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History of Eastern Townships

History of Eastern Townships

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Published by Nancy Cunningham

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Published by: Nancy Cunningham on Feb 20, 2012
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11/29/2012

pdf

text

original

made to the

community in this

place from time to

time,

indicate a

steady improvement.

Excellent roads

diverge from this

point in various

directions. A little north of east from

Robinson, is

the Victoria road

leading through Bury and a corner

of

Lingwick into

Hampden. On this road about four

miles above

Robinson, stands one of the small churches

above mentioned. The

country around seems toler-

ably well settled, the land

productive, and the farm

buildings substantial.

Another

principal line

leading from Robinson to

Lingwick, crosses the small stream on which the mills

are

located, and further

on, takes a north-eastern

course

through Lingwick to Winslow.

Passing this in another

direction, is a small

pond or

lake formed

by an artificial embankment and

supplied

with water

by a small brook. It covers a considerable

space of

ground, and is said to abound with fish. The

waste water finds

escape through a sluice in the side.

On a rise of

ground at the

right of this

pond stands

St. John's

church, one of the small wooden structures

erected

by the British American Land

Company. The

scenery around is

delightful, there

being some few farm

houses near ; just enough to

give it

signs of

life, and

yet not

enough to detract from its

appearance of

quiet

and

repose. The

locality is called De

Courtnayville,

from a former

proprietor.

Further on between the tenth and eleventh

ranges

of the

township, a road turns

abruptly to the north-

EASTERN TOWNSHIPS.

38?

east, through a

valley in which a fine brook of water

runs

nearly parallel with the road. The land rises on

either side rather

abruptly at

first, though reaching

back is a sort of extended

plain which is said to be

level and

productive. A post office called

Brookbury

was

opened here some

years since for the convenience

of the inhabitants of the

range, which local

appel-

lation has heretofore been

given to the

place. Fur-

ther

on, a road turns to the north-west and after

pas-

sing through a section in which there are few indica-

tions of

settlement, it enters the

township of Duds-

well.

Population of

Bury given in

1861, as 989 souls.

COMPTON.

This tract

formerly within the district of

Montreal,

bounded north

by Ascot, east

by Clifton, south

by Bar-

ford and Barnston, and west

by Hatley, was erected

into a

township named

Compton and

granted August

31st, 1802, to Jesse

Pennoyer, Nathaniel

Coffin, Joseph

Kilborne, and their

associates, viz., John

McCarty,

Ephraim Stone, Addi

Vincent, Stephen Vincent, John

Lockwood, Isaac

Farwell, Oliver

Barker, David

Jewett, Samuel Woodard, Silas

Woodard, Matthew

Hall the

younger, Page Bull, Abner

Eldridge, Samuel

Hall, Nathan

Lobdell, Ebenezer

Smith, Tyler Spaf-

ford and Thomas Parker.

Compton has no mountainous elevations. Its chief

streams are the Salmon river which crosses the north-

east corner

; Moe's riyer which enters it at the south-

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