Petroleum Engineering 201 Introduction to Petroleum Engineering Credit 1: (1-0) Required for Entering Freshmen Catalog Description: The course

provides an overview and history of the petroleum industry and petroleum engineering, including nature of oil and gas reservoirs, petroleum exploration and drilling, formation evaluation, well completions and production, surface facilities, reservoir mechanics, and improved oil recovery. It introduces the importance of ethical, societal, and environmental considerations and current events on activities in the petroleum industry. It also introduces students to professional society and university resources that aid career development. Prerequisites(s): Approval of Department Head Textbook Required: Nontechnical Guide to Petroleum Geology, Exploration, Drilling and Production, 2nd Edition, Hyne, Norman J., Penn Well Books, 2001. Topics Covered: Overview, Introduction to Petroleum Engineering 1. Nature of Oil & Gas 2. The Earth’s Crust, Geological Time 3. Reservoir Rocks, Sedimentary Rock Distribution, Ocean Environment, Maps 4. Source Rocks, Generation, Migration and Accumulation of Petroleum, Traps 5. Exploration 6. Mid-Term Examination 7. Drilling 8. Formation Evaluation 9. Completion & Facilities 10. Drilling & Production Practices 11. Reservoir Recovery & Reserves 12. Review & Course Evaluation 13. Final Examination Class/Laboratory Schedule: 1 50-min lecture session per week/no laboratory Method of Evaluation: Attendance Weekly Tests Mid-Term Examination Final Examination Total

25% 25% 25% 25% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Provides students an overview of the oil and gas industry; Introduces Engineering students to petroleum engineering concepts of porosity, permeability, and saturation. Introduces students to terminology in drilling, formation evaluation, production, and reservoir engineering. General Education Introduces students to the role of the petroleum industry in our society and the world and constraints on practice of petroleum engineering. Emphasizes importance of professional and ethical responsibility of engineers, communication skills, summer internships, life-long learning. Students are encouraged to join SPE student chapter. They learn how to access resources at TAMU that aid written and oral communication and those that help with obtaining summer internships and permanent positions.

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will Program Outcomes be able to… Describe the exploration and production process, the petroleum 7 engineer’s role, and petroleum engineering terminology. Describe the early history of the petroleum industry, the origins of the major international oil companies, the political tensions extant in the Middle East, and the technological challenge facing the industry in an increasingly environmentally conscious world. Demonstrate initiative to find a summer job. Demonstrate initiative to participate in professional activities. Remain in the program after completion of the freshmen year. 6, 8, 10

9 6 9

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 6 7 8 9 10 An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility An ability to communicate effectively The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning A knowledge of contemporary issues

Prepared by: Larry D. Piper, 20 July 2009

Petroleum Engineering 225 Petroleum Drilling Systems Credit 2: (1-3) Required for Sophomores Catalog Description: Introduction to petroleum drilling systems, including fundamental petroleum engineering concepts, quantities and unit systems, drilling rig components, drilling fluids, pressure loss calculations, casing, well cementing, and directional drilling. Prerequisites(s): ENGR 112; MATH 152; PHYS 218 Textbooks Required: Drilling Technology in Nontechnical Language. Devereux, Steve, Pennwell Publishing , 1999; Drilling Fluid Engineering Manual. Textbook prepared by M-I Drilling Fluids Co., 1998; Halliburton Cementing Tables. Casing and cement data tables prepared by Halliburton Company. Topics Covered: 1. Introduction to the course, Petroleum Engineering Units 2. Drilling geology, and reservoir properties 3. Managing drilling operations 4. Planning and drilling wells, rig selection, rig equipment, drill bits 5. Drilling fluids 6. Casing and cementing 7. Directional and Horizontal drilling 8. Evaluation 9. Well Control, drilling problems, safety, and environmental issues Class/Laboratory Schedule: 1 50-min lecture session & 3 lab sessions per week Method of Evaluation: Midterm Exam Final Exam Class Projects/Homework Laboratory Lab Safety Total

25% 25% 25% 20% 5% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students with the vocabulary and hand-on equipment experience to function in the modern drilling industry. Develops basic skills needed for more advanced senior level drilling and other design classes. General Education Equips students with laboratory skills and decision process of selecting from competing technologies.

