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We then tend to go Into a natural state of rest.rl During thls rest period. Thls will perslst for some perlod of tlme.- POINTERS K . Introduclng hammer-onrs. etc. lf you donrt.pull-offls. The progress was madedurlng the uphill climb. hourr shortened. you donrt. Donrt worry about lt. The rest perlod wlll contlnue for someperlod of time. or vice versa. and we wlll begln to becorneaware of our weaknegt€g. we all go through perlods in which we lre actlvatlng new nerve fwrctlonr. We wlll then begln the uphlll cllmb agaln and plateau again only to meet our deflclencies face to face agaln. Memorizlng the chord changes allows you to focus all of your attentlon on what you are playing rather than readlng the muslc. before stated. ln the Growth Process. Actually the reverse ls true. but your practlce reglmen must remaln congtant. key centerl mlsr€d.) lf you do it. This wlll last untll we select the speclflc lrea to attack flrgt. So. you get lt. Get the progression off the paper and Into your head as 3oon ar posrlble. etc. Then the road wlll becomevery rough agaln.. The objectlves put forth In this book are attalnable only lf the reader follows each step of the pnogram without deviation from the schedule (that means no mlssed days. we tend to feel that we have the world by the tall and great progress ls taking place. playlng dotted elghth cixteenth notes instead of elghth noter. on and on lt goes. and the psychologlcril spln-off ls the feellng that we are gettlng nowhere. L . tlmc frames dlsobeyed. A most commonmlstake ls to blame the left hand when the rlght hand lc at fault. M . Thls type of grcwth work drawr a tremendou3 amount of systentlc energles. not durlng the rest period. N. both ln the braln and throughout other partr of the body. SelfRest Plateau Questlonl SelfQuestlonl . fra plrteau. The overall physlcal feellng ls llke pulllng a traln uphlll. Watchout for this.

You could lay off for six months. refrigerator motor. come back and practice hard for about 2-3 weeks and it will come right back. as this will not cure hidden problems.e.the ability acquired during that period of time will be permanently imprinted and assimilated by your nervous system. seem to be going wrong. You should expect that. but 12 hours is better. or traffic noises--' from outside. Also be aware of your bio-cycles. P. the natural reflex is to stop playing.. you will encounter long periods when the tempo feels awful and. Donrt blame yourself -. s. but out of tune with an air conditioner. from time to time. This is great when you feel like it.form a group of other guitar players. R . during the process of building up your speed. the rest is mostly a matter of muscular strength and agility. There will be some days when you may feel like playing for long periods of tlme. of blaming yourself when something else is wrong. as far as the project lessons in this book are concerned. that creates an overload of humility. your guitar may sound out of tume. This applies even to the most experienced players. You must continue to practice with controlled discipllne. You will find that once you reach a given level of speed. Every person has natural high and low points running in approximately monthly cycles. Practicing an hour a day 6 days a week is great.PO NTERS o. U . points where the tempo is just right. During low periods. T . However. Exchange solos and comping. Trade off in sequence. Learn to ferrot out the real problems. When your music sounds bad to you. no matter how you feel about things from day to day. 18 . An'Accelerator -. on a daily basis. So before you blame yourself for a problem. etc. i. which is certainly possible.just be aware of the real problem. steady eighths or dotted eighths. medium and fast tempos that are just right for that particular rhythm feel and any other tempos inbetween feel awkward and difficult to play on. The group dynamics is superior to private study for a program of this sort. they tend to have slow. -. but donrt force it. sixteenths (shuffle) or triplets (12181 . lt seems that once this ability is programmed clearly. at least for the serious performer. as many do. but this must not interrupt the regularity of your practice routine. for approximately 2l days. make sure that you have accounted for elements in your environment that may be superimposing a subliminal orchestration over what you are playing.when tunes are played with a specific feel. For example. Another hazard to watch out for -. There seems to be something about the guitar. Coping ttith The Mental Hazards Of Developing A High Degree of Facility ln lt is extremely important to cerrectly place the blame when things lmprovising. keep in mind that it may actually be in tune with itself. a. and maintain playing at that level or faster. But do not fall into the trap. you may feel very down and discouraged. A certain amount of this is okay and selfquestioning is essential to oners progress.

