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THE WISH PROJECT

Sat 22 Jan, 2011. Times of India

Article - THE WISH PROJECT

http://epaper.timesofindia.com/Repository/getFiles.asp?Style=OliveXLib:LowLevelEntityTo

Publication: The Crest Mumbai;Date: Jan 22, 2011;Section: Tapping India;Page: 5;

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Dream Merchants

Sat 9 Jan, 2011. Sunday Business Standard - Mumbai

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Dreamers throng city to make world a better place
Wed 16 Feb, 2011. Deccan Chronicle - Bangalore

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Dream Index to evalute progress
Thu 17 Feb, 2011. Deccan Chronicle - Bangalore

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For our Dreams
Feb, 2011. Design Today

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Dream But Also Work
ET

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Riding the dream train
Tue 22 Feb, 2011. Bangalore Mirror

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Dreaming Big

Tue 22 Feb, 2011. The New Indian Express - Expresso

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Making dreams come true
Wed 16 Feb, 2011. The Hindu

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Riding the dream train
Tue 22 Feb, 2011. Bangalore Mirror

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Designs on scaling up
Apr, 2011. Entrepreneur

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Design: Core of Business
Fri 17 Jun, 2011. Economic Times

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Chitralekha
Aug, 2011. Chitralekha

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Chitralekha
Aug, 2011. Chitralekha

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Creative Business Take Centre Stage
Economic Times

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Meet the New Dream Merchants
Thu 3 Dec, 201.Economic Times

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China, India, Mexico, and Brazil Embrace “Design Thinking’
Thu 3 Dec, 201. Fast Co.

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China, India, Mexico, and Brazil Embrace “Design Thinking’
Thu 3 Dec, 201. Fast Co.

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China, India, Mexico, and Brazil Embrace “Design Thinking’
Thu 3 Dec, 201. Fast Co.

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One More Great Lesson From Steve Jobs: Innovat...

One More Great Lesson Fromhttp://www.fastcodesign.com/1665211/one-more-great-lesson-... Steve Jobs
Fast Co.

One More Great Lesson From Steve Jobs: Innovation Begins As A Social Movement
WHY IS THE LOSS OF ONE CEO THE CAUSE FOR UNIVERSAL MOURNING? BECAUSE HE SYMBOLIZED THE KIND OF ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPITALISM THAT GENERATES THE FUN THAT COMES WITH CREATING THE NEW.

Co.Design

business + innovation + design

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Hardly anything unites Americans anymore--except for the death of Steve Jobs. His passing and the deep mourning for him across political, generational, and cultural divides remind us that we all can agree on one thing--that it is Jobs’s kind of capitalism, entrepreneurial capitalism, that we love, because it generates the incredible fun that comes with creating the new. His death reminds us that the big, disruptive innovations almost always come from entrepreneurs who embody their following and enable the dreams and talents that they have inside and haven’t yet expressed. It reminds us that all net new job growth in the U.S. comes from startups and businesses five years old or younger that begin in garages, college dorm rooms, or Starbucks cafés. Above all, Jobs’s passing reminds us that entrepreneurial capitalism is not simply some rational economic market phenomenon but a social movement that binds groups of people together in communities of like interests and deep emotions. Think of the important innovations of our day that are changing our lives--Facebook, Twitter, Zipcar, YouTube, eBay, Amazon, iTunes/iPod/iPhone/iPad--and you find new social communities interacting on new platforms. Add them all up and you see entrepreneurial capitalism itself as a social movement that we join, participate in, and help create ourselves.

10 / 17
TWO THOUSAND AND ELEVEN

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One More Great Lesson From Steve Jobs: Innovat... http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665211/one-more-great-lesson-...

4 Elements That Make A Good User Experience Into Something Great

[Image by Charis Tsevis]

that to the crony capitalism Occupy “WE MUST Contrast protesting against. This kindthatcapitalismWall Street is of has Wall Street no longer allocating capital to businesses so REFRAME they can grow--which is its central economic and social With crony capitalism, banks CAPITALISM function. their own account--often with and hedge funds trade for governmentAS THE guaranteed savings and with government safety nets if they fail. With crony capitalism, big businesses, with a SPACE handful of exceptions, stop innovating and no longer generate jobs, income, or taxes for America. What FOR to excel is to game CREATORS, crony capitalists have come system toatfavor their the political, regulatory, and tax special interests. This anger against crony capitalism NOT TRADERS, crosses the political spectrum. FOR RISK-TAKERS, NOT RISK MANAGERS.”

