PO. and Cross­References  Each supplier has its own part numbering scheme and will likely use its own part number on invoices and shipping  documents.  This type of knowledge can reside on a legacy system or simply in the minds of the procurement staff. You can apply the relationships any way you need to meet your unique business requirements. A company that buys through  distributors often has several part numbers to deal with—one for the original manufacturer and others for the intermediate  suppliers. The  generic cross­reference function is a great foundation for custom code. Kimberley­Clark. Oracle Inventory keeps a cross­reference of manufacturers'  names and part numbers.  Communicating with Suppliers  Oracle Purchasing is designed to get complete information to and from suppliers quickly. negotiating agreements that all operating units within the  business can share. These are simplistic examples. Approved Supplier Lists. but they represent the need to distinguish between similar goods  within your organization. If there is  only one item number for Kleenex. purchase orders. In your business. To put it into the E­  Business Suite means that it is accessible by those who need it across the organization (even if the purchasing specialist  is on vacation or leaves the company). When they have separate numbers. a supplier will want to substitute one item for another. You also might want to record this information for various reasons. Having a product available where customers need it and when they want it will bring . if your Item Master was converted. Some suppliers might. or quotations.This information can be critical; for example. Company­wide agreements offer better prices and  negotiating at a macro level cuts the overhead costs involved in buying. Oracle provides the data capture screens and  some basic reporting. but not the other way around. peach­and blue­colored Kleenex will all be jumbled together on the shelves. you can use the Define Item Relationships form to define  substitution relationships.  The most elemental question when dealing with substitute items is whether to assign separate item numbers.  Vendor Part Numbers. because that is what they have in stock. In addition to importing new and replacement documents. It integrates with Oracle's quotation process. the interface now also imports  updates to existing documents. The Purchasing Documents Open  Interface imports price/sales catalog information from the supplier into Purchasing directly as blanket purchase  agreements and quotations. as a courtesy. Substitution can be one way or two way.  Purchasing offers a more general cross­reference feature for users to apply as they wish.  obviously cannot substitute one color for another. Big money is involved in your  communications with your suppliers. with no  separate accounting. include your part numbers as well as the manufacturer's name and part  number.  Frequently. The planning function can see on Oracle Purchasing that a burst of demand will necessitate a change from the  normal supplier. This  feature is often used to store the item's legacy part number.  Purchase Agreement and Catalog Import  When you purchase at a global level using ASLs. although there is not much logic to  support substitution.  Large businesses do much of their purchasing at a global level. It would be logical to allow substitutions on issue but not on receipt. Add to that the fact that these sources might make substitutions upon occasion. either  through electronic data interchange transactions or by loading them directly from a flat file.

 and shipping) map closely to Oracle's data structure. Goods that cannot be sold or used are a liability. every Ford division would need to recognize Silicon Graphics as the same supplier. EDI transactions parallel the transactions available in Oracle  Purchasing. Use an Alert to notify the buyer if there is no  supplier acceptance within a predetermined period of time.  Suppliers under Multi­Org  Suppliers are best maintained in a global perspective. If you advertise this service to sell the new system  to users. and shipping information; order changes; order cancellations;  order confirmations; and every other common transaction. cosmetic changes can be handled by  the formatting engine as long as the data is available on the document. Information about what you can offer your customers  might be the difference between success and failure. a buyer submits all EDI transactions to a network. but does not replace EDI for the high­volume transactions.  An Advance Shipment Notice (ASN) from your supplier lets you know that an order has shipped. EDI transactions are more batch­oriented. and so  forth) that you want to fax or e­mail. such as when to invoice. lines. Suppliers. real time. and based  on a single transaction. There are standard  transaction formats for orders. The Internet is  evolving as the medium of exchange. including headers. Although automatic faxing is not included as a standard  feature of Oracle Applications. Drop shipment is further described in Chapter 11. whereas the XML counterpart is event based. remember that you might have to do some substantial data cleansing to have usable fax numbers and e­mail  addresses when you convert your suppliers from a legacy system. However. For example. you can post solicitations for your suppliers to review or you can let them preview your  internal plans so they can provide you maximum service.  Electronic Data Interchange (EDI)  EDI is a protocol for exchanging machine­readable transactions between buyers and sellers.  Drop Shipment Communications  Drop shipment eliminates the time and expense of routing goods through your warehouse en route to a customer. therefore. Therefore. If Ford Motor Company were to negotiate a worldwide contract with  Silicon Graphics. you become dependent on your supplier and  customer for information about the transaction. This  feature lets you know whether the supplier can meet your customer's needs. line. it can be accomplished through minimal customizations and with Alliance Partner software.  This very often also supports an e­mail gateway and e­mail documents in the form of Acrobat Reader files. are global within Oracle Purchasing and Payables and  supplier sites are specific to an operating unit. Instead of having to  initiate one­to­one communications with each seller. You might want to have Order Entry forward the information as  an acceptance to your customer. Ford of Germany may do business with SG's office in Germany.  Business entities that participate in the exchange of EDI information have unique routing identifiers.  yet it achieves the speed and cost benefits of electronic delivery. In addition to the Oracle  E­Commerce Gateway.  You will normally find that you will want customizations to the external document (the purchase order. and the elements (header. The network sorts  and forwards them according to the routing code.  Although drop shipment enables you to offer better prices and service. and the corporation  would need to monitor total purchasing. Value­added networks have historically filled this role. It accommodates suppliers whose internal processes depend on paper. a shipped order can trigger an ASN to your customer and/or send an invoice. requisition. there is an XML Gateway to enable organizations to exchange documents outside the EDI  standards. Chapter 13 provides further details about this module. Oracle Purchasing has incorporated support for  transactions that facilitate drop shipment.  Oracle Supplier Portal  Supplier Portal is an Internet tool that provides your suppliers a controlled view of different aspects of their dealings with  your organization. but the  system will recognize that office as part of SG's global organization.you a good price. . some third­party software will take the output from a printer queue and run  it through a formatting engine before passing it to a fax or e­mail server.  Supplier Acceptances acknowledges that the supplier has accepted the order and committed to a delivery date.  Automatic­Faxing and E­mail  Faxing directly from Oracle Applications to your trading partners represents an intermediate level of automation: electronic  on the sending end; paper on the receiving end. In a drop shipment  environment.

 at the Inventory Organization level. Encumbrance Account. The master organization can be shared as widely as needed within a company to ensure a common definition of  parts and products. with local settings for those attributes that are controlled at the organization  level. A Purchasing Responsibility frequently accesses many Inventory Organizations. manufactured. the child inventory organizations each  have some subset of the master inventory. These are the two  structures that affect purchasing:  §  §  Operating unit This structure is associated with login Responsibility. such as Expense Account.  A user logged on to a particular Purchasing responsibility can order items for any inventory organization within its  operating unit. If you have enabled three­ or four­way  matching.  Inventory organization This structure resides within an operating unit. This  is because several attributes. The Enter  Receipts screen operates one level down. saving the vendor the effort of creating it and you the effort of  keying it in—it will still require approval and payment as normal. Drop shipments to support Order Entry eliminate the  need for your warehouse to handle goods that would only have to be reshipped. and how to account for the cost  of freight. Advance Shipment  Notices received through EDI prepare the loading dock to process a receipt automatically. It  provides a common reference for shared item numbers and carries values for item attributes that are the same across all  the child inventory organizations. Many attributes are associated with every item  in a company's inventory. It  usually involves checking the receipt and goods to make sure the quantity is correct and the quality is satisfactory.  Multiple Organizations in Inventory  Purchasing includes the Inventory screens necessary for creating and maintaining inventory items. Oracle's Payment on Receipt  option automatically generates an invoice in Payables. . how to handle freight invoices.  and therefore users use a Change Organization form to point the responsibility at the one they want to define item  attributes or perform receipts. Some of these. Each shipment must be made to an inventory organization for which the item is defined.  In the simplest installations the master is the only inventory organization; otherwise. Within an operating unit there can be one or more inventory organizations. and  then passing the information to Payables to use as the basis for paying an invoice. and Cost of Goods Sold. or ordered.  are Accounting Flexfields. are unchangeable. to differ between inventory locations  within an operating unit. The only proviso is that every organization using the master has to have a common set of books.  Each inventory organization that handles transactions is associated with a master inventory organization. They only make sense within the context of a single set of books. It defines the scope of Purchasing activities  available through a single user of the system. It limits receiving to shipments destined for a  specific inventory location within the operating unit. such as whether the item can be stocked. The master  organization carries the definition of every inventory item available to the child inventory organizations associated with it. Factories or distribution centers ship to  sales locations. Most large companies allow  other attributes. the receipt of an item will be required before an invoice can be paid. A receiving clerk can receive only  shipments due into his or her location. Not all inventory sites will need to store—or even see—every item of inventory. such as description and size. Purchasing usually precedes Inventory in a phased implementation. Sales Account. or one sales organization that is long on product might support another that is short on product. This is an essential  detail.Inventory organizations within a company are connected by a transportation web.  Oracle Purchasing continues to add features that reduce the amount of labor involved in receiving.  The Implications of Multi­Org  Multi­Org functions make it possible for one installation of Oracle Purchasing—one set of software and tables—to handle  multiple operating units. Chapter  10 describes how to define freight carriers to the system.  Receiving  Receiving is the function of accepting goods from a supplier and delivering them to their destination within the company.

 There are more  tolerance parameters on the Payables side to reconcile prices and quantities invoiced to what was ordered and received. They can handle it through the Desktop Receiving . It indicates what the item is and where it is going. Once all lines are closed. Expense. except the  receiving and inspection process is delegated to people at the site. They can go right  to their destination. and an invoice arrives for 10? There is a set of tolerance parameters to decide whether  that line should remain open to receive one last item.  A receipt traveler provides information regarding items in transit within the company the same way a packing slip  represents a supplier shipment. When do you close a PO with one line that has never been received? How about one with a line that was 80  percent received three months ago? Sometimes these matters take human judgment. It helps people who order expensed items to reconcile what they get with what they requisitioned  and it informs inspectors what to do with an item after they accept it. To help  when there is no packing slip. The setup parameters specify whether to accept such  shipments or return them to the supplier. Use Oracle Alerts to notify the  appropriate buyer of POs that remain open but appear inactive. the system needs to know when an order is closed. Therefore. 10 were received. so they can decide whether to contact the supplier  regarding the remaining items or simply close the PO. item number. many receiving operations move so quickly  that there is only a moment on the receiving dock for accepting or rejecting an order. are the issue. by definition.  A default chain establishes whether the system will accept recognized substitutes for any given line item on an order. The resolution between you and the customer is handled by  Order Entry; Purchasing handles issues between you and the supplier.  Sometimes a receipt cannot be matched to a purchase order. how many. The PO might already be closed. and in what condition. or they might be inspected first.  The processing requirement depends on whether you or one of your customers is the recipient. if the ordered item is out of stock or is unavailable. and the receipt date might not coincide with the required date.  Purchasing uses a series of defaults—at the system. Lines. it might be difficult to record  information that would normally be picked up at the receiving dock: what was received. Most of the time Oracle's native logic handles the  situation. Inventory needs that information to  stock items correctly. construction  material delivered to a building site. or  Shop Floor. the items might have been  order without a PO. or the supplier might have made a mistake.Exceptions  Usually a packing slip references the order number. The customer is responsible for notifying you if the materials received are not those  specified in the shipping notice or invoice that you have sent. supplier. Your customer is the  recipient when you use the Customer Drop Shipment feature of Oracle Order Entry.  Oracle Web Employees handles drop shipments to recipients within your own organization; for example.  Quantities received don't always match quantities ordered.  Receipt Routing  Each Purchase Order distribution line specifies one of three ultimate destinations for the item: Inventory. What if 11 units of an item  were ordered.  Additionally. and purchase order shipment level—to set tolerances for  these variables. whether to reject the order or accept  it with notification to the buyer that there is an exception. On a practical note. your customer takes  the lead in resolving the quality issues.  You can set up Purchasing to allow suppliers to ship substitute items. is never physically received in your warehouse. The complexity is in the exceptions. Business procedures establish the path that received items follow leaving the loading dock.  Drop Shipment Receipts  A drop shipment. Purchasing enforces the business rules for dealing with exceptions. A warning note is not much use to  purchasing; it is more effective to write an alert that e­mails the buyer when the company accepts an out­of­tolerance  shipment. These shipments are like receipts of expense items at your warehouse.  You can assume the shipment has been received when the supplier sends you an Advance Shipment Notice or you can  confirm the receipt by telephone. or whether to assume that no more are coming. the entire order will be closed. then. The people on the dock can compare the packing slip with the items  received and the order; then enter the quantities received of each line item. Oracle lets the receivers scan by supplier. As the recipient. and supplier part number to look  for a matching order.  Purchasing applies only the logic of tolerances to order lines; you will need to define processes to handle orders  themselves.

 This approach is most useful in operations with low volumes of expensive  materials. they can be paid the same as any other standard invoice.  Productivity versus Security  Companies with established supplier relationships often find that formal receiving does not add enough value to justify its  cost. making it an even more exact science. and the transaction costs are minimal. the value and volume of individual purchases. so  your receiving dock can process an entire shipment with a single confirmation. Oracle  continues to offer several levels of receipt control in a document­oriented environment:  §  No receiving is a very simple option. The receiving clerk notes that the transaction is an express receipt. The ASN is designed for use with bar  code scanning.  The transaction is usually captured by a bar code scanner. unapproved invoices for payment of goods based on receipt transactions. For services and Kanban purchasing. and the state of supplier  relationships. being the initial process in the procurement cycle. you can use the Payment on Receipt functionality. Payment on Receipt enables the user  automatically to create standard. It forces  the receivers to count every item. Periodic audits and inventory out­of­stock conditions will reveal over the long term whether the  suppliers' claims for quantities delivered are accurate. is tightly integrated with several other modules. The E­Business Suite offers the following features:  §  §  §  Web Confirm Receipts Allows employees to confirm the receipt of shipments to company sites other than your  warehouse.  Advance Shipment Notice Lets suppliers prepare you for a receipt of a shipment with an electronic packing slip.  Oracle offers options for receiving that support the various different receiving models.  §  Express receiving works on an exception basis. They might let the supplier replenish inventory and take the supplier's word for how much was sent; this offers  maximum efficiency. The notice can also include billing information (and be called an ASBN); this will cause the creation of  an invoice in Payables  Kanban Purchasing Treats the presentation of a Kanban card.  §  Standard line­by­line receipt confirmation lets personnel check the quantities received against the packing slip and  then enter quantities into Oracle from the marked­up packing slip. Invoices are  created using a combination of receipt and purchase order information.  Payment on Receipt  Rather than wait for your supplier to send you an invoice that you will either need to key into Payables or process through  the E­commerce Gateway. Finding what is  missing takes more brainwork than finding what is there. The model you choose depends on  many factors including the company culture. an express receipt considers the amount received to be the open amount for  every line on the order. Order . it is impossible for them to dispose of a shipment quickly by just keying in the open amounts. The process saves time by placing more responsibility on the receiving clerks.  Receiving Open Interface Accepts scanned receipt data or receipt transactions prepared in an outside system. The receiving dock can use hand­held RF (radio frequency) scanners to record pallets or parcels  being received. or just an empty container.  After processing the receipts. The system is most often set up to trigger an automated  payment through Oracle Payables. Otherwise they will usually confirm the receipt by telephone and let the warehouse  record it in Oracle. Blind receiving does not use tolerances.functions in Oracle Web Employees. Because receivers do not know how much of each  item to expect.  Other than the entered exception lines.  §  These electronic processing alternatives enable you to control receiving at a minimal cost per transaction. Chapter 10 describes the use of Kanban in  inventory and manufacturing systems.  §  Blind receiving offers maximum control—and a maximum of work. This  integration serves as the foundation for the more extensive material management available through Inventory. the invoice alone may be adequate. After  approving the invoices. you can run a batch program that creates the invoices and passes them to the Payables  Open interface.  Integration with Other Modules  Purchasing. The invoices are then imported in to Payables and matched to their corresponding purchase orders. as an order to a supplier. which eliminates duplicate manual data entry and  ensures accurate and timely data processing.

 The supplier will have created an open  receivable without ever issuing an invoice. Purchase Order lines can include project and task data regardless of the destination: expense. . During the  invoice approval process. See Chapter 14 for more on Oracle Projects. purchase. Project Manufacturing carries project identification through inventory and  manufacturing. or miscellaneous charges to a material receipt. This kind of matching associates costs related  to acquiring the goods that are on the receipt. Some items.  Inspection is largely a matter of timing. even if they are not on the  purchase order. you can match it to what was  actually received. As far as transactions go. three­ or four­way  match process. purchasing analysts usually need to handle their  implementation as part of a global vision. The match process transfers the accounting from the purchase order to the invoice.  §  §  The invoice matching to receipts feature. all before payment. which makes the costs calculated for  inventory and projects more precise. the match  process will bring over an expense or asset clearing account. significantly reducing paperwork for  both buyer and seller. Otherwise. narrows the gap between what you have bought  and what you are happy to pay for. but it does not affect the quantity and amounts billed on the receipt. If month end accruals are used the customization required to put this into Projects  as well is not prohibitively difficult. These details are then  carried through the system to ensure that first the commitment (on the purchase order) and then the actual cost (from the  invoice) is associated with the project. Instead.  or shop floor. might take a while to check. but for some reason  were never received by your company.  Four­way match Adds inspection to the process.  This step is required for accurate costing data if you use Periodic Costing. This prevents payment for items that were ordered. and delivery processes. Note that an accrual journal for goods received but  not invoiced is built in purchasing and passed to the General Ledger. Rent and phone bills are two good  examples.Entry. It relieves the supplier of the need to  invoice. and receipt  phases. task. Payables finalizes the cost when the invoice comes through. and expenditure type. inspection. The  company does not want to pay for the equipment until it has confirmed that the items meet their quality specifications. such as electronic equipment. Two­way matches are appropriate for purchases of  services and other intangibles that do not result in receipts of material goods. new in the E­Business Suite. you can match an invoice for tax. the match process will bring over an accrual account.  This way the company does not pay for items it did not order.  Three­way match Requires in addition to the two­way match that the purchase order be matched to the invoice be  physically received. Both parties use the price lists and financial terms in the governing purchasing  agreement. It provides  Projects with up­to­date status and cost data as a purchase advances through the requisition. Not only were the goods received; they also were accepted. Payables looks to Purchasing to validate payment obligations through a two­. but this accrual does not go to Oracle Projects so is  not visible against individual projects. This is effectively an extension to three­ or four­way matching.  Oracle Payables offers a number of options for matching:  §  Two­way match Confirms that an invoice matches a purchase order in quantity and unit price (within the tolerance). Instead of matching the invoice to the purchase order. Because of this. If the item on the PO  is an item that is flagged as an Inventory item.  The Purchasing system gives Projects the information it needs to commit funds within the project budget. and Project Accounting. or the  corresponding purchase order shipment. and you of the burden of processing the invoice. For items with a long lead time or in countries where currency fluctuations are large  the exchange rate can now be captured at the time of receipt. The high level of trust in this business arrangement pays major dividends. other costs required to acquire the inventory can be matched to the receipt. money is as good as spent once a requisition  goes to Purchasing—it can't be spent twice. As far as a project is concerned. Oracle Purchasing creates an invoice automatically  upon completion of the receiving.  most business that results in accounts payable is done through contractual vehicles established in Purchasing.  Payables Integration  Purchasing and Payables share supplier data and generally work with the same transactions.  The Payment on Receipt feature consolidates the receiving and payables functions. inventory. It uses the payment terms and conditions set up for  the vendor and automatically creates the match to the purchasing document. freight.  In addition. For example. Manufacturing.  Projects Integration  Purchases in a projects­oriented business can be coded to a project.