This is to be desired speed and try to rise to meet it. for whatever reason.H O WT O D O P R O J E C T L E S S O N SF O R W E E K SO N E T H R O U G H qtx A. lt'may be good to remember that these are only obiectives. Use Alternate Picking only. No phrasing. Follow the steps faithfully as given. T!re-key centers bracketed in the chord prog-ressions represent only one analysis of the progression. in aldition. E . D. may serve as a good. Rather. to make up strokes sound as strong as down strokes.o-ea9h proiect lesson for six consecutive days. your progress. Avoid skipp. F. you wifl know ii immediately. strive c. The effect is hazardous to progress. and precision in order to meet the tempo goals. No two strokes in the same direction. with one day off. In these situations oners individua-l preference can. there are ilmost unlimited scale and chord substitution possibilities. . lf theyrre_rlght. However.. Also. """u""ry The tempo obiective plan is symmetricar.re wron!. No pull-offls. 6ut the learning curve'is not. the tempo. Do nol set your metronome to a use the metronome only to track lempos in the boxes provided. Play only eighth notes. Hold each note as tong as possible Do not rush or drag Great attention should be given to holding steady time. t9 .prevait. No hammer-onrs. ltts just a matter of where you want the change of tonality to occur. other views may be apptiea as welt. No rests. Play Legato. G .discretion.e. Keep a daity record of your (NOTE: Your tempo may vaiy stower or faster expected. ttNothingr but stead-y eighth notes. " 9"y Regularity is essential. but indicated as a ll chord of another. *.) D . they will sound right and if ihey. other voicings may be used at your own.study in the application of I'garden-variety'r guitar chords. These will always come in time. Care shoutU be takin not to sac"i"fi". from day to day. The chord voicings shown in the proiect lessons are comrnonguitar voivings which are intended to assure a clear understanding of the progressi-on and. The week end tempo obiectives shown at the top of each project lesson are scheduled to increasg by two metronome points'daily.ing . Feel free^to use any harmonic devices at your dlsposal. continuo'rt: and uninterrupted. No other ornamentation. ror exarildlo.ilt encounter key center brackets in which a given chord could be viewed a's a lll orVl chord of one key.

Total 50 min Check off each step as it is finished 20 . Close your eyes. LOG OF DAILY METRONOME ETTINCS S Step 5 10min Pre-record yourself playing the chord changes (sustained . Relax all parts of the body. etc. Play uninterrupted recording. Step 6 2 min Step 7 Step I Step 9 10 min 2 min l0 min 2 min 10 min 2 min Play uninterrupted recording.WEEK ONE PROJECT LESSON I-A J Week End Tempo Obiective PREPARATION = 60 Step I Step 2 Step 3 Clear your work area of all things not pertaining to thislesson. eighth-notes to the conclusion of the pre- Break! Lie down. 50 MINUTE PROGRAM Step 4 2 min Play eighth notes once through the progression to establish your tempo of the day . Breathe deeply and rhythmically. r'Get it off the paper and into your head'r. stand up and stretch. with the metronomenearby so that it will sound on the tape like aplick track. Break! Step r 0 Step l l Ste p 1 2 Rest aw6y from the guitar. Play notes slowly at all parts of the fingerboard. Break! Set the guitar down. Objective: To eliminateany Iflamstr between the right and left h a n d s. Focus yoffihord prdgression. etc. Break! Set the guitar down.no rhythms). Mark down the day's tempo in the appropriate box below. Play uninterrupted eighth-notes over the progression as it is played back. Stand up and rewind the machine. Practice visualizing yourseif playing the project the way you wish you had. Tune your guitar. to the conclusion of the pre-recording. eighth-notes to the conclusion of the preLie down. Rcpeat the progression non-stop for l0 minutes. Know the key centers and memorize the progression.the speed at which you can play through the piece without mistakes. Warmup.