Foursquare Solves A Basic UI Problem That Eludes Google Maps And Yelp

EXPERT PERSPECTIVES

Jeffrey Phillips Discusses: Looking To Hire And Keep Great Innovators? Focus On The 3 Rs

Both Michele Bachmann and Sarah Palin, on the right, and Occupy Wall Street protesters, on the left, specifically decry crony capitalism and celebrate entrepreneurial capitalism. Nearly all of my socially liberal design students at Parsons support Occupy Wall Street and, at the same time, want to launch their own startup businesses. And that is where the role of design in capitalism is becoming ever more important. The new surge in startup culture among the young, the turn of design toward new business, not just big business and the overall collision of creativity with capitalism now under way, is the best way for us to rebuild our country. This will require reframing capitalism as the space for creators, not traders, for risk-takers, not risk managers, for community-builders, not destroyers. Steve Jobs, like all entrepreneurs, had an entirely different set of competencies from CEOs and managers of big corporations. His ability to be attuned to his following, his framing of the problem (it’s people’s experience with the product, not the functionality and technology, that’s key); his obsession with the look, feel, and materiality; and the charisma of his leadership generated an “aura” around Apple products. That aura extended to Jobs himself, which is why we feel so emotional for the passing of this particular CEO and not any others.

Craig LaRosa Discusses: Our Economy Is Mostly Services. But How Do You Design Great Service Experiences?

Roderick McMullen Discusses: Usability Is King For Your Product. Here’s How We Can Finally Measure It

FROM THE EDITOR
Thanks for stopping by Fast Company’s

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One More Great Lesson From Steve Jobs
Fast Co.
One More Great Lesson From Steve Jobs: Innovat... http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665211/one-more-great-lesson-...
Co.Design. If you’ve been a reader for some time, you’ll notice that we’ve just unveiled a brand-new redesign. YOU CAN READ ABOUT THE
THOUGHT PROCESS BEHIND IT HERE. Our

holding the iPad as a religious tablet on the February 2, 2010 cover of The Economist (“The Book of Jobs”), are often described in transcendental terminology. They have an aura that directly connects them to their followings whom they embody. These “visionaries,” “prophets,” “wizards,” “oracles” (the “Oracle of Omaha”) have a secular priest and laity relationship with their following. The priest promises the laity a coherent vision of the world, a way to release inherent hopes and talents while curbing existential angst, and a community to which to belong. The laity offers fealty in return. Prophets, religious and secular, tend to arise in moments of social and economic breakdown, which helps explain why there is a surge toward entrepreneurialism today. In The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Max Weber says that Calvin believed that people lived in a radical state of uncertainty about going to heaven. So they had to work extra hard to get there. Work becomes a calling. Today, we are living through yet another state of uncertainty. Innovation and entrepreneurship are our calling.
It is not an accident that so many of our startup founders “WE ARE (Tumblr, Twitter, YouTube, Airbn, Slideshare) have design backgrounds and share so many of the competencies we LIVING associate with Jobs. The fact that design is being the startup a major for THROUGH recognized inreal power ofspace is may wellvictoryits the field. But the design lie in A STATE reform of the venture capital process, which has traditionally been defined in terms of technology and OF functionality. Bringing design into the VC process early to define those UNCERTAINTY. opportunities (identifyingkeepingwho embody new groups and new cultures) and it through the development phase, has the INNOVATION business the dismal 10% success rate potential to India’s increase dramatically. AND innovation and design consultancy Idiom has an 80% success rate in “designing out” new companies. ENTREPRENEURSHIPtoward big business led The movement of design to a focus on process and a promise of rationality and ARE OUR CALLING.” routinization of inspiration into products. In the end, we didn’t get much real innovation or the economic

content, of course, will be the same: Our focus is on highlighting the world’s best examples of design and innovation, working in concert. We started this site with a few simple premises in mind. First, design is a window onto the world at large, and the culture we live in.
CONTINUED

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value that comes with it. The recent turn of design toward new business is leading to a focus on capitalism as social movement, and a promise of charisma and embodiment generating spectacular experiences that enable and delight. That’s why Steve Jobs and his entrepreneurial capitalism are so important--and why we mourn for him.

