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Metro Weekly - 03-01-12 - Fran Drescher

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LGBT Activists Reject Barry, Alexander
Incumbents suffer one-two punch, losing Stein Dems’ endorsement and
earning lowest scores in GLAA ratings
Barry
by John Riley
I
F ELECTIONS WERE SOLELY
decided by the LGBT commu-
nity, some incumbent council-
members would be serving on
borrowed time.
Councilmembers Marion Barry
(D-Ward 8) and Yvette Alexander
(D-Ward 7) lost big at a Feb. 23 meet-
ing of the Gertrude Stein Democratic
Club, earning only 7.8 percent and 2.6
percent, respectively, of the votes of
active club members present. The Stein
Club for LGBT Democrats is among the
most influential Democratic clubs in
the District. The Feb. 23 endorsement
meeting, one in a series ahead of the
April 3 primaries, was seen by many
in attendance as a rejection of the two
incumbent councilmembers for their
weak records on LGBT issues.
Alexander and Barry were the only
two of the 13-member council to vote
against marriage equality, and Barry
was the sole vote against recognizing
out-of-state same-sex civil marriages.
In a related development, Barry and
Alexander tied for the single-lowest
candidate rating from the nonparti-
san Gay and Lesbian Activists Alliance
(GLAA). Based on their responses to a
GLAA questionnaire, their legislative
records and their “championship,” or
lack thereof, on issues important to
the LGBT community, both Barry and
Alexander earned a rating of -3.5 from a
ratings range of -10 to 10.
Specifically, GLAA graded Alex-
ander’s submitted questionnaire as
“weak” and “marked by disagreement
with GLAA on basic issues.” But she
performed worst when it came to
analyzing her record on the council,
which included introducing legislation
to make prostitution-free zones (PFZs)
permanent, which opponents – such as
the GLAA – say is both unconstitutional
and increases profiling and discrimina-
tion against transgender people.
Alexander also introduced a bill cre-
ating mandatory HIV testing for people
applying for marriage licenses, com-
pared the city’s HPV vaccination pro-
gram to a “Tuskegee experiment” on
young black girls, and introduced an
amendment to the marriage-equality
bill that would have gutted the D.C.
Human Rights Act of protections based
on sexual orientation.
Barry, meanwhile, did not submit
a questionnaire, and was judged on
his record and advocacy of anti-gay
causes, including campaigning against
marriage equality, leading protesters
in anti-gay chants, and co-sponsoring
legislation mandating HIV testing for
people seeking marriage licenses and
supporting permanent PFZs.
According to Richard J. Rosendall,
GLAA’s vice president for political
affairs, candidates who earn a rating of
5 or above are generally considered to
have a favorable rating. Two candidates,
Tom Brown and Kevin B. Chavous, tied
for the top score of 3.5 in the Ward 7
race, and Darrell Gaston earned a top
score of 4 in the Ward 8 race.
Rosendall lamented the overall lack
of strong LGBT advocates for all races
this cycle, but he also noted that some
of the lower “positive” ratings for non-
incumbents were based on the candi-
dates’ lack of a record on LGBT issues,
and are not necessarily intended as
marks against candidates.
“Our intent is not to play ‘gotcha’
with these ratings, but to educate can-
didates and inform the community,”
Rosendall said.
Returning to the Feb. 23 Stein meet-
ing for the Ward 7 and 8 Democrat-
ic endorsements at the HRC Equal-
ity Center, the mood was contentious.
Many club members spoke out against
Barry and Alexander for their records
and their efforts against major LGBT
initiatives.
With Alexander absent from the
L
G
B
T
News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Poliglot: DCTC v. MPD, more from Maryland
News: Global Briefs
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
5 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
LGBTNews
6
three candidates, Brown earned 62 per-
cent of the vote, meeting the 60 percent
threshold required to earn Stein’s official
endorsement for the race.
Meanwhile, Barry, appearing in per-
son, proved the biggest personality in
the Ward 8 campaign. In addressing the
audience, he reminded those in atten-
dance of his longstanding support of the
LGBT community and personal ties to
the Stein Club, which gave him his first
Democratic endorsement when he faced
former Mayor Walter E. Washington and
then-Council Chair Sterling Tucker in
the 1978 mayoral race.
“I have supported the LGBT com-
munity more than anyone on the coun-
cil, including David Catania,” Barry said,
taking a swipe at out gay Councilmem-
ber Catania (I-At Large), with whom he
recently had a profanity-laced squabble
during a council retreat. Catania and
Barry have frequently butted heads over
a variety of issues, particularly so since
Barry voted against marriage equality.
Barry was the only Ward 8 candidate
who did not return the club’s candi-
date questionnaire, but said he wanted to
show up in person and address the group.
“Anybody can put words on a paper,” he
said.
“Judge me by the whole book, not
one page in the book,” Barry pleaded
with Stein members, arguing that in the
course of his political career he had kept
a gay teacher from being fired, instituted
the first sensitivity training course and
LGBT liaison for the Metropolitan Police
Department, and appointed the first
openly gay person in city government.
But Gaston countered that Barry and
the other candidates – Sandra Seegars
and Jacque Patterson – “can talk a good
game, but I’m giving you results.” Gaston
cited his work with transgender youth at
Wanda Alston House, his testimony in
favor of marriage equality and corralling
meeting and no one stepping forward to
nominate her for consideration, that left
Ward 7 challengers Dorothy Douglas,
Monica Johnson, Bill Bennett, Brown
and Chavous to compete for the group’s
endorsement.
Bennett, a Baptist minister, raised a
few eyebrows when he told the group
that his religious beliefs did not approve
of homosexuality. When asked later if
he would have voted for D.C.’s 2009
marriage-equality bill, he said he would
have opposed it.
In contrast, Brown, a former teacher
who is also an ordained minister, said his
religious beliefs oppose homosexuality,
but stressed that he would not impose
his faith on others as a councilmember.
Brown said he would have voted in favor
of marriage equality. He also criticized
Alexander for not actively engaging the
community on the marriage bill, saying
opinion in the ward was not overwhelm-
ingly opposed as Alexander had claimed
when the bill was debated.
Chavous also gave a strong perfor-
mance, coming out in opposition to PFZs,
which he called “unconstitutional,” saying
he would have voted for marriage equal-
ity, calling for implementation of required
sensitivity training for police officers, and
backing grant-making authority for the
Mayor’s Office of GLBT Affairs.
After the candidates left the room,
activist Lane Hudson stood to express
his opposition to Alexander, saying she
needed to apologize for her vote against
marriage equality. He also called out
Barry, saying, “You need to apologize as
well.”
In the Ward 7 race, on the first ballot,
Brown received 55.2 percent of the vote,
with Chavous and Douglas tying for sec-
ond at 15.7 percent. “No endorsement”
earned 10.5 percent and Alexander still
managed 2.6 percent despite no repre-
sentation. In the run-off between the top
ANC 8B commissioners to support the
measure.
Patterson also hit Barry for his oppo-
sition to marriage equality.
“When the chips were there, he did
not vote in your favor,” Patterson said to
the assembled activists.
Community activist Philip Pannell
was more blunt when given the oppor-
tunity to speak, raging against Barry for
making LGBT people the object of ridi-
cule and fostering a “poisonous” atmo-
sphere against LGBT individuals in the
ward by “making us a moving target for
scorn in the community.”
“Don’t buy the disingenuous crap
dished out by Marion Barry!” Pannell
shouted, lobbying his fellow Stein mem-
bers to reject the former mayor and long-
time councilmember.
In the Ward 8 race, on the first ballot,
Patterson got the lion’s share of votes,
winning 47.3 percent over Seegars and
Gaston, who each netted 18.4 percent.
Barry got 7.8 percent. The remainder
went to “no candidate” and a write-in.
In the second round of balloting, no
candidate earned 60 percent of votes,
leaving no Stein endorsement in the
Ward 8 race.
Still, LGBT activist Bob Summersgill
said he was “thrilled” with the results
and felt he had accomplished what he set
out to ensure: neither Barry nor Alexan-
der earning endorsement.
“Neither one was rewarded for their
treachery against our community,” said
Summersgill. “I think it is important
that a sitting incumbent could not get a
Democratic club’s endorsement, and that
speaks volumes.”
“Yvette Alexander has done more to
hurt our community than Barry, but Barry
actually campaigned against us,” Sum-
mersgill added. “I’m just very happy that
our community did not reward the incum-
bents who worked so hard against us.” l
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Snowe Retiring
Moderate GOP senator announces
she won’t seek re-election
by Chris Geidner
MAINE SEN. OLYMPIA SNOWE (R)
will not be seeking re-election, meaning
the loss of one of the most pro-LGBT
equality members of the Senate Republi-
can caucus – and talk of a possible pick-
up for Democrats.
Snowe said in a statement Feb. 28, first
reported by The Portland Press Herald,
“this was not an easy decision. My hus-
band and I are in good health. … I have no
doubt I would have won re-election.”
“[W]hat motivates me is producing
results for those who have entrusted me
to be their voice and their champion,
and I am filled with that same sense of
responsibility today as I was on my first
day in the Maine House of Representa-
tives. I do find it frustrating, however,
that an atmosphere of polarization and
‘my way or the highway’ ideologies has
become pervasive in campaigns and in
our governing institutions,” she said.
“Unfortunately, I do not realistically
expect the partisanship of recent years in
the Senate to change over the short term.
So at this stage of my tenure in public ser-
vice, I have concluded that I am not pre-
pared to commit myself to an additional
six years in the Senate, which is what a
fourth term would entail.”
Snowe is one of the three Senate
Republicans – along with fellow Maine
Sen. Susan Collins (R) and Illinois Sen.
7 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
LGBTNews
8
Of her accomplishments regarding
LGBT equality, Cooper noted, “She was
one of the Republican voices in support
of open service and voted for repeal of
the failed ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ policy.
She also provided an example to her
peers in her consistent support of the
Employment Non-Discrimination Act.
We look forward to continuing the legacy
and leadership of Sen. Snowe by standing
up for what is right.”
As referenced by Cooper, Snowe
voted for the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t
Tell” in 2010. She also voted in favor of
the National Defense Authorization Act
with the inclusion of the Matthew Shepa-
rd and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Pre-
vention Act in 2009. She is not, however,
a co-sponsor of the Respect for Marriage
Act, which would repeal the Defense of
Marriage Act.
Already being pushed for the seat
Mark Kirk (R), who is recovering from a
stroke – to co-sponsor the Employment
Non-Discrimination Act.
Log Cabin Republicans Executive
Director R. Clarke Cooper called the
news a “loss,” telling Metro Weekly, “Sen-
ator Olympia Snowe was a true states-
man throughout her remarkable 34 year
tenure representing Maine. Log Cabin
Republicans are proud to call Sen. Snowe
longtime ally.”
Christian Berle, LCR’s deputy execu-
tive director, has a personal connection
to the senator and the state.
“As a former Snowe staffer and as a
Mainer, I am in awe of her exemplary
career and her tireless work as a member
of Congress. The Republican Party and
the country were better for her service,”
he told Metro Weekly. “I look forward to
seeing the next Olympia Snowe step for-
ward to be a leader for a new generation.”
is pro-LGBT equality House member
Chellie Pingree (D), about whom Cour-
age Campaign’s Adam Bink said Tuesday,
on his own behalf and not on behalf of
his current organization: “I for one hope
Rep. Chellie Pingree runs. I met her in
the No On 1 [Maine marriage-equality
referendum] war room in ’09 when she
stopped in to wish us well and ask what
she could do to help. She’s also been a
leader in the fight for a health care public
option and on campaign finance reform
for a long time.”
Pingree, according to The Huffington
Post’s Amanda Terkel, said that in com-
ing days she will “consider how I can best
serve the people of Maine.”
Snowe first won election to the Senate
in 1994, when she won the seat formerly
held by once-Senate Majority Leader
George Mitchell (D) after he announced
his retirement. l
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
DOJ Promotion
for Delery
Gay attorney set to head depart-
ment’s Civil Division
by Chris Geidner
ON MONDAY THE DEPARTMENT OF
Justice announced that the lawyer who
argued against the constitutionality of
the Defense of Marriage Act in court
this past December, Tony West, is being
named to the No. 3 spot at Justice, with
out gay DOJ lawyer Stuart Delery being
promoted to take West’s spot as the head
of the department’s Civil Division.
In the Feb. 27 announcement, Attor-
ney General Eric Holder praised the two
attorneys, saying, “Tony and Stuart have
served the department with professional-
ism, integrity and dedication, and both
bring a wealth of experience to their new
positions. I’m confident they will provide
invaluable leadership and will play a criti-
cal role in furthering the department’s
key priorities and fulfilling its traditional
missions.”
West will be the acting associate attor-
ney general, and Delery the acting assis-
tant attorney general for the Civil Divi-
sion. That division, according to DOJ,
represents the United States, its depart-
ments and agencies, members of Con-
gress, Cabinet officers, and other federal
employees in any civil or criminal matter
within its control. These include cases
involving national policies and significant
litigation that is “so massive and span[s]
so many years that [it] would overwhelm
the resources and infrastructure of any
individual field office.”
According to Monday’s press release,
Delery came to the Justice Department in
January 2009 and first served as chief of
staff and counselor to the deputy attorney
general. Later, Delery served as associate
deputy attorney general, where he coor-
dinated DOJ’s preparation of the federal
lawsuit against Arizona’s immigration
law. Since August 2010, Delery has served
as senior counselor to Attorney General
Holder, including serving as a member
of the DOJ’s Affordable Care Act litiga-
tion team.
Delery and his partner, Richard Ger-
vase, are raising two sons, as Metro Week-
ly reported in 2007. Gervase is a board
member of Rainbow Families DC, an
organization that supports and connects
LGBT parents and prospective parents
in the D.C. area. Prior to joining the Jus-
tice Department, Delery was a partner at
Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr
LLP. At Wilmer Hale, Delery provided pro
bono counsel to Servicemembers Legal
Defense Network (SLDN) – including in
a case challenging the constitutionality of
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” Cook v. Gates.
In the appeal of that case in 2006, for
which Delery served as counsel of record,
in arguing why DADT should be found
unconstitutional, he wrote of the legal
landscape after the U.S. Supreme Court