  Average and Standard Costing  Oracle Applications allows you to choose between average and standard costing. receipts of stock items from the Purchasing system bump inventory  balances up. keep the  price at $5. Under standard costing. selling. many attributes are associated with an Inventory item—far more than are just needed for  Purchasing. Oracle sets attributes of all kinds as items are created; some of these attributes cannot be changed later and  many depend on other settings. If you have  10 baseballs in stock at $5 each and you receive another 10 at $7. they can be expected to do so again. These requisitions are routed to Order Management  through the Order Import Open Interface. which is relieved by Order Entry once the item  has been shipped. and Inventory  Interface—in a manner similar to that of an external customer order.Order Management Integration  User requisitions for internal stock items never go to suppliers.  Streamlining of accounting processes Each item number has an associated cost; this simplifies the processes of  budgeting and paying invoices. Then somebody would have to look into the variances to see  what went awry. In fact many of the items frequently purchased never go into a physical inventory—they are expensed and  consumed. If they fill the order correctly  once. Purchasing closes the requisition when the receipt is processed and the item is delivered to the requisitioner. and post the difference to a variance account. and to make sure that all the essential data about an item is captured  as the number is set up. and to establish an  expected price for Payables. It is simple and  it works. and issue it by yet a third. you would put the $7 baseballs into stock at $5. to ensure  that they adhere to standards. It prices requisitions based on the frozen costs in Inventory; then uses those  extended costs to determine what approvals are needed to encumber funds. to avoid duplicates.  Recording usage Item numbers make it possible to track usage automatically.  As mentioned earlier. regardless of  whether it has an item number (and therefore whether it appears in Oracle Inventory). Oracle Purchasing can handle orders for anything. store it by another.  Standard costing is the alternative. because they are essential to even the  most basic purchasing operations. Who wants to do that? . but as the first link in the supply chain it is the ultimate  source of a great deal of accounting data. Using item numbers in situations in  which they are optional offers a number of advantages:  §  §  §  §  Points of reference Each item is known by one designation throughout the company. Just as for requisitions that are satisfied through  POs. See Chapter 10 for a more complete discussion of the inventory  integration considerations. Ship Confirm. Purchasing puts records of open orders in the MTL_SUPPLY table to help Inventory plan its replenishment  requirements. Internal Orders will then proceed through the order cycle—Pick Release. However. and stocking items. Average costing is intuitive. Requisitions for Internal Orders place a demand on items.  Inventory Integration  Many items handled by Purchasing must be identified by item numbers because the numbers are required for  manufacturing.  Accounting Issues  Purchasing has limited communication with the General Ledger. The purchasing analysts need to anticipate downstream uses of Inventory item data in  their implementations. Chapter 10 suggests procedures for item number assignment.  Consistency Suppliers always see the same description for orders of the same item. as internal orders to be satisfied from inventory once the requisition has been  approved. End of story.  Units of measure conversion is another powerful feature of Inventory that makes it possible to buy an item by one  measure.  Purchasing needs the capability to create item numbers or have them created. to accrue receipts. your average price is $6. On a transaction basis. It is equally important to maintain central control in assigning part numbers.

 segment  by segment—although doing so is a lot of work. A purchase price variance account is  necessary under standard costing. This concept is fundamental in dealing with  suppliers and in product pricing. to say that Receiving posts to "the" accrual account. Payables and Projects depend on the accounting  data that is collected here. The  system might use Account Generator (which replaced Flexbuilder in earlier versions of the software) to apply user­  specified rules to derive segment values from some combination of the requisitioner's department. and a host of other activities involving the item. especially governments.  meaning the account can be broken down by other dimensions (segments) such as product line or region. supplier. Most  important. item category. average costing is not a true average. shipping. handling. or net them with accruals and actual  expenses against the budget to see how much is left. making it harder for the tolerance process to highlight price changes. there is always a need for an invoice price variance account.  thereby minimizing manual keying and maximizing both productivity and accuracy. there might be defaults associated with the supplier or item. Average pricing  means the price changes all the time. Purchasing provides multiple accounting distributions for this  purpose. whether or not the invoice is yet in hand. Determining whether it is easier to do the distribution in Purchasing or in the General Ledger using allocations is  a significant business process decision. There is still variance between the purchase price and the invoice price. when the full cost  actually includes purchasing. It is only an approximation. commitments and obligations. average costing supports the notion that purchase cost represents the total cost of an item. These  encumbrances are called.  It is worth discussing where those segment values originate. Chapter 11 describes how costs serve as the basis for setting sales prices. as in the preceding paragraph. The Financial Statement  Generator reports in General Ledger can report on encumbrances as a separate line. or other available data.  and a setup option governs whether receipts of expensed items are accrued immediately or at month end. Inventory receipts are accrued immediately. Encumbrance accounting goes this one or two better.  Although Purchasing itself makes rather limited use of accounting data. Payables deals with discrepancies using its own tolerance logic. The requisitioner or buyer can enter them directly. it turns out. It posts  acceptable differences to the invoice price variance account.Standard costing. Users often want to split the  costs of a purchase over two or more combinations.  The mechanisms described earlier are all used to generate individual flexfield combinations. Chapter 5  includes an accounting model that demonstrates how this works. which must  adhere rigorously to their budgets. Receiving posts an expense  to an accrual account. but a key task in  setup is to devise a scheme that takes advantage of all Oracle's devices for automatically populating flexfield values. which Payables relieves when it actually pays the bill.  Accrual Accounts  A receipt of goods represents an obligation to pay. Oracle uses  the accounting distributions from the purchase order line to get the other segments. Management's objective is the same whatever the mechanism: to make sure that the  company is paying what it expects to pay and that it pays a fair price. . makes more sense than it would appear: It is highly advantageous for distribution  operations; Chapter 10 explains this further. You can always demand that the users key in a full multisegment distribution. inspection. Additionally. It is based on Oracle Workflow and is easier to understand than previous incarnations and  readily customizable. but it can exist in a great many Accounting Flexfield combinations. An encumbrance picks up  expected expenses at the time a department makes a requisition or when the purchase order goes to a supplier.  The process computes the accrual amount by extending the quantity on the receipt by the line item price from the  purchase order. In short.  project. It is usually a single  natural account in the chart of accounts structure. The originator of the transaction can use a one­field shorthand code  (alias) for a full accounting distribution. That is not early enough for some entities.  Accrual accounting is a truer representation of a company's commitments than cash accounting in that it recognizes an  expense when the items are received. storage. Receipts relieve encumbrances—the actual obligation replaces the  expected obligation. respectively. The graphical representation of the workflow process is a good visual aid for explaining the rules to  business representatives. It averages only one thing—  the price on the Purchase Order.  Encumbrances are posted to the ledger to represent money under obligation to be spent.  Automatic Account Generation  It is convenient.  In terms of accounting.

 The state of the requisitions is an issue; you should complete all the requisitions on which activity has started. and it makes it far easier for them to read purchase documents. Though there is not a mandatory sequence for installing Oracle Applications. Therefore.  so Purchasing can treat the imports as new transactions. in general Purchasing builds on  Payables. A common approach is to keep the old  numbers for suppliers that are converted. is intended more for  the Payables system. whereas it would be tough to tell suppliers not to send confirmations nor deliver their goods. a combination of  methods is often most effective. Lowercase  letters and proportional spacing also make it possible to fit much more information into your notes. although the screens are available in the Purchasing setup menu tree.  Old mainframe systems did not deal well with lowercase letters. If legacy used five­digit  numbers. Most companies find that their supplier data fits comfortably within the 16. Users will see the same stale and duplicate suppliers and incorrect data forever unless they cull  them at conversion.  and associate bank accounts with supplier sites (AP_BANK_ACCOUNT_USES_ALL). and the word processing features can be used  to convert cases. This may or may not be true. They are not automated in most legacy systems. the company can  forcibly clear the legacy system before cutover.  However. You can write an extraction program to read the requisitions from legacy files and load them to the  interface.000 rows and 256 columns  available in a spreadsheet.  There is no "vendor open interface. and make other global changes.  Oracle can assign vendor numbers automatically or accept user­generated ones. manual conversion. and the Item Master usually comes up as part of the Purchasing  conversion (see Chapter 10 for detailed information on converting the inventory master). Sorts are useful for finding duplicate suppliers." so a custom program is required to load the vendor and site information. If you use some form of electronic funds transfer  (such as BACS) you will also need to create banks (AP_BANK_BRANCHES). The script needs to  load at least the PO_VENDORS and PO_VENDOR_ SITES_ALL tables. The process is  relatively straightforward and not terribly risky if you follow the guidelines presented in Chapter 20. In any case. A lot of the master data.  You can also expect users to advocate converting the file as is because the schedule does not allow time to clean it up  prior to conversion. Inventory builds on Purchasing. . translate abbreviations. Oracle's number generator is set one past the highest number of the old scheme. This sequence of dependencies is based on accounting information. and if necessary. GOING TO UPPER­ AND LOWERCASE LETTERS MAKES A HUGE IMPROVEMENT IN READABILITY. bank accounts (AP_BANK_ACCOUNTS). and programmed conversion are the main alternatives for dealing with open transactions in  the cutover to Oracle Purchasing.  Requisitions are easy to run out. The down side is that it  is more difficult to police the standard.Implementation  Some users will bring up all the packages at the same time in a "Big Bang" conversion. Because different types of transactions have different life cycles. The alternative is a phased  approach. such as payment terms. but you can be confident that the users will never find time to clean up  the data after it goes into Oracle Purchasing. spreadsheets are a great tool to use for cleaning up  supplier data. the first new Oracle­assigned vendor number would be 100000. It  makes a better impression on suppliers. and then make the new Oracle vendor numbers one digit longer.  Converting Transactions  Runout. Take the time to make sure you are converting clean data and only the data you intend to use.  Purchasing and Payables share the vendor tables.  Converting the Vendor Master  Expect the legacy vendor master file to be cluttered with duplicate suppliers and ones that haven't been used in years. The scope of the Purchasing  conversion depends on what has been done in previous phases.  you will need to determine whether to manually enter your vendor master or proceed with a customization.  The Requisitions Open Interface provides an easy migration path for users converting from a system that already uses  automated requisitions. After  conversion. the Payables  setup has to be thought out prior to supplier conversion.  transactions against it. Oracle does not allow deletions from some of its master tables and it is quite  exacting for those that are allowed—the master record being purged usually cannot have open.  Once you have extracted a list of suppliers from your legacy system. On the  materials side. which builds on General Ledger. or even recent. Requisitioners are in house; you can tell them to hold their requisitions for  a week or so. Keypunches and printers had a hard time with them.

 you might want to convert partial receipts into open receipts for the  remaining quantities; then let the Payables section manually reconcile invoices against receipts in the two systems. shorthand accounts. fax. unexpected  receipts.  Tip  Purchase agreements are usually valid for long periods of time. If so. However. The automated conversion process has to generate the  accruals accurately; otherwise the ledger will be thrown off. Put a bespoke form on the Applications menu so users can navigate to it  easily. Historical data is still more daunting. This allows users to search by part number.  §  Receiving goods under all possible exception conditions. including incorrect quantities. defaults.Purchase orders and PO releases are open until your suppliers satisfy them. The viability of this approach depends on the related systems: Can Receiving identify shipments as  being legacy or Oracle. you can continue to receive under the legacy system while placing new  orders in Oracle. is to write a small  program to deliver query results in HTML though the Web server.  Testing  Testing can verify that your setups will make Oracle Applications support your business procedures.  §  Use standard query tools. and capital goods.  §  Creating and sending purchase orders through the different means chosen; for example. Oracle accrues  upon receipt. The reasons not to write  conversion scripts for live data are given earlier in this chapter. The accounts might be different under Oracle. Open agreements have to be rekeyed into  Oracle in any runout scenario.  There are significant accounting implications in an automated conversion. which can take an indeterminate period of  time. and then access  it using a standard tool such as Microsoft Access or Oracle Discoverer.  The last alternative is to write automated conversion scripts. . which  can be rekeyed into Oracle after legacy shuts down. and automatic account  generation. With the release of the E­Business Suite this requirement is  minimal because Standard Purchase Orders are supported in the Purchase Documents Open Interface. the time it takes to riffle through  bankers' boxes of old transactions can mount up quickly. but not receive any goods or make any  payments until afterwards. Put legacy transaction data into a custom database on a PC or in Oracle. The rather minimal advantages—supplier performance tracking and  online query into old transactions—can be had more easily outside the Purchasing application. A simpler approach. It might be possible. For Purchasing.  Converting Purchasing History  Auditing requirements demand that records of closed purchasing activities be available for several years. This approach requires that supplier data be converted early. with a  manual process to coordinate supplier data updates until cutover. inventory replenishments. This strategy will hold the volume of open orders at cutover to a manageable number.  There are several more pragmatic ways to store and access your historical data:  §  Microfiche or hard­copy transactions will suffice if the volumes are small.  §  Put historical data in simple Oracle tables.  §  Creating accounting distributions using distribution sets. and normalization into Oracle's data  schemas. It is almost  never worth the effort to convert this data into Oracle. Finally. To keep the  conversion as simple as possible in Purchasing. you need business processes for most or all of the following tasks:  §  Requisitioning expensed items. translation.  §  Performing RFQs. unknown suppliers. Chapter 21 describes  the testing process in detail. substitute items.  §  Creating purchase agreements. The accounting data often has to be translated  from a legacy accounting structure into Oracle. and require significant purification. depending on the interfaces involved.  supplier name. if you don't need the access management afforded by the Applications. for  different types of suppliers and products. to run out your POs and PO releases by using the legacy  purchasing system in parallel with Oracle. and can Payables match its invoices with POs and receipts from two sources? Have you  accounted for accruals?  Another alternative is to start entering orders into Purchasing before cutover. and other useful data fields. contact. and damaged goods.  §  Approving through the approval hierarchy. e­mail. mail. as it can incorporate  old suppliers and accounting data. expecting Payables to reverse those accruals.  §  Ordering goods under purchase agreements.

 when used. the Applications work; the  question is whether you have made them work for you. Oracle Purchasing frees your staff to concentrate on  more strategic objectives. Most companies add a company logo and  return address to the purchase order print program. It requires a well­conceived access security plan.  There are many avenues available to inform vendors of your needs.  Chapter 10: Oracle Inventory . the following are the most common custom  reporting requirements:  §  Adapting high­volume internal documents. to precisely meet the company's  needs.You need test scenarios for the business processes and test data to support the scenarios. check whether you really need a requisition print given the workflow­managed process it will  become. Aside from external documents.  Oracle Purchasing can manage complex solicitations and awards. and four­way matching protect you against making erroneous disbursements through Oracle  Payables. To repeat the theme of this book. General Ledger.  Tip  Take the time and energy to plan thorough tests.  The alternatives for hard copy documents are to adapt your purchase orders to preprinted forms. such as building the best possible relationships with your suppliers. and fax. Most  users will not find much of a gap between what they need and what the package does. For example. Although the packaged reports might not be exactly what users would design. Purchasing is often the first financial system with broad visibility throughout a  company to go in.  Purchasing is a powerful module designed to support a business area that varies little from company to company.  By validating accounting and project data as it captures each requisition and purchase order. It manages what to buy through  its links with Inventory and Material Requirements Planning (MRP). Oracle's sourcing rules usually make vendor selection  totally automatic.  Electronic requisitioning and approval requires approvals consistent with the cost and nature of a user's request and  prompts approvers to move requisitions through the system quickly. the Web. Many of these are highly parameter driven. Inventory maintains the definitions of purchasable  items and services and works with MRP in determining when and in what quantities to replenish stock items. including paper documents. as much in need of testing as the  suppliers. defense contractors might accept a priority rating in a  DFF and then print it on the purchase order.  Oracle provides about 100 standard reports with the system. The full and timely  information you can now provide might enable your suppliers to offer better prices and service. Routine replenishments should require no user intervention. or create a bitmapped report that uses a PostScript printer. Online requisitioning and approvals. When you are satisfied that  the test scenarios work within Purchasing. Inventory. Order Entry.  Customization  Documents that go outside the company should represent the company well. especially since Oracle has yet to provide an open  interface for the Vendor conversion. such as requisitions and receipt travelers. General Ledger. Treat the approval hierarchy as standing data. However. EDI.  §  Displaying vendor and manufacturer part numbers on reports. producing output  in a number of different formats. you must perform integrated testing with Payables.  Conversion is a major factor in installing the Purchasing module. and use sophisticated sourcing rules to automatically  select a vendor for each purchase.  Conclusion  Oracle Purchasing improves all aspects of the process of acquiring goods and services. three­. Inventory. Purchasing ensures that the  financial implications of its activity will flow accurately through Projects. Change orders and RFQs usually need the same type of modification. Accounts Payable. and  Fixed Assets. along with the Oracle item number.  §  Adding Descriptive Flexfield columns to reports. they  satisfy most basic data requirements.  demand extensive planning and testing. and any other systems with which Purchasing is integrated.  Projects.  By automating purchasing decisions that can be reduced to rules. have a vendor provide a  flash overlay for a laser printer. Two­.

 Because many other modules need  to access data in the Inventory Item Master. You can. Inventory relinquishes control and decreases its balance when items are sold or put to their final use  within the company. A planning assembly represents a statistical average of parts requirements. however. transporting to your other inventory locations. These items include products ordered through Oracle Order Management. items paid for through Oracle  Payables.  Note  Oracle Inventory is not a property management or asset tracking system. and Oracle Inventory recognizes that  the purchase price is only part of the entire cost. such as plant and equipment. It also performs  a logical. or other assets that are in use within your company or on  loan to customers. sells. Oracle Inventory's on­hand balance is increased when an item is  bought or made.  items invoiced through Oracle Receivables. and how much to buy to satisfy  the need. computers. an assembly that is never stocked in inventory because it is used immediately in a  higher­level assembly.  Oracle Cost Management can store values for these cost types with each inventory item. when it is needed. It coordinates with Manufacturing for parts required to build products. Commonly. Master Production Schedule/Material  Requirements Planning. for example. items maintained through Oracle Service.  Assemblies that are never stocked can also be defined in Inventory. never have an on­hand  balance because they are put to their final use as soon as they are bought. Work in Process. Supply­chain management software  coordinates with external suppliers to ensure availability of raw materials.  Inventory's ability to maintain items can extend further than its management of physical assets.  The assets in inventory would not be worth tracking if they had no economic value. and Cost Management) deals with items named in Inventory. Pads of paper in the stock room are inventory; the same pad of paper on somebody's desk is not—as  far as the company is concerned.  The science of managing inventory involves having what is needed. storing. shipping to customers. The company can sell these items along with physical goods. it is already used.  Inventory is one of several systems that capture such costs. Inventory will be installed during the  implementation of Order Management.  The stock management function is unique to Oracle Inventory. inspecting. and no more of it than is needed. distribution. or internal consumption. the Define Items form is found in the menu structure of most of the modules. Manufacturing. what. and companies keep ever tighter control over their stocks. A phantom item. This stock is referred to by its item number and has many attributes that affect the  transactions that the modules can process against the item. represents an  intermediate step in manufacture. but it is an extremely  complex module in its own right with several important setup considerations. and items charged against projects in Oracle Projects. cataloging function. Oracle Assets is the package for managing such "inventory" of expensed and capital  items. as it manages physical instances of items that are  available for sale. Intangibles like magazine  subscriptions or labor hours carry inventory names. Its cost rollup function can sum  the different cost types for purposes of analysis or to set a realistic frozen cost to use as a basis for pricing. and Oracle Property Management is the package for tracking real property. It now  has the ability to request action when it sees an imbalance between supply and demand and to request that assets be  moved in anticipation of where they will be needed.  manufacturing. then recommend when. Wherever assets come from and however they are derived.Inventory is at the heart of almost any business and is central to the planning process. Setting up  multiple inventory organizations that share one item master will provide the balance between global and local item . Purchasing. or uses in its  operation looks to the Inventory Item Master.  Large enterprises will have a number of physical warehouses stocking different items for different purposes. items purchased through Oracle Purchasing. and counting assets. Many major purchases. A new desk in the warehouse belongs to inventory; a desk in  somebody's office is no longer in inventory.  Overview of Inventory  An inventory system provides physical management of a company's stock until it is either used up or sold. It continues to increase support for Kanban systems in which the  presence of a physical signal such as a printed card or an empty container is enough to signal the need for an inventory  replenishment. or Supply Chain Management. track  capital items that have been returned to your warehouse awaiting reuse within the company in both Assets  and Inventory. There are additional costs associated with receiving. Every module  in the Manufacturing suite (Engineering. Bills of Material. It has the  ability to use these rules to compute future requirements.  Oracle Inventory provides a number of different algorithms for projecting material requirements into the future. It is not well suited to keeping  track of who currently has furniture. As the pace of inventory movement has picked  up.  Every other module within Oracle Applications that needs to refer to things that the company buys. Oracle Inventory has become increasingly proactive. The considerations in setting it up  are at least as complex as those for any other single application.