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Remembert This exampte and alT other examples for the prciect lessons are qqdels of ttre type of solo line to be improvised. The lmportant cdfrGiiiEiatlonis ine spontaneous Invention of your own solo line. The point of the project lessons is to hone y6FtEch: nique to a level that will facilitate and not hinder the tmmediate reproduction of any and alt of your musical ideas. Use the examples as source material and for reference, but when doing the proiect lessons, itts rrevery man for himselft,

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write d.a fiorlq @ Following is a 2l day "gestationrr period aimed toward affixing your present maximum -one technique as a permanent reflex capability. The following here is a suggested schedute (you may change the order at will). a point at which may go without playing for_long p_eriods time. regain ttre of full technique.o*l the present maximummetronomesetting (the setting at which you ortlfiy through the project lessons free of mistakes). W E E KF I F T E E N Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day One Two Three Four Five Six One Two Three Four Five Six One Two Three Four Five Six Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Project Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson l-A l-B 2-A 2-B 3-A 3-B t-A 4-B 5-A 5-B 6-A 6-8 l-A 4-A 2-A 5-A 3-A 6-A tt. Whether you have or have not attained this tempo. our goal has been to gradually rach a tempo of ) = lltwith ctean execution by the end of the fourteenth week.EEKSIXTEEN W E E KS E V E N T E E N D a y Day Day Day Day Day 78 .HOW TO DO PROJECT LESSONSFOR WEEKSFIFTEEN. SIXTEEN AND SEVENTEEN (2 1 D AY REVTEW ) 9p t9 now. but with about two to three weeks of practic6. ? Frnr @ .

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etc. to the conclusion of the pre-recording.the speed at which you can play through the piece without mistakes.no rhythms). Total 50 min .*r LESSONREVIEW WEEKSEVENTEEN PROJECT I End TempoObiective 1 = t. Play uninterrupted eighth notes and eighth note triplets over the progression as it is played back. Tune your guitar. Close your eyes. Break! Set the guitar down. etc Step 5 2 min Step 7 l0 min Step 8 Step 9 Step 1 0 Step il Step l2 2 min 10 min 2 min l0 min 2 min Play uninterrupted eighth notes and eighth note triplets to the conclusion of the recording. Play uninterrupted eighth notes and eighth note triplets to the conclusion of the pre-recording. with the metronome nearby so that it will sound on the tape like a click track. Know the key centers and memorize the progression. Practice visualizing yourself playing the project the way you wish you had.12 Week I PREPARAT ON Step I Step 2 Step 3 Clear your work area of all things not pertaining to this lesson. 50 MINUTE PROGRAM Step 4 2 min Play combinations of eighth notes and eighth note triplets once through the progression to establish your tempo of the dav . Stand up and rewind the machine. Warmup. Check off each step as it. stand up and stretch. Mark down the dayrs tempo in the appropriate box below. Repeat the progression non-stop for 10 minutes. rrGet it off the paper and into your head". Relax all parts of the body. LOG OF DAILY METRONOME ETTINGS S t^eP 5 l0 min Pre-record yourself playing the chord changes (sustained . Breathe deeply and rhythmically. Break! Set lhe ggitar down. Play notes slowly at all parts of the fingerboard.is finished. Break! Rest away from the guitar. Break! Lie down. Focus your attention on the chord progression. Obiective: To eliminateany I'flams" between the right and left h a n d s. Lie down.

you can expect an almost immcdiate. r3l ?.o. hanmer=onrs pull-offr.o .. Now letrs expand the resources to include (a) hammer-onrs. 82 . But for those who may not be so famillar with them.NINETEEN --*morr'r. seven notes are sounded ulth one attack of the plck. our technical resources have been limited to (a) alternate down and up strokes and (b) duple tlme and trlple time. and slides arc nothing new.t DEs Up to this point in the pnogram. The picking stroke shown as ( $ ) means either a down or up stroke may be used. 4 ?. r^""= il. Example18 0 t ||. One main reson for this ls that the duties of the picking hand are greatly reduced. 3 H. ln Example 15. in that 2 sr urore tones can be phyed wlth only onc picklng stroke.AND TWENTY (REVTEW) WEEKS EICHTEEN.o. dramatic acceleration of technique in general. the follouing examplesbriefly describe and demonstratethe basic principles. (b) pull-offrs and (c) glissandi or slidesBy introducing these devices into your work studles.o. For those of you who have been playing for someUme.