had overturned all sodomy laws in Law-
rence v. Texas in 2003:
“In overturning Bowers [v. Hardwick],
the Court made clear that all adults,
regardless of their sexual orientation,
possess a constitutionally protected liber-
ty interest in determining how to conduct
their private lives in matters pertaining
to sex. Lawrence, moreover, was about
more than sex. The decision’s language
and holding evince a clear concern not
only with the privacy of the bedroom, but
also more broadly with the equal legal
dignity to which gay persons are consti-
tutionally entitled. Taken together with
Romer v. Evans, Lawrence means that the
government may not demean the lives of
gay persons by enacting laws that infringe
their fundamental liberties or treat them
as a separate, secondary class.”
That, more or less, is now the position
of the U.S. government, as enunciated
by DOJ in several ongoing challenges to
the constitutionality of the Defense of
Marriage Act’s federal definition of mar-
riage. Those include a case brought by
SLDN in which DOJ recently announced
it would not be disputing the DOMA
claims and West’s argument in December
2011 to a federal trial court that decided
in late February that Section 3 of DOMA
is unconstitutional.
Then, in arguing that DOMA’s fed-
eral definition of marriage should not
force Karen Golinski – a federal court
employee – to be denied equal health
benefits to cover her wife, West told the
court, “What is at issue is whether or not
the federal government can use sexual
9 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
LGBTNews
10
The bill passed the House of Del-
egates Feb. 17, 72-67, before moving on
to the Senate, where it passed, 25-22,
on Feb. 23. Gov. Martin O’Malley (D),
a strong supporter of marriage equal-
ity, is expected to sign the bill into law
Wednesday, March 1, at 5 p.m. in Annap-
olis, after Metro Weekly deadline.
But opponents of the measure are
not admitting defeat. Rather, they are
gearing up a referendum campaign. The
Maryland Marriage Alliance, the organi-
zation spearheading the effort, is already
organizing the required petition drive –
needing nearly 56,000 signatures – to put
marriage equality to voters in November.
Marylanders for Marriage Equality,
a coalition of community, religious and
civic groups, also announced plans to
counter the Maryland Marriage Alliance
with and educational and engagement
campaign. Both sides are expected to
spend millions of dollars.
Polling also shows a tight race: a
Washington Post poll released in January
showed 50 percent of Marylanders sup-
port marriage equality, with 44 percent
opposed.
With the marriage bill off to the gov-
ernor, attention in the General Assembly
has turned to a renewed effort to pass
a statewide bill prohibiting discrimina-
tion based on a person’s gender identity
or expression in employment, housing
and public accommodation. The Senate
Judicial Proceedings Committee fielded
orientation as the basis to grant health
benefits to some legally married couples,
yet deny them to others.”
West, on behalf of DOJ, argued that
the federal government cannot.
West will take on his new role upon
the departure of Associate Attorney Gen-
eral Thomas Perrelli, at which time Del-
ery will take West’s role. l
Annapolis Update
O’Malley has a date with
marriage, while gender-identity bill
gets Senate hearing
by John Riley
AFTER YEARS OF TRYING, THOSE
backing LGBT equality in Maryland are
finally seeing progress when it comes
to passing major legislation through the
state’s General Assembly.
Proponents of HB 438, a bill legaliz-
ing same-sex marriage in Maryland, are
celebrating after the measure narrowly
passed both chambers.
After weeks of lobbying and behind-
the-scenes legislative wrangling, propo-
nents were able to amend the bill to
gain the support of several delegates who
were wavering on the measure or had ini-
tially expressed fervent opposition to it.
testimony Tuesday, Feb. 28, on the pro-
posed bill, SB 212.
Advocates, particulary Gender Rights
Maryland, are hoping the committee
will approve the bill and move it to the
floor for a full vote. They are also hoping
Senate allies, such as Sen. Jamie Raskin
(D-Montgomery Co.), will be able to con-
vince Senate President Thomas V. “Mike”
Miller (D-Calvert, Prince George’s coun-
ties) to allow and up-or-down vote on the
bill. Miller had previously told supporters
he was opposed to voting on two contro-
versial “gay” bills during the same session.
A bill that did not include protections
for public accommodations passed the
House of Delegates 86-52 in 2011, but
was later killed in the Senate.
Similar measures have already passed
on the local level in four jurisdictions
since 2002, when Baltimore City passed
an ordinance preventing discrimination
based on gender identity or expression.
Since then, Montgomery, Howard, and,
most recently, Baltimore counties, have
passed nearly identical legislation. Taken
together, the four jurisdictions cover 46
percent of the state’s population.
“Follow your counties,” Sharon Brack-
ett, president of Gender Rights Mary-
land, told senators at Tuesday’s Judicial
Proceedings Committee hearing. “They
are ahead of you on this.”
For updates on Maryland, visit
MetroWeekly.com. l
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Romney’s
Big Wins
Arizona and Michigan give GOP
candidate a needed jolt
by Chris Geidner
ON FEB. 28, VOTERS IN MICHIGAN
and Arizona had a significant say in
the selection of this year’s Republican
presidential nominee – a say that for-
mer Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney
wasn’t expecting less than two months
ago. Even more surprising is that former
Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum was his
leading challenger going into the night.
At the close of the polls, though, all
the networks declared Romney the win-
ner in Arizona. And, little more than
an hour later, they called Michigan for
Romney as well, although the outcome
was close and Santorum could end up
receiving nearly the same, if not more,
delegates in the state as Romney.
Santorum attempted to give his
speech before the results were called in
Michigan, but ended up with all the cable
networks calling Michigan for Romney
while the conservative Pennsylvanian
was speaking.
Less than 30 minutes later, Ann Rom-
ney began introducing her husband, who
said from the Romney campaign head-
quarters in Novi, Mich., “We didn’t win
by a lot, but we won by enough and that’s
all that counts.”
The two remaining competitors,
former House Speaker Newt Gingrich
(Ga.) and Texas Rep. Ron Paul gave their
speeches for the evening before polls had
closed in Michigan and Arizona – and
from outside of either state. Paul spoke
from Virginia and Gingrich spoke from
Georgia.
R. Clarke Cooper, executive director
of Log Cabin Republicans, said in a state-
ment issued after the races were called,
“Mitt Romney’s victories in Arizona and
Michigan reflect a tightening in the field
and rejection of Rick Santorum’s extreme
views against gays, women and education.
It remains unknown the actual delegate
count from tonight, but any hopes by
Santorum to take the race all the way
to Tampa have been greatly diminished.
Further, the outcome of two Romney
wins tonight will yield greater donor sup-
port to the candidate as well as the RNC.”
GOProud Executive Director Jimmy
LaSalvia said in a statement issued after
the races were called, “These are big wins
for Governor Romney. Governor Romney
continues to show strength all across the
country – finishing in a virtual tie for first
in Iowa, winning in New Hampshire, fin-
ishing second in South Carolina, winning
in Florida, winning in Nevada, winning in
Maine and now winning in both Arizona
and Michigan.”
He added: “Governor Romney’s wins
tonight are particularly pivotal given the
marketplace - real estate
11 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
LGBTNews
12
the U.S. House of Representatives (the
“House”), through counsel, respectfully
appeals to the United States Court of
Appeals for the Ninth Circuit the District
Court’s February 22, 2012 Order and final
Judgment, both insofar as they grant
Plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment
and deny the House’s motion to dismiss.”
The filing also notes, “The Demo-
cratic Leader and the Democratic Whip
decline to support the filing of this notice
of appeal.”
Golinski is represented in the chal-
lenge, in which she is seeking equal
health benefits for her wife, by Lambda
Legal Defense and Education Fund.
U.S. District Court Judge Jeffrey S.
White found on Feb. 22 that Section 3
of DOMA, as applied to prevent Golin-
ski from receiving equal benefits for her
wife, violates Golinski’s equal protection
guarantee under the U.S. Constitution.
BLAG has retained outside counsel,
led by Paul Clement at Bancroft PLLC, to
represent it in the case, which it took up
following the decision by the Department
of Justice and President Obama to stop
defending legal challenges to Section 3 of
DOMA. DOJ has taken Golinski’s side in
this challenge, arguing that Section 3 of
DOMA is unconstitutional.
Lambda Legal attorney Tara Borelli
said in a statement, “We are confident
Judge White’s thorough and well-rea-
soned decision will stand the test of time.
recent surge by former Senator Rick San-
torum. It is clear that Governor Romney’s
message of economic hope and renewal
has resonated with voters in both Michi-
gan and Arizona.” l
BLAG Appealing
Golinski
Pelosi spokesman, Lambda Legal
criticize DOMA defense
by Chris Geidner
IN A BRIEF FILING FEB. 24 IN THE
U.S. District Court for the Northern
District of California, the House Bipar-
tisan Legal Advisory Group (BLAG)
has announced that it is appealing the
recent decision in Golinski v. Office of
Personnel Management finding that Sec-
tion 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act is
unconstitutional.
The appeal sends the case to the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit,
which recently struck down Proposi-
tion 8 as unconstitutional under limited
grounds.
According to the filing: “Notice is
hereby given that Intervenor-Defendant
the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group of
However they may recycle their failed
arguments on appeal, the one thing we
know is: DOMA is doomed, and efforts to
extend this discriminatory law, while not
unexpected, serve only to harm loving
couples and families.”
Drew Hammill, spokesman for House
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.),
also released a statement: “The District
Court in Northern District of California
flatly rejected the arguments of Speaker
Boehner and his taxpayer-funded law-
yers that insulted millions of Americans
and their families. The court made it
clear that there is no legitimate interest
in denying a class of couples the rights
and responsibilities guaranteed to mar-
ried couples under state law.”
Referencing Pelosi and other Demo-
crats’ stated concerns about the cost of
supporting the GOP’s defense, Hammill
added, “Over the past year, the initial
$500,000 in outside legal fees Speak-
er Boehner plans to spend has tripled
to $1.5 million without any vote of the
BLAG. That is a tremendous amount of
taxpayer money expended, on a purely
partisan basis, to defend discrimina-
tion. With progress on marriage equality
coming from all corners of our country,
Speaker Boehner would have been better
served and saved taxpayers’ money if he
had more carefully reviewed the district
court’s ruling and had declined to file a
notice of appeal.” l
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
LESBIAN JUDGE WON’T
MARRY OPPOSITE-SEX COUPLES
A DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS, JUDGE ANNOUNCED IN
February that she will no longer provide marriage licenses to
heterosexual couples until same-sex marriage is legal in the
state. Judge Tonya Parker is the first out lesbian African-Ameri-
can elected official in Texas.
“I use it as my opportunity to give them a lesson about mar-
riage equality in the state because I feel like I have to tell them
why I’m turning them away,” she told the New York Daily News.
“I usually will offer them something along the lines of, ‘I’m sorry.
I don’t perform marriage ceremonies because we are in a state
that does not have marriage equality, and until it does, I am
not going to partially apply the law to one group of people that
doesn’t apply to another group of people.’”
Civil district court judges are not required to perform mar-
riages in the Lone Star State, but can do so under Family Code.
– Joe Corcoran
LESBIANS ARRAIGNED
ON GAY HATE CRIME CHARGES
THREE LESBIANS WERE ARRAIGNED ON HATE-CRIMES
charges Feb. 24 after a gay man accused them of assaulting
him at a Boston transit station, the Boston Herald reports. The
unidentified victim claims that Lydia Sanford, Erika Stroud and
Felicia Stroud used anti-gay epithets while beating him after he
grazed one of them with his backpack.
Massachusetts law allows for enhanced penalties for crimes
perpetrated due to a victim’s sexual orientation or gender iden-
tity. Not all Bostonians, however, agree on the issue.
“My guess is that no sane jury would convict them under
those circumstances, but what this really demonstrates is the
idiocy of the hate-crime legislation,” said Harvey Silverglate, an
attorney associated with the American Civil Liberties Union of
Massachusetts.
Sarah Wuncsh, an ACLU staff attorney, countered, “The mere
fact that someone is a member of the same class doesn’t mean
they could not be motivated by hatred for their very own group.”
Prosecutors say they can prove that a hate crime was commit-
ted. “The defendants’ particular orientation or alleged orienta-
tions have no bearing on our ability to prosecute for allegedly
targeting a person who they believe to be different from them,”
Jake Wark, a spokesman for Suffolk District Attorney Daniel F.
Conley told the Herald. – Joe Corcoran
NewsBriefs
NATIONAL
marketplace - real estate
13 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
marketplace - professional services
14 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
A Mega Success
The Chamber’s Mega Networking event is a way to make new connections –
and cement current ones
Attendees at the 2011 Chamber MegaNT
by Kate Karasmeighan
F
OR THE PAST FOUR YEARS,
the spring season has brought
not only the inevitable tour-
ists and cherry blossoms and
warm weather and allergies to the
Washington area, but also the Capi-
tal Area Gay and Lesbian Chamber of
Commerce’s annual Mega Networking
and Social Event (MegaNT). This year,
CAGLCC and dozens of other profes-
sional, networking and social groups
are inviting LGBT people from every
walk and every corner of the region to
connect with thousands of other LGBT
and allied professionals to mix, mingle
and have a great time at Town Dance-
boutique, all while exchanging a busi-
ness card or two – or 1,500.
To date, the organizations partner-
ing with CAGLCC to ensure a wide
range of attendees include (but are
not limited to): the DC Ice Breakers,
the Sexual Minority Youth Assistance
League (SMYAL), Metro DC PFLAG,
Miss Gay DC America Regional Pageant,
Latino GLBT History Project, Mautner
Project, Burgundy Crescent Volunteers,
Whitman-Walker Health, The DC Cen-
ter, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund and
dozens of others. You can see from the
list – local, regional, national, sports,
social, advocacy – everyone who is any-
one will be at this event.
Megan Wallace of Wallace Law
LLC (an LGBT certified supplier and
member of CAGLCC) has attended the
MegaNT for the past three years and
says that 2012 will be no exception.
“I haven’t missed a MegaNT yet, and
I don’t plan to start this year! While I
always enjoy all of CAGLCC’s events,
the MegaNT is extra special. Thou-
sands of people are there. It’s more like
a networking party than a buttoned-up
W
A
R
D