 Purchasing brings it in.  Most transactions are processed in batch mode through open interface tables. and  then ships the chair with a Pack Slip. many users who need items will never use Oracle Inventory  Responsibilities at all.  Instead. and  products—to a company and its customers.  Integration with Other Modules  In the Oracle Applications scheme. They perform their own work and then provide Oracle Inventory with the transactions needed to  update balance records after the fact. used internally. The systems have to be conscientious about closure—relieving  demand. Even if a warehouse manager needs a chair from his own  inventory. They tell you something about the item in addition to uniquely identifying it. One notable limiting factor was the 80­column punched card. supplies. The only requirement is follow­through. and then notifies Inventory to increment its records  accordingly.  Choosing the System Item Key Flexfield scheme you will use to identify items is one of the first tasks you face in setting  up Oracle Inventory. Doing this allows local manufacturing and distribution center managers to control the operations they manage. but is necessary in order to retain control and record the  proper accounting transactions. notably  receipts and issues. He submits  a Requisition to Purchasing. Inventory does not receive stock.  Internal to the company. Purchasing and Work in Process are the primary sources of materials. slashes. Look at the bottom of your keyboard. if a company established a  system in which the first character of a part number indicated the product in which it is used. Many of the  original intelligent­key features in such short numbers have become obsolete. modules other than Inventory are responsible for getting materials into and out of  Oracle Inventory's custody. these systems work as a troika. for instance. Inventory does not issue stock to be sold. and produce manufacturing inventory for the store­brand pasta plant. or your stapler. the transaction needs to go through three systems to ensure proper accounting and replenishment.  Oracle handles segmented identifiers through its Key Flexfield feature. and then delivers the chair to the  requester in the warehouse. This is important to conceptualize. Outside systems as well as the Applications  feed these tables.  Legacy inventory numbering schemes were often constrained by design limitations from the era in which they were  conceived. which are either bought  or made. Oracle Inventory will need to track  them all. Order Management takes the material (via the pick­release process) and then notifies Inventory that the material  is gone.  while giving vendors and customers a common view of your company.  Oracle's design anticipates integration with non­Oracle systems. The scheme should be broad enough to cover every type of inventory in the company. MTL_DEMAND and MTL_SUPPLY. separated perhaps by dots. which cuts a Pick Slip. that designation will have lost . which sends an Internal Purchase Order to Order Management. or dashes. Timing is critical. produce division  resale inventory. One segment may  identify the class of product (say.  your telephone. Designers often specified part numbers to from  eight to ten characters so the remainder of the card would have room enough for a complete transaction.  Item Setup  Inventory items are widely used throughout the Oracle Applications product suite. Purchasing picks up the item with a Receipt. For example.  Part numbers can be made up of several segments. This process may seem complex. Segmented part  numbers like this are called intelligent keys. These modules refer to Inventory master tables as they generate transactions that affect Inventory. your mouse. The concurrent  processes must run frequently enough that the Inventory records are kept sufficiently accurate to support the target  service levels. In fact. or put into  products.definitions. Two tables. A  supermarket chain may have separate legacy systems to handle headquarters' stockroom inventory. The numbers you find there uniquely identify types of items—parts. Order Management and Work in Process are the primary consumers; material is sold. You often have to set them up to be  independent of the Inventory package itself. a modem) and another may specify the type of modem (56KB external).  Item Numbers  You are probably surrounded by item numbers as you read this book. when an order is canceled or shipped. provide  Inventory with the information it needs to support replenishment processing.

 it is best if all the master­level attributes  for the item are set as the item is created. You can expect resistance. substitutions. Most users get by with one segment. for a theoretical total of 800 characters. Inventory.  [1]  Self­checking numbers  are of less use now that operators can visually verify a description on the screen. which are very significant in the Purchasing and  Payables applications. give some thought to the business process for assigning numbers.  Manufacturers and distributors have their own part numbering systems.  §  It should not hinder performance or be difficult to support with bespoke (custom) code. Most systems leave the last segment unconstrained so it can be chosen to make  the number unique. Otherwise. Establishing a "Request for New Part  Number" document will help make this process more formal and to ensure adherence to numbering and description  standards. and part number fields may  wrap on reports. Order Management maintains price lists by item range. You may set up rules. in the same format as Accounting Flexfield  cross­validations. Many processes. have the ability to  address ranges of items. and so on. but it also requires discipline. such as the Key Flexfield that identifies the  item. A Responsibility can be  restricted to updating only those attributes within specified groups. Often the easiest way to put  this into effect is to let one segment of the new part number indicate what legacy system it came from or what group  within the company defined it. Productivity in keying in a part number is no longer  an issue: Oracle can complete the number automatically or present a short pick list based on the first few keystrokes. For example.  §  It should have an intelligent link with the legacy system. and assign only one person and a backup to that Responsibility. Service.  As you design the part numbering scheme. is one of Oracle's largest master files in terms of the number of  columns. to limit users to predefined ranges of items associated with their assigned Responsibilities. The Define Item and the Update Item forms group attributes by  business areas. Because there is  no mechanism in Oracle Inventory to make mass changes to established items.  Oracle item numbers have overcome several early design problems.  §  It should anticipate flexfield security requirements. People who know the legacy numbers should be able to use  Oracle without memorizing anything new. People identify with item numbers. so that representatives of all the affected user communities see the impact. you may want to confine every segment  but one to a limited set of values.  §  It should have consensus. It is usually  necessary to have a centralized cataloging operation that assigns numbers throughout the organization.  Expect to spend a fair amount of time resolving the seemingly simple issue of what the stock number will look like. MRP. is a  reasonable maximum. Attributes are organized in groups.  The Oracle part number should satisfy the following criteria:  §  It should be unique across all operations within the company that uses item numbering. In a multisegment item number. users may have to scroll field contents in screens. company operations become dependent upon people who know the  numbers by heart.its meaning when the company grew beyond 26 products. in Inventory and other modules.  Attributes  The Inventory master table. a Hazardous Material class might be an attribute of the  item Turpentine. Although Oracle allows up to 20 segments of  40 characters each.  §  It should anticipate reporting requirements. When the intelligent­key structure breaks down and the part  number itself does not inform the user about the part. its weight. rational or not. . Attribute groups also support security. It is useful to work through some  complete scenarios with proposed new item numbers. Plan to take advantage of this as  you lay out the first (or only) segment of the item number. Chapter 9 covers manufacturer part numbers. including the use of the items in Purchasing and Order  Management and in the pick­slip process.  Implementing a global part number standard can bring major benefits. Order Management. 3 segments and 15 characters. Order  Management supports customer part numbers and commodity codes. and cross­references. This system allows a user  to review the settings of related attributes as a group.  §  It should be short enough to fit conveniently into displays and reports. It is reasonable to limit the ability to create new part numbers to only one  Responsibility. Some of the columns provide characteristics unique to the item. such as Purchasing.  §  It should have some sort of validation plan. if the  "headquarters MIS guys" impose a new numbering scheme without user buy­in. Most columns categorize the item in various groups: Is it hazardous material? Does it  need to be cycle­counted? Can it be sold?  Columns equate to attributes in database terminology. Multiple segments add to the  complexity of user­written reports and forms. MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS. A column in the MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS table corresponds to an  attribute of the item defined by a row in the table. and its volume. including separators. The  process presents a good opportunity to air everyone's expectations of the new system.

 If you apply several templates to one item.  Boston. The Define Item screen logic checks all the attributes at once. The Stockable and Build­in­WIP flags  are both set at the Item/Org level. each need to set every attribute that is not unique to the item and organization.  Tip  Try to handle as many attribute settings as possible in the initial Item Master conversion—even for  applications that will come up in later phases. Micros Systems manufactures its point­of­sale terminals in  Beltsville. applying the template leaves the other attributes unchanged. Attributes set to Item/Org­level control may have  different values across the organizations. To do this. This association does not require Multi­Org. Used online. and statuses as an integral part of the inventory conversion process. Attributes set to Item­level  control will have the same value across all Inventory organizations. which is an alternative to using templates. A template does not have to set all attributes. not in the database.  as is often the case.  Templates  Templates are used to set the attributes that determine how various applications will handle an item. This fact is particularly important for companies that implement Oracle Applications in phases. It does not maintain stock or execute transactions. it can be built only in Beltsville. Chicago. a template  sets the attributes only in the Define Item screen. It can be easier than using templates. the  settings overlay one another. For example. a majority. Maryland but distributes them worldwide. The control level of the remainder of the attributes. there would be  duplication of effort. It  functions merely as a reference. nor is it restricted by organizational hierarchies  defined in Multi­Org. on the other hand. with multiple part numbers for the same item and possibly multiple items with the same part number. you should usually associate every Inventory organization within one set of books with one  common master organization. a company brings up Purchasing and Payables first. These settings become important as Manufacturing and Order Management are  used. If. Several attributes cannot be changed once they have been set and transactions  have run against them. Although it is  possible to set the attributes individually when defining an item. such as item name and description. such as whether the item is  purchased or made.  The master organization is usually not an operating organization. The Item Open Interface can accept only one template name.  Oracle offers the Copy Item function. This function copies all attributes of one  item to those of another. The Define Item screen will present an error if the attributes are inconsistent. belong to the item itself. you need it to provide product line or  organization data. templates. Otherwise. You specify in setup  which attributes will be controlled at the Item level and which at Item/Org (item/organization).The setup of an item's attributes is critical to how that item will be transacted and processed throughout all the modules  that access the Inventory Item Master. but it risks compounding any existing errors. just before it saves them.  Setting hundreds of attributes individually for each item would be a daunting task and would be likely to yield inconsistent  results. depend on the item and the inventory organization in which it is being used. and many other cities; however. It is essential to plan  these group operators. the standard approach is to name the item. you might establish it as an Item/Org attribute. If. therefore. it may be that one  account will be sufficient for the item throughout the company. The best way . The templates you define  for conversion. It includes a record for every item used in any of the operating inventories as well as for  intangible items used in Purchasing and Order Management that never appear in operating inventories. Its 3700­series workstation is stockable in Beltsville.  Oracle specifies certain attributes that must be controlled at the master organization (Item) level and a few that must be  managed at the organization (Item/Org) level. is for you to  determine at setup. Others.  Tip  Be sure to debug your templates before putting them into use. to  make sure they are consistent. use the template to create a phony  item in a test instance.  It is essential that all organizations within a company share a common Inventory master. If your Automatic  Account Generation takes only the natural account segment from the Cost of Goods Sold account. then identify  one or more templates to set the item attributes. The use of templates and user­defined statuses allow you to set these attributes en masse for like items. it may not appear to matter which way the Pick­  to­Order or BOM­enabled flag is set. Custom  conversion scripts can extend this same leveraging logic across all items being added as a group. Accounting fields provide an example of the way you determine the control level.  Attributes Within Inventory Organizations  Some attributes. Los Angeles. Getting them right when Purchasing is installed avoids the time­consuming and risky task of directly updating the  database with SQL when new Applications come online. If only ten specific  attributes are defined in a template.  Though it is not mandatory.

 It should be apparent when  the unit is wrong on an order—the extended price for the order line will be way off. gallon. a unit name may mean more than one thing. Army Depot in Long  Binh. but others are item­specific.to ensure consistent attribute settings is to make sure you have a well­planned.  Oracle's conversion logic appears in the Inventory. You need to coordinate your  master and child level templates. convert to kilograms. A  UOM class is made up of related measures. Though templates are designed in such a way that you can  use many of them in creating one item.  However. only Item/Org attributes should be enabled in child level templates.  tablespoon. Oracle's Applications impose checks that help validate unit conversion. and a dozen is always 12. the logic would find the equivalent measure in the base unit for volume. The Inventory system will just as readily accept ten pallets of copy  paper as ten sheets. However. and at least one lower level template to add the same item types to child Inventory  organizations. cup. but a case of  motor oil contains 12. The U. If is often worth the  effort to write code that automatically loads the templates from a spreadsheet. because  technology can be more sophisticated than the people who have to use it.  Used in combination.  There are several reasons to keep your templates in a spreadsheet as you develop them. There is a base unit in each UOM class to which all other  units are related. Similarly. in practice you should use only one.  §  Your external customers may use different units of measure than you use in stock. when it was actually  something like a carload. This check is absent for Oracle  Inventory users who don't use Oracle Purchasing. They must be set up carefully. There are several possible conversions for Oracle to deal  with:  §  Your suppliers may deal in different units of measure than your company.  §  Your internal users may order merchandise by different units of measure. The quick­pick entries are the values within a UOM class. weights would run from microgram through ton and  long ton; lengths would run from perhaps microns to meters. pint. Fluid measures would include milliliter. then use those  templates every time you set up an item. for example. The master level templates are the only source that will be used for attributes controlled at the Item level.  Unit­of­Measure Conversions  Warehoused items are stocked under units of measure (UOM). Address the risks of copying as you write business procedures for creating  items. For example.  Many users put the template name in the Item Type attribute. barrel. it is essential to know which template was used to  create each item. teaspoon. . you will want to print your templates in a succinct form. If your templates appear to work differently after an upgrade.  Caution  UOM conversions often work better in theory than in practice.  If you ever need to update item attributes after the fact using SQL. the same is not true for water. and Order Management applications. check to be sure that the defaults  Oracle generates for new attributes you do not set are consistent with the attributes already in your template. You frequently need to compare attribute settings in different templates and make  across­the­board changes; for this reason. ounce. and so on. a case of soft drinks contains 24 cans. and the problem may not be recognized until there is an out­of­stock condition or a wild variance in  stock valuation.  Some conversions are universal. A gross is always 144 of an item. lastly.  Tip  Your templates are not automatically updated when Oracle adds new attributes to the item master to support  a new release. maybe grams; and. The default for  Purchasing is the Primary Unit of Measure. and the default for Issue is the Unit of Issue. most screens present  the user with a quick­pick of values to override the default. What is the conversion between case and each? And although a half­pound of butter equals one  fluid cup. thereby ensuring that your templates  remain identical across all environments. perhaps fluid ounces; then convert  ounces to the base unit for weight. A clerk had thought that the unit of measure was each.  To avoid conflicts. liter.S. quart. stable set of templates. once received enough telephone poles to build a log cabin city as a result of  a unit­of­measure gaffe. To convert a tablespoon of butter into  kilograms.  You need templates at two levels for each type of item you will be defining: a master­level template to create a new item  in the master organization. Purchasing. The base units are the basis for interclass conversions as well. That is all the Open Item Interface will accept. centiliter. Vietnam.

 Figure 10­1 depicts the Oracle tables  that are involved in UOM conversions.  Figure 10­1: Tables involved in Unit of Measure conversions  The lines in the drawing represent the relationships between the tables. then set up Oracle to handle them automatically. for instance.  §  Every unit of measure other than the base unit has to be convertible into the base unit. and  Order Management clerks are alert to the way conversion works and understand the units that are applicable to their  operations. If the item is soft drink then a carton is 24 times each. or retail unit. then a  dozen is 12 times each. it is worth the effort to fully  understand units of measure and get them right in the initial inventory conversion. To do so would render historical  transactions meaningless and change their accounting implications.  Setting Up the UOM Conversion for Your Inventory Start by writing a script to find all of your legacy units of measure  and their conversion factors. then a  carton is 12 times each.  You should usually choose your smallest common unit to be the Primary Unit of Measure. and a gross is 144 times each. buyers. Draft your Oracle Unit of Measure setup procedures based on that list.  Oracle does not allow you to change the Primary Unit of Measure for an item. then one pound (weight) equals two cups  (volume). plus two UOM conversions. the relationship can be made to apply only to a given item. If the base unit is each. Inches. which are as follows:  [2]  §  Every item must have a Primary Unit of Measure. and ream would belong to the count class. Each. If the item is butter. A class is made up of units of the same kind of measure. then to set up appropriate UOM classes.  §  There may be conversions between UOM classes. The first step is  research to determine which measures are in use. if the item is egg. gross.Within the count class. Purchasing can place orders in the units most convenient to the supplier.  §  These conversions may be item­specific.  feet.  Each class has a base unit of measure. Find out what manual computations purchasing/receiving  and Order Management/invoicing have to do under the legacy systems. That being given. correcting for  whatever shortcomings you know to exist in the legacy system. and they will be converted to  stock units upon receipt.  §  Each unit of measure must belong to a UOM class. Oracle would use this conversion.  It is a mandatory field in the interface table.The Inventory and Purchasing Superusers need to put a lot of planning into the UOM conversion plan. and meters would belong to the length class.  planners need the right combination of business procedures and training to make sure that the requisitioners. . This is ordinarily the Unit of  Issue. dozen. After the classes are in place. to figure out what a tablespoon of butter  weighs in ounces.  §  Optionally.

 because it has no physical reality. Where one exists.  Enabled Attribute  STOCK_ENABLED_FLAG  BUILD_IN_WIP_FLAG  MTL_TRANSACTIONS_ENABLED_FLAG  Base Attribute  INVENTORY_ITEM_FLAG  n/a  n/a  Purchasable  Internal  Orders  Enabled  PURCHASING_ENABLED_FLAG  INTERNAL_ORDERS_ENABLED_FLAG  PURCHASING_ITEM_FLAG  n/a  Customer  Orders  Enabled  Invoice  Enabled  BOM Allowed  CUSTOMER_ORDER_ENABLED_FLAG  CUSTOMER_ORDER_FLAG  INVOICE_ENABLED_FLAG  INVOICEABLE_ITEM_FLAG  BOM_ENABLED_FLAG  BOM_ITEM_TYPE  The value you enter for item status in the Open Item Interface overrides values you provide for the eight status attributes. a Pick­to­Order item could never be enabled for purchasing.  Transactions can  be performed on  the item in Order  Entry.  Customers can  order the item. Purchasing. . These correspond roughly to master­level attributes that define whether the process is even applicable to  the item.  Item can be built by  manufacturing. On the other  hand. an obsolete product may be an inventory item but not currently enabled for stock.  Item can be put on  a Purchase Order.  and Manufacturing.  Item can appear on  an invoice in Oracle  Receivables.  You usually want to use the following strategy at conversion time.  This affects  Inventory. the Purchasing Interface. It is no more than a  number given to a set of items that may be ordered together as one.  Item can be  ordered for use  within the company. For example.Tip  The only opportunity to correct ill­chosen legacy units of measure is upon conversion of the Item Master. The  scripts that load the Item Interface table have to be coordinated with the ones that load the Transactions  Interface to pick up on­hand balances.  Status Codes  Inventory processes refer to eight status attributes to determine which processes can operate on an item within a given  organization. Order  Entry.  Table 10­1 shows the eight status attributes.  Item may appear in  a Bill of Materials. it identifies the base attribute prerequisites for setting the  flag to enabled status. and  Purchasing. and the Sales Order Interface.  Table 10­1: Inventory Item Statuses  User Status  Name  Stockable  Build in WIP  Transactable  Meaning  Item can be stored  in inventory.  either as an item to  be built or as a  component on a  bill.

 Identifying a revision level with the product helps move  older versions out of inventory and allows customer service to provide better warranty and maintenance support to  buyers. as of the ECO  implementation date. CTO option selection  applies to Pick­to­Order as well as manufacturing Assemble­to­Order operations.  Enter the name that represents the appropriate combination of "enabled" attributes as the status code attribute in  the template.  change status simultaneously. keyboards.  Using status codes provides more control than updating the eight attributes individually.  Define master and operating level templates for your different item types. It gives you the ability to ensure consistency  among your organizations and within your product lines.  Revisions  Manufacturers change their products over time. Bills play a role in the following situations. Relatively few status combinations make sense in an organization. All you need to do is associate a master­level template with each legacy item and an  operating­level template with each item in an operating inventory organization. There may be ten to twenty different  combinations. and individual  items will go through a characteristic life cycle.  2. Business procedures usually require that groups of related items.  Inventory Replenishment Material Requirement Planning.  You can update revision levels directly through Inventory screens.  3. revision is usually handled through Oracle  Engineering. The fact that you must name a  predefined combination protects you from entering inconsistent settings.1. then apply them using the Update Item Status  concurrent process. §  §  §  §  .  Bills of Material  Inventory and Order Management use the manufacturing concept of bills of material.  Statuses are highly interdependent.  Define a separate status code for each combination of the eight attributes. with a Bill of Materials to specify the components in the assembly. Users enter  pending statuses for items via the Define Pending Status screen.  §  Pick­to­Order (PTO) Bills of Material PTO items are defined to sell a number of items as a group. such as from prototype to active to pending deletion. Plan to deal with  statuses as a group using the Define Status screen to give your own name to combinations of all eight statuses. The system will  sell at a discount to its component parts. Order Management  requires that users make all appropriate option selections before the order can be booked. The eight item­status attributes are set  according to the status code in the template. and so on) are rolled up  to arrive at a proposed cost for a manufactured item. improve the product.  Costing Costs of the individual components within the Bill of Materials (material. Oracle Manufacturing associates item revisions with the Engineering Change Orders (ECOs) that implement  changes in the bill structure. with or without manufacturing. There is a Work  Order associated with the order line. including settings for the eight "enabled"  attributes. and items in multiple organizations. Item statuses give you the ability to plan and  apply changes for groups of items at the same time via a batch process.  Configure­to­Order (CTO) Options are carried in the Bill of Materials for the saleable item. A computer  retailer that carries monitors. and system units as separate inventory items may find it convenient to give  a separate inventory number to a complete system in order to ease the Order Management process. and the system will generally ship as a unit. can use the Bill of  Materials to determine what to reorder. However.  This approach simplifies conversion. A revision usually corresponds to a change in the Bill of Materials for  an item. everything is in place and the stock of components no longer used is exhausted or returned to  suppliers. The manufacturing plan coordinates parts and processes so that. or reflect a change in suppliers. The  assembled item goes from manufacturing into inventory to be held until it ships. They may change the components or the manufacturing process to  reduce costs. part of the Manufacturing product suite.  Assemble­to­Order (ATO) ATO items require a manufacturing step to create the ordered item.  Updating statuses through the combinations you establish in the Define Status form is a two­step operation. even if you do not have Oracle Bill of  Materials (BOM) installed. overhead.