CONTRIBUTORS

BRUCE NUSSBAUM

Bruce Nussbaum blogs, tweets and writes on innovation, design thinking and creativity. The former assistant managing editor for Business Week is a Professor ... CONTINUED › Twitter

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Designers Are The New Drivers Of American Entr...

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665120/designers-are-the-new-...

Designers Are The New Drivers Of American Entrepreneurialism
Fast Co.

Designers Are The New Drivers Of American Entrepreneurialism
DESIGNERS ARE MERGING THEIR WAYS OF THINKING WITH STARTUP CULTURE. THE RESULT, WRITES ASTOUNDING VC SUCCESS RATES. BRUCE NUSSBAUM, IS GREATER INNOVATION AND

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I recently walked into a packed hall of 200 Parsons students for an event called “Start Something--Why Creatives Need to Become Entrepreneurs,” organized by the NYCreative Interns group. Four women entrepreneurs, including Laurel Touby, the founder of Mediabistro, were up front, talking about their experiences of launching their respective businesses. The incredible energy in the room highlighted an emerging trend--the headlong crash of creativity into capitalism to forge a startup model for the future. In this new model, designers drive the force of American entrepreneurialism. This business model is a cause for true optimism. It’s not the big business capitalism that no longer generates jobs or income or tax revenues. Nor is it the old, slow attempts by design and design thinking to reform big corporations to make their culture more innovative, with limited success. Rather, it’s the capitalism of Max Weber’s The Protestant Ethic--the original, early form of entrepreneurial capitalism. It’s the promise of design fusing with startup culture to increase innovation by raising the success rate of venture capital from 10% to as high as 80%. This growing desire
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TWO THOUSAND AND ELEVEN

INFOGRAPHIC OF THE DAY

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Designers Are The New Drivers Of American Entrepreneurialism
Fast Co.
Designers Are The New Drivers Of American Entr... http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665120/designers-are-the-new-...

tech/engineering-centric world of startups promises to be transformative and explosive. The pattern can be broken down into a series of dots. There’s the dot of students at Parsons, RISD, RCA, the Stockholm School of Entrepreneurship, and Aalto University, in Helsinki, beginning to embrace the world of startups. (Stanford has been there for a while, thanks to David Kelley.) There’s a dot of small design/innovation “THE consultancies, such as Ammunition, Fuse, and Smart EMERGING Design, which are developing and selling more of their own products, independently and through corporate TREND partnerships. (Yves Béhar has been an entrepreneur for REPRESENTS a decade; his latest product, a great new urban bike called Local, is now in production.) In addition, A we have IDEO now supporting incubators such as HEADLONG General Assembly, Excelerate, and TechStars, and CRASH OF helping to launch products such as the Yoomi self-warming baby bottle. CREATIVITY INTO CAPITALISM.” Perhaps the most important dot of all is the one of innovative startups started by entrepreneurs with design degrees or backgrounds--YouTube, Flickr, Slideshare, Tumblr, Airbnb, Slideshare, Vimeo, and Feedburner, and YCombinator. These successful examples have inspired countless design students who want to start their own companies. They see that it can be done. Another dot is Idiom, India’s answer to IDEO. The cutting-edge design/innovation consultancy has successfully launched 80 companies, out of 100 attempts, over the past six years, with the average launch taking about nine months from concept to profitability. (Idiom calls its process Mind to Market.) By applying the approaches and tools of design to the traditional startup process, Idiom increased the success rate of VC from 10% to 80%. Led by its cofounder Sonia Manchanda, whom I consider to be the intellectual heir to the great C.K. Prahalad, Idiom is pioneering an entirely new VC model called Dream:In. I was lucky enough to participate in it last year. It goes like this: Hundreds of students were trained to interview and tape thousands of people about their dreams--their aspirations, not their needs. The dreams were collected, categorized, and presented to business people, consultants, and folks like me to help draw up business plans to enable those dreams. Those plans are now in a portfolio, from which venture capitalists can choose by category, by individual concept, or by investing in the fund itself. Each year, students go out, dreams come in, business plans replenish the portfolio. When was the last time we even thought about a radical change in the VC model? This made-in-India idea does. What does this new direction of design toward entrepreneurship and away from big business mean? For me, two things. The less important is epistemological. The Parsons event by NYCreative Interns says it all--“Why Creatives Need to Become Entrepreneurs.” Creativity is a more inclusive term than design. Creativity is more easily accepted by venture capitalists, engineers, business people (and maybe even design students) than design. In addition, as design goes social, it moves toward industries such as advertising, with a long tradition of having “creatives” as part of its