M
O
R
R
I
S
O
N

/

M
E
T
R
O

W
E
E
K
L
Y
meet and greet.”
Wallace adds that the MegaNT
draws not only the “regular crowd,”
but also “all of their friends and busi-
ness contacts. If a colleague has been
suggesting that she or he introduce you
to a potential client, then that introduc-
tion is likely to happen at the MegaNT.”
Just as Wallace has, many attendees
have used the MegaNT as an opportu-
nity to meet not only new clients, but to
encourage a more personal relationship
that ultimately adds to professional
relationships with business contacts.
The relaxed atmosphere allows conver-
sations to flow freely, leading to closer
business and professional relationships
in the days to come.
Megan says it best when she
describes the MegaNT’s value to her
business and personal life: “The busi-
ness connections are great, but it’s the
personal relationships that keep me
coming back and telling other busi-
ness owners about CAGLCC. When I
opened my office several years ago, I
tapped several members of CAGLCC to
help me with everything from website
design to stationery. The MegaNT is
like a one-night microcosm of my entire
CAGLCC experience.”
So, now the word is out. You should
attend the MegaNT, and you should
expect a relaxed atmosphere where
you’ll meet new clients, old clients, new
friends, old friends, and the guy who
used to walk your dog. Get there early,
because the event will be shoulder-
to-shoulder people (expect a line like
people are waiting to see Madonna)
within minutes of the doors opening.
The CAGLCC MegaNT is Wednesday,
March 14, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Town
Danceboutique, 2009 8th St. NW. Pre-
register at meganetworkingdc.com.
The Chamber means business. For more
information about the Chamber, go to
caglcc.org. l
15
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G
B
T
Business
Chamber
Connections
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
16
Leather-soled boots, long pants recommended.
Details/RSVP: Patrick, 202-352-2356,
trail@asgra.org.
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes Bull Run
Mountain near Haymarket, Va. Bring beverages,
lunch, “a few dollars” for fees. Carpool 10 a.m.,
East Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride lot. Craig,
202-462-0535. adventuring.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BETHEL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 202-248-1895, betheldc.org.
FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets
for worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW,
Quaker House Living Room (next to Meeting
House on Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special wel-
come to lesbians and gays. Handicapped acces-
sible from Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance.
quakersdc.org.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130
Old Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
WASHINGTON, D.C. services at 9 a.m. (ASL
interpreted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School
at 11 a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. 202-638-7373,
churchoffice@mccdc.com, mccdc.com.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclu-
sive church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel
worship, 8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11
a.m. 5 Thomas Circle NW. 202-232-0323,
nationalcitycc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.,
and in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW.
202-232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring. uucss.org.
MONDAY, MARCH 5
The DC Center hosts its monthly VOLUNTEER
NIGHT. Assemble FUK!T safer-sex kits and pitch
in with light cleaning. 7-9 p.m. 1318 U St. NW.
202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
Mautner Project and The DC Center offer
SMOKELESS LGBT DC, one-night smoking
cessation class. 6:30 p.m. Mautner Project, 1875
Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 710. RSVP: Riana,
202-332-5536, rbuford@mautnerproject.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
THE DC DIFFERENT DRUMMERS Capitol Pride
Symphonic Band rehearses 7-9:30 p.m., Reforma-
tion Lutheran Church, on Capitol Hill. Contact
membership@dcdd.org.
GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
SATURDAY, MARCH 3
GLOE’S 5TH ANNUAL QUEER PURIM PARTY
includes special appearance by the DC Cowboys.
Open bar and food. Costumes encouraged. $20
advance, $30 at the door. 202-518-9400, dcjcc.org.
LGBT DOGGY STYLE: DC, social group for
LGBT dog owners, walk Capital Crescent Trail. 1
p.m. For details, doggystyledc.com.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer organiza-
tion helps at Food & Friends in D.C., at Lost Dog
& Cat Foundation at Falls Church PetSmart, and
at SLDN’s 20th annual national dinner.
burgundycrescent.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of
the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning
Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush
luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For loca-
tion/time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk;
or 10 a.m. for fun run. info@dcfrontrunners.org or
dcfrontrunners.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass
for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30
p.m., Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Semi-
nary Road, Alexandria. All welcome. 703-912-
1662, dignitynova@gmail.com.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Tur-
key Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan
Ave. NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or
straight. teamdcbasketball.org.
SUNDAY, MARCH 4
ATLANTIC STATES GAY RODEO ASSOCIA-
TION offers its monhtly trail ride. Piscataway
Stables, Clinton, Md. $25. 11 a.m. Space limited.
THURSDAY, MARCH 1
The TRANSMEN DISCUSSION GROUP kicks
off today, with first Thursday meetings to follow.
7 p.m. The DC Center, 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-
2245, transment@thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit
andromedahealthcenter.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia
social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in
Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor
bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. Email info@dullestri-
angles.com or visit dullestriangles.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV test-
ing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and
in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or
Takoma Park at 301-422-2398.
WASHINGTON RENEGADES RUGBY FOOT-
BALL CLUB practice, 6:45-9 p.m. Cardozo High
School outdoor field, Florida Avenue & 13th Street
NW. 6:45-9 p.m. dcrugby.com.
FRIDAY, MARCH 2
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedahealthcenter.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30
p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529
16th St. NW. betmish.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social atmo-
sphere for GLBT and questioning youth, featur-
ing dance parties, movie nights and game nights.
Leandrea.Gilliam@smyal.org.
TRANSGENDER HEALTH EMPOWERMENT
“Diva Chat” support group. 6-8 p.m., 1414 North
Capitol St. NE. Snacks provided. 202-636-1646.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the
gay community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities.
Event information should be sent by e-mail to calendar@metroweek-
ly.com; by fax to 202-638-6831; or by mail to Metro Weekly, Attn:
Community Calendar, 1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209, Washington, D.C.
20005. Deadline for inclusion is noon on the Friday before publication.
“Announcement” submissions that are not date-specific may run for two
weeks, with the option for listing organizations to resubmit if appropriate.
Questions about the calendar can be directed to the Metro Weekly office
at 202-638-6830.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
17 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
ADVERTISEMENT
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment, for youth 21 and younger. Youth Cen-
ter, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
HIVprevention@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a black gay men’s evening
affinity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van
Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swim-
ming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504;
secretary@wetskins.org; or wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT
GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7
p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
TUESDAY, MARCH 6
GLOE presents NURTURING YOUR SOUL to
enhance greater inner quiet and healing. Tickets
$18, $15 discounted. 7:30 p.m. DCJCC, 1529 16th St.
NW. 202-518-9400, washingtondcjcc.org/gloe.
REBELS WITH A CAUSE: RELIGIOUS LEADER-
SHIP AND GENDER panel discussion with Imam
Daayiee Abdullah, Rabbi Cotzin Burg and Rev. Jane
Spahr. 3:30-5 p.m. Free, all welcome. Towson Uni-
versity, University Union, Potomac Lounge. events.
towson.edu.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly happy hour, with
dinner afterward, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Cobalt/30
Degrees Lounge, 1639 R St. NW. afwashington.net.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment for youth 21 and younger. Youth Cen-
ter, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
hivprevention@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7
WEEKLY EVENTS
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
CAREER DEVELOPMENT is offered at The DC
Center, 1318 U St. NW. 3 p.m. Advance registra-
tion required. 202-682-2245, careerdevelopment@
thedccenter.org.
18 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 p.m. swimdcac.org.
DC SWING! rehearses 7-9:30 p.m., at Reformation
Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill. Contact
membership@dcdd.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave. Walk-ins
2-7 p.m. For appointments other hours, call Gaith-
ersburg at 301-300-9978.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
at 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid”
HIV testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Call
703-823-4401 for details.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454.
SMYAL’S LGBTQ Youth Arts Program, for youth
13-21, meets 5-7 p.m., Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE.
Stephanie Remick at 202-567-3163 or
stephanie.remick@smyal.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment, for youth 21 and younger. Youth Cen-
ter, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or hivprevention@
smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts “A Positive U” support
group for black gay men living with HIV/AIDS, 7-9
p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m., Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van
Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swim-
ming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504
or secretary@wetskins.org. wetskins.org.
THURSDAY, MARCH 8
DC STROKES ROWING CLUB hold a spring rush
event showcasing programs for both experienced
and novice rowers. 6-9 p.m. Nellie’s Sports Bar, 900
U St. NW. dcsrc.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer organiza-
tion, helps Food & Friends. burgundycrescent.org. l
19 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
20 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
21 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
Glamour, Glitter
and Gold - The DC
Center’s Oscar Party
Sunday, February 26
Town
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scene
22 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
23
WHETHER YOU
breathed a sigh of
relief Tuesday night
when Rick Santo-
rum lost in Michi-
gan or a sigh of dis-
appointment that
he didn’t take out
Mitt Romney, it’s
pretty clear we’re
going to have Tricky Rick to kick around
for a while longer. So it’s fair enough to
still be wondering how on earth college
aspirations become a front in 2012’s rap-
idly metastasizing culture wars.
College attendance was a rare occur-
rence among my elders where I was
raised in rural Kentucky. My great aunt
went to college and became a teacher.
My dad had a little bit before leav-
ing to work in auto repair, then get-
ting drafted. My mom went to college
while I was in elementary and middle
school, giving me access to psychology
and sociology textbooks that taught me
some pretty interesting tidbits about
human sexuality.
But while college was a rarity among
my family’s older generations, for my
generation it quickly became an expec-
tation. I would sit as a sixth grader look-
ing through my mom’s college course
catalog, excitedly picking all the classes
I wanted to take — at the time I couldn’t
decide if I wanted to major in astrono-
my, archeology, biology or journalism. I
wanted to take them all.
My two older cousins up the road,
my sister and I all went to college.
Many of my cousins in the rural Indi-
ana branches of my family went as well.
And it didn’t turn all of us into raging
liberals. Even in my case, it wasn’t an
effete liberal faculty that turned me
far more liberal than I had been — it
was the Paleolithic, homophobic, radi-
cal right-wing antics of the majority
Republican student body that took care
of that.
But the greater point being, we all
turned out different. One of my neigh-
boring cousins and my sister have both
turned out more conservative than
me; my other cousin I suspect may be
even more liberal than me. If being
gay hadn’t put me through a radical-
ly different experience, hell, I might
have ended up as one of those College
Republicans. A college education isn’t
a deterministic ideological experience,
as a cursory glance at all the MBAs
and law degrees attached to Republican
presidential candidates proves.
My rural generation went to college
because our parents wanted us to have
better opportunities, the great upward
mobility dream, not because they want-
ed us to be snobs. It floors me that San-
torum would make an argument against
that dream by saying, essentially, “You
don’t all need a fancy degree. Somebody
has to clean the toilets.”
I’m at a loss how to translate that
into soaring campaign rhetoric. Per-
haps someone else on K Street has the
skills.
But it seems especially odd to me
that Santorum, a former senator from
an intensely blue-collar and massively
rural state, would be unaware that some
people who work with their hands go
to college to do it better. My cousin’s a
farmer; his oldest son is a farmer. Both
went to college. Neither is a Foucault-
trained Marxist out to subvert the sys-
tem with collectivist farming strategies.
I’m not better than anyone else
because I went to college. But I am a
better person because I went to college
and learned how to best use my own
skills and talents. Santorum’s reverse-
elitism is an insult to everyone who
wants to pursue their own American
dream, whether that dream includes
college or not.
And given the drawn-out slog of
the Santorum campaign, its just one of
many insults still to come. l
Higher Dread
Not content to grouse about gays, Santorum
expands the culture wars to include highfalutin
college educations
MARCH 1, 2012
VOLUME 18 / ISSUE 44
PUBLISHERS
Sean Bugg, Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGING EDITOR
Will O’Bryan
SENIOR POLITICAL EDITOR
Chris Geidner
STAFF WRITER
John Riley
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER
Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
Dylan Comstock, Brian Walker
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Chris Heller, Carrie Megginson, Jonathan Padget,
Troy Petenbrink, Richard Rosendall,
Doug Rule, Daniel Villarreal, Kate Wingfield
WEBMASTER
David Uy
MULTIMEDIA
Aram Vartian
ADMINISTRATIVE / PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Julian Vankim
ADVERTISING & SALES
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Randy Shulman
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Dylan Comstock
NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Rivendell Media Co.
212-242-6863
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Dennis Havrilla
PATRON SAINT
Mr. Sheffield
COVER PHOTOGRAPHY
Courtesy TV Land
METRO WEEKLY
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Washington, DC 20005
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www.metroweekly.com
All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be
reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publishers. Metro Weekly assumes no
responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject
to editing and will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Metro Weekly is supported by many fine advertisers, but we cannot accept responsibility for claims
made by advertisers, nor can we accept responsibility for materials provided by advertisers or
their agents. Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization in articles or
advertising in Metro Weekly is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of
such person or organization.
© 2012 Jansi LLC.
LGBTOpinion
by Sean Bugg
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
THE DIRTY SECRET
about bullying is that
it is more popular
than most of us care
to admit. Many adults
believe that a bully-
ing victim must learn
to fight back, and do
not intervene. There
is also the group dynamic in which bul-
lying, at least for a time, wins applause. A
bully succeeds because others go along.
Gov. Chris Christie has built a politi-
cal career on lines like, “I will go Jersey
on you people,” presenting rudeness and
bullying as straight-talking leadership.
He must have thought he had won the
day on MSNBC’s Morning Joe on Feb.
23 when he was challenged by the polite,
Christie exploits the fact that many
gay advocates agree with him on Obama.
We have allowed our frustration with
the president’s “evolving” to blind us
to how much better he is than Christie.
Obama in 2008 called Prop. 8 “divisive
and discriminatory,” and said the same in
2009 about ballot measures in Maine and
Washington state. Television, however,
is a medium where facts can be knocked
aside by hard elbows and mockery. But as
with firefighters using a firebreak, a rhe-
torical fire can burn itself out and over-
heated patriots be exposed as scoundrels.
After acknowledging that Democrats
had said a civil rights issue should not
be on the ballot, Christie changed the
subject by saying that Democrats claimed
New Jerseyans want marriage equality,
and he is giving them a chance to prove it.
But that ignores the question of whether
civil rights should be on the ballot at all.
Morning Joe co-host Joe Scarborough
asked the loaded question, “Would you
compare the status of a relationship and
how it is recognized officially by a state
to little children being blown up in Bir-
mingham?” In other words, if you haven’t
faced lynch mobs, you’re not entitled to
equal protection of the law. This absurd
standard too often goes unchallenged.
Capehart calmly answered “Yes”
to the civil rights comparison: “It’s an
issue of equality. It’s an issue of equal
treatment under the law. It’s an issue of
whether, if I were to get married to my
partner and we were to have children,
my children would have the same pro-
tections that your children have because
you’re able to legally marry.”
It shows how far we have come that a
mainstream, Pulitzer-winning journalist
could challenge Christie’s lies from his
own perspective as a black gay man. That
Capehart did so with poise and persis-
tence was an admirable service, not only
to gay families, but to civility in public
discourse.
Yes, the president needs to finish
evolving. But recognizing that Obama
is better on marriage than a governor
pushing a marriage referendum is in our
self-interest. In the struggles ahead, we
cannot afford to treat imperfect allies as
enemies.
Jonathan Capehart may not have
won the testosterone match against Gov.
Christie, but he was right. Bravo to him
for standing up to a bully.
Richard J. Rosendall can be reached at
rrosendall@starpower.net. l
bespectacled Jonathan Capehart of The
Washington Post.
The elegantly dressed Capehart is not
imposing but fought above his weight
that day. Christie was defending his veto
of New Jersey’s marriage-equality bill:
“My feet are firmly planted right next
to President Obama.” He claimed that
his stance opposing marriage equality
while supporting civil unions is identi-
cal to Obama’s, and that Obama is better
treated only because he is a Democrat.
Capehart pointed out that, unlike
Christie, Obama (1) has opposed anti-
gay ballot initiatives; (2) praised New
York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s leadership
on that state’s marriage-equality bill; and
(3) declared the Defense of Marriage Act
unconstitutional and refused to defend it
in court. Christie repeatedly interrupted
Capehart, said, “I’m not going to be cross-
examined by you,” and accused Obama of
cowardice. Capehart did not back down.
24
LGBTOpinion
Capehart vs. Christie
Persuasive poise should trump bombastic bullying
by Richard J. Rosendall
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
marketplace - professional services
25 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
26 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
F
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INTERVIEW BY RANDY SHULMAN
PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY TV LAND
I
N JANUARY OF 1985, INTRUDERS BROKE INTO
the Los Angeles home of Fran Drescher and Peter
Marc Jacobson. Drescher was raped, while Jacob-
son, held at gunpoint, was forced to watch.
“It was a traumatic experience,” says Jacobson,
softly. “Thank God we lived through it, that nobody
was killed. But after that, we were both in not great
shape and went into therapy.”
That’s when things slowly started changing, specifically for
Jacobson. “In therapy, everything came out in my head that was
bothering me,” he says.
And what was bothering him, it turns out, was a long-dormant
attraction to men.
Some years later, Jacobson informed his wife – and business
partner (the two produced Drescher’s hit series The Nanny for CBS)
– that he was bisexual.
“I wasn’t looking to be with a man,” Jacobson recalls. “I just
wanted to let her know what was going on in my head. We went
on with our marriage. But when you keep burying something,
eventually it comes up in ways that are destructive, such as being
controlling.
“What killed our marriage was that I wasn’t at peace with
myself.”
When The Nanny ended its successful seven-year run in 1999,
Jacobson, already separated from Drescher, moved to New York.
The couple eventually divorced.
In 2000, Drescher fought a battle with cancer – and ultimately
won – but a horrific experience with the medical community fired
up her inner-activist. A resulting book about her experience, Can-
F
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28
cer Schmancer, was on the New York Times bestseller list for
months.
“When I started writing Cancer Schmancer,” says Dre-
scher, “I felt very betrayed by the medical community and I
was quite bitter. I had to write four drafts of the book before
I really struck the funny bone and found my voice. With each
draft, I emotionally began to heal.”
In 2007, Drescher officially launched the Cancer Schman-
cer Movement (cancerschmancer.org), a nonprofit organi-
zation dedicated to ensuring people, particularly women,
are diagnosed while the disease is still in its earliest, most
potentially curable stage. Her fervent activism on behalf of
prevention and early cures have defined, in part, Drescher’s
recent life.
Even more recently, life came full circle for both Drescher
and Jacobson, who joined forces to produce a show for TV
Land, which, a few years ago, entered the realm of creat-
ing original, old-style sitcoms that trade on nostalgia while
deploying a modern sensibility. The network’s biggest hit,
Hot in Cleveland, is a sterling example of the format when it
fires on all pistons.
“TV Land has a very good strategy,” says Drescher. “They
built the network with an audience that loves sitcoms and
were willing to tune in to watch repeats. And then decided
to leverage it and start building a new franchise with current
programming that later can be syndicated.”
“Fran had a meeting with TV Land to pitch some ideas for
some shows,” recalls Jacobson. “They said, ‘If there’s some-
thing you were to do what would it be?’ And she said, ‘Oh,
that would be about me and my ex-husband who is now gay.’
And then she started to pitch other ideas and they said, ‘Don’t
bother, because we just bought that one.’”
The resulting sitcom, Happily Divorced, starting its second
season Wednesday, March 7, stars Drescher as Fran Lovett
and the superlative John Michael Higgins as her recently
out ex-husband, Peter. On the show, the characters remain
friendly and supportive of each other, all the while intruding
on the other’s personal life for maximum comedic irritation.
Drescher is beyond thankful that Higgins, a straight actor
known for his work within the Christopher Guest improv
ensemble, accepted the role.
“John really wasn’t interested in playing gay parts, until
this part came along,” she says. “The idea of playing a man
that, at 45, comes out and has lived his whole life up until then
as a straight man, and is just learning how to integrate into the
gay community, was fascinating to him.”
“The whole journey of Peter is that he comes out in his
40s,” adds Jacobson. “When I came out and went into a gay
bar, I didn’t know everything. Somebody called me ‘Daddy’
and I said, ‘Wha-?’ And a friend said, ‘That was a good thing,
don’t worry.’ I had to learn it all.
“[The character of] Peter is totally oblivious and uncom-
fortable and he’s figuring it out. The first season, he dressed
a little more nerdy and stuff because he wasn’t exposed to it
yet. He’d never been into a gay bar. And now he’s beginning
to pick up all the things that a lot of gay men do who live in
West Hollywood.”
Last season’s Happily Divorced featured several familiar
guest stars, including an uproarious, sexually charged turn
from Drescher’s former Nanny co-star Charles Shaughnessy.
This season, Jacobson hints, will have its own share of special
guests, including an appearance by Morgan Fairchild on the
season premiere.
He also reveals, a trace of mischievous glee in his voice,
that “in the first show, the last scene we have a little exposure
of Fran than has never been seen on television before. That’s
all I will say. And you’re the first person that knows this –
because we literally got the clearance for it 10 minutes ago
from ‘Standards and Practices.”
“I love working TV Land,” croons Drescher. “I feel very
blessed in this economy to be able to keep working in the craft
that I love, and inviting people into the Lovett home every
week. And hopefully at the same time exposing people to
opening their minds and hearts to the normalcy of being gay.”
METRO WEEKLY: Let’s start with your life growing up in Flush-
ing, N.Y.
FRAN DRESCHER: I grew up in a middle class, provincial part
of Queens in the ’60s and ’70s. I had two loving parents, and
I have one older sister. I always wanted to be in show busi-
ness. I always had aspirations to live a life bigger than the
one I knew. I liked things I saw in the movies and on TV and
aspired to attain those things and realize my creative talent.
And I think I was like I am now: sometimes funny, always
intelligent and ambitious.
MW: The first time I encountered you was in the movie This Is
Spinal Tap, where you unforgettably portrayed publicist Bobbi
Flekman. When The Nanny emerged in the ’90s, I watched it
religiously. It was one of the
first times I’d ever felt such
a powerful connection with a
Jewish character on television.
DRESCHER: TV is such a fast
medium that when you’re
writing, executive producing
and starring in a show, the
closer you can play a charac-
ter to yourself – or something
that you’re extremely famil-
iar with – the more rich the
character’s going to be, and
the less of a broad stroke its
characterization is. When we
were still writing the pilot
script for The Nanny, the net-
work wanted the character
to be Italian. And I said, “We
can’t write that. We don’t
know that, it’s gonna come
out too broad. It’s not going
to have the specificity and
richness of detail that I can
bring to the show if Fran is
Jewish.” I really dug my heels
in on that, even though this
was a big break and I needed
the break. But I wasn’t gonna
do it wrong.
MW: The show worked well
because you stayed honest to
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
About two-thirds
of the way through
the marriage, he told
me he thought he
was bisexual,
but that he’d never
acted on it. Two years
after we divorced,
he came out to me.
HE DIDN’T EVEN SAY
HE WAS GAY.
HE JUST SAID
‘I STARTED
DATING MEN.’