 There is usually more than one category set  because it is useful to divide items up in different ways. how they function. and that 107064 is not. on the other  hand. Costing. and how they are used. Order Management. It is far easier to  implement Pick­to­Order initially than to convert later. the solid bar from the item's end means must. users should take the  following measures: . If there is any category information to be preserved from the legacy system. which may include  electronic components. and packaged goods for resale. A keypunch machine had enough logic to validate self­checking numbers before they  even got to the computer. Purchasing.  The Purchasing category set is useful to buyers. Order Management accepts a category as a parameter in its pricing. These categories would be  useful for purchasing activities such as assigning buyers and tracking vendors.  As part of setup. There is no facility to load category or  category set data.  Bill conversion adds a significant degree of complexity to inventory planning and setup. those whose conversion schedule  does not allow for improving the business process at the time of cutover—can specify the same one or two category sets  as the defaults for all seven functional areas.  [1]  A self­checking number contains its own validity check. capital equipment.  Engineering. scheduling.  Needless to say. users must specify a default category set for each of the seven previously named functional  areas.  Categories and Category Sets  A category set represents one way in which to divide items into categories. For  example. It splits all items up by their purchasing categories.  Oracle's standard forms and reports in the seven applications just mentioned accept categories as input parameters. It could tell that 107063 is a valid part because it divides evenly. for instance.  [2]  In Entity­Relationship diagrams.§  Item Revision Levels These are changes in the Bill of Materials for an item. like 11. and Planning. the dotted line from the UOM end means  may. Leverage through groupings is one of  the keys to Oracle Inventory's power. Oracle Applications forces a category for every enabled item subject to reporting within a functional area via a  two­step process:  1. subscriptions. usually corresponding to a new revision  level. commodity items. Categories give the sales department the power to discount computers differently from computer printer  ribbons.  Tip  Take an in­depth look at Oracle Bill of Materials features if you are planning to use Order Management. What this means in Relationship 1. and backlog reporting  processes. Catalogs group items by how they  appear externally: what they look like.  Each category set must designate a default category. Pick­to­Order bills are surprisingly relevant for smaller internal  and resale inventories. Service. The simplest technique is to choose part numbers that are  divisible by a prime number. and Pick­to­Order activity that they need it.  The Open Item Interface process assigns default categories as it loads items. Oracle's internal processes use categories in reporting within  seven functional areas for which an item may be enabled: Inventory. Many companies carry preassembled kits in inventory because they do not have PTO capability.  Bills of materials are essential to manufacturing operations. self­checking adds length and makes the numbers harder to assign. Most  users have just enough kitting. The Engineering category set. might divide items up according to the responsible engineering group. Categories are the  mechanism for grouping items according to the way they will be handled internally.  Grouping Items  A large inventory must be managed as much as possible through mass rather than individual actions. and the crow's foot means many. is that each UOM record may be  referenced by zero to many material System Items records.  2.  Users who do not want to take immediate advantage of categories—more probably. A UOM class may have class conversions; class  conversionns must have a UOM class.

 The most common usage is to choose your categories so that each  category belongs to only one category set and to make an exclusive definition of which categories are within a category  set.§  §  §  Pass category names associated with each item into Oracle Financials as user­defined attributes in the Open  Interface table. Doing so divides everything cleanly: Every enabled item gets assigned to one of the specified categories within a  category set. The concept behind category sets is that the many different ways to group items have little to do  with one another. The relationship  between category sets and categories is complex. and the flexfield formats can be different for different category sets.  Figure 10­2: Simplified Category relationships  Categories are identified by flexfields. and insert MTL_ITEM_CATEGORIES rows appropriate to each item. Table 10­2 shows . most category schemes can be satisfied by single­segment flexfields. you can  string together all your categories in a single 150­character ATTRIBUTEn column. Since the system does not perform any validation on these Descriptive Flexfield entries. Oracle allows categories to belong to multiple category sets and permits category sets to be  nonrestrictive.  Figure 10­2 shows the foreign­key relationships that have to be maintained as you add categories.  Write a custom script to read the categories associated with each item. This degree of  flexibility makes sense. However. look up the appropriate CATEGORY_ID and  CATEGORY_SET_ID.  Use the online forms to define categories and category sets corresponding to the category information in the item  import just mentioned. In practice.

. They help sales people. Each item can be cataloged by any number of characteristics appropriate to its type. Oracle Inventory often supports custom­written subsystems. and as required. while letting attributes that affect site­level inventory operations be addressed by location. annually. quarterly. customers.  Oracle Inventory is designed to minimize the human effort associated with tracking the vast amounts of data associated  with individual items and transactions. the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) carries  subscriptions as inventory items. There are  a great many different groupings of items. buyers. There may be a large numbers of items and large numbers of  transactions against those items.three categories that might be established if the item in question were a computer processor. vendors. They are in a table rather than a flexfield structure. and so on  associated with an item. semi­annually. have two­segment flexfields. For example.  Purchasing and the Manufacturing applications also take advantage of catalog data carried in the Inventory Master. Oracle's  extensible functionality can minimize the amount of custom code needed in custom subsystems. Notice that two of the  categories. Catalog entries for an item are free­form—that is. Each item is assigned to only one catalog group. Catalogs are  non­intrusive and can be quite useful. A catalog group. prices. The form returns items that  match the search criteria. want to carry the name of the person responsible for setting prices as a DFF for each  Order Management category. they  are not required and are not validated against any list. Finally. A number of reports are able to select and sort information on the basis of catalog entries. Other forms. bimonthly. develop a category set to categorize  subscription items by periodicity: monthly. for instance. The power of its design is in the leverage that the following shortcuts provide:  §  §  §  §  Templates Used as items are being created. there may often be many locations. or none at all.  Table 10­2: Sample Flexfield Formats for Itemizing a Computer Processor  Category Set  Purchasing  Order entry  Inventory  Category Set Flexfield  Usage Material class  Order category  Storage type Control level  Category Flexfield  Computer CPUs  System components  Fragile packaged High dollar  Tip  Even though you may use only one or two unique structure layouts for your categories (a typical shop would  have one­ and two­segment structures). or all issues of a publication  for a certain time period. allow you to link to the Search  Items screen to pick items. One orderable item equates to a certain number of issues. You query using the catalog group name and some  combination of values and wildcards for the descriptive elements associated with that group. for the purposes of subscription management. The flexfield structure will tell the Define Category form to automatically present  the appropriate DFF pop­up window; for other categories there could be a different DFF. Purchasing and Inventory. costs.  Catalogs  Catalogs serve as indexes to inventory items. There are a great many attributes associated with each item and transaction.  The catalog scheme can be extended infinitely.  Doing so provides you with a context field for any Descriptive Flexfields (DFFs) associated with the category.  Categories Used for dividing items into functional groups for internal use and for organizing processes that address  items by category. notably Delete Items and Item Cross References. defined  as part of setup and associated with the item through the Define Items screen. The IEEE has a custom­written subscription fulfillment system that uses Oracle Order Entry and  Receivables as a front­end.  Multiple organizations Used to control the many attributes that are common throughout all operating organizations  at the item level. establishes which descriptive elements  apply to the item.  You might.  Mass edits Helpful for updating attributes that need frequent maintenance. and engineers locate things by  description. which may  have to categorize items in unique ways.  Issues of Volume  Inventory manages voluminous data in many ways. to assign large numbers of attributes as a group. It could. it is a good idea to define a separate structure for each category.  The Search Items inquiry screen handles catalog searches.

  Oracle Purchasing.  The U. using customer data that is shared and consistent regardless of the  organization. Its receiving operations support only one location at a time. The item  import process handles updates as well as inserts and so gives an alternative method for mass edits or updates  sourced from third party systems. passes a requisition to Oracle Order Management. defined in the Responsibilities available in their user  login menu. Order Management maintains a global view. many attributes of an inventory item can be different in different  inventory organizations. and sends finished goods to. People working at a loading dock only need to deal  with receipts for their warehouse. and it provides for each operating unit to have separate  customer addresses and contacts. which breaks down as follows:  §  §  §  Inventory organizations Have different missions (for example. purchase orders. which are associated with their own Inventory organizations. Just as customers hope to deal with the company without having to be  conscious of that company's internal operations. They are optional by  subinventory.S. Oracle  creates an internal order to fill the requirement from the source organization designated for the item in question. Oracle Applications hides its complexity from them. using Purchasing  on the demand end and Order Management on the supply end.  Purchasing can support multiple Inventory organizations. Order Management's concern with organization has to do with satisfying an order. but Inventory shows it as stock­on­  hand only for the brief period between Order Entry and the time the warehouse picks the order for shipping. Oracle Inventory moves stock between organizations by way of internal orders. The same type of item may appear in many places within  the system. It determines the plants or  warehouses that will be used to make and ship products. which performs a small­scale manufacturing operation. The  organization can see its open request for the item. the people in each organization within the installation are responsible for  managing their own stock.  Stock locators These are the addresses of storage locations within the warehouse.  That way. Bureau of the Census. Order Entry has something to ship from inventory. is an example of the use of  Oracle's open architecture and transaction import.  Order Management has a customer's perspective. at an appropriate cost. which handles movements between organizations using internal orders. Oracle can handle many  kinds of relationships among them. Material does not move across organizations unless the  people in the organizations allow it to do so.§  §  Default chains Used for broadly applying general rules while allowing specific exceptions; provided in all Oracle  applications. They are usually defined by the  physical location and the nature of the items being stored. Although a single installation of Oracle Inventory can maintain  Item Master records for an entire company. and it can see the item as due into its organization. As indicated previously. It is  visible to the requesting Inventory or Purchasing organization in the same way a supplier order would be. A manufacturing  plant draws raw materials from.  Inventory Organizations  An Inventory organization within Oracle runs its own show. such as plant to . They see items. Oracle defines a hierarchical storage scheme. You may create a structure in which material flows in one direction. It accepts product orders on  behalf of the whole company or operating unit.  Subinventories Reflect different storage areas within a geographical location. a single Inventory organization. which is associated with one organization.  Physical Storage and Management  Physical storage of items is laid out to serve operational needs.  Manufacturing is oriented towards plants. To recognize the cost of manufacture. A single Purchase Order can handle deliveries to multiple  locations.  Multiple inventory organizations serve different locations. corporate organizations. manufacturing versus sales) and different  geographical locations. it  customized Order Entry to have it create a miscellaneous receipt of the ordered item in response to each customer order. and purposes. The Bureau presses CD­ROMs of census data on a make­to­order  basis—a process too simple to justify the use of a manufacturing software suite.  Individual employees normally belong to one operating organization. and other activity in  light of their responsibility in a given transaction.  Open interfaces Used to embed transaction logic in outside systems and import the results into Inventory.

distribution. They  track quantities. It is easy to add minor subinventories as required. It does not matter much if you scan most of your . because it can be troublesome to redefine subinventories (and  locations) after conversion. The benefits of a  multisegment approach are modest. rows of racks across the warehouse. say.  Locators  Warehouse locator codes usually include segments for aisle. rack. The native functionality of Oracle Inventory lends itself to custom extensions to handle the requirements  associated with consignment goods. For example. perhaps unlike legacy systems. and a yard­storage  scheme for lumber or quarry stone. or within  the company. Make sure you split asset inventory  into appropriate subinventories upon conversion.  Stock locators are a natural use of flexfields. Choosing your location numbering scheme is part of setup. You can have Oracle manage all aspects of your shipping operations. you may use a manual business  procedure or custom software to establish costs in different sites. and bin corresponding to aisles on the long dimension  of the warehouse. you can have the system track in­transit  inventory.)  §  Does the system track locations for the subinventory?  §  How available is stock within the subinventory to customers? Is it nettable against demand? (In other words. and stacks of bins from floor to ceiling. On the other hand. your numbering scheme must reflect an appropriate balance  between brevity and content.  Subinventories  The subinventory determines the uses to which an item can be put. Most companies combine all elements of the locator into a single segment. such as returned goods or received goods  awaiting inspection. between an aisle­  rack­bin scheme for packaged products. Remember that Oracle. If not. The following questions should be considered when setting up subinventories:  §  Does the system track quantities for the subinventory? (Whether the quantity can be allowed to go negative is  established at the organization level. as long as you do not have to move  balances into them. maneuvering through data entry screens is  faster with one­segment flexfields. A markup can represent value added in freight.  Your location numbering plan has to cover all types of storage.  Minor subinventories are convenient holding places for material in transit. Short and concise is best. Oracle allows a  large number of segments and characters. you can have the system decrease stock in the source and  increase stock in the receiving organization in the same transaction. and are carried as assets.  Subinventories are a useful tool for managing consignment goods. have locations.  The cost of an item may vary in different inventories. as in this example:  Building  Aisle  Rack  Bin  One character  Two positions  Two positions  One position  You can build the whole aisle­rack­bin structure into a single segment or split it into multiple segments. Brevity is most important in data entry. Large organizations may  want another segment or two for building and room number. are "ATPable" and reservable. They can be associated with ledger accounts in a way  that recognizes that consignment "assets" are offset by the liability arising from the ownership of the consignment goods  by another firm. returned items awaiting inspection  cannot be shipped to a new customer. in which case the difference will be posted to a variance  account. are nettable. a rotating bin scheme for small electronic components. If the locations are close. will manage your entire  inventory. Or. handling. or in both directions. as opposed to expensed items?  The answers are generally yes for the major subinventories that support customers and manufacturing operations. Using value sets to limit the valid entries in a given segment allows for expansion of  any individual segment if a longer location code is needed.  To allow for growth and promote ease of understanding. Planning the major subinventories is an important part of setup. Oracle can compute this transfer charge as a flat rate or a percentage. can it be  shipped as product?) Is it reservable against customer orders? Should it be considered in Available­to­Promise (ATP)  calculations?  §  Are items in the subinventory considered inventory assets. You might have to compromise.

 The system needs to track serial numbers at each level of  nesting within the final product. The major attributes of a lot are  the lot number and expiration date. The second dimension is time.location codes. Your choice will have a significant impact on  the labor and processing involved in material movement transactions and will depend on how much detail you need to  track about each item. use miscellaneous transactions to bring the balances to zero. Oracle  Inventory can also track items by serial or lot number within each location. for instance. in test and inspection.  Lots are useful in managing goods with limited shelf life. Although some subinventories may not require locator codes. That serial  number may be useful in custom systems that track the costs of warranty support. but it matters a lot to anyone who has to key them in. define them in the new subinventory.  Configuration management. the oldest merchandise not having reached its  expiration date should be consumed first. The first dimension is depth. Service can  associate Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) warranty terms and conditions with components sold to customers. more efficient than keying transaction data in through Oracle Inventory's online forms. Lots are  usually manufactured together and are subject to the same quality controls and handling. or through field upgrades and maintenance. see Chapter 11) of serially numbered items by serial number. Purchasing can receive items with lot numbers.  Lot Processing  A lot is a group of units of a single type assumed to have the same attributes and to be controlled as a group. business procedures. and Order Management can pick and ship by lot number.  Tip  Accounting considerations make it difficult to move stock locators from one subinventory to another. An  engineering change may change the structure—substituting one item for two. There may be multiple locations for a given stock number. In subinventories that use locations. deactivate and then rename the  locations in the old subinventory. Configuration management is a . and hardware at the same time. In general. Oracle Order Management controls RMAs (Return  Material Authorization; for more on RMAs.  Oracle Service and custom extensions to Oracle Applications often take advantage of serial numbering. There should be business procedures or subsystems to deal with stock that has  passed its expiration date. each with a balance of individual units. It demands a push­type inventory management system that records parts  usage before the fact. the tracking of serially numbered components within serially numbered assemblies. This can happen before shipment.  Lot numbers are associated with transactions affecting lot number­controlled items. possibly different. You decide item by  item whether to use serial numbers and at what stage to start tracking them. adds two  more dimensions to the dilemma. Lot numbers provide an audit trail  through the system. or you choose from available  locations as items need to be stocked. The only economy available  for data entry is that transactions can be entered by serial number range. of  course. when they are received out of manufacturing into inventory. However.  Locators may be specified or dynamic: either there is a preassigned place for everything. This audit trail is essential in resolving problems  such as finding where flawed components may have been used in manufacturing. Lot control must be a factor in planning  business processes for discrete manufacturing. default location where it should be put  upon receipt. Inventory can accept items with lot numbers from  manufacturing. the  numbers themselves are independent of the subinventory. If you  must do this.  Stock locators must be unique within an organization. there are costs involved in implementing  bar codes that should be weighed against the added benefits. and then pick up the balances through  miscellaneous receipts. Capturing movements through a bar code scanner is. It is a good job for an SQL script.  Test and inspection results are associated with serial numbers. The open design of the  transaction interface process lends itself to the use of mobile devices. each stock number may have one default  location from which it is to be picked for shipment and another. Serially numbered components may be swapped in and  out of an item. or as they are shipped. This example points up the need for a holistic  approach to the applications—the need to plan setup.  Transactions for serially numbered items have to reference all the individual item numbers.  Serial Number Processing  Tracking of serially numbered items can start at several points within the Inventory process: when the items are received  into inventory. Where the items are actually stored is quite independent of where they ought to be—Oracle Inventory  records both. The labor impact of this requirement will depend  on the level of automated data capture within the warehouse.

  Counting  The gap between ideals and reality can cause credibility problems in Inventory. and revision level as well as by lot number and serial number. counting inventory  costs money.  MTL_ITEM_QUANTITIES_VIEW and MTL_SUBINV_QUANTITIES_VIEW sum across lots and serial numbers. Conversely. but it should be accurate enough to assure a target level of support. The result was an Oracle Inventory that could be used for shipping and would accurately record  the cost of goods sold. due in from Manufacturing. and one that differs significantly from industry to industry. Micros  Systems needed to make its legacy inventory available to be picked and shipped from Oracle's Order Entry. are responsible for maintaining the  records. often more than the items are worth. You weigh the effort of keeping the  balance totally up to date against the cost of an occasional bounced check. It asks a more sophisticated question: How accurate does the data have to be to get  the job done? Oracle supports this statistical view. and on that basis you decide what level of  accuracy is optimal for you." The support that appears in Inventory. because its legacy system already accounted  for assets on hand. The quantity can be used to  satisfy customer orders if you have specified in setup that assets in the subinventory are nettable against demand. as described in the  following section on inventory counts. location.  Inventory balances have to be accurate enough that the warehouse finds sufficient quantity on hand when the automated  system says to pick the item—not all the time. and reserved and due out on  Sales Orders. and over  receipts and issues. but a very high percentage of the time.  Balances  Oracle Inventory provides inquiry forms for the various ways you need to look at item balances. another element delaying the process.widespread requirement. to present the figure of interest: how many of the item are available. for example. Can you afford the new suit? Do you have to draw on  the credit union to make the mortgage payment? And. How accurate do the balances have to be?  Similar considerations apply in managing your checking account. An answer like "3285. is only the tip of the iceberg. such as Oracle Purchasing and Oracle Work In Process. and you need to reconcile every now and then. You do not have to know exactly how much money you  have at all times; you need to know only enough to make decisions. Warehouse personnel might not record transactions as they  happen. due in by Purchase Order. Oracle  Inventory processes some transactions in batch mode. Cycle counting with . An operation of any size cannot be assured of knowing exactly how much it has of any item at  any time. The simple view is that the automated  system should know exactly how many grommets. the ability to drill down through  the serially numbered components of an item in inventory.  Note  There may be accounting reasons for running a negative inventory. during conversion. and an offset with negative  balances. It shows quantities on hand. however. you need enough control to make sure that nobody else is writing  checks on your account and that the bank has not made any mistakes. are on the shelves.  An entry in the Define Organization Parameters form controls whether or not negative balances are allowed. The modules that acquire  materials for inventory. but instead may hold paperwork until a certain time of day. allowing negative balances often improves accuracy. the cost involved in achieving and maintaining complete accuracy is usually not  justified. or even day of the week. The premise is that Oracle Inventory's  balance is not expected to be 100 percent accurate. For example. View Item Quantities  shows what is on hand. Additionally. Management is the art of striking the right balance. It does not pretend to try.  Micros could not allow Oracle to value the inventory. by subinventory. Also. The bottom line is that you need to know more or  less what you have at all times. but which appeared in the General Ledger as an asset with zero value. Though it  may be counterintuitive.32 grommets?  It is a problem of volume. Oracle has named its configuration  management support "Serial Number Genealogy.  Inventory derives the quantity on hand from Views instead of storing the information as a column in a table. View  Subinventory Quantities and View Locator Quantities give you inventory balances from a warehouse storage perspective. The solution? They set up two offsetting subinventories in Oracle: one with positive  balances from which they could ship and capture the cost of goods sold.32 grommets"  will not make sense. How could there be .  The reasons for the discrepancies between what is actually in your warehouse and what is being reported in the  application are timing and the economics of recordkeeping.  View Item Supply­Demand Information addresses a more interesting question: whether or not the warehouse can satisfy  demand.