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will Know oil field vocabulary and demonstrate familiarity with methods and materials used in drilling, oil and gas wells. Demonstrate hands-on testing skills with drilling and completion fluid. Calculate fluid pressure losses through basic drilling systems. Identify and define the components of a drilling rig and to group them into their various systems (e.g. rotating, hoisting, circulating, etc.). Write concise engineering lab reports. Demonstrate and practice proper lab safety practices.

Program Outcomes 1,7,11 2, 4, 7 1 7 7 3

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 3 An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability 4 Ability to an function on multi-disciplinary teams. 7 An ability to communicate effectively. 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Prepared by: Jerome J. Schubert, 10 August 2009

2

PETE-225 - Lab Syllabi Requirement

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT — PETE 300 One of the unique features of the Curriculum in Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University is a requirement that students have summer practical experience - at least six weeks fulltime employment in exploration and production with an oil and gas company or oilfield services company. This requirement permits our students to see how subjects they have studied are applied in industry, become familiar with practices and equipment of the petroleum producing industry, and gain valuable job experience. While only one summer work is experience is required, multiple summer work experiences are suggested and encouraged. Completion of the requirement must be documented by the student before registration in senior level courses. The documentation consists of a Student Intern Report, prepared by the student, and a Summer Internship Evaluation, prepared by the student intern’s supervisor. Both documents are prepared at the end of an internship following completion of the Junior Year petroleum engineering courses and submitted to the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee for use in program evaluation. See the departmental website for more information (www.pe.tamu.edu) It is the general policy of the Petroleum Engineering Department to assist students in completing this requirement. In unusual circumstances, a letter from the student's employer stating the time period employed and the nature of the work experience may be used in judging satisfactory completion of the degree requirement.

Petroleum Engineering 301 Petroleum Engineering Numerical Methods Credit 3: (2-3) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: Use of numerical methods in a variety of petroleum engineering problems; numerical differentiation and integration; root finding; numerical solution of differential equations; curve fitting and interpolation; computer applications; introduction to the principles of numerical simulation methods. Prerequisites(s): PETE 225, 311; MATH 308 Textbook Required: Numerical Methods, Hornbeck, R.W., Prentice Hall, 1982. Suggested: Engineering with Excel, Larsen, Prentice Hall, 2002; A Guide to MS Excel 2002 for scientists and engineers, Liengme, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2002. Topics Covered: 1. Introduction, Orientation, Engineering problem solving and software development tools (Excel Visual Basic for Applications,), programming style, errors, debugging. 2. Taylor’s series, Numerical errors, Error propagation, Basic concepts of numerical methods (Iteration, Convergence, Order, Stability), Classfication of problems and methods. 3. Finding roots of equations, extrema of functions (single variable). 4. Numerical differentiation and integration of functions. 5. Interpolation, Smoothing, Differentiation and integration of discrete data series. 6. Linear, pseudo-linear and non-linear least squares. 7. Numerical Solution of ODE. 8. Multivariable (Linear Algebra) Methods: Matrices, vectors, System of Linear Equations. 9. Gauss, Gauss-Jordan, LU decomposition, Special cases, Iterative methods. 10. Multivariable Methods: Root finding and search for extrema Nonlinear Least Squares, Numerical solution of system of ODE. 11. Numerical Solution of PDEs, Transient solution of the diffusivity equation (onedim finite difference). 12. Reservoir simulation. 13. Midterm exams, reviews, final examination. Class/Laboratory Schedule: 2 50-min lecture sessions and one 3-hour lab session per week Method of Evaluation: Laboratory Assignments and Participation Class participation and quizzes 1-hour examinations (15 % each, 4) Homework Total

20% 10% 60% 10% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students an overview of numerical methods used in the oil and gas industry. General Education Equips students with skills to select appropriate numerical method; Provides programming and other computer skills.

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Select numerical methods suitable for commonly arising Petroleum Engineering problems. Program simple methods in a high level programming language and use available software resources. Recognize main features of numerical problems and algorithms (e.g., single or multi variable, linear or nonlinear, explicit or implicit), sources of errors.

Program Outcomes 2 11 1, 5

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 11

Prepared by: J. Bryan Maggard, August 17, 2009.