29
who you were. You created an identi-
fiable bond with the audience.
DRESCHER: A lot of people bonded
with the character [of Fran Fine].
In fact, it was very surprising to the
network, especially, that the show
was so lovingly embraced by the Sun
Belt, the Midwest and throughout
the world – including very unlikely
places like Saudi Arabia and Egypt
and Jordan and the Emirates repub-
lic – so much so that the Knesset in
Israel honored me for transcending
political borders with humor as a
strong Jewish character.
MW: Why do you think that hap-
pened?
DRESCHER: Different places, differ-
ent cultures, different reasons. But I
think everybody understands work-
ing class versus aristocracy.
MW: There was also a lot of warmth
and love conveyed in that show.
DRESCHER: I like doing shows about
love. And the global message in Hap-
pily Divorced is love as well.
MW: Happily Divorced is based on
your life.
DRESCHER: It’s certainly inspired by
my life.
MW: You and Peter were married for
how long?
DRESCHER: We got married in ’78,
and got divorced in ’99.
MW: How did he come out to you?
DRESCHER: About two-thirds of the
way through the marriage, he told
me he thought he was bisexual, but
that he’d never acted on it. He felt
that he had an attraction to men, but he wanted to live his life
with me. He loved me and he loved our life. I eventually left
because I felt very suffocated in the marriage and unhappy.
Two years after we divorced, he came out to me. He didn’t
even say he was gay. He just said, “I started dating men.”
MW: How did that feel?
DRESCHER: Relief, because I’d felt guilty that I left him. He
didn’t want the marriage to end. He was very upset and felt
very abandoned and alone, and was very angry with me. When
[The Nanny] ended, he moved to New York – he couldn’t get
far enough away from me. So I felt very guilty. I was already
in love with a man 16 years my junior, living my life.
Then I got diagnosed with cancer and our manager – we
have the same manager – called him. As soon as she told him,
he burst into tears, and in that moment all of his anger melted
away. All that was left was the love, and he wanted to come
and be by my side, but I already had somebody and I wanted
to be with that person.
But we began to rebuild our friendship and to try to rein-
vent ourselves. And in the 13 years since the divorce, we’ve
managed to completely find each other as best friends and
soul mates again.
MW: Has Happily Divorced been cathartic for the two of you?
DRESCHER: In ways you might not expect. We miss the house
we used to live in together, so we sort of copied that for the
house that the couple lives in. We get to see each other every
day and be creative together and revisit our relationship and
reflect back on the way we were. So I think it is cathartic.
Being creative and writing about what you know, especially if
it’s something that is inspired by your own personal experi-
ence, is really a wonderful, wonderful ride to take. It’s illumi-
nating. We’re really loving it.
MW: In all those years, how did you not sense that perhaps you
were with a man who might be gay?
DRESCHER: Here’s the thing: We met when we were 16. We
didn’t have a lot of experience. We loved each other. We had
a great friendship. We made each other laugh and we had an
active sex life. And he was in show business, he was an actor,
he was musically inclined and the metrosexual was in vogue.
So I guess you see what you want to see.
MW: Looking back over that part of your life, do you have any
regret?
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
Drescher with John Michael Higgins in Happily Divorced
30
DRESCHER: Regret about what?
MW: Well, for instance, when you’re with somebody for so long
and then it ends, for whatever the reason, do you have any
regret that it continued for as long as it did?
DRESCHER: I think I might have felt that way at one point early
on. You know, when did he figure this out? Was it walking
down the aisle marrying me and thinking he was gay? But I
think it’s unhealthy to look back with any regret. Still, some-
thing that we’ve explored comedically in the series is that
Fran blames Peter for robbing her of her youth. Now here she
is middle-aged out in the meat market.
MW: In 2000, you learned you had uterine cancer. But you
were misdiagnosed for years before they even arrived at that
diagnosis.
DRESCHER: I was on a two-year, eight-doctor odyssey in search
of a proper diagnosis. Everywhere I turned, somebody had
something else to say, but nobody knew I had uterine can-
cer. And by the grace of God, even after all that time, I was
still in stage one, which is the most curable stage for cancer.
A radical hysterectomy
cured me with no post-op
treatment, only follow-up
doctor visits.
MW: Your experience
caused you to lose faith in
the medical community.
DRESCHER: Most definite-
ly. And it caused me to
become a medical con-
sumer, and start a wom-
en’s health movement,
and become empowered
to take control of my body,
and understand that doc-
tors are not gods. When
the doctor calls and tells
you, “You have cancer,”
at the end of the day he
goes home and eats din-
ner with his family, while
you go home and eat your
heart out with yours.
It’s really important
to not put your head in
the sand and be an ostrich
when you feel those
early warning whispers,
because it could be can-
cer when you feel some-
thing happening. And you
wanna capture it at its ear-
liest onset when it’s most
curable. If everybody was
diagnosed in stage one,
95 percent of the people
would live. The reason
why we lose loved ones
to cancer is almost always
because of late-stage diag-
nostics, which is uncon-
scionable in this time that we live in. But because people are
fear-driven and they don’t wanna know if something’s wrong
with them, because doctors are bludgeoned by big business
health insurance to go the least expensive route of diagnostic
testing, because we have a nation where so many people are
uninsured or under-insured, it creates a very dangerous cock-
tail. And this is what I’m trying to change with the Cancer
Schmancer Movement.
MW: Many of our readers are lesbians – and lesbians sometimes
deal with cancer issues differently.
DRESCHER: I speak out to the lesbian community all the time,
because they actually are not as good about taking care of
their female reproductive organs or breasts, as a general rule.
That needs to change. Being a lesbian does not preclude you
from dealing with women’s health issues.
MW: How do we turn that around?
DRESCHER: Well, I think it’s consciousness-raising. You know,
“Each one teach one.”
MW: Currently, there’s controversy swirling around the Susan
G. Komen Foundation. Any thoughts on that?
DRESCHER: There are many, many organizations out there that
people can support. Komen is one of them. They were a pio-
neer in raising breast cancer awareness and galvanizing and
taking breast cancer out of the closet, where you don’t have
to speak about it in hushed tones, and getting Capitol Hill to
get the conversation going. So I think that they’ve earned a
place in our society.
However, Cancer Schmancer is a very lean, mean orga-
nization that is not really rich at all. And I used to be jealous
that we didn’t have the kind of money that Komen has – not
even close. But now I see that we can maneuver more nimbly
because we’re not such a big bureaucracy. And we can get
things done more effectively at the scale that we’re at – with a
celebrity at the helm. And so I think that to everything there
is a purpose under heaven.
MW: What do you think of “Obamacare”?
DRESCHER: I’m very happy that it got passed because now it
exists. It’s not a perfect document, but what is? Like our Con-
stitution, which is always, as you know, having amendments
added to it, so will this. But you gotta start. You can’t begin
with a perfect document. You do the best you can, you get it
on the books, and then you let the people and Congress keep
improving it. Even though three-quarters of the stuff hasn’t
even been implemented yet, I already see a change in attitude
from big business health insurance who are becoming more
prevention-oriented, which is so important.
All the nations that provide health care for their citizens
are much, much more prevention-oriented than we are and
this is something we have to start changing. We are transfixed
on closing the barn door after the horse escapes, trying to find
a cure for the sickness, because big business pharma stands to
make money off of sick people promising them that you can
live longer sick. But where’s the cure?
One out of two men and one out of three women will get
cancer in their lifetime – and that’s too much. We’re on a
slippery slope towards our own demise. One out of two men!
That’s crazy. The children of today for the first time in U.S.
history are predicted to not live as long as their parents lived.
And the babies are already being born pre-polluted with 200
to 300 chemicals in the mother’s umbilical cord. American
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM


I live in this
great nation. If I
get robbed, I want
a policeman to
come help me.
And if my house
goes on fire, I want
a fireman to come
put it out.
AND IF I GET SICK
I WANT A DOCTOR
TO CURE ME.
THAT’S OUR RIGHT
AS AMERICAN
CITIZENS.
31 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
32
women’s breast milk has the highest amount of flame retar-
dant in it from any women on the planet. So we are right now
functioning like a virus on this planet. We are just destroying
everything in our path that actually supports life until we’re
going to kill ourselves. That’s what we’re doing.
MW: The Republicans seem determined to dismantle Obam-
acare, to do away with it completely.
DRESCHER: They want to do away with Obama. The parties
are so biased that they’re completely unwilling to give kudos
where deserved. They’re going to make everything he’s
accomplished seem evil.
I live in this great nation. If I get robbed, I want a police-
man to come and help me. And if I get in trouble, I want an
attorney to come and help me. And if my house goes on fire,
I want a fireman to come and put it out. And if somebody
attacks my country, I want a soldier to protect me. And if I
have a kid, I want that kid
to be educated, not illit-
erate. And if I get sick I
want a doctor to cure me. I
think that that’s our right
as American citizens.
This all costs money.
Everything costs money.
And the very people that
are dishing Obama – who’s
actually stuck his chin
out against Wall Street,
against the banks, all these
people who have proved
to be greed mongers – he
may have lost a lot of sup-
port from those people. I
don’t think he’s lost sup-
port from the everyman,
the working bloke, but
when you look at the ben-
efits that the politicians
who are trying to revoke
Obamacare have – paid
by the citizens – it’s such
a hypocrisy. And unfor-
tunately the people that
they are driving fear into
may not have the politi-
cal savvy to question those
obvious hypocrisies.
MW: You were a big Hill-
ary Clinton supporter lead-
ing up to the 2008 cam-
paign. So I’m curious: Are
you happy with the job
Obama’s done?
DRESCHER: I am happy
with the job he’s done. I
think he’s done a yeoman’s
job. He came into a nation
that was at the depths of
despair, and it got worse
before it got better. A lot
of people think that the money that was spent to try and
resolve the financial crisis put us deeper into debt, but I think
what they don’t really realize is that very, very smart financial
analysts looked very long and hard at what was done wrong
during the crash of ’29, when we experienced bread lines
everywhere and much higher unemployment. And they made
a bold move. As a result, more businesses didn’t go belly up,
more people didn’t become unemployed.
It’s not to say we’re not struggling. But at the end of the
day, I think that the hard decisions that he’s made were the
correct ones. Even though, you know, sometimes choices are
just “What’s the lesser of two evils?” or, “How do we do the
best damage control? We’re not going to fix the problem over-
night.” I think that that’s how they approached the problem,
and I think they did a good job.
MW: You should run for office.
DRESCHER: I’ve been told that many times. And I think that it
is on the horizon, but right now I feel like I have the forum to
speak publicly without being thrown to the wolves.
MW: It would be fun to say “President Drescher.”
DRESCHER: [Laughs.] Oh, well, yes it would!
MW: You’d be the first Jewish president.
DRESCHER: Not to mention woman.
MW: Plus you could re-marry Peter, and we’d have a gay first
husband. Speaking of marriage, one of the things you are about
to do is to marry several gay couples in New York on March 6.
DRESCHER: Yes, I’m officiating three gay weddings.
MW: So what does the idea of gay marriage mean to you, per-
sonally?
DRESCHER: It’s an opportunity for the nation to grow and
further realize the American dream to mature, and raise con-
sciousness by continuing to strive to live up to the promise of
liberty and justice for all. It’s a civil liberty issue. And I think
it’s important for that reason. You know, we’re always trying
to mature, and I think that this is an opportunity to do so. I
think that we are at our best as a nation when we can inspire
the world like the beacon of freedom that we are. That means
that we have to continue to uphold that standard and keep
demanding more of ourselves. I think that that’s what makes
this nation great and so important to the world.
MW: Do you think that, overall, the country will come around
on the subject?
DRESCHER: Absolutely no question. The majority of people
under a certain age see nothing wrong with [marriage equal-
ity], so it’s a generational thing that is going to ultimately
fade out. But hopefully, more and more people and states will
come to realize that love is love, and everybody has a right
to live an authentic life. Everybody has a right to marry the
person that they love in a traditional way.
MW: And what about you? Are you still involved?
DRESCHER: I recently broke up, and now I’m single. So if you
know somebody, they have to have the “Five S’s” – sexy, suc-
cessful, smart, single. And straight!
The second season of Happily Divorced premieres Wednesday,
March 7, at 10:30 p.m. (EST) on TV Land. Check your local
satellite and cable listings.
Learn more about the Cancer Schmancer Movement at cancer-
schmancer.org. l
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM


Understand
that doctors
are not gods.
When the doctor calls
and tells you,
‘You have cancer,’
at the end of the day
he goes home and
eats dinner with
his family,
WHILE YOU
GO HOME AND
EAT YOUR HEART OUT
WITH YOURS.
33 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
34 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
35 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
THE PRIDE OF
THOMAS ROBERTS
THE OUT – AND ENGAGING (AND ENGAGED) – MSNBC NEWS ANCHOR
WILL BE IN THE DISTRICT THIS WEEKEND TO HELP SLDN CELEBRATE
ITS