 The next inventory count will reconcile this estimate to the actual quantity on hand. Run the analysis three  or four ways to see which one appears to work best and note the exceptions.  Allowing operations to continue. the Bill of Materials  for the items.  Physical Inventory  A physical inventory is a count of all items in some portion of an inventory. Backflushing is the term given to the process of  updating inventory after the fact by this kind of deduction. The ABC Descending  Values sorts items in descending order by the level of activity (monetary value. Oracle prints inventory count tags for the  warehouse staff.  Cycle Counting  Cycle counting has replaced "wall­to­wall" counts as the preferred technique for managing warehouse stock.ABC analysis—counting the most important stock most frequently—gives the highest level of inventory performance for  the counting effort invested. and Category C is low­value. Shutting  down operations just for a count is disruptive in small organizations and impossible in large ones. and low­volume. In other words.  Oracle provides two reports to help categorize items based on cost and activity in a given period. 2 lots of 5 would reduce inventory by either 10 or 12. Instead. Your business procedures may  allow inventory activity to continue throughout the count. You may find that major finished goods  represent the greatest high­dollar values but that the biggest adjustments are in items that regularly get broken or are  subject to theft.  Then. If 1 tube breaks for every 10 TV sets made. use the ABC Assignments list to show your assignments.  Though Oracle offers full support for physical inventory counts.5 tubes after a run of five. Users might specify that As get counted  once a month. Standard cycle­count functionality will handle the  assignments you have made using custom algorithms. low­action.  Attrition factors can yield fractional inventory balances.  Many other criteria may be used to assign ABC categories. Using the snapshot as a baseline. value. they compute part usage by taking into account the number of items produced. In setting up the count. accepts its counts.  ABC Analysis  ABC analysis divides stock into categories to be managed with different levels of intensity. transactions. Users can buy third­party software or take advantage of  Oracle's open design to write their own ABC stratification logic. Take the Oracle Inventory category assignments as a starting point.  you can choose only one method of having Oracle automatically assign categories to your items. and there is tremendous time pressure to finish and get back to business.  Category B is in the middle. mission­critical.  Cycle counting uses the ABC groups to establish how often items get counted. complete inventory counts may be less accurate.  Manufacturing Inventory Counts  Manufacturing operations assume that counts are approximate. On top of everything  else. The answer has to be to reduce inventory by 5. People with little inventory experience are pulled in just for  counting.  Oracle lets you categorize your parts by on­hand quantities or on­hand item value; historical usage quantities. inventory should go  down by 11 after a lot of 10. There are typically three  categories. or  number of transactions; forecast quantity or value; MRP demand quantity or value; or adjustment amounts. or quantity) and provides a  cumulative total at each line. What about after 5? With rounding. Category A stock is high­value. Oracle does all its comparisons against the frozen snapshot. It is worth a high investment of  labor to keep the counts accurate for Category A items. Most of them do not actually count parts as they go into  assemblies. it highlights the items for which activity and cost show the most need for tight  control. despite the fact that tubes only come  in integer quantities. and/or high­volume. both  inaccurate. The Define ABC Assignments form assigns ABC classes to items; all you have to do is specify the cutoff points. and Cs yearly. Oracle Inventory takes a snapshot of the  balances as they exist at a point in time. then use manual reassignments to  take care of the exceptions. the system divides the number of items to be counted . The fact that Oracle lets you have  both systems in use at once eases the transition to cycle counting. and attrition factors built into the bills to cover waste. though Oracle allows any number. Cycle counting and ABC analysis will be discussed in more detail in the upcoming sections. In the end. means that the counters have to allow for activity between the freeze and their  count. however. Category B and C items merit proportionately less effort. most organizations find that cycle counting according to an  ABC analysis is the most effective way to achieve their objective on a regular basis. and then requests recounts or makes adjustments. Bs quarterly.

  The cycle count interface makes it possible to use mobile devices to do the counting.  Many organizations converting to Oracle have not implemented cycle counting. in which the counter may  either directly enter the quantity to be ordered. it takes into account the time it takes to make items. and efficiency demands that items be ordered in  rational units. If they are essential for the  operation. items in transit from other company locations.  Inventory uses forecasts to compensate for the fact that it cannot get materials instantaneously.  When the entered counts disagree with the computer count and the discrepancy is within a user­prescribed tolerance. . the replenishment logic figures out how much to  order and when. Using the actual need as a basis. as described in the following section. stock shrinkage. at a time when receiving and picking  activity are low.e. however. It creates and sends a requisition to Purchasing. the  entered count is taken to be accurate; otherwise the system will request a recount. the replenishment logic  has to order more.  usually custom or third­party. The warehouse usually schedules an hour or two per day for counting. booked) and forecast demand.  Min­Max Planning Stock items may be coded for replenishment by reorder point (ROP) or by MIN­MAX logic. or enter a count so Oracle can perform MIN­MAX computations to  determine what to order. The warehouse knows the process is working when the  number of recounts falls to an acceptable level. starting with the Category A items.by the number of workdays available to count them. Management can devise reports (again.  although transactions can still be done during the count. It can base the replenishment decision solely on the amount of stock on hand and on order. This minimizes dual keying errors (particularly if the counting device first reads the  barcode and then the user types in the number of items present) and ensures that advanced warehouses already using  this kind of counting equipment do not perceive that they are taking a step back with the move to the E­Business Suite. they do need to be replenished. manufacturing raw material needs. and it is usually best left until the Oracle system is running smoothly.  Purchasing.  Cycle counting keeps average accuracy in the warehouse high and consistent. and deliver the item to its destination  Oracle Manufacturing plans the production of manufactured items to meet firm (i. These  include items on order from suppliers. expendable items may not be worth counting at all for financial purposes. In  addition to the preceding factors. Inventory keeps a parallel MTL_DEMAND table with records of all material requirements for  customer orders. Suppliers and internal  manufacturing operations need time to ship or make inventory items.. and requisitions for internal use. Inventory is only the custodian. and Work in Process (among other Applications) maintain data in these tables to reflect  their operations. Your business procedures  should allow time for a count and a recount in a period when the items are physically inactive. Order Management. and other parameters.  Replenishment Counts  Inexpensive.  Determining what to order is complicated by the time factor and ordering considerations. You export the list of items to be  counted and import the count results. indicating that most counts agree with the automated records. The purchase  requisitions it generates take into consideration the following lead­time factors:  §  The time it will take to turn a requisition into a purchase order and get it to a vendor  §  The time it will take a vendor to ship the item  §  The time it will take to receive. Some  items—and some subinventories—can continue under the old counting methods while cycle counting is being  implemented.  Managing Stock Replenishments Inventory is responsible for the big picture of overall material requirements. It adds forecast quantities  to actual demand to compute the most realistic estimates of requirements at each future point in time. MIN­MAX  logic is the simplest. items being manufactured.  Inventory replenishment logic compares future demand against what is on hand and on order to determine what needs to  be ordered. In addition  to its balance records. they will complicate the process. it maintains a MTL_SUPPLY table to record all items expected to be received into inventory. so warehouse personnel count roughly the same number of items  every day. or it can  take demand into account as well. As with the physical inventory process. inspect. If there are customer orders for six of an item and two are on hand and two on order. and items  due back from customers. It takes minimum and maximum values from the min_minmax_quantity and  max_minmax_quantity attributes in the MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS record for the item. It represents a significant change in  philosophy and business procedures. A gradual  cutover is recommended. Oracle supports replenishment counts. using Oracle transaction data) to monitor warehouse accuracy as measured by warehouse  denials. like boxes or pallets.

 as shown in Figure 10­3. Oracle  Inventory supports two statistical methods for computing safety stock. and so on) against the ongoing carrying cost of keeping  stock in the warehouse (cost of money. it creates a  requisition for some multiple of that adjusted EOQ. in statistical terms.  Businesses have to decide. the trade­off between the cost of carrying stock and the cost of being unable to  satisfy customers. weeks.  Figure 10­3: MIN­MAX reorder calculation logic  Demand data may at times be excluded altogether. pallet. Service level expresses. For a hospital. If the quantity  on hand and on order falls below the specified MIN. You specify time buckets (days. Oracle can compute safety stock as a factor of historical  usage and the desired service level. Reorder point replenishment. It can use a straight percentage of forecast  demand. You set  the parameters up item by item to meet your business needs. demand data may not be worth  the effort for inexpensive items that experience steady consumption. the amount of time an item should be  available when it is requested. by item. parts could not be ordered from vendors in time to meet user needs. It is not useful when lead times are longer than delivery schedules; in  that case.  Using demand and forecasts information and analyzing matching supply against demand by time period will usually  provide a more accurate picture of requirements than will MIN­MAX point­in­time projection.  ROP incorporates the concept of an Economic Order Quantity (EOQ). When the ROP replenishment logic determines that more stock is needed. such as paper clips or solder.  as shown in Figure 10­4. and shrinkage). uses future demand plus safety stock to compute requirements. you would say that the  supply and demand for milk must match one another within each time bucket. In addition. occupancy.9 percent satisfaction level than a 99 percent level. The item manager factors in the standard  units for ordering and handling material (case. and so on) in setting the Fixed Order Quantity and Fixed Lot Size  Multiplier attributes for the item.MIN­MAX includes expected receipts (supply) and existing orders (demand) out to a cutoff date you specify. if there is enough history on the item. a can of Spam due in this week will satisfy  cafeteria demand next month.  Figure 10­4: ROP replenishment logic  Reorder­Point Planning Safety stock is a "fudge factor" to protect against the risks of a change in demand. Alternatively. Milk due this week will not. overhead. or periods) within which Oracle matches supply and demand. it orders up to the MAX. A carload of grapefruit next month does not satisfy shoppers  tomorrow. The EOQ formula balances the one­time costs of  processing an order (cutting the purchasing order. whereas with Spam the demand in one time . receiving.  Time is an important factor in balancing supply with demand. If you are using weekly time buckets. It takes more stock to support a 99.

 Users without Oracle Purchasing need custom programs to populate the MTL_TRANSACTION_  INTERFACE and MTL_SUPPLY_INTERFACE tables with appropriate records to show purchasing activity. Order Management is the primary demand driver. The earlier the demand is recognized. the lot managers could reflect this by setting the outlier update percent to 1. it looks at supply due from purchasing or manufacturing  and demand for that item itself or as a component of a Pick­to­Order order line.  Overconsumption results in higher replenishment orders. Schlage's forecast for deadbolts will be the aggregate of direct  sales forecasts in the states and countries in which it markets. forecast goes down. and each warehouse must ship. . in order to meet  company­wide demand. determining how much each factory must produce. demand consumes forecast. MRP can also compute requirements across an  organization. Forecasts have to be done by item. is firmer than forecasts. In other words. Schlage Lock may not want OEM orders for  deadbolts to consume the forecast for its wholesale distribution arm. Oracle follows the rules given for demand  consumption.  Actual demand places a reality check on a forecast.  §  After correcting for outliers.  Demand. if OEM sells twice as many as  expected.  The replenishment algorithms use all the real demand. it is consumed.  one at a time. and seasonality and use mathematical smoothing  techniques. including that in the period of overconsumption. In inventory terms. Your company has  to set the rules.  the system needs to translate demand (in terms of shippable product) into requirements (in terms of components). which are estimates of future  requests. It finds a source—either another organization  within the company or a vendor—and places the appropriate internal or external purchase order. You also specify how future supply may satisfy current  demand.  Forecasting and Demand  Each installation needs to establish its own policies for recognizing demand and making forecasts to be used by the  Oracle Material Requirements Planning application. MRP and inventory replenishment both calculate what is required and generate requisitions for  Purchasing.bucket can be satisfied by supply in any previous time bucket. the higher the demand satisfaction will be; however. this does not mean that the best guess is only another 200  will be sold. The algorithms take into account historical demand. Overconsumption effectively ignores the impact of excess demand in one given period on the forecast. plus what it may manufacture for private­label sales. it will require more manufacturing instead of taking the pressure off the dealer sales force.  If the forecast for the period cannot fully consume the demand in that period. If it receives one order for 300 trees. carrying costs will  also be higher as a result of items held for orders that never firm up. consuming forecast within a number of periods after the forecast. Purchasing follows its setup rules to act on the requisition. Replenishment  will buy the parts to make more deadbolts. using purchasing and manufacturing as sources for the items. A pair of skis due next month may satisfy demand this week if the customer is willing to wait. In making its computations. For example. The  forecasting system uses forecast sets to combine multiple forecasts into aggregate figures to plan manufacturing. MRP  uses Bill of Material explosions to determine those parts requirements. the best guess is that the order for 300 is a fluke and perhaps 495 more will be sold. and the Demand Interface is part of the cycle. It adjusts the inventory balances and relieves the on­order  amounts appropriately. however. meaning that no  single demand can consume more than 1 percent of a forecast. On the contrary. a  demand can be made visible to Inventory at several points in the cycle between the time an order is first entered and the  time it ships. You can make intuitive projections when past demand is nonexistent or would be a poor guide. The forecast of what will happen has to be adjusted for what is  actually happening. or "overconsuming" forecast in the  current period. In Oracle. Demand  goes up. Inventory handles  replenishments at the item level only. and add to it the  forecasts for other periods that would have been diminished if the overconsumption had been applied to them. In other words. one at a time.  Different sources of demand require separate forecasts. The exceptions follow:  §  A given order that dwarfs the average is called an outlier. if the forecast for a period can fully consume the new demand. Forecasts may be kept by demand class—groups of customers and types of orders. Subject to some exceptions.  Oracle Purchasing handles the receipt and inspection of items. and they have to allow appropriate algorithms and parameters for each  item. In a manufacturing operation. which is associated with actual customer requests. It advises Inventory of  the state of the requisition through postings to the MTL_SUPPLY table. each order for an item  lowers the forecast demand as it raises the actual demand. trends. It may use up the demand by consuming forecast within a specified number of periods preceding the  demand period.  Oracle then follows rules for consuming by demand class.  Material Requirements Planning The Material Requirements Planning (MRP) application handles material planning  across items and across organizations. Establishing order  cycles is a major part of Order Management setup. Suppose a Christmas tree lot forecasts selling 500 trees a  week.

 Bar  code labels are about the only paper used anymore in warehouse operations. the system tells him what is in it. MRP runs do not order items; they simply create requisitions. how much.  and to move them with maximum efficiency when they have to be stored. Real­time two­way communications provide Oracle's automated systems with  the kind of information and quick response ability to increase efficiency significantly.A forecast set is a group of forecasts that combine to give a complete forecast.  Figure 10­5: Three forecasts divided into two demand classes  Multiple forecast sets are useful for "what if" projections. A given run of the Inventory Reorder Point  Planning Report or of MRP.  Forecast sets need to be consumed only if they are used in the replenishment process. what kind of inspection is required. Portable RF devices—that stands for  "Radio Frequency"—that combine scanner. Oracle can consume more than  one set. Once an order has been placed. There may be more than one forecast set. It takes space to store things. money to  carry them. You can have and maintain any number of forecast sets. Planners can look at different requisition  quantities based on different forecasts and decide what to order. The  automated system can decide whether to "cross­dock" part of the receipt to immediately fill backorders and where  best to put it in the warehouse. and where to put each . After the warehouseman identifies a receipt to the system.  Industry Efforts to Improve Stock Movement  The warehouse is the place that the information age confronts physical reality. Just about everything comes marked with bar codes. You can model different economic scenarios or determine what  would happen if you acquired new customers or expanded your marketing territory. Some of the areas of increased  efficiency are  §  Intelligent receiving Electronic Advance Shipment Notices (ASNs) prepare Oracle Purchasing for a receipt. however. The objective is to avoid having things pass through a warehouse at all whenever possible. keyboard. and radio functionality tell warehousemen what to do. and people and equipment to move them around. A forecast  must belong to one and only one forecast set. when possible by a bar  code scan. if you want to consistently generate material requirements for multiple scenarios. has to use a single forecast set (or forecast) to calculate material requirements and  create requisitions. as illustrated in Figure 10­5.  Several information technologies support warehouse operations. then  accept their confirmation of what was done. display. You can compare the results of  different MRP runs. the supply it represents  will be taken into account by all MRP runs. each representing a different  business scenario. Warehouse operations are central to the whole supply­  chain management revolution.

 it pulls them—and a simple. the transactions that move material around within the inventory for the sake of inventory efficiency or in  response to Kanban requests. or item. so that one pass through the warehouse. subinventory. physical signal such as a  Kanban card or empty container triggers a replenishment. other production lines. possibly remote organizations within the  company.  The pull sequence provides Oracle with the information it needs to automatically create Kanban cards for each item. The options include order picking. but a hand tally will suffice for most  organizations. Kanban systems are self­regulating in that replenishments flow  down to the point of use only at the rate they are needed. The newer approaches involve consolidating picking for multiple customer orders  as well as warehouse movements.  Kanban  Kanban. It may have bar coded labels printed to identify the materials as they are put into storage. eliminating the time it takes to go through a production scheduling process. and passes the output to another PU. assembly­line operations that produce similar items  on a continuous basis. signals one PU to  resupply the next one up the line. showing the sequence of Kanban locations (that is. Bar code scanning accurately captures shop floor  movement at very little expense. The  manufacturing process takes materials as they are needed—that is. paper­based/  picking. and it has the logic to generate the inventory movement transactions needed to build up and  break down shipping containers. called a "picking wave. or even just an empty container.  Proactive material movement With visibility up and down the supply chain. outside  suppliers. is a method to support pull­based replenishment in manufacturing systems. container. cluster picking. You have the option to ignore  the pull sequence and manually generate Kanban cards using numbers of your own choosing. It is easy to record that a Kanban container passed  from one station to another. even if locator control is not in effect for the organization. RF devices let the men on the warehouse floor tell the automated  system exactly what they have done. the inventory system can anticipate  where materials will be needed.  Multiple layers of containerization Inventory is often stored on the palletsand/or in the containers used to ship it. The  system can capture and/or verify serial numbers and lot numbers at the same time. and you can have Oracle temporarily take cards out of circulation to hold down supply. the processing units  or PUs) that models the replenishment network. and locator. zone picking. Oracle allows the use of stock locators for purposes of Kanban  definition. The replenishment network includes locations on the shop floor. The  simplicity of the system minimizes the cost of capturing transactions. Because the PUs are represented by locations. A Kanban card. so the system doesn't get confused when they act on their own initiative. bulk picking. and destination. Presenting the card takes the place of a requisition or a delivery order. adds value to create  an output. .  The production process is broken down into processing units (PUs). and accuracy.  Automated support enhances the simple manual Kanban concept. non­Kanban organizations. Oracle now has visibility of inventory through the layers of  shipping containers. A bar code scanner is the preferred method. Each card is uniquely identified by a generated Kanban number. The materials pulled in a picking wave are typically brought to a staging area where they can be sorted by  order.which means card in Japanese.  On­the­fly decision making Oracle Workflow processes specify how much flexibility there is in choosing the storage  locations to use for inbound and outbound goods.  subinventory.  The number of cards in circulation controls production; a PU is not allowed to make its product without a card." satisfies many  needs. Kanban is best suited for flow manufacturing. The immediacy of the Kanban signals lead to shorter lead times  and reduced inventory.  §  §  §  Most material movements are initiated by Oracle Purchasing (in the receiving process) and Order Management/Shipment  Management (for getting goods out to customers).  Oracle accepts Kanban as an alternative to setting a Release Time Fence for MPS/MRP within an organization. and other. You can have Oracle create non­replenishable Kanban cards to handle spikes in  demand. efficient movement through the  warehouse. You have  to define a pull sequence for every Kanban item. Each PU takes in raw materials. It has the ability to initiate warehouse move orders to prompt the physical movement.line of the receipt. The integration between  Inventory and Manufacturing is such that Inventory can present a Kanban card to initiate production when it projects a  need for an item. and pick and pass picking. depending on  whether or not it goes outside the company. The few transactions described here are the ones that Oracle Inventory  owns outright.  §  A choice of picking styles Makes it possible to find the best balance among speed.  and these in turn usually carry bar code identifiers.

 such as the item.  staging areas work well in an automated warehouse operation.Warehouse Movements  With Release 11i. Technology supports a more fluid organization.  2.  5.  When converting from a legacy system to Oracle Inventory. from which an item may go into a customer  order through a standard pick release or be directed to another subinventory or storage location. and the shipping  dock. The  recommended approach to conversion is as follows:  1.  Populate the interface table with organization­level records. This section  covers issues related to conversion. The Item Open Interface can  apply only one template to set attributes for an item.  the organization. so you can prepare for Oracle conversion as you maintain the legacy system.  Define templates that can be used to set up every type of item in the organization. Not coincidentally. which has columns  corresponding to those in the MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS table. the optimum places to locate stock items in a warehouse depends  on how frequently they are picked. Oracle move  transactions translate directly into commands to automated storage and retrieval systems. or want to make. primarily pick waves. Programmed logic. from Oracle and others. in such a way that the automated records remain accurate. usually fall into groupings such as those defined by Oracle templates. it can be difficult to map all the item attributes one­to­one. transactions (opening balances). or manufacturing location to which they usually go. and the organization­level template to apply. expand the legacy schema to carry the  template name. The important questions involve determining the optimal place to put each  new receipt and to deciding when it is worth the expense of moving items around within the warehouse just to tune the  operation. The picking apparatus and conveyor systems can bring  stock to forward staging areas. weight. It has to continually respond to changes in demand and in what is actually in  storage.  3.  6. and location conversions.  handling requirements. You may find it useful to define the templates such that the name of one can be  derived from the other. The organization­level template must be compatible  with the master­level template.  Associate a master­level template with each legacy item. items that are generally the same in terms of security requirements.  Warehouse organization is in constant flux. These usually include little more than the item number.  Load the interface table with records in which the item­specific attribute columns (item number.  Item Master Conversion  Oracle Inventory provides the Item Open Interface to enable you to load new items into the Inventory Item Master. carousels. If possible. staging area. Legacy items do. Oracle Inventory includes alerts to determine when  and RF devices empower the warehousemen themselves to make these decisions. It all goes to staging areas.  Typically.  Import the organization­level items into Oracle. or  even come close. It directs the warehouse to pick materials to be moved in  the same wave as material for customer orders. what else is commonly picked at the same time. and  automated guided vehicles. more than half the attributes will remain null; your testing will indicate which attributes need values. These factors need to be taken into consideration  in initially assigning storage locations. can pick optimal  storage locations for receipts as they arrive and can periodically match the actual warehouse organization against past  activity and future demand to figure out how it should be rearranged.  Warehouse organization cannot be static.  Import the master items into Oracle. In this case.  Users previously accommodated re­warehousing transactions using miscellaneous issues and receipts or custom  subsystems that fed the open interface tables. from which warehousemen can pick them again for packing. Oracle introduces formal transactions to support movement of materials within the warehouse. special handling and the like. Oracle now supports moves with a series of move transactions that are  integrated into the stock picking schemes.  In arranging items within a subinventory—that is. The load process cross­checks to ensure that the attribute  settings are consistent with one another. however. how bulky they are.  Conversion Issues  Oracle Inventory provides many open interfaces to assist with ongoing interfaces and initial data conversion. conveyors. . units of  measure) are populated; name a template that will fill in all other needed attributes in the master organization.  4. This  program processes records that you have loaded into the MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS_INTERFACE table. They can tell the system what moves  they have made.