or 3rd finger (b) while the string is stil{ vibrating. l.o. ril ll. beinq t rr.O. L t tu rr-o.d. & lf'O.d.O.c.o. 4 Ir. fl. t?. group of to*rer or chords without any initial pick stroke at all. tL+ ls$. *rs t t- tl.L H'S.i*l :: (a) Strike . if the hammer-on is forceful anough.} f{. Thus wG are able to sound 2 or more not€s for the price of one picking stroke. Example l9 q. This hammer-like action" produces another tone {hiEher in pitch} without having to strike the string again. t rfL. Znd.o. S ' t*l &LrF fl. * H.o. 42" ll. s3 . l1ifitnr il. Thls ie efpccislly trtre lf-the amplifier is turned up to a hlgh vslurne eetting.lr.a fri H.$. NOTE: Not only is it important to hammer-on strongly enough to sound like a plucked string.lldba pointed out that it k poeuiblc ts sound any ton€.t n. 3 t{. tt shor.o. .: HAfitt'lEnisilr5":r ' t'strong slam-(irsmmer) your 2.s" + '. . e2 l{.3?-{ ll. 4 H.o. tl.o. not€ very straight sh€ad move. but the rhythmic character of the PassEgc must-be precise.O. 7* *. or 4th finger &wn on the sam€ string. * fl.6. t*l tL.a" g lr.al. The Hammer-on technique itself is a presssd with the lst. H6" r3 + il.s.o. ft.

toward the side of the fingerboard in a pluckindaction. f. r 11. P. r*+ tl*. t4 P-o. z- f7 f. $ | ILO. L l*3 t&r t{a.is.s. zfii. or drag the time.great care should be taken to maintain rhythmic contlol otine puli-ofi.roximatingthe loudness of the origina! {pickEc striig}. I + @ ?. 7I Example 21 r*+?..A. tf.G. rf.1}.1.f cornbinations of Harnmer-on's and pull*off's. 2_ | g4 . (bl press down the same strinol The Pult-off technlque involy*:. {ai Fress down the primary eo. Exarnpte 20 withtherii."}.?. L ?-& ll"$.o. 3rd. f.figl. or tlth fingers.:n* string is vibrating.6..fc" LI ?*4 L z. pick the strinq a second time-wlth the fingerin{ hand. " Keep the rhythmic character of the phrase precise. L I ?. fi1g:ring preparatio-n. ln other wordi.o...(dl pult the finger {ptaying the higFer pitch} away rrom the string. eo.o.i':J:."' "uon't rush. This allows the lower note (still heing h€ld) to sound..A.o" $ 7* (t ?.d.f. ?"e. * q'S Ro" 4 r. rtt* buil-off shoutd be ." tone a. RT:_ou:*__"_:olicl Also'-. P.ly. * f"o" k c ?*e g. #. ila.. ?"o' b?-41.r. **n I . A1 no" ?t* f.o. | .o.?. {c} pluck the preparatory thieher} tone and"' y-lrj*.r.o.a f{.?& 7. "iir'"#iiil. l|"rb ?o.. 4n- r*4 n.o. il.a. $. L+L li.d.O..?. :31:g_I"".}oic rine a prepariatory tone (higher in pitch on ffii.r.a.8.e that tone..a.t*Tri^"nil.o" ?o. ga.. F{JLL*SrF:IS with the Znd.pp.s. r. a. trL I+F?.h'i. r L ll.

l H O W T O D O P R O J E C TL E S S O N SF O R W E E K SE I G H T E E N . The slile may cover oneor more frets.rt". pick the first note jr . Example 22 .L W E E KE I G H T E E N Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day One Two Three Four Five Six One Two Three Four Five Six One Two Three Four Five Six Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Review Project Project Project Proiect Project Proiect Project Proiect Project Project Proiect Project Proiect Proiect Proiect Proiect Project Project Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson Lesson l-A l-B 2-A 2-B 3-A 3-B 4-A 4-B 5-A 5-B 6-A 6-8 l-B tt-B 2-B 5-B 3-B 6-8 WEEK NINETEEN W E E KT W E N T Y 85 . not break away from the-pnogram or time frames.redule (you may change the order at will) " "rgt. re slide is indicated as a line connecting one note to another.-rtes and. either ascendi-ng or descending and may be used for chords as well as single note playing.SLtDES (CL|SSANDt) The execution of.the gliss (or glissando) simply involves stiding from one note to another. pult-offrs and slides. slide up or dbwn to a new note or notes. N I N E T E E N A N D T W E N T Y Review the following Proiect Lessons incorporating hammer-oflts. without lifting the finger(s). The following is -.

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