20TH ANNUAL NATIONAL DINNER
INTERVIEW BY CHRIS GEIDNER
PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL YOUNG
N
EARLY SIX YEARS AGO, MSNBC’S
Thomas Roberts told attendees at the
National Lesbian and Gay Journalists
Association that he was gay. It was, he
says, something his friends, family and
co-workers already knew.
But it was still a rarity then for a tele-
vision anchor or news show host, even
locally, to be out.
Less than five years later, though, Roberts – who worked for
CNN when he publicly came out – already was getting used to his
seat at MSNBC, where he hosts the 11 a.m. weekday hour on the
cable news network.
This weekend, the Maryland native will be in the District, serv-
ing as the emcee for Servicemembers Legal Defense Network’s
20th annual national dinner on Saturday, March 3.
SLDN Exective Director Aubrey Sarvis, for whom this will be
his last dinner at the helm of the organization, tells Metro Weekly
36
that, “Thomas has been a force in the coverage of LGBT mili-
tary servicemembers.”
In light of the end of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” this past Sep-
tember, Sarvis notes, this is the first year when lesbian, gay
and bisexual active servicemembers will be able to attend the
dinner, be out and not face fear of reprisal.
Saying they are “honored” to have Roberts as their emcee,
Sarvis says, “He is an outstanding journalist who brought a
great deal of professionalism and integrity to his coverage of
the repeal debate.”
Metro Weekly talked with Roberts Feb. 24, after he had
come into the office on his day off to shoot a cameo scene for
a summer movie release – and one day after the Maryland
Legislature passed marriage-equality legislation.
METRO WEEKLY: When were you approached about emceeing
this year’s SLDN dinner?
THOMAS ROBERTS: They approached me a couple of months
ago and I jumped on the opportunity right away. My dad
served in the Army. I was paid for by Army
health insurance so I only cost my parents
25 bucks. They love to tell that story: I was
a cheap baby.
MW: From the perspective of somebody who
has been out publicly now for nearly six
years, how do you see the changes that are
happening from the military to marriage
and so on?
ROBERTS: I think they’re fantastic. I was
actually in Maryland yesterday for a speech
for the United Way Emerging Leaders
Conference and it just so happens that last
night marriage equality passed the Senate
in Maryland. I’m from Maryland, I couldn’t
be more proud of Gov. [Martin] O’Malley
and my home state. But I still think that
people, in being honest about who they
are, it’s still a ring of fire for people to walk
through, whether you’re giving commit-
ted service to our country in one of our
branches of service or just in everyday life.
But now I think we see a world that is
opening its arms to a loving and under-
standing embrace. We still have a lot of
work to do. We just need to keep shining a
really bright light on where any inequality
exists and what can be done to change it. And I couldn’t be
more pleased to be invited, to be a part of this.
MW: And that’s part of how you talk about what you do on TV.
ROBERTS: Yes, I couldn’t be happier that I get 60 minutes a
day on MSNBC to add voice to the voiceless in this country.
As a proud member of the LGBT community, I devote a lot of
time and so does my executive producer. We agree on a lot of
these social justice issues – that they need to be discussed and
debated and talked about – and we try to bring as many as we
can in the 60 minutes that we’re granted a day to try to make
that difference.
When you think about the fact that we can lead a show
with a string of youth bullying – where kids are jumping off
bridges or stringing themselves up in their own closets – and
then end the show with the fact that in a state like Maryland
marriage equality passed. When you’re showing that big of a
chasm between what you can lead a show with and how you
can end a show, it’s hard to not make a connection [about] the
big disconnect that exists right now in this country.
So, we take great pride in the fact that we have this 60
minutes a day, and we try to use it in the best and brightest
way that we can to educate, inform and inspire.
MW: One of the questions that people in the LGBT movement
have been faced with recently is whether or not marriage equal-
ity is getting too much coverage and other issues like the fact
that the Employment Non-Discrimination Act is still sitting in
Congress and the fact that for a lot of people those issues, you
already referenced, with bullying, those issues – “Are you physi-
cally safe? Do you have a job?” – are still out there.
ROBERTS: I think they’re all part of the conversation. When we
have states like in Maryland or like we have in Washington
state where we can see the movement of positivity going, it’s
good to be able to report on forward motion.
You do make a great point, though. There is still so much
to be discussed, still so much to be debated. When a group
like One Million Moms – that’s not even a million moms – can
launch an attack against Ellen DeGeneres,
for her to be challenged and try to get her
fired being a spokesperson for an American
brand like J.C. Penney, just shows you how
much more conversation needs to be hap-
pening in this country about those states
where you still can be fired for being LGBT.
It’s a huge conversation that still needs to
be had in this country.
Not to discount anything else with mar-
riage equality or what’s happening with the
full repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and
how that moves the conversation along to
what the federal benefits should be for our
married service members. However, all
these conversations deserve equal footing
in the national conversation.
MW: What times, when you are on the air,
do you feel that who you are is an important
part of the story?
ROBERTS: I’m lucky enough to be invited
into the viewers’ homes on a daily basis.
Do I want to be a stranger in that person’s
home? No. Am I proud of who I am when
I leave this building, as well as who I am
when I’m in this building? Absolutely. And
should the two match up? Absolutely. I
don’t come in here and try to be one thing and leave and go
be someone else. And I don’t mind having people at home
know that. I think that’s important and people respect know-
ing who they’re inviting into their home. And just by doing
so, just by allowing me in their homes, someone that may not
believe in marriage equality or may not think that they know
a gay person or have gay friends, you know, lo and behold,
they do.
I think by me just being who I am and showing up, I think
that that lends honesty to the conversation and I try not to shy
away from that.
MW: Do you think that’s important across the board? I don’t
want to get into any specifics about other people, but do you
think that that’s an issue that other personalities should be
considering?
ROBERTS: Oh, where are you going?
MW: I’m not asking to go person by person. But do you think that
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
“I think
by me just being
who I am
and showing up,
I think that
THAT LENDS
HONESTY
TO THE
CONVERSATION
and I try
not to
shy away
from that.”
37
it’s a responsibility of a person on air or do you think that’s just a
decision that you’ve made?
ROBERTS: It’s easy for me to stand on the other side of having
decided to be publicly out six years later and act self-righteous
about it, but I’m confident that this is the place where I need to
be. I don’t want to cast aspersions or judgment on anybody else.
I’m just glad that I’m where I am. And that, while other people
may choose to stay more off the radar on this, that’s their choice.
Would I personally want to be out there being at the fore-
front of these issues and not having people know who I really
was? No. I like the fact that people know who I am. And if they
don’t, they can Google me real fast and figure it out.
I’m not perfect – by far not perfect – but I’m somebody who’s
waking up every day, I’m finding my own happiness profession-
ally and personally, and I think that the kids in this country who
are struggling need to know that. They need to have people that
they can look at and be like, “You know what, this is achievable,
there is hope.”
MW: So, what’s next for you?
ROBERTS: I’m completely happy with where I am right now and
the opportunity that I get to be a part of this family and this
network and I get to be exactly who I am and I don’t have to
make any apologies for it or hide. I feel such gratitude and am so
privileged to be here. So, whatever comes from me next, as long
as I’m here working with these fantastic people, a part of this
fantastic brand, I will be a happy man.
MW: Speaking of being a happy man, I know that you announced
your engagement to your longtime partner, Patrick Abner, after
New York passed marriage equality.
ROBERTS: Correct.
MW: Are there specific wedding plans and, if so, in what state?
ROBERTS: Well, with Maryland thrown into the mix…. [Laughs.]
We were considering doing it here in New York coming up in
the fall. We’ll celebrate 12 years together in September, and I
don’t like to change my anniversary date because I don’t want
to have to remember anything new, so I’d like to do it on our
anniversary on Sept. 30.
So when it comes to the wedding plans, we were hoping for
something in the fall. Then we ended up buying a condo and we
moved into our condo that weekend [in 2011, following mar-
riage-equality legislation passing in New York that summer],
and so Patrick is like, “You are nuts if you think we’re going to
move the same week and get married the same week and do all
that stuff. We’ll be divorced!”
MW: [Laughs.]
ROBERTS: So we put off doing it. He was absolutely right. He’s
always right. I’m very grandiose. My sister likes to call him the
“string to my balloon” because he keeps me grounded. I get
these big ideas, so he helps to keep me grounded and realistic:
“That’s crazy, we’re not doing that.” So, this fall we’ll be a year
in our place. I think marriage equality in Maryland will not be
happening this year, even when it’s signed into law [and if the
referendum does not succeed in preventing the law from taking
effect]. It’s 2013, right?
MW: Right.
ROBERTS: So, that will give us more time for this engagement
thing to see if it works out. [Laughs.] But, I think almost 12 years
together kind of makes it a done deal that we’re compatible and
we should do this thing.
Thomas Roberts hosts MSNBC Live weekdays, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Eastern time. l
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
MARCH 1 - 8, 2012
SPOTLIGHT
12TH ANNUAL FLAMENCO FESTIVAL
For 12 years, the Flamenco Festival USA and Lis-
ner Auditorium have showcased the best of fla-
menco music and dance from Spain. This year’s
highlights center on performances by some of the
style’s leading female dancers and their companies,
including Carmen Cortés, Rafaela Carrasco, Manu-
ela Carrasco and Olga Pericet, along with special
dinners at the area’s two suburban Jaleo locations,
and an event in which everyday patrons are given
flamenco dance lessons right on stage. The festival
runs until Wednesday, March 7. Lisner Auditorium,
The George Washington University, 730 21st St.
NW. Ticket prices vary. Call 202-994-6800 or visit
lisner.org.
FROM SHUFFLE TO SHOW BOAT
From Shuffle to Show Boat: Prelude to the American
Musical explores how the musical came to be, draw-
ing from vaudeville, operetta, blues and Tin Pan
Alley. KenYatta Rogers directs this cabaret-style
show, written by Sybil Roberts and choreographed
by Angelisa Gillyard. Part of the Intersections: A
New America Arts Festival at the Atlas. Friday,
March 2, at 7 p.m., Saturday, March 3, at 4 p.m., and
Sunday, March 4, at 5 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $37. Call 202-399-
7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
GLOE’S 5TH ANNUAL QUEER PURIM PARTY
The DC JCC’s Kurlander Program for Gay & Les-
bian Outreach and Engagement presents its fifth
annual Mardi Gras-like Purim party, “Masquerade
& Mischief,” with a repeat performance by the soon-
to-retire DC Cowboys, a “Purim schpiel” and music
by DJ jame’ foks. Purim celebrates the Jews who
were spared execution by Persian leader Haman in
biblical times. It calls for dressing up — “especially
drag - of every kind!” — and drinking a lot. Those
in costume enjoy an open bar with beer, wine and
champagne cocktails. There will also be food. Satur-
day, March 3, from 8:30 p.m. to 12 a.m. Washington,
D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW.
Tickets are $20 in advance or $30 at the door. Call
202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org.
HAPPY TOGETHER
As part of its annual Screen Valentines: Great Movie
Romances series, which lasts nearly a month after
the actual holiday, the American Film Institute’s
Silver Theatre offers this valentine to gay life and
love from Chinese director Wong Kar-wai, who won
as Best Director at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival for
his work here. The film focuses on two lovers from
Hong Kong who seek a new, gayer life in Buenos
Aires, where they quickly struggle to transition their
relationship to just friends and roommates. In Man-
darin, Cantonese and Spanish with Engligh subtitles.
Friday, March 2, and Saturday, March 3, at 9:20 p.m.,
Sunday, March 4, at 9 p.m., and Monday, March 5, at
9:40 p.m. AFI Silver Theatre, 8633 Colesville Road,
Silver Spring. Tickets are $11.50 general admission.
Call 301-495-6720 or visit afi.com/Silver.
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Compiled by Doug Rule
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L’Enfant Café offers a “unique” cabaret with drag singer Joey Arias
B
Y NATURE, CABARET IS AN EVENING OF SONG, OF STORIES, OF FUN
in an intimate space, where there’s a direct connection with the audience,”
says Jim Ball of L’Enfant Café. Twice a month, the Adams Morgan restaurant
offers all that, courtesy of singing drag queens. “The Speak Easy: Sunday Supper
Club & Cabaret” stars and is co-produced by probably the best-known singing
drag artist, New York-based Joey Arias. “We said, ‘Let’s get somebody like Joey
Arias,’” says Christopher Lynch, who co-owns L’Enfant Café with Ball. “But only
Joey Arias is like Joey Arias.”
As it happens, Arias was only too eager to revive his cabaret days, telling Lynch
he missed doing shows in small, intimate spaces. Arias has recently performed at
Carnegie Hall, in addition to nationally touring his theatrical stage show with pup-
peteer Basil Twist, Arias With A Twist, which lands at Woolly Mammoth in April.
The next show, set for Sunday, March 11, will feature Paddy Boom, the original
drummer for the Scissor Sisters, serving as the evening’s DJ. Noted jazz bassist
Ben Allison and guitarist Brandon Seabrook will accompany Arias for the eve-
ning’s two shows, one at the end of a three-course dinner, the other over cocktails.
Patrons enter through L’Enfant’s back door for Speak Easy, a nod to its name-
sake private, dimly lit joint of old. The event builds on the French-styled venue’s
annual Bastille Day block party and especially La Boum, its always-booked Sat-
urday “house party” brunch. All attract a mixed gay/straight crowd, and are gay
business partners Ball and Lynch’s way of contributing to “making the gay scene
in D.C. unique and cool.” —Doug Rule
The next Speak Easy shows are Sunday, March 11, at L’Enfant Café, 2000 18th St.
NW. The cost is $50 for the 7 p.m. three-course dinner show or $10 plus
two-drink-minimum for 10:30 p.m. show. Reservations required.
Call 202-319-1800 or visit lenfantcafe.com.
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
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SAMPSON’S INTIMATE EVENING OF COMEDY
Local standup comedian Sampson performs “Live
Love Laugh” along with special guests for a perfor-
mance at the DC Center to benefit the local theater
arts group Brave Soul Collective, which focuses on
identity, sexuality, self-esteem, creating awareness
about HIV/AIDS and encouraging safe sex. Satur-
day, March 10, at 7 p.m. The DC Center for the LGBT
Community, 1318 U St. NW. Call 202-682-2245 or
visit thedccenter.org.
SHAKESPEARE IN KLINGON II:
THE WRATH OF (MICHAEL) KAHN
Victor Shargai of theatreWashington and local
broadcast news celebrity couple Joe Palka and Sue
Palka join the Shakespeare Theatre Company’s
Michael Kahn in a fundraising event for the other
major Shakespeare theater company in town: Arling-
ton’s WSC Avant Bard. The event follows on the
first effort, from 2010, to present famous scenes
from Shakespeare in both English and especially the
made-up Klingon language. Included in the lineup
this time are Delaney Williams (The Wire, Law &
Order: SVU), leading local actress Nanna Ingvarsson
and Forum Theater’s Michael Dove. Shirley Serotsky
will direct Allyson Currin’s original script. Sunday,
March 4, at 8 p.m. Rosslyn Spectrum Theater at
Artisphere, 1611 North Kent St. Arlington. Tickets
start at $85, which also includes two WSC theater
passes for this season. Call 703-418-4808 or visit
wscavantbard.org.
TOM GOSS, POTOMAC FEVER,
THE PUSHOVERS AT INTERSECTIONS
This Friday, March 2, Atlas Performing Arts Center
is offering what it’s billing as a gay night of perfor-
mances as part of its Intersections: A New America
Arts Festival. Festivities kick off at 8 p.m. with a free
concert in the venue’s Kogod Lobby with a concert
by Mara Levi, Nancy Eddy and Liz DeRoche’s smart-
pop group the Pushovers. At 9:30 p.m., folk singer-
songwriter Tom Goss teams up with Potomac Fever,
the a cappella pop ensemble from the Gay Men’s
Chorus of Washington, for a one-of-a-kind concert.
The night concludes at 11 p.m. with an after-party
hosted by DCypher Dance. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $20 for the Goss/
Potomac Fever concert. Call 202-399-7993 or visit
atlasarts.org.
BEST OF SOURCE FESTIVAL’S
10-MINUTE PLAYS
As part of the Intersections: A New America Arts
Festival, the Source Festival offers a chance to see
four of what it considers the best 10-minute plays
written for the festival in its first four years, includ-
ing a wacky one about gay dolphins on the subway.
The festival also offers a sneak preview of a new
10-minute play to come at the 2012 festival. Thurs-
day, March 1, at 7:30 p.m., and Friday, March 2, at
10 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE.
Tickets are $10. Call 202-399-7993 or visit
atlasarts.org.
FILM

ALBERT NOBBS
HHHHH
Albert Nobbs should work. Hell, it already did work
on stage 30 years ago when Glenn Close raked in
Off-Broadway acclaim and first aspired to put the
story on film, so why not again? Close is a brilliant
actress, working with a familiar role in a famil-
iar medium. Shouldn’t that enough to get Nobbs
good? This conceit — women masquerading as men
in 19th-century Ireland — sounds compelling, but
tempts director Rodrigo Garcia with an awful lot of
issues. In 113 minutes, he crams poverty issues, class
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AU theater production engages the community on coming-out issues
W
HEN RUTGERS UNIVERSITY STUDENT TYLER CLEMENTI
killed himself in 2010, Carl Menninger might have been more disturbed
than most. As a gay assistant professor at American University, the details of
Clementi, 18, committing suicide after his roommate secretly recorded him
kissing another male in their dorm room, hit close to home. So when a student
of his own came out and faced some backlash that resulted in depression,
Menninger was moved to do something. As he’s also AU’s director of theatre,
musical theatre and dance, it’s not surprising that the “something” turned out
to be a show: Bare.
“I wasn’t familiar with it till last year,” Menninger says of the gay-
themed musical set at a Catholic boarding school, suggested to him by
a colleague with whom he discussed his depressed student. “The play
has a tragic turn to it, but it ends hopefully. The reaction has been great.
Audiences have been moved.”
In staging Bare, Menninger and a group of students have worked to
produce more than a show. Instead, they’re bringing in groups such as the
gay-Catholic DignityUSA, the Sexual Minority Youth Assistance League
(SMYAL), and the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) to
better engage the community.
Aside from helping students better understand coming-out issues,
Menninger would particularly like to see older LGBT locals at Bare for
them to better grasp that, while things have gotten better, there is still a
long way to go.
“We as the gay community look at the progress that’s been made for young
people coming out. We think things are better — and they are,” he says. “But
some issues we think have been resolved, have not. We’ve started to do our
work and have made huge strides, but students are still challenged.”
–Will O’Bryan
AU Performing Arts presents Bare Friday, March 2, and Saturday, March 3,
at 8 p.m. A panel discussion of the struggles of gay adolescents follows a 2 p.m.
Saturday matinee. Tickets are $15 general admission or $10 for AU community
and seniors. Call 202-885-ARTS or visit american.tix.com. Performances are
at Katzen Studio Theatre on the AU campus, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW.
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
tension, dreams of America, an outbreak of scarlet
fever, drunken cons, and some rotten medical atten-
tion into Nobbs, seemingly to remind us again and
again that life can be unbelievably shitty. Save for
Janet McTeer’s Hubert Page, though, there’s barely
a whiff of flavor in this wallowing pit of miasma. You
want to know why Albert Nobbs is no good? It, like
its title character, is so caught up in its own drama,
it never bothers to fill in the blanks. Now playing.
Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema, 7235 Woodmont
Ave. Call 301-652-7273 or visit landmarktheatres.
com. (Chris Heller)

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX
Danny DeVito, Zac Efron, Ed Helms, Rob Riggle,
Betty White even Taylor Swift – yes, her — all voice
roles in this adaptation of another animated tale
from Theodor Geisel – better known as Dr. Seuss
– about a grumpy but charming forest creature fight-
ing to save his environment. Opens Friday, March 2.
Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
PROJECT X
Nima Nourizadeh’s film, starring Thomas Mann
and Oliver Cooper, is rated R for “crude and sexual
content throughout, nudity, drugs, drinking, perva-
sive language, reckless behavior and mayhem — all
involving teens.” Yeah, that oughtta get people to the
multiplex to see this movie about high school seniors
being bad. Opens Friday, March 2. Area theaters.
Visit fandango.com.
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
As part of a retrospective of Nicholas Ray, one
of postwar Hollywood’s definitive filmmakers, the
American Film Institute’s Silver Theatre offers this
touchstone of teen angst from 1955 starring James
Dean, Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo. Friday, March
2, at 4:40 p.m., Saturday, March 3, at 7 p.m., and
Wednesday, March 7, at 9:10 p.m. AFI Silver The-
atre, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets are
$11.50 general admission. Call 301-495-6720 or visit
afi.com/Silver.

