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The Gulf of Mexico PP

The Gulf of Mexico PP

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How it all started with gulf of mexico
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Published by: william404 on Feb 24, 2012
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04/04/2015

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The Gulf Of Mexico

By: Will Francis

Getting To Know The GOM
Spanish: Golfo de M`exico The size of the Gulf of Mexico is approximately 810 nautical miles long, 14,383 ft deep, and holds about 660 quadrillion gallons of sea water. The partially landlocked Gulf of Mexico is surrounded by the North American continent, Mexico, and the island of Cuba. Amerigo Vespucci was the first European explorer to sail around the coastal land mass of the Gulf of Mexico in 1497. The Gulf of Mexico didn't have a name up until the early 1540's. It was most commonly referred to then as the "gulf" or "bay³.

Habitat Of The GOM Part I
Abiotic Components:

The major components are shifting temperatures, sun light exposure and water. Gases like C02,NH3, and oxygen etc., organic and inorganic nutrients and other components are in dissolved states. The pH depends upon the above mentioned components. Water provides the major habitat and the environment.

Habitat Of The GOM Part II
Biotic Components More than 400 species call the Gulf of Mexico home. There are over 29 species of marine mammals, seven sea turtle species, and wide variety of marine invertebrates including snails, crabs, and shrimp. Fish are the primary species that fill the 600,000 mile Gulf. The fish species rang from sharks and sting rays to tarpon and snapper. The Gulf of Mexico hosts a number of bird species. Many live there year round, while some migrate to this warm location during the winter. Species include native birds such as pelicans, anhingas, frigatebirds, egrets, herons, spoonbills, ibis, and mallard ducks, and wintering species which include the large northern gannet. (Jennifer Kennedy,2011.Marine Life in the Gulf of Mexico).

References: Jennifer Kennedy,2011.Marine Life in the Gulf of Mexico. Retrieved from: http://marinelife.about.com/od/habitatprofiles/tp/GulfofMexicoMarineLife.htm

Human Impact On The GOM
Ixtoc I Explosion and Oil Spill In June 1979, the Ixtoc I oil platform in the Bay of Campeche suffered a blowout leading to a catastrophic explosion, which resulted in a massive oil spill that continued for nine months before the well was finally capped. This was ranked as the largest oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico until the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. (Gulf of Mexico,2011. Wikipedia)

Deepwater Horizon Explosion and Oil Spill On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil platform, located in the Mississippi Canyon about 40 miles (64 km) off the Louisiana coast, suffered a catastrophic explosion; it sank a day-and-a-half day-andlater. It was in the process of being sealed with cement for temporary abandonment, to avoid environmental problems. Although initial reports indicated that relatively little oil had leaked, by April 24, it was claimed by BP that approximately 1,000 barrels (160 m3) of oil per day were issuing from the wellhead, about 1-mile (1.6 km) below the surface on the ocean floor. (Gulf of 1Mexico,2011. Wikipedia)

Reference: Gulf of Mexico,(2011). Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_of_Mexico

Human Impact On The GOM Part II
The toll of the latest oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon in 2009 was disastrous on the ecosystem of the GOM. This devastation not only caused monetary damage but environmental damage. A comprehensive 2009 inventory of offshore Gulf species counted 15,700. The area of the oil spill includes 8,332 species, including more than 1,200 fish, 200 birds, 1,400 molluscs, 1,500 crustaceans, 4 sea turtles, and 29 marine mammals. As of November 2, 2010, 6,814 dead animals had been collected, including 6,104 birds, 609 sea turtles, 100 dolphins and other mammals, and 1 other reptile. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, cause of death had not been determined as of late June. According to NOAA, since January 1, 2011, 67 dead dolphins have been found in the area affected by the oil spill, with 35 of them premature or newborn calves. (Deepwater Horizon, 2011.Wikipedia) References: Deepwater Horizon,2011. Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deepwater_Horizon_oil_spill

Future Impact On The GOM
Chemical Impact If we continue releasing more oil and chemicals into the GOM it will further destroy the habitat and ecosystem. It would further drive down the number of existing endangered and non-endangered species that reside in nonthe gulf, cutting off one of the most richest sources of seafood. The GOM yields more shell-fish, finfish, and shellshrimp yearly than the south and New England, midmidAtlantic Chesapeake areas combined. Ecosystem Impact We could lose a precious habitat that supports the life of over 400 species, drive the revenue gained from the gulfs fisheries down, and lose a natural ecosystem to be enjoyed by future generations.

Steps To Preserve The GOM
1. Get involved in the collective clean up and restorative project that the city, state, and other organizations organize. 2. Donate time and money to the rehabilitation efforts of the gulf. 3. Support the effort of cleanliness while visiting the gulf by disposing of waste products properly.

References
Deepwater Horizon,2011. Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deepwater_Horizon_oil_spill Gulf of Mexico,(2011). Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_of_Mexico Jennifer Kennedy,2011.Marine Life in the Gulf of Mexico. Retrieved from: http://marinelife.about.com/od/habitatprofiles/tp/GulfofMexicoMarineLife.htm

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