 The balances will be debited to the material account associated  with the subinventory.  Make sure your test plan includes transactions from every business area—particularly Inventory. and Manufacturing—that will use the attributes you set. The accounts will  balance only if both the inventory balances and the item costs agree. can remain unresolved well into setup. After you get the inventory­ to­inventory conversion to balance. One of the first jobs in conversion will be to populate the  location tables. You set them up first because stock locators have to be present to accept balances. and category data. However. Use Oracle's utility to delete Pending costs. deciding which subinventories to  define for asset items. Oracle does the  complex work of revaluing stock. and work in process. Use the following SQL routine to create a list of the correspondence  between internal and external attribute names:  SELECT attribute_name. such as cost. The major issue. and those with light borders are populated in the second phase of conversion. The process is straightforward. in­transit inventory. you can use the Open Transaction Interface to bring in balance data as  miscellaneous receipts. catalog. Purchasing. sales  price.  Making the accounts balance between the legacy system and Oracle Applications takes some effort. The interface program does not load these values. Figure 10­6 shows how these tables relate to each other and the sequence of conversion within each  organization.Using templates does more than just simplify the conversion. then run Update Standard Costs to have Oracle apply  the change and compute the accounting implications. and then run the update.  Costs are more volatile than items themselves. It ensures that new items created after cutover will have the  same characteristics as legacy items brought over during conversion.  Tip  The Attribute Names in the Define Item screen and the Define Item Template screen are not the same as the  column names in the interface table. There should be no adjustment at all if the legacy inventory agrees with the legacy ledger (but it is worth  checking whether that is historically the case). Reconcile the legacy inventory valuation that existed prior to conversion with the Oracle  valuation. Order  Management. Although you must let Oracle apply the changes.  There are usually so few subinventories that you create them manually. . insert your new  Pending values into CST_ITEM_ COSTS and CST_ITEM_COST_DETAILS. it should be a small matter to reconcile to the  General Ledger. Oracle provides an online mechanism to update them. Set up the Open Item Interface to bring in the frozen  standard costs of each item. Those with medium borders are populated  in the first automated conversion steps. The accountants need to tell you where to post the credit. It is critically important to choose the right template at conversion.  Transaction Conversion  Once the items and locations are in place. You use the  Update Costs form to assign the new cost to the Pending cost type.  Location Conversion  Users can convert items and import balances via the open interfaces. but you still need custom scripts to set up stock  locators. The tables with heavy borders are populated manually at setup. Plan to write SQL*Plus or PL/SQL scripts to populate them as part of the conversion. user_attribute_name  FROM mtl_item_attributes  ORDER BY attribute_name  Oracle can carry multiple values for certain attributes that legacy systems define as unique to an item. it is quite easy to  write your own script to create Pending cost type records.  There is no open interface for batch updates of items. the Oracle tables are  relatively straightforward.

 Most organizations develop a mass  load utility for flex values as part of General Ledger setup.  3. better yet.. The  script will perform the following tasks:  1. Load them through the Open Item Interface.Figure 10­6: Relationships among Location Tables in Inventory  MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS master records need to be converted independently of locations and prior to loading any balance  or location information for items.  §  Populate any other columns for which data is available from the legacy system. that this may force some trade­offs  between re­warehousing and assigning a less than optimal subinventory scheme. as described earlier in this chapter.  everyone can clearly identify records that were created during initial conversion.  Create a master list of item locations from legacy files.30 columns if Oracle does not have a place  for them. Map them into unused Attribute 1 . There is no open interface to import these records.  §  Populate the WHO columns with the date and the user ID of the author of the load script.  create a conversion user and run all conversion programs from that account.  §  Use the legacy data to select a valid subinventory for the location. however. .  Perform the required translation from the legacy system into the Oracle Location Flexfield format.  2.  Insert records directly into the MTL_ITEM_LOCATIONS table. These locations are independent of the items stored in  them. Chapter 15 describes the process of analysis and  programming. Be sure to do the following:  §  Validate the segments against any flex value sets you may have defined for the Location Flexfield.  4. even years later. Or. though usually not all. but inventory management is generally easier when physically  adjacent locations belong to one subinventory. so that nothing is lost. Subinventories can be assigned according  to the type of item currently in the location.  FND_FLEX_VALUES may be used to validate some segments in the Location Flexfield. you have to set them up in advance.  §  Use the Oracle­provided sequence MTL_ITEM_LOCATIONS_S to generate unique LOCATOR_ID values.  MTL_ITEM_LOCATIONS defines locations within the organization.. Recognize. Write a script to create them from legacy location data. If you are  going to limit the values a segment may assume. Then. Leave  no legacy attributes behind.  Test the validity of the conversion script by querying created locations and assigning items to them in the test  instance.

Balance and location data are usually available in the same legacy file. They need to work with the accounting department and the software  setup team to make sure that the accounts will serve their own information needs. but they all need to balance. The money side flows to the General Ledger. where the financial operations of the  whole enterprise are recorded and reported.  In addition to the summary reports required by law.  Inventory is carried on a company's books as an asset. and  everything else?  §  How can inventory costs be reduced? What are the optimal trade­offs?  §  Ultimately. There is a big  difference between keeping the books in balance and producing information needed to manage the business. Reporting follows the Chart of Accounts. the data may be in the extract used to populate MTL_SYSTEM_ITEMS. but also where they go when they arrive and where to look for them first. MTL_SECONDARY_LOCATORS. The following types of decisions are made in Inventory:  §  What is the real cost at sale of an inventory item. Your first step is to write a custom  script to populate the tables. factoring in the purchase cost. shown at the top of Figure 10­6.  Shaking down the accounting setups is a major part of the Inventory installation process. Deciding what they want in light of what Oracle can do is a matter of trial and error. Generate entries for the mandatory columns and populate the others to the extent that legacy data is available. The most fundamental accounting requirement is that the value of  all the items in inventory sum to the amount carried on the General Ledger books. shown in Chapter 2. the ledger provides the detailed information to support business  decisions. Depending on the legacy system's sophistication  or lack thereof. It exemplifies how to get the process  started. These accounts are the basis for ledger reporting. They show what information will flow to the  ledger. The model is a kind of "financial flowchart" that accountants.  Accounting models are an essential device for planning and communication. and MTL_ITEM_SUB_DEFAULTS are simple  tables. and the MIS staff can share in  setting up the Oracle Inventory parameters. what products are profitable for the company to manufacture or sell?  The Oracle Inventory setup requires many ledger accounts.  Chances are that Oracle Inventory admits more complexity than the legacy system.  MTL_ITEM_SUB_INVENTORIES. Your algorithms will have to define not  only where items are. handling costs. There can be more than one set of  books and more than one Inventory organization within each set of books.  The following accounting model is simple and accurate—but very incomplete. Setup would be simple if users  knew how Oracle Applications worked and what they needed in the way of reports; unfortunately they usually don't have  this information. You add the  balances after you have defined places to put them. storage.  Accounting Entries for Inventory Transactions  Inventory accounts for items and their costs. functional experts. Its financial accounting is automatic; few organizations would bother to track  items that have no monetary value. of which  the material managers will be the biggest users. Step 1  Finance an inventory company by putting cash into the company for an inventory account:  Account  Cash  Equity  Step 2  Use $60 to buy some inventory:  Account  Inventory Assets  Cash  Step 3  Sell the inventory for $80: Debit  60  60  Credit  Debit  100  100  Credit  . that join to both items and subinventories.

 The verb "buy" in Step 2(a) is too simplistic.  Most companies operate on an accrual rather than a cash basis. receiving. and paying the bill are separate steps. Sometimes the .Account  Cash  Inventory Assets  Profit  Debit  80  Credit  60  20  Balance sheet statements after each of these transactions would show thez financial state of the company at that time:  After Step 1  Assets  Cash  100  Liabilities  Equity  100  After Step 2  Assets  Cash  Inventory  40  60  Liabilities  Equity  100  After Step 3  Assets  Cash  120  Liabilities  Equity  Profit  100  20  Additional Accounting Transactions  The preceding model is overly simplistic. while not providing much useful  information. They show income when it is earned rather than when the money is paid. This calls for a Receipt Accruals account. rather than  when they are paid. Step 2—buying inventory—  becomes two steps. then send an invoice separately. The vendor will ship the product. After Step 2(a). It tells  management that there is $100 in the bank. Oracle Payables requires at least one  accounts payable account. They  make the accounting model and financial reporting more complicated. The company actually owes for the goods  when they arrive. but $60 of it is owed to suppliers. regardless of when the invoice arrives. it  would show the liability for accounts payable as follows:  Assets  Cash  Inventory  100  60  Equity  Accounts Payable  Liabilities  100  60  Introducing the accounts payable account increases the utility of the financial statement by adding new information. but they do a better job of reflecting the actual state  of the business. Their books show expenses as they are due.  Step 2(a)  Buy the assets and incur a liability to pay for them:  Account  Inventory Assets  Accounts Payable  Step 2(b)  Pay for the purchased assets:  Account  Accounts Payable  Cash  Debit  60  60  Credit  Debit  60  60  Credit  The balance sheet statement after Step 2(b) would look the same as that shown in the first example.  This model still does not reflect how business really works. The following paragraphs introduce some of the accounts that Purchasing and Inventory setup require. Buying is really a  process in which ordering. but it is financially accurate in that it balances. The company will issue a purchase order to  the vendor.

 In addition to showing how an accounting model works. to account for such things as materials that  have been received but not yet inspected. so it doesn't  spend the same money twice. In the course of a routine purchase there may be slightly different amounts at each step in the process:  §  Amount the internal requisitioner expects an item to cost  §  Supplier price that the purchasing department enters on the purchase order  §  Invoiced price from the supplier  §  Standard cost of the item within the inventory system  Differences in price require adjustments in most of the steps shown in the accounting model used earlier as well as in  many other places within manufacturing. this example shows  how accounts are used to provide the detail necessary to manage business operations.  Variances  Prices and costs are subjective. Price and cost vary over time. Still assuming that the exact cost of the assets are known start to end. and there may be several in effect at  one time. By convention. called variances. are posted to variance accounts. The adjustments. Your supplier's price is your cost. the term price applies to the seller's side of a transaction and cost applies  to the buyer's side. in addition to others. Here is . the accounting  model would include the following steps:  Step 2(a)  Order the assets:  Account  Assets on Order  Step 2(a)  Order the assets:  Purchase Obligations  Step 2(a)  Receive the assets:  Account  Purchase Obligations  Assets on Order  Inventory Assets  Receiving Accrual Account  Step 2(a)  Process the invoice:  Account  Receiving Accrual Account  Accounts Payable  Step 2(a)  Pay the bill:  Account  Accounts Payable  Cash  Debit  60  60  Credit  Debit  60  60  Credit  60  60  Debit  60  60  Credit  60  Debit  60  Credit  Oracle Inventory uses all the accounts just mentioned.company wants to know how much (in monetary terms) has been ordered or even requested to be ordered.

 Both cost methods recognize an Invoice Price  Variance account (IPV). The other four. They have to be kept small through  periodic adjustments to standard prices. are treated the same under either system. Ford.what happens to the buying segment of our accounting model when the system sees three different prices: $55 (standard  cost). and manufacturing organizations. Material is only  one of the five cost elements for which average costing is an alternative. The choice of either average or standard costing is ultimately a  business decision—Oracle Inventory can perform both. margin on a product is the difference  between price and cost.  Managing inventory and manufacturing processes is a matter of managing variances.  purchasing. watches the variances closely. in Payables. Under standard costing.  A change in the frozen cost of an item ripples through a number of inventory. discussed in the following section  on standard costs. However. IPV picks up  prompt­ pay discounts and other charges and credits that affect the ultimate cost of purchased materials. Take the time to determine your long­range  needs as you initially install Oracle Inventory. and $58 (invoice price):  Step 2(b)  Receive the assets:  Account  Inventory Assets (at standard cost)  Purchase Price Variance Account  Receiving Accrual Account  Step 2(b)  Process the invoice:  Account  Receiving Accrual Account  Invoice Price Variance Account  Accounts Payable  Debit  60  2  58  Credit  Debit  55  −5  60  Credit  Passing the differences to variance accounts buffers the system from constant small changes in price.  Nonmaterial Expense Collection  Manufacturing collects expenses associated with producing individual products. and then periodically adjusts  the standard cost to bring variances back down. It is probably true  that no two Ford automobiles rolling off the assembly line cost exactly the same amount to make. Even in a manufacturing organization  there are a number of overhead expenses that cannot be pinned to one item of inventory. and manufacturing processes. there is no tool . and manufacturing setups. inventory. plans  and prices as if they do.  Average versus Standard Costing  Costing provides a system for judging success in many areas. The company sets a standard cost.  The similarities between standard and average cost are significant. The adjustments the  system makes as you change the frozen cost are ultimately posted to variance accounts you have defined in inventory. At the highest level. a process that brings them in line with actual costs for purchasing and handling.  Caution  Converting from one costing method to the other is difficult.  Each issue to manufacturing is costed at the average cost in effect at the moment of the issue. for differences between the purchase price and the invoice price. Oracle recomputes item cost with every receipt. with the difference posted to the Purchase Price Variance (PPV)  account. however.  Under average costing. purchasing. You analyze elements of cost and patterns of change to evaluate the performance of your  purchasing. the inventory asset  account is charged for each receipt at standard cost. $60 (purchase order price).

  Oracle specifies five steps for setting standard costs:  1.  The ledger postings are differentiated according to Accounting Flexfields associated with the items and the organizations. The simplest  figure is the average price recently paid to suppliers. Because the item number does not flow to the General Ledger. establishing pending costs. you need an allocation formula to distribute the  ledger amounts to individual items. and so on) are captured by Payables and as depreciation flows from Fixed Assets and  other sources; they flow to the ledger. and so on) are captured by Payables; they flow to the ledger.  subinventories. If inventory is a major part of your  operation and is held for resale. total cost is the rollup of the costs associated with the five this­level cost  elements (those associated with assembling the item from its components) and the five prior­level cost elements (those  same five cost elements applied to the creation of the lower­level items that make up the assembly). Overhead costs associated  with running an inventory system follow these paths into the general ledger:  §  Overhead labor charges may be collected by a labor distribution system; they flow from payroll to the ledger. receiving. . for both buy and make parts. The cost of buy (purchased) items is easier to establish. It  collects the raw figures you need to compute all other types of costs.  4.  Setting Standard Costs  Costs are usually set at two levels: buy and make. In Oracle's terminology. but assigning them is  up to you.  2. is straightforward. inventory shrinkage for office  supplies into one GL account.  Oracle automatically computes and assigns the average cost of purchased items if you elect to use average costing.  Update pending costs. applying costs in steps 3–5 after you know what they should be.  What you do with inventory overhead depends on the needs of the organization.  Define pending costs. For example.  Print and review pending costs. it makes good sense to compute the costs of purchasing.  §  Overhead resource charges (utilities. and outside processing that goes into them. and categories that apply to the item. and managing it into  the price at which an item is carried in inventory and eventually sold.  §  Overhead costs (occupancy. for example. The cost of make (manufactured) items equals the cost of the  component items plus the labor. it may be adequate  to absorb the cost of managing it as corporate overhead or use a high­level allocation to spread overhead to the  organizations it serves.  §  Expenses associated with Inventory operations flow to the ledger using Accounting Flexfields defined in Inventory  setup. They  may be applied to the system via the Applications Desktop Integrator. The art of  pricing is in the first two steps.  Print new standard costs. Oracle defines five cost elements for each item:  §  Material (the average purchase price)  §  Overhead (resource and department overhead)  §  Material Overhead (also called burden)  §  Outside Processing  §  Resource  The total cost of an assembled item is computed as the sum of the five cost elements for the item itself and of the lower­  level assemblies within it. The GL might capture.  For users who need to establish costs precisely. overhead. Material overhead may include costs of purchasing and receiving.  5. If the inventory is for internal use.  3.provided for non­manufacturing organizations to track expenses by item.  Roll up pending costs. You can develop your own formulas to spread such overhead expenses over actual  inventory items.  Users who take advantage of these cost elements usually break down costs even further by defining cost subelements  unique to the organization that rolls up to the cost. Overhead expenses such as warehouse  management generally have to flow to the ledger and be allocated back to individual items. the resources that go into the manufacturing of a part  may include labor and utilities.  The end of the process.