STAGE
ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE,
HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY
Gail Humphries Mardirosian directs this musical for
kids about a young boy prone to melodrama when
things don’t completely go his way. Ever meet such
a boy? Parker Drown and Sandy Bainum star in this
musical, with book and lyrics by Judith Viorst and
music by Shelly Markham. Adventure Theater, 7300
MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo. Tickets are $18. Call
301-634-2261 or visit adventuretheatre.org.
ANNA IN THE TROPICS
The arrival of a new “lector” at a 1929 Cuban
cigar factory in Ybor City, Florida, becomes a cata-
lyst amongst the workers. Forbidden passions are
unleashed in this Pulitzer prize-winning play by Nilo
Cruz about the transformative power of literature in
a landscape that pits old traditions against changing
economic realities. José Carrasquillo directs this
Spanish version of the play (with English surtitles)
starring Oscar Ceville and Verónica del Cerro, as
well as a cast including Hugo Medrano, Monali-
sa Arias and Manolo Santalla. Closes this Sunday,
March 4. GALA Theatre at Tivoli Square, 3333 14th
St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $38. Call 202-234-7174 or
visit galatheatre.org.
ASTRO BOY AND THE GOD OF COMICS
A highly visual, retro-sci-fi show about the 1960s ani-
mation series Astro Boy, focused on a crime-fighting
robot, and its creator Osamu Tezuka. Georgetown
professor Natsu Onoda Power has created this high/
low-tech multimedia extravaganza, featuring on-
stage drawing, interactive video and 1960s-style
41 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
42
animation, specifically for Studio’s 2ndStage. Joe
Brack, Jamie Gahlon, JB Tadena and Kristin Watson
are among the cast. To March 11. Studio Theatre,
14th & P Streets NW. Call 202-332-3300 or visit
studiotheatre.org.
GENESIS REBOOT
A farcical twist on the Biblical creation story, Ben
and Peter Cunis penned this play in which a lone
angel ponders the question, what would happen if
everything started over? The show features Synetic
company members Brynn Tucker, Mary Werntz and
Matthew Ward, along with Joseph Carlson, Jeffer-
son Farber and Austin Johnson. Extended to Sunday,
March 11. Synetic Theater — Crystal City, 1800 South
Bell St., Arlington. Tickets are $45 to $55. Call 800-
494-8497 or visit synetictheater.org.
HUSBANDS & LOVERS
The Washington Stage Guild presents what it bills
as the Amerian premiere of Hungarian playwright
Ferenc Molnár’s Husbands & Lovers, a wry, wise
kaleidoscopic look at sex, and the many ways people
in love can drive each other crazy. Now to March
18. Undercroft Theatre of Mount Vernon United
Methodist Church, 900 Massachusetts Ave. NW.
Tickets are $30 to $50. Call 240-582-0050 or visit
stageguild.org.
JOSEPHINE TONIGHT
HHHHH
Even if every theater in town easily accessible by
Metro were staging high-quality, first-rate musicals,
it’s unlikely any of them would be quite as satisfying
and joyous as Josephine Tonight. Virginia’s Metro
Stage may take some work to get to if you’re not
traveling by car. But the little Alexandria theater
that could has really outdone itself with this produc-
tion, making any effort to see this all-consuming
Josephine Baker story worth it. With music by the
late Wally Harper and book and lyrics by Sherman
Yellen, Josephine Tonight offers pretty much every-
thing one would hope for in a musical: Rousing,
wide-ranging music, scintillating lyrics that both
touch and tease, and a compelling story to match.
Most importantly, this production, directed and
choreographed by the great Maurice Hines, features
an ensemble cast of terrific actors, one better than
the next, bringing the show to life in extraordinary,
triple-threat fashion: with assured acting, glorious
singing and vivacious dancing all around. To March
18. MetroStage, 1201 North Royal St., Alexandria.
Tickets are $45 to $50. Call 703-548-9044 or visit
metrostage.org. (Doug Rule)
LES JUSTES
HHHHH
Based on the assassination of Grand Duke Sergei
Alexandrovich by Russian socialist-revolutionaries,
Albert Camus’s Les Justes, now being staged at Arti-
sphere by WSC Avant Bard, is still relevant (despite
being written in 1949). Camus imagines these radi-
calized citizens both before and after the violence
and explores their motives, rationales and, ultimate-
ly, the constraints of conscience in the actions they
choose to take or decline. Though the intellectually
curious will not be shocked by Camus’s frank con-
sideration of what motivates extremism — whether
ever justified or not — credit is very much due WSC
Avant Bard for staging a piece that elevates the
discussion well beyond the current sound bites. To
March 11. Artisphere’s Black Box Theatre, 1101 Wil-
son Blvd. Arlington. Tickets are $25 to $35. Call 703-
875-1100 or visit artisphere.com. (Kate Wingfield)
NEW JERUSALEM:
THE INTERROGATION OF BARUCH DE SPINOZA
Theater J revives its production from 2010 retelling
the story of the 1656 interrogation of philosopher
Baruch de Spinoza. In a four-star review, Metro
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GAY BY ASSOCIATION
Michael Ian Black is an affiliated member of the gay community
M
ICHAEL IAN BLACK ONCE MADE OUT WITH BRADLEY COOPER.
“He wasn’t yet People’s Sexiest Man Alive,” Black says. “Had I known
he would be that, obviously I would have videotaped it.”
Of course, it was videotaped, as a scene in the 2001 cult comedy Wet Hot
American Summer, further popularized on YouTube.
But the filmed toolshed tryst isn’t the only reason people often mistake
Black’s orientation. “I think I just come off as gay,” says the straight comic actor
and writer, familiar from various shows over the years, including NBC’s Ed,
VH1’s I Love The… series and Comedy Central shows Stella and Reality Bites
Back. “I look at myself on TV and [even] my gaydar pings.”
In truth, Black has long been an affiliated member of the gay community — as
the New Jersey-reared son of a lesbian. “As I got older, it made [LGBT] issues
very personal for me,” he says. “I related very directly to [the gay rights move-
ment] because it affected my mom, it affected people that I care about.”
These days, the 40-year-old father of two is focused on raising his own fam-
ily, and revealing in book form personal details about his life. Next week he’ll
appear at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue to read and answer questions about his
new memoir, You’re Not Doing It Right: Tales of Marriage, Sex, Death and Other
Humiliations.
This summer, Black will release another humor-tipped book, one co-
authored with Meghan McCain. Yes, John McCain’s blogger daughter, whom
Black says he befriended via Twitter. “We took a one-month road trip from San
Diego to my home in Connecticut, and the book documents that,” says Black,
who says the working title is America, You Sexy Bitch. “It’s kind of our love letter
to our country — but there’s some tough love in there.” The book even docu-
ments one evening they spent with the Log Cabin Republicans in D.C.
“Lovely people. Great people,” he says, queuing up a joke at the expense of
gay Republicans. “But it’s a little bit tragic what they’re doing.” — Doug Rule

Michael Ian Black appears Thursday, March 8, at 7 p.m., at the
Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $12, or $28 for a pair of
tickets and the book. Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.
Weekly’s Tom Avila called David Ives’s play “an
immensely complex exploration of everything from
the nature of God to the existence of the human
soul,” and said the original staging was “wonderful”
and “also fantastically, some would say surpris-
ingly, entertaining.” Jeremy Skidmore directs a cast
including Alexander Strain and Michael Tolaydo.
Opening night is Sunday, March 4. To April 1.
The Aaron & Cecile Goldman Theater, Washington,
D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW.
Tickets are $41 to $60. Call 800-494-TIXS or visit
boxofficetickets.com.
PETER PAN: THE BOY WHO HATED MOTHERS
HHHHH
No Rules Theatre Company’s Peter Pan demands
you suspend disbelief and let your imagination loose.
But once you do, you’ll see there’s a lot to explore
in this world premiere production by Michael Llu-
beres, which is more imaginative in its storytelling
and staging than most theatrical productions, Peter
Pan or otherwise. Lluberes’s adaptation of J.M. Bar-
rie’s popular story is darker and more adult-minded
than you’ll remember it, but he and his strong cast
make a persuasive case that this is the way Barrie,
who had a serious mother obsession, intended it.
This version is based on Barrie’s story Peter and
Wendy and uses a subtitle drawn from an alternate
title of Barrie’s, The Boy Who Hated Mothers. Obvi-
ously, this is all a far cry from Disney’s whitewashed
version. It’s also probably too layered and dark for
children who aren’t already teenagers. But give it a
chance and it will likely appeal to even those adults
who aren’t typically drawn to fantasies or make-
believe worlds. Closes this Saturday, March 3. The
H Street Playhouse, 1365 H St. NE. Tickets are $25.
Call 336-462-9182 or visit
norulestheatre.org. (Doug Rule)
REALLY REALLY
Paul Downs Colaizzo’s new comic tragedy pushes
the edges and embraces the harsh reality of today’s
youth, “Generation Me.” Matthew Gardiner directs
this world premiere, about a party at an elite univer-
sity that spirals out of control. Really Really contains
nudity, strong language and explicit situations. To
March 25. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave.,
Arlington. Tickets are $55 to $60, though 20 seats
at every show are available for only $20 to those
30 and under. Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-
theatre.org.
RED
HHHHH
Paint splatters and spills like blood in Red, soaking
skin and canvas alike as an aging artist and his young
assistant toil in a Manhattan studio. Subtle symbol-
ism it’s not in playwright John Logan’s exploration
of a pivotal period in the life of abstract expressionist
Mark Rothko (Edward Gero), but it’s bracingly effec-
tive nonetheless as a reflection of the creative and
destructive forces he faced. Extended to March 11.
Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW.
Tickets are $40 to $85. Call 202-488-3300 or visit
arenastage.org. (Jonathan Padget)
SUCKER PUNCH
Kinetic, comedic and emotionally bruising, British
playwright Roy Williams’s masterwork Sucker Punch
blasts open the experience of being young, black and
ambitious in 1980s London. The story focuses on
two black boxing teens, played by Sheldon Best and
Emmanuel Brown. Leah C. Gardiner directs. Now to
April 8. Studio Theatre, 14th & P Streets NW. Call
202-332-3300 or visit studiotheatre.org.
THE GAMING TABLE
The Folger Theatre offers this stylish, effervescent
comedy by early 18th century playwright Susanna
Centlivre. An independent-minded widow holds a
43 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
dining
44 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
nightly card game that attracts revelers and rakes
and exposes the eccentricities of English manners.
Eleanor Holdridge leads an all-female design team,
including set designer Marion Williams, costume
designer Jessica Ford, lighting designer Nancy
Schertler and sound designer Veronika Vorel. Closes
this Sunday, March 4. Folger Theatre, 201 East Capi-
tol St. SE. Tickets are $30 to $65. Call 202-544-7077
or visit folger.edu.
THE LANGUAGE ARCHIVE
Julia Cho’s prize-winning comedy asks whether
love is a universal language or, like Esperanto, just
a well-intentioned dream. Mitchell Hébert stars as
a linguist consumed with preserving and document-
ing dying languages, all the while his marriage is
falling apart. Nanna Ingvarsson, Kerri Rambow,
Katie Atkinson and Edward Christian also star in
Forum Theatre’s latest production, directed Jessica
Burgess. To March 10. Round House Theatre-Silver
Spring, 8641 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets
are $25. Call 240-644-1100 or visit
forumtheatredc.org.
THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA
HHHHH
Matters of the heart take a rather bloody turn in
director P.J. Paparelli’s vision of Shakespeare’s com-
edy The Two Gentlemen of Verona, now onstage at
the Lansburgh Theatre. Contemporary references
abound, as Paparelli correlates social status and
royal power in 16th century Italy to the corporate-
dominated culture of today. And when things get
complicated after Valentine (Andrew Veenstra) and
Proteus (Nick Dillenburg) make their way to Milan
and both fall for the Duke’s daughter, Silvia (Natalie
Mitchell), out come more firearms than you’d see on
the latest episode of Hawaii Five-0. The gunplay is
overwrought and overdone, as is the climactic fight
between Valentine and Proteus as they beat each
other to a pulp before reconciling. Closes this Sun-
day, March 4. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 7th St. NW.
Tickets are $39 to $90. Call 202-547-1122 or visit
shakespearetheatre.org. (Jonathan Padget)
THE WATER ENGINE
Spooky Action Theater presents David Mamet’s
play, set during the Chicago World’s Fair in 1933 and
focused on an inventor Charles Lang and his attempt
to patent an engine running solely on water. Spooky
Action presents a production, directed by Richard
Henrich, staged as a live radio play, and starring Ian
LeValley, Scott Seder and Mary Egan. Now to March
11. The Universalist National Memorial Church, 1810
16th St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $25. Call 202-248-
0301 or visit spookyaction.org.
MUSIC
AMERICAN YOUTH STRING ENSEMBLE
Cheri Collins leads an ensemble consisting of stu-
dents aspiring to become classical professionals in
a “Spring Fling” program including Newbold, Verdi,
Borenstein and Mozart. Sunday, March 4, at 8 p.m.
Kenmore Performing Arts Center, Arlington. Tickest
are $7. Call 703-642-8051 or visit aypo.org.
ANAIS MITCHELL
One of the most ambitious indie upstarts around,
the Vermont-based Mitchell offers another epic tale
with multiple protagonists with her just-released
new album Young Man In America, inspired by the
recession’s toll on American hope and dreams. Last
time around, she created and recorded a folk opera
offering a modern-day retelling of the Orpheus myth
and featuring guest singers Justin Vernon (better
known as Grammy Award-winner Bon Iver), Ani
DiFranco and Greg Brown. And if you haven’t heard
2010’s Hadestown, do yourself a favor and rectify
the situation. It’s mind-blowingly fantastic. Friday,
45 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
marketplace
46 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
March 2, at 7 p.m. Jammin Java, 227 Maple Ave. E.
Vienna. Tickets are $12. Call 703-255-3747 or visit
jamminjava.com.
BEN BELLMAN
A young violinist who won the 2010 Montreal Inter-
national Musical Competition at the age of 20, Bell-
man stops by Strathmore for a performance that
includes Mozart, Strauss and Prokofiev. Sunday,
March 4, at 4 p.m. Mansion at Strathmore, 5301
Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda. Tickets are $30.
Call 301-581-5100 or visit strathmore.org.
BOHEMIAN CAVERNS JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Darryl Brenzel conducts the celebrated local jazz
orchestra in his arrangement of Igor Stravinsky’s
20th century masterwork reinterpreted with jazz
rhythms and improvisations. “The Re-Write of
Spring: Stravinsky for Big Band” is part of the Inter-
sections: A New America Arts Festival at the Atlas.
Thursday, March 8, at 8 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $20. Call 202-399-
7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
CHOPTEETH AFROFUNK BIG BAND
The Washington Post has called this local band “a
storming powerhouse of big-band African funk…
smart, tight and relentlessly driving.” Chopteeth has
already won eight Washington Area Music Associa-
tion Awards — otherwise known as Wammies — in
just the past four years, including the Artist of the
Year accolade in 2008. Next, the band performs at
U Street Music Hall in a show presented as part of
its arrangement with the 9:30 Club. Saturday, March
10. Doors at 7 p.m. U Street Music Hall, 1115A U
St. NW. Tickets are $15. Call 202-588-1880 or visit
ustreetmusichall.com.
IMANI
Mono-named D.C. based jazz singer Imani performs
with her trio and some special guests selections
from the golden age of jazz as well as original
compositions and reinterpretations of contemporary
pop classics. “The Colors of Sound” is an encore
performance after last year’s hit concert at the Atlas,
as part of the venue’s Intersections: A New America
Arts Festival. Saturday, March 10, at 7:30 p.m. Atlas
Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are
$20. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
LIGHTS
Canadian electro-rock singer Valerie Anne Poxleit-
ner has actually changed her legal name to Lights. A
child of missionary parents who grew up in remote
places of the world, Lights’ most recent album
is titled Siberia, with melodic songs dirtied up in
retro-electronic fashion. She’s all over the map.
The Brooklyn-based eclectic rock/electronic band
Ambassadors opens. Monday, March 5. Doors at 7
p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets are $20.
Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com.
LOS AMIGOS INVISIBLES
Self-described as Jamiroquai meets Santana, this
popular Venezuelan disco/funk band creates infec-
tious, energetic music that the whole world can
enjoy. The sextet offers an incredibly positive atmo-
sphere that makes it impossible not to want to get up
and dance. Lou Lou (Thievery Corporation) and DJ
Afro open. Thursday, March 8. Doors at 8 p.m. Black
Cat, 1811 14th St. NW. Tickets are $22 in advance or
$25 at the door. Call 202-667-4490 or visit
blackcatdc.com.
MAX RAABE & PALAST ORCHESTER
Led by charismatic baritone Raabe, this 12-piece
German cabaret band recreates the high style and
musical glory of the 20’s and 30’s, which includes
some American Songbook standards from the likes
of Cole Porter and Irving Berlin. It’s entirely cute
47 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
DANCE
DISSONANCE DANCE THEATRE
“Cinema” is a ballet-based world premiere, fused
with moves from jazz, modern dance and hip hop
and inspired by cinema in American culture, from
one of D.C.’s newest dance companies. Part of the
Intersections: A New America Arts Festival at the
Atlas. Saturday, March 3, at 9:30 p.m., and Sunday,
March 4, at 2:30 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center,
1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $25 to $30. Call 202-399-
7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
KEIGWIN + COMPANY
Known for provocative, witty and engaging dances,
Larry Keigwin’s New York dance company returns
to the Kennedy Center. The program includes
“Megalopolis,” a fun and serious blend of formalism
and pop performed to a mash-up of music by Steve
Reich and M.I.A., the latter of which begs the ques-
tion: Does flipping the bird count as a dance move?
Friday, March 2, and Saturday, March 3, at 8 p.m.
Kennedy Center Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are
$18 to $55. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
PETER DIMURO
“PDM: Public Displays of Emotion” is a world pre-
miere-commissioning experiment by dance vision-
ary Peter DiMuro — formerly of the Liz Lehrman
Dance Exchange — incorporating ancient hula, Sri-
Lankan dance, clogging and urban street dance, and
all set to the classical music of Rachmaninoff. Part
of the Intersections: A New America Arts Festival at
the Atlas. Thursday, March 8, at 8 p.m., and Friday,
March 9, at 7 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333
H St. NE. Tickets are $20. Call 202-399-7993 or visit
atlasarts.org.
ABOVE & BEYOND
NEW GALAXY THEATRE GROUP
Inspired by The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, New
Galaxy offers a fusion of sketch comedy, spoken
word poetry and live DJ music from Malcolm Pelles,
creating a romantic comedy featuring 16 distinct
skits based on the album’s 16 tracks. This “Slam
Theatre 2.0” event is part of Intersections: A New
America Arts Festival at the Atlas, and builds on New
Galaxy’s first go-round at last year’s festival. Thurs-
day, March 1, at 9:30 p.m., Saturday, March 3, at 9:30
p.m., Thursday, March 8, at 7 p.m., and Saturday,
March 10, at 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Atlas Performing
Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $20. Call
202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
SMYAL’S YOUTH ARTS ENSEMBLE
AT ATLAS’S INTERSECTIONS
The Sexual Minority Youth Assistance League’s
Youth Arts Ensemble offers a work-in-progress this
weekend at Intersections: A New America Arts Fes-
tival at the Atlas. Dance Exchange’s Teen Exchange
will also present a work-in-program in this program
focused on encouraging youth to create art. Sunday,
March 4, at 3 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333
H St. NE. Tickets are free but reservations required.
Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org. l
PEÑA, RICKMAN & KEYS
Three of D.C.’s most popular contemporary jazz
artists pianist Federico Peña, drummer Sean Rick-
man and saxophonist Marshall Keys – team up for
a unique blend of music straddling divides between
jazz, electronica and R&B. Friday, March 2, and
Saturday, March 3, at 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Bohe-
mian Caverns, 2001 11th St. NW. Tickets are $18. Call
202-299-0800 or visit bohemiancaverns.com.
PETER YARROW
The “Peter” in Peter, Paul & Mary, Yarrow performs
his passionate, uplifting folk songs, including “Puff
(The Magic Dragon)” and “Torn Between Two Lov-
ers.” He’ll be joined by special guest Mustard’s
Retreat, consisting of musicians Michael Hough and
David Tamulevich. Thursday, March 1, at 8 p.m. The
Barns at Wolf Trap, 1645 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets
are $25. Call 703-255-1900 or visit wolftrap.org.
THE RHYTHM ROAD:
JED LEVY QUARTET, EARTH STRING BAND
The Rhythm Road: American Music Abroad is the
name of a joint project by Jazz at Lincoln Center
and the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educa-
tional and Cultural Affairs to promote homegrown,
traditional American music overseas. The National
Geographic Society welcomes two of the 10 jazz,
gospel, blues and roots acts featured in the project
to offer free concerts next Thursday, March 8: New
York’s jazz ensemble Jed Levy Quartet at 6 p.m. and
Boston’s fiery bluegrass act the Earth String Band at
7:15 p.m. Thursday, March 8. National Geographic
Society’s Gilbert H. Grosvenor Auditorium, 1600 M
St. NW. Tickets are free. Call 202-857-7700 or visit
nationalgeographic.org/allroads.