Infographic of the Day: Ingenious Infographic: U.S. Highways, Mapped Like A Subway System

EDITOR'S PICKS

12 Hand-Written Love Letters From Famous People, From Henry VIII To Michael Jordan

4 Elements That Make A Good User Experience Into Something Great

Foursquare Solves A Basic UI Problem That Eludes Google Maps And Yelp

EXPERT PERSPECTIVES

Jeffrey Phillips Discusses: Looking To Hire And Keep Great Innovators? Focus On The 3 Rs

Craig LaRosa Discusses: Our Economy Is Mostly Services. But How Do You Design Great Service

2 of 6

www.dreamin.in

17/02/12 1:09 PM

Designers Are The New Drivers Of American Entrepreneurialism
Fast Co.

Designers Are The New Drivers Of American Entr...

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665120/designers-are-the-new-...
Experiences?

creativity. But if anyone is uncomfortable with the term, just use the D-word. The more important change from big business to new business is conceptual. We need new conceptual categories to deal with the new turn toward entrepreneurship. Zuckerberg, Hurley, Fake, Chase, Stone, Jobs--why and how and where they innovate require entirely different categories of design thinking, if you will, than we’ve used before. We need to learn much more about leadership and the roles of charisma and calling, and the transformation of inspiration into execution. Entrepreneurs are a lot like religious prophets--they embody their following, they “know” their tacit dreams and longings, and they express them. It’s no accident that The Economist put Jobs on its cover with a halo around his head while he held the newly launched iPad as a “tablet.” Another critical concept is framing. One key to entrepreneurs’ success is that they frame things differently, they connect existing dots in unique ways. The two guys who started Method, for example, frame-changed the market for sustainable cleaning products from a “suffering-is-good-for-you” space to a “cool-design-that’s-good-for-the-planet” space. We also need to know a lot more about “meaning,” not just the data gathered by ethnography but knowledge that takes us much deeper into understanding culture. We need to know more about shared spectacle and why we crave it, and how honing craft and skill to near perfection can enable you to make and do the unique--which is what entrepreneurs do. The encouraging news is that we are seeing a dynamic expansion of the scale, range, and power of traditional design. It promises to revive a broken VC model, capture the imagination and energy of a new generation of young designer/creators, and perhaps even regenerate Western capitalism (yes, no small thing). But perhaps most important of all, the creative turn to the entrepreneurial is hopeful. Optimism has always been at the heart of design. This takes it to a new level. To read more about creative capitalism, go here. [Image by Adam Foster]

Roderick McMullen Discusses: Usability Is King For Your Product. Here’s How We Can Finally Measure It

FROM THE EDITOR
Thanks for stopping by Fast Company’s Co.Design. If you’ve been a reader for some time, you’ll notice that we’ve just unveiled a brand-new redesign. YOU CAN READ ABOUT THE
THOUGHT PROCESS BEHIND IT HERE. Our

content, of course, will be the same: Our focus is on highlighting the world’s best examples of design and innovation, working in concert. We started this site with a few simple premises in mind. First, design is a window onto the world at large, and the culture we live in.
CONTINUED

BRUCE NUSSBAUM

Bruce Nussbaum blogs, tweets and writes on innovation, design thinking and creativity. The former assistant managing editor for Business Week is a Professor ... CONTINUED › Twitter

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11/29/2011 12:26 PM

CONTRIBUTORS

My name is Spencer Nikosey and I'm a design entrepreneur. I turned an industrial design college project into a business. I

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