  Use the guidelines above to apply the pending costs once you know what they are. If you have multiple locations. These items usually have  the planning_make_buy_code attribute set to "buy. meaning the cost of an assembly depends on the cost of the components. not the invoice price. To  reflect the differences among items and among warehouse operations. You need your own algorithms.  A large number of items and frequent changes would make a manual approach to setting pending costs impractical for  most manufacturing organizations.  Material overhead costs are associated with the item type. it may be  worth allocating the overhead to provide a truer picture of cost­of­sales. some more efficient than others.  §  Tag the costs as being for this level. ship.  Overhead costs represent the cost of running a materials operation. Although you know it costs more to handle cement than nails. The Oracle Financials capture and  carry a significant amount of data to help you compute the five cost elements. and warehouse an item. warehousing. Instead. receive. They can include the costs  to procure. The cost is associated with the item  being assembled through the WIP job.  To manually copy the frozen item costs into pending. such as commodity prices from the  Internet. the price you pay for an item. which a purchased item does  not have. Doing so will change the cost without adjusting  the General Ledger. you always need a formula to compute the material costs of purchased parts.  §  Insert costs only for the elements you use." You can. In discrete manufacturing. . Oracle Manufacturing captures  resource utilization costs. You enter costs at the level of the five cost elements just  described; the form displays the total as the pending item cost. for example. You may want to use a different method. use Copy Costs. Otherwise you can write custom SQL scripts to insert pending costs into the CST_ITEM_COSTS  and CST_ITEM_COST_DETAILS tables. Many companies do not bother to allocate them down  to the item level. and shipping operations in the General Ledger  and set margins high enough to cover them. depends on the time it takes and the cost of labor. The first step. There is no need to insert zero values for cost elements you don't need.  Resource utilization is usually not a factor for purchased parts. you may want to use an outside source.  In net. They collect the costs of the purchasing. your company  has to judge whether it is worth the effort to assign each item a material overhead cost or simply charge all warehouse  operations to overhead. but they leave it to you to write the  equations to derive them. always create pending  costs.  Caution  Never insert frozen cost types (cost_type_id = 1) directly. including labor. have a Bill of Materials for a buy part and specify  that the cost be derived by a rollup in the next step. is available from Oracle Purchasing. Manufacturing organizations use the data captured by Oracle Work in Process to compute costs for the  resource and for outside processing cost elements.  Outside processing is also not commonly associated with purchased parts. It is captured by Oracle Purchasing on a Work  in Process job when a manufacturing operation is performed by an outside contractor. Its reports show the standards and variances. and then use the Define Costs screen in Oracle  Cost Management to enter or update pending item costs. not individual instances of an item. The cost of receiving and  warehousing 100 sacks of cement. however.  therefore. Prior level costs would come from components. such as using the most  recent price or the actual invoice prices. destroying the financial integrity of the applications. Use the following guidelines:  §  Define the costs of parts by user instead of basing them on rollup. unless you use average costing. and have Oracle's Cost Update process convert them to frozen. Oracle's average costing sets the cost to  a weighted average: the total on­hand quantity multiplied by the average cost equals the amount paid for stock on hand. by work order. Oracle's average costing will  satisfy your requirement. you may want to assign material overhead and  overhead costs. You can use the  work­order level data to compute new standard resource utilization. is to establish costs for the lowest­level items: those you buy from outside suppliers. You can compute a figure from Oracle Purchasing's records of  purchases and Oracle Inventory's records of stock movements. It  uses the purchase order price.  Material cost. Or. neither of which  quantity Oracle Inventory captures directly. If your organization cares only about material costs.Define Pending Costs  Pricing starts at the bottom.

 following the links shown in Figure 10­6.  Configure Inventory to calculate component costs. If all you care about is a component's total cost. At  the same time.  Print New Standard Costs  The last step is to distribute these new costs within your organization via standard Inventory reports. The Frozen item cost is the single figure used for valuing  inventory as well as the cost of goods sold and the default cost in purchasing. you  may have Oracle roll up all prior level cost elements into the material cost. the rollup creates  CST_ITEM_COST_DETAILS records for every cost element in use.  Run the rollup process. ." To roll up pending  costs. whether they are buy or make. You may want to use simple SQL*Plus scripts to analyze items with unexpectedly large differences  between the old and new prices.  Print and Review Pending Costs  Oracle provides a costed. A full rollup computes the  costs of all intermediate level assemblies starting from the buy parts.  Update Standard Costs copies costs and cost elements associated with the Pending cost type to the Frozen cost type. In other words. Prior­level costs are the totals  of the five cost elements for the component parts of the assembly. A one­level  rollup uses just the costs of the components on the bill.  Oracle Cost Management's rollup process computes new costs for items flagged as "based on rollup. indented bill report that shows how the rollup cost of an item was derived.  The Costing Tables  Figure 10­7. It uses the Bill of Materials to compute the prior level costs for the assembly. This level costs include  the resources and outside processing that go into manufacturing the assembly. and at times a material cost for shop stock. solder. and it adds the five cost elements to get a pending item cost. the overhead costs of the inventory operation. use the old costs when you don't have new ones. complex as it may appear. In either case. They will  automatically be included in Oracle's costing computations. and on the shop floor in WIP. The report's detail is  very useful in debugging your rollup procedures. It adds the this level and the prior level costs  to get total costs by cost element. in transit.  3. is a highly simplified illustration of the data relationships involved in capturing and  carrying manufacturing standard costs for labor and resource utilization. This instructs the rollup process to use frozen costs for an item for  which no pending costs have been defined. This step can be accomplished by using the copy feature. follow these steps:  1. The alternative is to write scripts to update or insert the records directly.  Create Pending cost type records for the items to be rolled up in CST_ITEM_COSTS and  CST_ITEM_COST_DETAILS. and other materials that are not carried on the Bill of Materials. You need  to set the "based­on­" rollup flag for the item to have Oracle perform the rollup. You define this level values for the  five cost elements for manufactured items yourself.  such as cotter pins. though its size makes the report cumbersome for monitoring the whole  costing process. You usually specify Frozen as the default cost type in the Define  Cost Types setup for the Pending cost type. the material overhead costs of handling  the completed assemblies.Roll Up Pending Costs  The cost of an assembly is the cost of its components plus the cost of building the assembly itself. it creates all the cost adjustment transactions needed to make the General Ledger's asset balances equal  to the extended value of material on hand. The rollup process itself will extend the standard cost of  resources you specify on the Bill of Materials. then updating the records  through the Define Costs form.  2.  Update Pending Costs  The Update Standard Costs procedure is at the heart of costing.

Figure 10­7: Capture and application of costs in Oracle Manufacturing .

 and CST_ITEM_COST_DETAILS. and uses them as the basis for creating different price  lists for different customers.  INTRASTAT Reporting  In the early 1990s. or expectations. a project budget takes a lifetime view of the tasks that make up a project. the job records (shown in the upper­right of Figure 10­7) capture what actually happens.  Routings define the sequence of operations involved in making a product. In discrete manufacturing. Oracle provides a robust mechanism to compute and maintain accurate item costs; and its cost system is  the most convenient basis for computing sales prices. The other tables in Figure 10­7 show  where standard costs are carried and actual costs are collected in the manufacturing process. it will pay the  VAT on £100 and be credited for VAT on £50. Oracle Purchasing and Payables have long been able to manage project expenses. . pyramid­style. Other columns in that table. If a British company buys raw materials  from France for £50.  The frozen standard cost is the most common basis for setting prices and the only one for which there is automated  support. the European Community replaced individual countries' border inspections of individual shipments with  a system of monthly reports of cross­border movements.  Direct Jobs within Oracle Work in Process capture the cost of actually producing products.  The rollup process will support any additional cost types your organization may add. Project Manufacturing has a parallel capability to account for manufacturing expenses at a  project level. among them labor. Whereas accounting budgets focus on  accounting periods. of how an item is supposed to be built and what resources it is supposed  to take. The associated BOM_RESOURCES record gives a  current cost for the resource. Each operation may use any number of  resources. The cost rollup process will  extend the standard resource utilization by resource unit costs to derive Pending values for the resource cost element and  subelements.The cost that is used throughout the Applications for a given item is carried in the CST_ITEM_COSTS record for frozen  costs associated with that item.  Project Manufacturing  Oracle Projects casts a project­and­task perspective on your business activities. both of which have assigned uses within the system. It collects costs from Inventory for  transfer to Oracle Projects. then combines them in a manufactured product which it sells in Germany for £100. Oracle Manufacturing can set  up overhead jobs to capture indirect labor and resource usage.  Determining Sales Prices  Oracle Order Management manages sales prices through the use of price lists and discounts. as described in Chapter 11. or not at all. over the course of  manufacturing. Order Management users  need to plan their pricing operations with an understanding of the power of Inventory's item cost processes. weighing progress made against expenses incurred. It is impossible to know the cost of an assembly without accurate costs for the  subassemblies.  Full knowledge of the cost factors involved in handling an item is essential to successful pricing.  Routings represent standards. these standards go into each job as a sort of budget. and  standard usage for them. and track inventory quantities by project. Average and Pending. This pushes  back. A project budget can  assess earned value. The Shop Floor  Transactions screen captures utilization figures associated with each resource used in each step of each job to produce  one inventory item. Which resources are used. Users can exploit the job data captured by Manufacturing  to update standard resource utilization in the routings based on actual work order experience. not just steps to making a product. receive. show how the cost was  derived. into manufacturing. This is accomplished by taxing them on the entire value of their end  product. Oracle seeds two other cost types.  Oracle Inventory lets you issue. are defined as part of the routing steps. Then. The new system improves efficiency. allowing freight traffic to  move unimpeded. and commodity items like electricity. but crediting them back for the VAT component of their raw materials. This is far more detailed than most users can afford to enter by hand; most will capture it  automatically. The mechanism favors a system that computes list prices.  Cross­border movements of materials have major tax implications under the EU's VAT system. These packages  combined give you the ability to maintain accurate records on the costs of prototype projects or work done for others on  an outsourcing basis. the tax authorities responsible for VAT collections watch  cross­border movements and correlate them with tax returns. A project view can also put profit and loss into sharper focus. Needless to say. A company is effectively  taxed only on the value they add to a product. machine time. The tasks within a project may be seen as  milestones.

Material movements visible to Oracle Inventory do not always coincide with the financial transactions managed by  Payables and Receivables. These will  use segments from the code combinations carried in Oracle Inventory to derive the segments used for the eventual  General Ledger postings. Analysis tools  such as Oracle's Business Intelligence System enable you to put ABC data to good use in support of management  decisions. You want to optimize  your margins at the lowest possible levels. Assign account values for cost_of_sales_account. and encumbrance account entries if you have specified encumbrance accounting. These diagrams are essential to your planning. taking advantage of the cost mechanisms shown in Figure 10­7 to  carry granular cost data and bringing standard costs in line with actual costs as often as required. consignment.  Set up Automatic Account Generation (Flexbuilder prior to Release 11) to generate the flexfield combinations for  material expenses in Oracle Purchasing and the Cost of Goods Sold account in Order Management. Specify Transfer Detail to General Ledger so you will be able to tie back any implications in  General Ledger of a transaction to the transaction itself for the purposes of this testing. Put them in the  appropriate subinventories. They may take place in different periods. Oracle Inventory's INTRASTAT reporting supports the reconciliation of financial to material transactions. and cost to cost objects based on their  [3]  use of activities.  4.  3.  Activity­Based Costing  Activity­based costing. and you cannot know your margins without knowing your costs. Diagrams  show the debit and credit implications of many standard transactions. that do not have tax  implications. inspection. consistent with your setup in step 3. you create test  data for each transaction in the scenario."  Activity­based costing in Oracle Inventory means using the features of all the Applications to capture  the actual costs of doing business at a detailed level.  2. overhead accounts. is not to be with ABC analysis used to support cycle counts.  Establish proposed natural account values for inventory. open a test accounting period. After the accounting department has established a Chart of  Accounts structure. the second ABC acronym in Inventory. They may equate fairly closely to your templates.  Only a minority of users will implement activity­based costing immediately upon converting to Oracle. and the simple debit/credit T­bar diagrams apply only to the  natural account segment of the Accounting Flexfield. These should include entries such as  §  Cost change  §  Inventory adjustment  §  Cycle count  §  Complete from manufacture  §  Replenishment  §  Internal orders  §  Sales order; pick­release  §  PO receipt.  Create a list of transaction scenarios to be tested. Note that you will almost  certainly want to change this setting in production.  Refer to the Inventory User's Guide to set up default accounting information through the Define Organization  Parameters screen. such as the transfer of assets from a warehouse in one country to that of another. If you are including Order Management and Receivables in the test. useful essays on average costing and standard costing.  encumbrance_account.  7. material overhead accounts. The diagrams do not begin to cover all cases.  The situation calls for a common­sense testing scenario. and whatever other categories make sense to the  business. but  not sufficient. product line. They will need values for some or all the following.  Set up test subinventories. expense_account. This would include items chosen from consumable  supplies.  Set up one standard item of each major type in inventory. and Inventory manages some cross­border  movements.  Planning and Debugging Cost Transactions  The Oracle Inventory Reference Manual includes long. such as customers and vendors. and run the test transactions (and only those test . and sales_account. nonstock. you should run the following type of test in one of the early development environments:  1. outside  processing accounts. if you  manage inventories of goods for sale it may be a good idea to include ABC in your long­range plans. resale. you may need to  set up the AutoAccounting rules that will use segments of the sales account in creating the flexfield account to  which it credits orders. Your setup process has to ensure that the other segments—  organization. and the like—are also being generated correctly. depending on whether the  installation includes manufacturing: material accounts.  5. manufactured. However. Once the test scenarios are laid out.  Activity­based costing "assigns cost to activities based on their use of resources.  6. and release  The remaining steps of the test follow the plan set forth in Chapter 16.  Set up or select master item records for other transactions.

 They can be resubmitted at such short intervals that they  approach real­time.  §  Accounting or the Warehouse Manager has the authority to do the closing." Cost Technology.  §  Organization Item Managers in decentralized operations have the ability to add items and change attributes at the  organization level.  executing in the background.  [3]  Peter B. You can examine the Accounting Flexfields as they  appear in the MTL_MATERIAL_TRANSACTIONS table.transactions) through the system in the chosen accounting period.  §  The Warehouse Manager can define subinventories. The Responsibilities that Oracle  delivers with the package are "user­friendly. or templates. Instead. sometimes shared with Purchasing. but it would slow down the interactive processes if they were executed online. You need to elaborate on it. move inventory. They usually cannot set up catalogs.  Interface Manager Processing  Inventory. The greater the volume.  invisible to users. Manufacturing concerns often give the  responsibility to a Materials Management Group. and manage the adjustment process." in that they offer a minimum of frustration by  allowing a maximum of access.  The MTL_TRANSACTIONS_INTERFACE table is the major source of input for the Material Transaction Worker.  Although each attribute associated with an inventory item belongs to a certain attribute group. You will generally want to define your own. users can choose whether the transaction worker will run periodically as a concurrent process or  immediately as a concurrent process. along the  following lines:  §  The Superuser has access to every process and every organization. update.  At setup time. with operations  within each Inventory organization delegated to a person within that organization. Oracle's architecture anticipates  integration with custom and third party systems. This  mini­batching process has the added benefit of providing a natural interface into which user­written routines can insert  their transactions." rather than "manager­ friendly. than direct users. the greater the advantage in periodic concurrent . through all the other Applications  that depend on Inventory. the  issue is not whether Oracle's code works.  Operation of Oracle Inventory  Responsibility for running the Oracle Inventory system is best vested in one individual within a company. the online  process writes the process to an interface table. like all of the Applications. set up cycle counts.  categories. and the workers awaken every few seconds to take it from there. the Define Items form  provides access to all attributes.  §  An Order Management Responsibility has the ability to update items. more limited Responsibilities.  §  Line­level warehouse staff can assign locations. Use flexfield security as well if different part number ranges belong to different organizations. subject to the same limitations as Purchasing.  §  Master Item Managers can create. Use the Function Security feature to restrict users' access to those attributes for which  they are responsible. keeping in mind that thorough testing is the key to  success in data processing in general. but whether you have made it work for you. The Cost Worker checks a flag in MTL_MATERIAL_TRANSACTIONS to  see whether a transaction needs to be costed. the ABC Performance Breakthrough.  §  A Purchasing Responsibility has the ability to update Inventory Master attributes in the Purchasing Group. Distribution companies may see it  as part of operations.  This catalog lists only essential steps. 1992. and initiate and enter cycle counts. These concurrent processes. and delete items and item attributes. such as  lead­time. It has an intermediate layer. has online screen operations and batch reporting. Business processes need to establish policy for deleting  items and changing item numbers. Turney. To repeat this book's central theme. "Common Cents. It can be  populated by user­written code as well as the standard Oracle online Applications. are a concession to efficiency. and especially in Oracle Applications. using your business procedures and your setups.  Responsibilities  Defining jobs and limiting system access to the requirements of individual jobs are essential parts of Inventory setup. of workers that update Inventory transaction tables after the fact. The only way to know is to test your  transaction types.  Chapter 17 describes how Oracle Applications uses Responsibilities to control access. but they can apply them to items. Whoever has the task. the system usually has more indirect users.

 Oracle Consulting Group. Because errors are the exception. will make  such enhancements on a contract basis. Its consulting arm.  Advantages of an Open Design  One characteristic that distinguishes Oracle Inventory is the ease with which it can be extended using custom code. However. The most common errors are caused by periods being closed within an organization  before all the transactions were completed. it often takes a while to notice when the workers stop working. You can view transactions  that are in error through the View Pending Interface Activity form. resubmitting themselves each time they complete.  Periodic alerts are convenient for monitoring potential error conditions. These one­time items are usually most in need of deletion. It is more efficient to process a larger number at  one time. how  many can run. it takes discipline to  remain in the habit of checking. and how many transactions they should process at a time. but each process completes more quickly if the number is small. Watkins Johnson  puts a "Z_" prefix on inactive items. For example. The first step towards  deleting an item is to disable it for Purchasing. there is the potential for numerous errors to occur. Whatever the number. so there is always at least one active or pending job for  each worker.  Because they work as background processes. as a concurrent process  is initiated. The Purge Transaction History process (an online  form. because their item numbers have a characteristic infix. The Oracle Applications Users Group (OAUG) maintains an Enhancements  Committee that works closely with Oracle on such requests. as these  interfaces serve many different functions.  The interface managers update transactions with error messages if they cannot be processed.  Oracle Corporation takes a keen interest in such user extensions. the item can be deleted using the Delete Item Information form. Sometimes the workers are idle because the DBA has  shut down the concurrent manager to which it is assigned. a pending concurrent process gets put into  standby status and never starts. and whatever other system might use it. Period purges are absolutely essential to holding down processing times and disk  storage requirements to acceptable levels. The only restriction is that the  date must be in a closed period.  Deleting item records from the master is another matter. or transactions stop being costed. They are easy to set up and efficient to run. must be  kept for historical or audit purposes. raising (however minimally) the chance of a stock­out or unnecessary  backorder. The downside of periodic processing is that records are not totally up­to­date. Business needs define by policy what data.  Use the Request Interface Managers form to start the background processes and specify how often they should run. Many  users write alerts to check for an excessive number of records or the presence of error records in the  MTL_TRANSACTIONS_INTERFACE table. . The workers behave like any other  concurrent job. if any. it may be useful to change the item identifier to tag the item as awaiting deletion. If there is a broad enough community of interest. Such items are usually associated  with one sales order and one point in time. Inventory  balances stop getting updated. It may take a minute or two for a  pick or a receipt to be reflected in the database. Manufacturing. it will spawn itself enough times to handle all the pending transactions.  INVENTORY_ITEM_ID is a foreign key that permeates the whole suite of Oracle Applications. Items are the foundation of the inventory system. Finally.  Purged data is no longer available for any reporting purpose.  Archiving and Deleting Data  The Inventory system generates transactions at a tremendous rate. Allow time for all  the transactions that reference the item to be flushed through the system. Occasionally.  Note  Assemble­to­Order manufacturing generates one custom item and Bill of Materials for each Final Assembly  (FAS) work order.processes. initiating a concurrent process) deletes all transaction data prior to the given date. Oracle will incorporate the  extension into its standard product. They are also among the  easiest to identify. After the item is no longer likely to appear in  reports. which can then be copied from disk to a high­volume offline medium such as  tape or optical disk. They can likely satisfy any archiving requirements by running a concurrent process to  generate detail­level transaction reports.

 and even organizations that the marketing. Item  templates. and many other cost  elements. Although you can sometimes capture these costs directly at the item level. Although they are invariably related. and follows up with collections when necessary. shipping. sharing custody of the master customer data with other the subsystems that  deal with them. unit­of­measure conversions.  §  Oracle Shipping.  Order Management is customer oriented. catalogs. It added the necessary attributes to support these new areas. sales. They need to look ahead to the total requirement. Purchasing.  Oracle's RMA (Return Material Authorization) processing is an example.  Most users need to define Inventory items earlier in the implementation cycle than they need the functionality of the  Inventory package itself. The best time to start is at initial item conversion. creates credits for customer returns. A business can ask its employees and suppliers to do  things its way. categories. the nature of the relationships is unique for . Inventory gives users the ability to  manage activities in the areas of receiving. shipping. Order  Management satisfies customers' needs for goods and services. addresses.  The cost data carried in Inventory supports Order Management pricing. applies invoice  payments. and issue a replacement or a refund. Since margins drive profit. put it into inventory. handling. but in general a business has to adapt to the customer rather than the other way around. and  replenishment. manufacturer's part numbers. to give them prices. which handles the physical delivery of product to the customer. and service organizations deal with  are routinely different from one another. from which they must be allocated to individual items.  Oracle Inventory includes powerful devices for helping users cope with large numbers of items and transactions.  §  Oracle Service.  Oracle reworked and expanded the customer model in 11i to meet the needs of its Customer Relationship Management  suite. Payables. this planning is  fundamental to most businesses. and Manufacturing need that function to define inventory items. it went to the core of the question of what constitutes a customer. item cataloging. Order  Management. which invoices customer orders. as listed here:  §  Sales and Marketing. from company­wide to highly local. and to assign them to  categories and catalog groups. The part that is unique to Inventory. It includes subinventory and location management.  §  Oracle Accounts Receivable. because some attributes cannot be changed. There is no correct answer:  the people. they are most often captured in the  General Ledger. warehouse counts.Note  See Chapter 17 for details on the Oracle Applications Users Group. has to do with running a  warehouse. More  difficult and far reaching. It qualifies buyers. It can also carry cost elements for resource usage. primarily Sales and Marketing and Service. It takes all costs into account; purchase cost is  only the beginning. Users may need to develop their  own business processes and custom routines to record the fact that configured items have been stripped to their  components and to receive them back into the warehouse. customer part numbers.  Warehouses occupy a unique niche at the lowest level of Oracle's Multi­Org hierarchy.  Chapter 11: Oracle Order Management  Overview  Customers are the one thing on which every business depends.  Inventory attribute settings and unit­of­measure logic require close attention. The Order Management functions are fairly full­  featured; they can get the material back. which manages contracts and post­sales service­related needs of the customer. which manages initial contacts with customers as salespeople develop business.  Conclusion  Part of the Inventory system is global. provides product price and availability  information. and accommodates their orders and delivery arrangements. that you have to buy. and cross references all make it  easier to locate items of interest and to deal with groups of items at one time. overhead. and warehouse operations at whatever level is most  appropriate. available to users of any product that uses items. The RMA process  does not extend to disassembly and restocking of configured Assemble­to­Order items.