and charming. Thursday, March 1, at 8 p.m. Music
Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North
Bethesda. Tickets are $28 to $58. Call 301-581-5100
or visit strathmore.org.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Christoph Eschenbach leads the NSO in a perfor-
mance of “Hungarian Dances” as part of the Kenne-
dy Center’s tribute to the music of Budapest, Prague
and Vienna. The program includes works by Bartók,
Kodály, Liszt and Brahms. Friday, March 9, at 8 p.m.
Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $20 to
$85. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
NOT WHAT YOU THINK
This a cappella ensemble, once affiliated with the
now-defunct Lesbian and Gay Chorus of Washing-
ton, offers “Never Give Up,” a sing-along concert
to benefit SMYAL’s Youth Arts Ensemble and pre-
sented as part of Intersections: A New America Arts
Festival at the Atlas. Sunday, March 11, at 4:30 p.m.
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets
are $10. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
PAULA COLE
Grammy-winning folk-pop singer-songwriter Paula
Cole is insistent, as documented in the titles of her
hit songs, on finding her a cowboy (“Where Have
All The Cowboys Gone?,” “I Don’t Want to Wait”).
Maybe she found one in Ithaca? At least that New
York town stands in for the title of her most recent
album, from 2010. Saturday, March 10, at 7:30 p.m.
The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1645 Trap Road, Vienna.
Tickets are $25. Call 703-255-1900 or visit
wolftrap.org.
48 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
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F
ILM DOESN’T GET
much grimmer than
We Need To Talk About
Kevin. It’s an utterly
bleak, astonishing piece of work
that demands your attention just
as you hope to look away. It’s hor-
rific in the most troubling sense
of the world, mining our most
primal instincts to ask about the
most absolute of our fears: What
do you do with a child you don’t
want? A family? A life?
Tumbling through those ques-
tions is Eva Khatchadourian
(Tilda Swinton), a one-time travel
writer turned ambivalent mother
who’s left to bear what’s wrought
by her teenage son, Kevin (Ezra
Miller). From the moments after
his birth, he’s distant and cold
toward her; years later, those
feelings manifest into a unnerv-
ing posture, an unspoken rage
that threatens to devour Eva, her
husband (John C. Reilly), their
daughter (Ashley Gerasimovich),
as well as the suburban world
in which they’ve wrapped them-
selves.
Split into disjointed fragments,
We Need To Talk About Kevin
reflects the state of Eva’s mind
as she struggles to reconcile Kev-
in’s life with her own. She’s jag-
ged, raw, and nearly shattered.
We begin to see why as director
Lynee Ramsay cuts from year to
CHRIS HELLER
year without regard for chronol-
ogy – Eva is perpetually teetering
on the edge of a nervous break-
down, living a collection of past
and present in chorus with one
another. The only pattern here, if
any at all, is cruelty throughout.
If Kevin seems an unbeliev-
able sociopath as a toddler, it’s
because that memory is colored
by what he does years later. Same
goes for her husband’s naivety, or
her daughter’s waifish innocence.
We’re not watching flashbacks,
we’re watching her memories,
where characters are overblown
and personalities are dispropor-
tionate to their persons. This is a
very, very hard thing for a movie
to do well. Ramsay puts us as close
to Eva as we can reasonably be,
framing difficult questions about
nihilism and purpose within an
emotionally troubling, incredibly
sensitive subject.
Ramsay’s direction, of course,
is complemented by acting that’s
just as impressive. By now, laud-
ing Swinton seems old hat, but
it’s worth repeating what many,
many others will proclaim: This
performance, under the pressure
of such a demanding role, is fas-
cinating. Swinton grips audiences
by her force alone. But rather than
chew up scenery, her nuances add
a profound melancholy to what
would otherwise be an exhaust-
ing ordeal.
Alongside Swinton, watching
Kevin develop – or rather, watch-
ing the three actors who portray
him in ages from toddler (Rocky
Duer) to child (Jasper Newell)
to teenager (Ezra Miller) – is a
brilliant and difficult task. Where
he ends up is no mystery, mak-
ing each stonewalled glare all the
more overwhelming. He’s hell-
bent on deceiving his mother,
wounding her in a way that’s
so cruel, so malevolent, that he
seems more demon than human.
For that reason, as well as
others, it may be hard for some
to praise this movie. Doing so is
uncomfortable because it implic-
itly acknowledges a troubling
story and message as something
valuable, something worth watch-
ing. Make no mistake, We Need To
FILM
We Need to Talk About Kevin is an utterly bleak, masterfully executed
piece of work that demands your attention
Glower power: Swinton and Duer
WE NEED TO
TALK ABOUT
KEVIN
HHHHH
Starring
Tilda Swinton,
John C. Reilly
Rated R
112 Minutes
Opens March 2
Area Theaters
49
Tough Love
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METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
50 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Talk About Kevin is both of those – but it
will also drain you.
That, after all, is the means to its end.
We Need To Talk About Kevin asks dif-
ficult questions about the human condi-
tion, ultimately leaving redemption as an
open-ended ideal. When Kevin admits
that he no longer knows why he did what
he did, there’s recovery in his voice. He’s
unguarded, perhaps for the first time in
his life. Will he be saved? Will Eva be
his savior? These are tough questions,
surely with tough answers. That we still
ask them, though, is Ramsay’s greatest
triumph. l
W
HEN AN OPERA
is as much a sta-
ple in the reper-
toire as Mozart’s
Cosi fan tutte, it’s hardly surpris-
ing when a director gets the urge
to give it a goose. And why not?
Though new takes on old favor-
ites might not endure as artis-
tic interpretations, when inter-
spersed with more traditional
offerings, they can bring much
color and wit to the continuum.
And with director Jonathan
Miller’s Cosi, re-set to “yesterday
afternoon in Washington, D.C.,”
with all that entails (cell-phones
and suits, if not politics), the Wash-
ington National Opera delivers just
that. Of course, it won’t sit well
with those who froth at the mouth
at the mere mention of an adapted
libretto, but for most it’s a good
whacking dose of Mozart delivered
under the careful baton of Philippe
Auguin, in the guise of a fun, mildly
irreverent, entertainment. And it’s
hard to argue with that.
Despite the update, nothing
changes in the plot. The action
starts when cynical K-Street-
style elder Don Alfonso bets the
young Ferrando and Guglielmo,
who are engaged to the George-
town-dwelling sisters Fiordiligi
and Dorabella, that he can get the
women to cheat the minute they
think the men are out of town.
KATE WINGFIELD
Outraged, the men accept the
challenge and so begins a charade
in which the men pretend to go
to war but instead disguise them-
selves and begin ardently pursu-
ing the sisters. When, after many
failed attempts (though only a day
since the men went to war), the
interlopers finally win the sisters
over, the game is up and everyone
is wiser if not happier.
The hijinks are set almost
exclusively within the walls of
the sisters’ minimalist boudoir, a
room suggesting the grand spaces
of their wealth without the dis-
traction of its baubles, and other
than the colorful characters, there
is little to draw the eye — no art,
no books. Despite costumes and
attempts to “act modern” almost
too geeky to suggest parody, we
nevertheless know what Miller
is getting at: These women are
rich, spoiled and, in the adapted
words of their PA Despina, “air-
heads.” And, whether one sees it
as antithesis or modern equiva-
lent, the contrast between these
two tweet-culture gals and the
wigs, fans and simpering of a tra-
ditional production is worthy of
another, perhaps more thought-
ful, giggle. The bottom line is we
are never going to get anywhere
near as heavily invested in these
two as we are in the music.
As Fiordiligi, the sister most
pricked by her conscience and
thus the purveyor of the more
beautifully mournful of Mozart’s
arias, Elizabeth Futral is an inter-
esting mix. Spunky, confident,
and offering great comic timing,
she grabs the eye and knows what
to do with it. Yet, at times, the
necessities required to keep Mill-
er’s mood afloat argues with the
music. Futral pulls it off, but it
isn’t easy to capture the depth of
Fiordiligi’s regret while garbed in
Neiman Marcus’s idea of casual-
wear or your mother-in-law’s idea
of a biker-chick outfit. A strong,
agile soprano with gorgeous tone,
Futral delivers her Mozart with
gratifying precision and much
expression. Perhaps, in the spe-
cial moments, ‘tis better to shut
one’s eyes.
OPERA
While purists may sniff at WNO’s modern staging of Cosi fan tutte,
it’s still a good whacking dose of fun, mildly irreverent Mozart
Temptation trio: Prieto, Rhodes and Shimell
COSI FAN
TUTTE
HHHHH
To March 15
Kennedy Center
Opera House

$25-$300
202-467-4600
kennedy-center.org
51
Modern Romance
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52 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
P
UMPED UP PECS AND
sticky skin, floors
unswept and walls are
thin,” the four members
of Imperial Teen sing in unison
on a jaunty new song. “Were you
the last to know? Were you the
last to go?”
Know what? Go where?
And pumped up pecs? Sounds
hot and fun — but it just doesn’t
make sense.
Which is the point. The half-
gay indie-rock group Imperial
Teen took its name from the title
of one of its early songs, which
referenced “party favors, pesti-
cides and pills,” rashes, chicken
hawks, the messiah, even Lib-
erace – for no apparent reason
other than to be clever, in a rhym-
ing, stream-of-consciousness
way. It’s funny to any thinking
person who bothers to look at the
lyrics, but the joke seems to be
especially on anyone who spends
too much time trying to decipher
significant meaning – or at least
any kind of tale – out of the lyrics.
Guilty as charged.
“Put a mirror in the cage, it’s
just another game we play,” the
band sings on “Over His Head,” a
track from the band’s rewarding
new album Feel The Sound. “It
doesn’t know what’s happening, it
never knows what’s happening.”
What is happening, you may
be wondering. Just who is Impe-
rial Teen? Why, it’s the best band
you’ve probably never heard of,
that’s who.
The gay Roddy Bottum – yes,
that is his real name – formed
Imperial Teen as a side project to
his gig as the keyboardist for ’90s
alternative-metal hitmakers Faith
No More. (Remember “Epic,” and
the controversy over its video fea-
turing a dying fish out of water?)
Fellow San Franciscans Lynne
Perko Truell, Jone Stebbins and
Will Schwartz joined Bottum to
create Imperial Teen in 1996.
(Meaning, there are literally teens
alive today born after Imperial
Teen formed.)
After opening for Courtney
Love’s band Hole and The Breed-
ers at the turn of the millennium,
the band has been relatively quiet
the past decade. But Feel The
Sound, its first set in five years, is a
stand-out album, pleasing to both
old-time fans as well as to those
new to the fold. And it’s not just
because of the clever yet obtuse
lyrical wordplay. That only goes
so far — and actually, because
they often sing in lovely four-part
harmony under distorted musical
instrumentation, the lyrics can be
hard to make out by ear anyway.
What really sells Imperial
Teen is its music: a hazy shade
of pop-rock, utterly drenched in
melody, with touches of psyche-
delia. You hear influences of The
Beatles, of course, but also Elec-
tric Light Orchestra, as well as
sophisticated pop contemporaries
like The New Pornographers,
even Foster The People.
“No Matter What You Say,”
for example, starts out with a
hazy, ELO-esque keyboard riff,
followed by heavenly “ahh-ahhs”
from the band. The sweet song
turns a little edgy as it gets to the
chorus, after lyrics about cells and
bells, wills and drills. “No matter
what you say,” they practically
snarl four times, before taking
the high road. “With a foot on
the ground, I can turn it around;
warming up to the sound, and I’m
not coming down.”
Stay high, Imperial Teen.
We’re warm to your sound now.
Download These: “No Matter
What You Say,” “Last To Know”
JUSTIN UTLEY IS STILL ON
a mission. The former Mormon
missionary, later a pop star in the
church’s own Utah-based enter-
tainment industry, may no longer
be part of the church that wanted
nothing to do with him once he
came out as gay. In fact, now the
Imperial Teen is the best band you’ve probably never heard of,
while former Mormon Justin Utley is still on a mission
Pulling the strings: Imperial Teen
IMPERIAL TEEN
Feel The Sound
HHHHH
Merge Records
$13.99
JUSTIN UTLEY
Nothing This Real
Kolob Records
$14.77
53
Royal Highness
DOUG RULE MUSIC
M
A
R
I
N
A

C
H
A
V
E
Z
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
OPERA
continued from page 51
54 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
Utah-born, New York-based musician is
a thorn in the church’s side, pushing for
it to accept gays from the outside.
Just as important, though, is Utley’s
crusade – so to speak – to inspire and
motivate people, especially gay people,
through his music. You can take the boy
out of the Mormon faith, in other words,
but you can’t take the Mormon out of the
boy – at least, in terms of dedication to
community service and uplift.
Utley’s second album, Nothing This
Real, opens with serious promise – real
musical heat. He channels R.E.M. in the
twangy but blistering title track, sound-
ing a lot like Michael Stipe as he talk-
sings the verses before wailing a bit in
the chorus. The powerful lyrics focus on
his decision to leave the Mormon church
after suffering through ex-gay conver-
sion therapy. “I’m ready to go, to do what
I feel,” he sings. “I’ll do whatever I want
to, ‘cause nothing’s this real.”
Next comes “Great Escape,” an even
more hard-edged tune, also about leaving
an oppressive past behind. “Yeah, your
life is calling,” he sings. “Better get mov-
ing on before it’s too late.”
The lyrics – which later touch on his
relationships, as well as losing people he
cared about – generally maintain a sense
of verve throughout the set’s remaining
eight tracks. But the music mostly settles
into a blander blend of pop, rock and alt-
country that could be called Daughtry-
lite. And if you grew up with contempo-
rary Christian music, you can’t help but
hear traces of that often too-sweet, syrupy
sub-genre.
Here’s to Utley sticking to his musical
guns throughout his next album.
Download These: “Nothing This Real,”
“Great Escape” l
As the more wayward sister Dora-
bella, mezzo-soprano Renata Pokupic has
much presence, even as she allows for
Futral’s star-shine, though her ’80s-esque
outfits are almost as distracting as they
are amusing. Pokupic delivers some
sweet sound with mellow fullness, but at
times she almost seems to strain slightly
through this softness. As the long-suffer-
ing Despina, soprano Christine Brandes
brings an interestingly butch style to her
ever-pragmatic and ironic PA and some
equally clear-edged, if not always even,
singing.
Ferrando and Guglielmo spend most of
their time in disguise as their own rivals
and make the most of the sheer silliness of
The Party Store biker personas. Each man
goes so heartily for the other’s betrothed
in their bid to test fidelity it’s hard to
believe they are any more faithful than
their would-be wives. As Ferrando, tenor
Joel Prieto offers a lot of boyish charm,
so much so he comes across as quite a bit
younger than either sister. A surprisingly
large tenor from such a lithe figure, Pri-
eto has a pleasingly noble, tensile sound
even if it is not always smooth. As Gug-
lielmo, baritone Teddy Tahu Rhodes cuts
an impressive figure and makes for some of
the better comic moments. With his rich,
resonant voice, he anchors the music well,
even if he could stand to be a touch more
expressive.
Drawing out the more sophisticated
moments of the evening, comic and oth-
erwise, William Shimell gives his Don
Alfonso a cell-phone wielding believabil-
ity while bringing a certain old-school
operatic gravitas to his cynic. Alfonso
starts the mad ball rolling but he also
brings it all back to his original point —
which in the words of Little Richard — is
really nothing more than: “the girl can’t
help it.” l
marketplace - body
55 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
NIGHT
LIFE
57 METROWEEKLY.COM
LISTINGS
Destinations on page 64
THURSDAY, 03.01.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-10pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks
and domestic beers •
$3.95 Cuervo margaritas
• Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
• $1 Vodka Drinks,
9-11pm • Underwear
Contest hosted by Lena
Lett and Ba’Naka, midnight
• $200 in cash and prizes
• DJ Sean Morris • DJ
Chord • Door at 9pm • $3
Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $1
off regular prices • Power
Hour, 4-6pm • Additional
$1 off Happy Hour prices
• Club Bar: DC Boys of
Leather • Boys Night
Out — Restraints and
Sleepsacks
FIREPLACE
Any Absolut or Bacardi
$4 from 10pm-Midnight •
VJ Dina
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
t
There was a time when René, 21, growing up in Aurora, Ill., was in the shadows,
suffering the bullies in elementary and middle school. Then he discovered martial
arts and entered high school a changed person. “I went in very confident,” he
says. “Peppy, preppy, full of school spirit. When there was a spotlight, I had to be
in it. I crave attention. I’m not shy in front of a camera.” Living in Norfolk, Va., till
he leaves the Navy in August, René is in D.C. regularly, hitting Town and Secrets.
Though he likes attention, he’s not sure he’s ready for Secrets’ amateur night.
“I’m very confident in my body,” he says. “The thing is, I get hard.” Look for
René out and about before he moves to his next chapter, which he hopes is head-
ing to the Culinary Institute of America to study pastry and management.
59
Photography by
Julian Vankim
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties,
and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
Jock U • Men’s College
Night • DJ Steve
Henderson • VJ Darryl
Strickland • Universal
Gear Go-Go Boys Doors •
Absolut Vodka Specials,
All Night • Doors at 9pm
• 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Shirtless men drink free
(rail & domestic), 10-11pm
and Midnight to 12:30am
• All nude male dancers
• Dancing w/ DJ tim-e,
9pm-close • Cover
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for
a step-up from rail) • $5
Rail, $2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm
to close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Active Duty Military Night
• Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • New Drink Menu
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
FRIDAY, 03.02.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
COBALT/30 DEGREES
DJ Sean Morris (upstairs)
• DJ Keenan (downstairs)
• Free Vodka Drinks,
11pm-midnight • $8 Cover
• 21+
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town
Bear Happy Hour, 6-11pm
• $3 Rail, $3 Draft, $3
Bud Bottles • Free Pizza,
7pm • Hosted by Charger
Stone • No cover before
9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
Power Hour: $1 off Rail
and Domestic, 4-6pm
• People in Leather,
Uniform or Rubber get free
Kamikazes, 9pm-midnight
• Otter Night, 10pm-3am
• $4 Rain and Domestic,
9pm-Midnight
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
FUEGO SALVAJE
@Cafe Asia
720 I St. NW
New location, New Night
• Open 10:30pm-3am •
fuegosalvaje.com
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
All-U-Can-Drink Smirnoff
Buffet, $16, 10-11:30pm •
JALWA Bollywood Party,
10pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Deep in the Game •
Doors at 10pm • Karaoke,
9pm-1am
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• $5 Coronas, $7 Vodka
Red Bulls, 9pm-close •
Mash Up Night: Retro
and new
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Della Volta • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks, 5-9pm
• $3 drinks after midnight
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
For the Ladies • DJ Joey
O • VJ Blanca
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half price burgers and
fries
t
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
60
TOWN
Upstairs: DJ Wess
• Downstairs: DJ
BacK2bACk • Doors open
10pm • Drag Show starts
at 10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka
• $3 rail drinks from
10-11pm • For 21+, $5
from 10-11pm and $10
after 11pm • For 18-20,
$10 all night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
in Secrets • DJ Don T
in Ziegfeld’s • Ladies of
Illusion with host Kristina
Kelly, 11pm • Cover
SATURDAY, 03.03.12
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Rumba Latina ABC Party
(Anything but Clothes),
9pm • $150 prize for the
most creative outft • DJs
Willie and MadScience •
Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour Leather
Specials • Power Hour
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Club Bar: Mr.
MAL Matt Bronson
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
• Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
Beat the Clock Specials
on Rolling Rock and Rail
Vodka starting at $1 •
All-U-Can-Drink Bacardi
Buffet, $18, 10pm-2am •
CODE, 10pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
DJ C-Dubz • Doors
Open 10pm • Karaoke
10pm-2am in Karaoke Bar
• Cover
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Zing Zang Bloody Marys,
Nellie Beer, House Rail
Drinks and Mimosas, $4,
11am-5pm • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks, 5-9pm
• $3 drinks after midnight
• No Cover
OMEGA
DJ Tre • Pool Tournament
at 9pm
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
What’s on your
nightstand?
A glass of water
and lube.
What’s in your
nightstand
drawer?
There’s no drawer.
Where do you
keep the
condoms?
Underneath the bed.
What are your television favorites?
I love watching Glee. I’m a big musical nerd.
What’s your favorite musical?
Wicked.
What was your favorite cartoon
when you were a kid?
Rugrats.

What superhero would you be?
Storm or Iceman.
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
61
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
For the Ladies • DJ Joey
O • VJ Centrik
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
Super Dirty Pop •
DJ Drew G • Live
performance by Jessica
Spaulding and The Dance
Camp • Downstairs: DJ
Wess • Drag Show at
10:30pm • Doors at 10pm
• $8 from 10-11pm • $12
after 11pm • 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers
• The Ladies of Illusion
hosted by Ella Fitzgerald,
frst show at 11pm • DJ
Spyke in Ziegfelds • Cover
SUNDAY, 03.04.12
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Martini Madness • $5
martinis all day and
night, 4pm • Homowood
Karaoke • $4 rail drinks &
domestic beers, 10pm •
No cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Club Bar:
Beltway Bears

GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
$3 Smirnoff (all favors)
• Trailer Park Karaoke,
9:30pm
JR.’S
$2 Coors Lights & $3 Skyy
(all favors), all day and
night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks, 5-9pm
• No Cover
OMEGA
Church Lady Bingo with
Kristina Kelley • $4 House
Vodka
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Happy Hour all night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Retro Night • Retro videos
• Complimentary drinks
with trivia quiz • All nude
male dancers upstairs in
Secrets • Drink and Beer
specials • Cover
MONDAY, 03.05.12
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Open Mike, 7pm-close •
Emceed by Zoe • $3 off all
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• 21+ • No cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • New Specials
• $1 Drafts (Bud and Bud
Light)
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4pm-close •
Karaoke, 9:30pm • Bears
Do Yoga, 6:30pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour 4 - 9
Rouge Show • Different
performers each week •
Drink Specials
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
TUESDAY, 03.06.12
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour, all
night • $3 rail margaritas,
rail drinks and domestic
beers • $3.95 Cuervo
margaritas • Gordon Kent
on the Piano, 7:30pm-close
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• DJ Erik Lars Evans •
2-4-1 rail drinks • 21+ •
No cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $2 Rail and
Domestic, 4pm-midnight •
Pool League, 7:30pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
What would you serve?
Chocolate-covered strawberries and
a big, fancy cake.
You know Paula Deen is diabetic?
Right! Shoot. I’ll use Splenda.
How would you describe
your dream guy?
Tall, dark and handsome. Pretty eyes.
And big... ego.
Define good in bed.
Someone who takes charge.
Who should star in a movie
about your life?
John Leguizamo.
Who was your first celebrity crush?
Justin Timberlake.
Who gets on your nerves?
Childish people.
If your home was burning, what’s the
first thing you’d grab while leaving?
My iPhone.
Who’s your greatest influence?
My mother. I get a lot of strength and inde-
pendence from her. She’s never once asked
for help. That’s what she taught me.
What’s your greatest fear?
Not succeeding in life. Not becoming the
person I want to become.
Pick three people, living or dead, who
you think would make the most fascinat-
ing dinner guests imaginable.
Paula Deen, Ricky Martin and
Justin Timberlake.
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
62
FIREPLACE
Hump Day • $3 Domestic
beer, all night

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
HIPPO
Bingo, 8:30pm • Cash
Prizes and Progressive
Cash Jackpot Game
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• College Night, Comedy
and Trivia, 9pm-Close • $2
JR.’s Drafts with College
ID, $4 Bud/Bud Lights, $5
Rail, $6 Skyy
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-close • FUK!T
Packing Party, 7-9pm
(upstairs)
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Showtune Video Madness,
7:45pm-12:30am • VJ
Brian Mongeon • Best of
Hollywood and Broadway
Showtunes
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
Special Guest DJ Matt
Bailer • 2-for-1, all day
and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag BINGO hosted by
Shi-Queeta Lee, 8pm
OMEGA
2 for 1 Drinks, 4pm-close
• Bear Night • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • $3
Drafts, $4 House Vodka •
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
V3 LOUNGE
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
Crazy Tuesday • Drink
Specials, 10-11pm • Show
hosted by Jocelyn Carrillo
and her stars, 12:30am •
18/21 • Cover
WED., 03.07.12
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Happy Hour, all night •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
7:30pm-close
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Wednesday Night
Karaoke at Cobalt, 10pm
• $5 Absolut & Smirnoff
favors • $8 • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power Hour
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Wooden Nickel
Night, 9pm-close
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
New Drink Menu • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks, 5-9pm
• No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Shirtless Men Drink Free
House and Domestics,
10-11pm • Men of
Omega, 9:30pm • Pool
Tournament, 9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
New Meat Night • Dancer
auditions • Happy Hour
Prices, all night • All nude
male dancers • DJ tim-e,
9pm-close • Drink and
Beer Specials • Cover
THURSDAY, 03.08.12
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
Upstairs
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-10pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail
margaritas, rail drinks
and domestic beers •
$3.95 Cuervo margaritas
• Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
What’s your biggest turn-on?
A smile.
What’s your biggest turn-off?
Bad teeth.
What’s something you’ve always wanted
to do but haven’t yet tried?
Skydiving.
What’s something you’ve tried that you
never want to do again?
Get in a car accident. We flipped.
Was everybody okay?
Yeah.
Boxers, briefs or other?
Boxer-briefs.
Who’s your favorite musical artist?
David Guetta.
What’s your favorite website?
Facebook.
What’s the most unusual place
you’ve had sex?
Under a bridge in Norfolk.
What position do you play in the big
baseball game of life?
Catcher.
What’s your favorite retail store?
American Eagle Outfitters.
What’s the most you’ll spend
on a haircut?
$20.
What about on shoes?
$95.
What’s your favorite food
to splurge with?
Pizza, hands down. All-meat.
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
63
COBALT/30 DEGREES
2-4-1 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
• $1 Vodka Drinks,
9-11pm • Underwear
Contest hosted by Lena
Lett and Ba’Naka, midnight
• $200 in cash and prizes
• DJ Chord Bezerra • DJ
MadScience Door at 10pm
• $3 Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • $1
off regular prices • Power
Hour, 4-6pm • Additional
$1 off Happy Hour prices •
Club Bar: DC Eagle Poster
Preservation Project
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
HIPPO
1 W. Eager St.
Baltimore, Md.
Hip Hop • DJ Rosie
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for a
step-up from rail) • $3 Rail
Vodka Highballs, $2 JR.’s
drafts, 8pm to close • Top
Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Active Duty Military Night
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
OMEGA
2 for 1 Happy Hour, 4-9pm
• Karaoke with Howard,
10pm • $4 House Vodka
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
(Formerly Apex)
Jock U • Men’s College
Night • Doors at 9pm
• 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Shirtless men drink free
(rail & domestic), 10-11pm
• All nude male dancers
• Dancing w/ DJ tim-e,
9pm-close • Cover l
What are you most
grateful for?
Just being alive.
What’s something
you want more of?
More money.
State your life
philosophy in 10
words or less.
Do it right,
all the time. l
What’s your favorite season?
Fall. I love the smell, the beautiful
autumn colors.
What kind of animal would you be?
A snow tiger with ice-blue eyes.
They’re beautiful.
What kind of plant would you be?
Bird of paradise.
What kind of car would you be?
Jaguar. Black.
METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
64
DESTINATIONS
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
BARS & CLUBS
MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
MARYLAND
CLUB HIPPO
1 West Eager Street
Baltimore, MD
(410) 547-0069
THE LODGE
21614 National Pike
Boonsboro, MD
(301) 591-4434
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855-N Washington, Blvd.
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-4840
VIRGINIA
FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
V3 LOUNGE
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
301-802-8878
WEST VIRGINIA
SUGARDADDYS
1309 Winchester Ave.
Martinsburg, WV
(304) 262-1530
m&w gg

HRC
ACTION CENTER
& STORE
1633 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 232-8621
Dupont Circle Metro
THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
FUEGO SALVAJE
Cafe Asia
1720 I St. NW
www.clubfuegodc.com
m d t
GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW
(behind 1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d
NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
D.C.
18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
9:30 CLUB
815 V Street NW
(202) 265-0930
U Street / Cardozo Metro
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d
NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
OMEGA
2122 P Street NW (rear)
(202) 223-4917
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
PHASE 1
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
PHASE 1 of DUPONT
1415 22nd Street NW
(Formerly Apex)
Dupont Circle Metro
w m d
REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street/Cardozo Metro
m d v t
ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
RETAIL
65 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
Jock University
Thursday, February 16
Phase 1 of Dupont
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
DYLAN COMSTOCK
scene
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
66 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
67 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
68 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
Pop Goes the World
Friday, February 17
Green Lantern
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
DYLAN COMSTOCK
69 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
70 MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM
71 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
V3 Lounge
Tuesday, February 14
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scene
72 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
73 METROWEEKLY.COM MARCH 1, 2012
“We don’t want students to be exposed
to alternate lifestyles.
If their parents want them to know about that, they can teach them at home.
— Tennessee state Rep. JOEY HENSLEY (R), one of the legislators behind the state’s controversial “Don’t Say Gay” bill
that would prohibit discussing or mentioning homosexuality in schools, on why he is sponsoring the bill.
(The Tennessean)
We removed anything to do with homosexuals. We were all agreed that
Zimbabwe is not a country that makes friends with gays.”
— MUNYARADZI PAUL MANGWANA, co-chair of the Constitution Select Committee that was charged with drafting a new
constitution for Zimbabwe, on why the document omits – yet criminalizes – homosexuality. Co-chair Edward Mkhosi said,
“Homosexuality is a foreign concept. Our culture, our tradition and our increasingly Christian outlook
do not permit us to legalize homosexuality and same-sex marriages.”
(Zimbabwe Mail)
“There’s more and more openly gay people every day,
public figures, people’s friends.
You can see that they love each other and it’s not something the government should be able to say, to tell them what to do.
— California college student MATTHEW BOYD, 24, on the increasing support for marriage equality in the state,
following a new poll showing registered California voters now support marriage rights by 59 to 34 percent.
(Sacramento Bee)
We believe that when things like that happen,
the wrath of God is going to come from somewhere.”
— LA TOYA HARRIS, a Republican from Sacramento, explains why she believes efforts by marriage-equality advocates
to build outreach to minority and religious communities won’t be effective.
(Sacramento Bee)
“[I] can’t believe how many shares and likes
we have gotten on this.”
— Marine Sgt. BRANDON MORGAN responds to the outpouring of support that came after a photo of him returning home
from duty and leaping into his boyfriend’s arms for a welcome-home kiss went viral on Facebook and blogs.
(Daily Mail)
74




MARCH 1, 2012 METROWEEKLY.COM

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