 An order processing flow defines the actions appropriate to a given type of order. .  §  Oracle Bills of Material. In any case the seeded Workflows  predefine all the steps most businesses need.  Receivables interface Pass detailed order information to Receivables to create invoices and credit memos.  §  Oracle Configurator.com processes thousands of  orders per hour; Boeing might process a few per month for new planes and one hundred per day for parts and service;  and a shipyard might handle a handful of very complex orders per year.  Return Material Authorizations (RMAs) are treated as reverse orders.  The nature of order transactions varies tremendously from business to business.  Ship confirm Confirm for Order Management that the items did in fact ship. stage.  Not all actions apply to all orders. and executed through Oracle Workflow. Amazon. which maintains the price lists available for an individual order.  The behind­the­scenes applications that support customer transactions include the following:  §  Oracle Pricing. and where to ship it; and apply the prices.  o  Credit check Make sure customer has sufficient credit for the order.  §  Oracle Global Available to Promise. but does not require approval or  shipment. to lead to an optimal  product solution for the customer. including  account management. and ship the order. which is an electronic commerce application that provides a Web­based channel for unassisted selling of  products and services directly to customers and business partners.  §  §  §  §  §  §  Booking the order Treat the order as firm.  and Inventory Interface. and provide  real­time feedback about order status and inventory availability while still leveraging the same business processes  across channels. and what actions are allowed at each stage. booking. In  Oracle's parlance these companies will use different order flows. Oracle's customer scheme accomplishes the difficult task of managing this complexity while making it  look (relatively) straightforward to the line­level people who enter orders and handle shipments. Ship Confirm.  §  iStore. It used to be that Order Entry handled them all; now they are split  between Order Management and Shipping. each with a large number of change orders.  §  An order for a free upgrade requires order entry. and order creation. which seeks to optimize shipping plans.  Demand integration Let your inventory department know about the demand.  Pick release Tell the warehouse to pull. In businesses with long lead times it is  a good idea to let the Inventory system know what unbooked orders are in the pipeline.  §  An internal order that will ship from one location within your company to another does not require Receivables  Interface. and calculates the price of an ordered  item based on sophisticated pricing strategies and rules. which provides guided selling/guided buying and configuration capabilities.  Order confirmation Tell the customer he or she has a firm order. by whom. but not approval or shipment. which defines the components of pick­to­order kits and configurations and is needed to  determine the availability of parts for manufactured items to compute an Available­to­Promise date. keeping shipping­related costs to a  minimum while satisfying the customer's need for delivery of goods. You can automate order fulfillment and order management. manage.  §  Telesales.  §  A drop­ship order has a Purchase Release action in place of the warehouse actions of Pick Release. quote generation. almost all companies will have a number of  different order processing flows for different types of orders. and execute throughout the entire customer sales cycle. and shipment; but does not require invoicing. contact management. To  offer some examples from the computer business:  §  An order for freeware that has been downloaded already requires entry and billing.every customer. approval. In fact.  §  A phone order for hotline support service requires booking and invoicing. establishing a schedule date based on product availability. opportunity management. which is designed to meet the needs of inside salespeople in a call center environment. It includes a  versatile set of tools to effectively track.  The order processing flows define the stages of human and automated processes that orders and order lines can go  through. It enables companies to bring products to market  faster and to provide unique customer care. including the following:  §  Entering the order Get the details of what is being ordered.

  Many companies add a user­defined credit approval step to certain order types instead of using Oracle's credit hold  mechanism. quick. As required. If your business processes define every order of a  given type as an exception. However. select shipping  schedules for multiple delivery dates. which made it difficult to extend or customize the  rules. check credit. This section outlines the key  differences between SVRS and the new Defaulting Rules. Credit holds are designed to work on an exception basis. By  taking unapproved orders into account you can get a more realistic demand forecast earlier on in the cycle. the Oracle Order Entry product contained a feature called Standard Value Rule Sets (SVRS) in which you defined  how you wanted order attributes to be defaulted into sales orders. you define a  set of rules for each attribute (that is.  Standard Value Rule Sets provided great functionality for Order Entry users; however. followed by the Order Management transactions and then the support functions  such as pricing and shipping.  Defaulting Rules  Defaulting is the process by which values get defaulted into fields without manually entering them. and then use the approval activity  step process rather than the hold release process to move an order through the system. the new framework seems more straightforward and intuitive. Departing from the organization of other chapters. In releases 11 and  earlier. the order can be available to other processes. You can define the order flow to ensure that an order is booked before being invoiced or approved  before being shipped. and  consistent with the rest of Oracle's E­Business Suite. validate a credit card. In addition. and one or more alternatives in the  case of exceptions. That is. you can give Oracle Workflow  rules that allow it to ask for only the necessary information. the new  framework brings more flexibility in where you can default data from and to. instead of within the context of an order type.  Processing Constraints.  There was a hard­coded list of sources for each particular data field. each enterable data field) on the order header or line; then define the conditions for  when to use each rule. This forces you to think of each attribute individually.  Oracle's Workflow product lets you construct customized paths through the standard program functionality in Order  Management. This section outlines all four so you can understand the new  setup features and how they can be used to control sales order management. which offers somewhat differing functionality. In Order Management. with tips on how to use the new. but  largely driven by the needs of Order Management. the Workflow defines a next step if all goes well. they were very much tied to the  architecture and functionality of the Order Entry product. speed is usually of the essence. and do everything else that a particular order might require.  Most businesses will find that Order Management achieves the threefold objective of being thorough. but it begged for a  better tool.  OM Setups  Oracle 11i Order Management has four major setup steps that are critical to any implementation; Defaulting Rules. With Defaulting Rules. In Release 11i Order Management. more powerful features. and enables you to invoke your own PL/SQL  package to perform more complex logic.  Once you think of attributes in this way. Once a customer has requested  a purchase. Making the best use of such a powerful and nuanced tool takes  some planning. configure an item.At each point in the order process. in this chapter we will focus first on the business of  setting up Oracle Order Management. you provide  rules to tell Oracle when and what it can bypass. The transaction for a returning customer ordering a  handful of items through your call center should be as fast as possible. the product architecture has been redesigned and the product functionality has been greatly  expanded. there is a new  defaulting paradigm called Defaulting Rules. Workflow. workflow can lead the order entry clerk  through screens to enter a new customer. As part of setup. .  When it comes to entering orders. which makes for huge strides in the speed of order  completion. you build your own order processing flows. even if the order remains unapproved for a while to come. and Transaction Types. You could define sets of rules and attach them to order types. The Order Entry process in Releases 11 and prior was a masterpiece of programming. it becomes easier to define a new process flow activity.  Functional Differences  The biggest difference between SVRS and Defaulting Rules come in the definition. Workflow is it—a colossal improvement in functionality that is used throughout the E­Business Suite.

  An attribute is a field or column that belongs to that entity. you can use an expression containing a formula; for example. Order Price Adjustment. generic names are  used for the things you default from and to.  §  §  §  §  Constant Value A text string that will be used. because their defaulting is controlled by AOL's flexfield routines.Some benefits of this new framework include the capability to default the Order Type. So there are entities of Order Header. For example. and the capability to define formulas to create the  defaulted data. be sure to place the  ALWAYS condition last in the Precedence for Defaulting Conditions.  Related Record The value of another attribute on a related entity (or record). Line Price  Adjustment. The ALWAYS  condition is seeded for each entity. you might set up the Ship  Method on the line to default from the Ship Method on the header or some attribute on the order header might default  from an attribute on the related customer record. manage. For example. Defaulting Rules provide a variety of sources that you can use to  build your defaults. Order Line. Attributes and entities are the things you default to; sources are where things  default from. defaulting of the currency on the order header from the set of books (SOB) is seeded this way. the capability to define defaulting  rules for returns and return lines (they used to be hard­coded).  PL/SQL API You provide your own routine to provide the default. If the Agreement is changed. When you query up the Defaulting Setup form for a  particular entity. There are a few seeded defaulting rules that use  this; for example.  Because Defaulting Rules are now generic. such as System Date. which discusses all the various places from which  you can default. Therefore. Entities correspond to blocks in the old Standard Value Rule Sets (SVRS).  Profile Option The value of a profile option. Attributes correspond to fields in the old SVRS. and use Defaulting Rules can be found in the 11i Order Management  User Guide.  the Price List is dependent on Agreement. As in OE. For  example. or another one for all internal order lines. you'll see a list of all the attributes for which you can define defaulting rules. This can be a system­provided profile option or a new profile option that  you've defined just to provide a defaulting value.  Dependencies Among Attributes  Some attributes are dependent upon the value of other attributes on the same record.  Attributes and Entities in Order Management  An entity in this context is a group of related attributes that roughly correspond to an Oracle DBMS table or a forms  window in Order Management.  Others There are several esoteric source types relating to the Web App Dictionary definitions for this attribute. you will not be able  to define defaulting rules for descriptive flexfields. the ordered unit of measure is an attribute of the  Order Line entity. See the "Source of Values" section later in this chapter. and so forth. If you are defining a set of conditions and using them in rules. For this type of source (and this  type only). You define  one or more condition validation templates based on whatever common business rules you might have. It also provides a needed distinction between defaulting behavior and cascading.  System Variable The value of a system (server) variable. If an attribute is changed—either by  the user or by the system—any other attribute that is dependent on it will be cleared and then re­defaulted. the Price List will be cleared and re­defaulted. . sysdate + 7. You define one or  more of these condition templates per entity; then you can use them over and over for the attributes of that entity.  Sources of Values  Sources are places where values can be defaulted from. You  can look at this attribute for an example of how to specify a PL/SQL API or you can look in the Rule­based Defaulting  Framework HLD for technical details. For example.  Conditions are rules you set up that will control when a particular group of default sources will be looked at.  Same Record The value of another attribute on the same entity (or record) as the attribute you are defining the rule  for. and potentially can be used by other Oracle applications. you might set up the Promise Date to default from the Request Date on the same line. you might set up a condition template for all return lines.  §  §  §  Detailed information on how to create. Most of them will be familiar to users of Oracle Order Entry.

  You can define a custom message that an Order Management user will see when they try to violate a constraint. and split at the entity  level. which allowed you to control whether  changes could be made to certain characteristics of an order after certain cycle steps had been reached.  §  The capability to call custom PL/SQL code to determine whether a condition is true. define a constraint  on a line based on the state of the order). order line.  Processing constraints are rules that allow you to control who can change what and when. the Oracle Order Entry product contained a feature called Security Rules. The new processing constraints framework has many more features and is much more flexible  than security rules; some of the enhancements that this framework allows are listed here:  §  The capability to control changes based on who is trying to make them (by responsibility). For instance. you could choose to allow update to the warehouse field of an order line but not to the price list field. The  messages you set up might look like one of these:  "No one can change the customer purchase order at the line level; your company requires that one sales order can relate  to only one customer purchase order.Processing Constraints  Processing Constraints allow Order Management implementers to control changes to sales orders. there is a new security paradigm called Processing Constraints.  The philosophy behind processing constraints is the opposite. perhaps to comply with a vendor liability law. In Release 11 and  earlier. As a result the seeded security rules were very restrictive. order sales credit. the biggest difference between security rules and processing  constraints is a philosophical one."  "No one can add a line to an order after any of the lines on the order have been invoice interfaced. .  You can control more than just what can be updated. You can control the update operation down to the attribute level. You can control who can make  changes based on responsibility. The philosophy behind security rules was to prevent the user from doing anything that  might cause inconsistency or confusion. In prior releases you could control operations  only for certain hard­coded cycle actions. given a set of  conditions."  "Only the Customer Service Manager can change the discount percentage on an order line after the line has been  shipped.  order price adjustment. are shipped to a central returns  processing facility. and many companies  did not need to create any more. For example. For the order header."  "You require a reason if someone wants to cancel an order line after it has been booked.  §  The capability to constrain operations at any point in the process flow. or to all except a list of authorized responsibilities. to only a list of constrained  responsibilities.  §  The capability to control changes based on the value of a field. identified by order type = Return. which means you can call your own PL/SQL code to evaluate the condition.  §  The capability to define constraining conditions based on the state of related objects (for example. You also can base  a condition on a custom API. which serves the same ends by a  somewhat differing mechanism. line sales credit. such as the order being in a Booked status.  This provides the granularity to be as precise as you want; for example. Multiple  conditions can be combined using either AND logic (all the conditions must be true) or OR logic (at least one of the  conditions must be true). Therefore the seeded processing constraints are not very  restrictive; they are designed to prevent only data integrity problems. you may not allow a user to  create a new order line."  "Your company requires that all return orders. For example. cancel. The designers decided that the implementer knows better  than the developer what the user should be allowed to change. In Release 11i  Order Management. and line price adjustment entities you can control. The conditions can  be based on either the state of a workflow activity (where the entity is in the flow) or a value in a table. given a set of conditions. you could get down to the level of the sale of a  particular type of cell phone for shipment to Long Island.  You can define rules such that a condition must be collectively true for a given constraint to fire and prevent the changes."  Functional Differences  To an Order Entry/Management user or implementer. you can't change the price on an order  after it has been invoiced. A constraint (rule) can apply to all responsibilities. delete. create.

  Transaction types. which apply at both the order and line level. As  part of the upgrade you should set up the flows associated with your upgraded transaction types as either seeded or  custom flows. automatically executes functions and sends  notifications. determine the workflow and are still used as a source for  defaulting and to establish processing controls. You model your individual business processes by  copying and editing seeded Workflow processes or craft your business processes from the ground up using a mixture of  seeded and custom activities.  Workflow replaces the Order Cycles of Release 11 and prior.  Order Management enables you to track the history of individual transactions by utilizing Oracle Workflow to control the  execution of the order process. Your existing order cycles will be upgraded to new order  and line workflow processes.  Also note that your existing order number sources are upgraded to document sequences. order lines. the  system records the event. When Order Management begins an order process step or sends a notification. The event is also recorded when the system has completed processing or the notification is  answered. However.  §  You can create new workflow activities from custom PL/SQL code. and detects error conditions and starts error processes. Document sequence categories  are created for your upgraded order types; these are assigned to the correct sequences.  §  A workflow process can have an unlimited number of activities. The  Workflow Engine is implemented in server PL/SQL and activated through a call to an engine API. so you shouldn't need to do  anything to these.Migration/Upgrade from Security Rules  Because of the magnitude of the changes to the fundamental architecture between Security Rules and Processing  Constraints. In graphical  format you can see not only the activities that the workflow has completed but also the activities that still require  completion. which were created for new OM orders.  §  You can view the status of the workflow on an order or order line in either tabular or graphical format. but Oracle did not try to duplicate the security settings of prior releases. Refer to Chapter 15 for  more discussion on the features and use of Oracle Workflow. They include  many activities that check for status and are necessary for upgraded orders. returns.  §  There is no limit on the number of custom workflow activities that can be defined in Order Management. Order Cycles could have no more than 30 actions. If you want to add an approval step to the order process.  The Oracle Workflow manages the state of all activities for an order. and provide a foundation for  future enhancements that will benefit ERP applications. When defining a  new workflow. Oracle decided not to provide an automated upgrade path for user­defined Security Rules. This allows you to have both order and return lines on the same  order. but are very inefficient for new orders. Some Processing  Constraints have been seeded.  Order Management enables you to model your business operation in terms of generic order processes.  §  A workflow process can have subprocesses. This makes it very easy to extend OM. Some of the enhancements brought by the Transaction Type and  Workflow functionality are as follows:  §  Each line on an order may follow a different flow. . and Order level Transaction Types replace Order Types. you can start with the basic activities of order processing.  The 11i Customer Model  The 11i Customer Model is a re­architecture of the Release 11 customer model used by Oracle Receivables. you should not use these upgraded workflows for your new orders. The 11i  Customer Model provides capabilities needed to meet CRM and e­commerce requirement. maintains a history of completed activities.  Migration/Upgrade from Order Types  If you are a customer who is upgrading from a previous release of Order Entry to Order Management your existing order  types will be upgraded to new order and line transaction types. you would model your approval  process in Oracle Workflow.  Workflow Integration  Order Management utilizes Oracle Workflow to provide you control over the sequence of events that occur in processing  of orders. Order Management provides the maximum flexibility to handle mainline  revenue cycle and exception­based business processes. and return lines.

S. the address itself does not have to be duplicated  numerous times. Additionally. groups. and Fiscal Year End). Party) from the Business Relationship (for example.  Groups A group is a party to which any other party or parties are associated. users can use this  structure for assignment purposes.  The Party type Relationship allows for the relationship between two parties to be viewed as a party in its own right. which allow for rollup and reporting at different class levels. A group can be viewed as a  single entity while still allowing for the members of the group to be viewed as standalone entities. Lisa Dunning. Title. This means regardless of the type  of customer (organizations. It is possible for a group to contain  another group or groups. this could result in three parties: Tony (party of type person). Department of Defense. U. Oracle Financials. A user might want to stratify customers by industry. SIC Code. Oracle Customer Care. and others).  Customer Account). Lisa Dunning. The user not only  decides upon these categories; he or she can decide the classes (or values) within each category. if the address changes. or relationships). The new Customer Model supports four types of Parties:  §  §  §  Organizations Examples include Oracle Corporation.  The customer model allows for any number of user­defined party classifications that can be used for reporting and  assignment purposes. Further. This is an important concept because the separation allows for each party to have one or more  customer accounts (thus it is possible to define multiple business relationships with the same party).The 11i customer model is not a product; instead. This allows for  the modeling of complex business entities such as households and buying consortiums. Oracle Marketing Online. phone numbers. B2C. an authorized buyer or guarantor for the account). . Additional parties can  also be associated to the customer account (for example. Because Tony @ Oracle is a party in its own right.  A many­to­many relationship between parties and locations (as in addresses) allows for less duplication and easy update  capability. Examples include The Dunning Household (made up of John and Lisa Dunning and their  children). Oracle (party of type  organization). or  iStore. it has to be updated only once.  A Party is the highly generalized notion of a customer introduced in 11i. For  example. and customer accounts can be directly associated with this entity.  Oracle offers a Single Source of Truth in viewing customer data.  The Party Concept  The Party construct enables the customer model to treat all business entities equally. without  being aware of the changed customer model  §  Upgraded customer form  §  Upgraded customer interface  §  Upgraded customer merge  A Single Source of Truth  Because all Oracle E­Business Suite applications utilize the customer model (ERP through backward­compatible views). Even though the model tracks different attributes for people than for organizations (such as for  people: Date of Birth. B2C.  The customer model separates the Business Entity (for example. Because an address can be associated to multiple parties. both people  and organizations are Parties and therefore stored in the same table in the database.  People Examples include Rhonda Cash. if Tony works at Oracle. people. the customer model can easily handle B2B. and The West End Social Club (made up of Rhonda Cash. A Party is defined as an entity that can enter into  a business relationship. Classes then can be  broken down into subclasses. A key point is  that the 11i customer model was designed with B2B. The 11i customer model is composed of the following:  §  Data Model (tables and the relationships between them)  §  Backward­compatible views (allowing ERP applications to have the same functionality as they did before. Because all business entities are treated equally. each is handled in the same way by the data model: as a  party to a transaction. This means a customer record is the exact same record  whether it is viewed through Oracle Sales Online. This means the same sort of  business relationships that can be formed with an organization can be just as easily formed with a person. and Gender; for organizations: Duns Number. it is the portion of the data model that stores customer information. and so forth. and University of Chicago. and buying behavior. size. All  CRM modules utilize the customer model to store customer information. Gina Gannon.  addresses. and Tony @ Oracle (party of type relationship). although the degree to which the customer model  is utilized differs from product to product. and mixed models in mind.  The Party type Group allows for the grouping together of any number of other parties into a single entity.  or mixed business models.

 who pays the bills. headquarters of. This. VAR of. Although Order Management is restricted to simplifying views of the customer schema. and so forth). A Location is a po