2

Petroleum Engineering 310 
Reservoir Fluids   Credit 4: (3‐3)  Required for Juniors    Catalog  Description:    Thermodynamic  behavior  of  naturally  occurring  hydrocarbon  mixtures;  evaluation  and  correlation of physical properties of petroleum reservoir fluids including laboratory and empirical methods.     Prerequisites(s):  PETE 311; CHEM 107; MEEN 315; MATH 308    Textbook Required:  The Properties of Petroleum Fluids, 2nd ed., McCain, W. D., Penn Well Publishing Co., Tulsa,  Oklahoma, 1990.    Topics Covered:        1. Introduction, Organic Chemistry: Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes, Cycloalyphatic Aromatics, Non‐        Hydrocarbon components.  2. Properties of Pure Substances. Two, Three, and Multi‐component Mixtures. Phase Diagrams.  3. Virtual Lab‐ Orientation, Safety, Determination of Vapor Pressure.  4. Classification and Identification of Reservoirs by Fluid Type.  5. Ideal and Real Gases.  6. Reservoir  Engineering  Properties  of  Gases:  Gas  Formation  Volume  Factor.  Viscosity  (Bg  &  μg  ).  Wet  Gas  Gravity and Isothermal Compressibility.  7. Definition and Evaluation of Black Oil Properties from Field Data.  8. Reservoir  Fluid  Study:  Report,  lab  procedure,  and  determination  of  fluid  properties  from  reservoir  fluid  studies.  9. Field Trip Commercial Fluid Laboratory.  10. Evaluation of Black Oil Properties from Correlations: Bubble point pressure, solution gas oil ratio   (pb  & Rs),  oil density (ρo), compressibility, viscosity (co & μo), and formation and volume factor (Bo).  11. Virtual  Lab‐  Evaluation  of  gas  z‐factor  and  Analysis  of  Leaks.  Bubble  Point  of  Live  Oil  Sample  and  Phase  Envelopes.  12. Surface Separation Calculations and Equilibrium Ratio Correlations.  13. Evaluation of oilfield brine properties: Salinity, Bubble Point, formation volume factor, density and solution  gas water ratio (Bw, ρw, Rsw). Water isothermal compressibility, viscosity (cw, μw).  14. Lab‐ Determination of Viscosity and Surface Tension of Oil, Gas, & Water Samples.  15. Conditions for Hydrate Formation and Hydrate Inhibition Procedures.  16. Cubic Equations of State: Solution of Cubic Equations. Calculations with Equations of State.  17. Virtual Lab‐ Differential Vaporization and Separator Tests of Live Oil Sample.   18. Hydrate formation and inhibition techniques.    Class/Laboratory Schedule:  Three 50‐min lecture sessions per week, and nine 3 hr lab sessions per semester.    Method of Evaluation: 
Homework                              Quizzes          Laboratory         3 Major Examinations (10%, 10%, 15%)  Comprehensive Final Examination      Total              10%  10%  25%  35%  20%  100% 

 

1

Contributions to Professional Component: 
Math and Science  Petroleum Engineering  None  This  course provides  students  with  a  fundamental  background  on  the  determination  and evaluation of fluid properties. It also provides mathematical tools for the analysis  and interpretation of data.  None 

General Education   

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: 
Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to…  Describe how physical properties of hydrocarbon components are affected by molecular  structure, size, pressure, and temperature. Explain the physical meaning and evaluate the  impact of fluid properties in reservoir engineering and production problems.  Compute formation volume factors, viscosities, solution gas‐oil ratio, densities of oil, water  and gas, Z‐factor (single and two‐phase), and interfacial tensions.  Calculate gas, oil, and oilfield brine properties (z‐factor, density, viscosities) using various  correlations with different independent variables: gas or oil composition, API gravity, gas  gravity, salinity, bubblepoint pressure, and temperature.  Calculate the specific gravity of a wet gas mixture by recombination using production data  and:  all surface compositions, or separator composition, or properties of the separator gas.  Describe the laboratory procedures required for a Reservoir Fluid Study and calculate  reservoir fluid properties (formation volume factors, solution gas oil ratios) from the PVT data  obtained from a virtual PVT lab simulation.  Determine and analyze values of oil and gas formation volume factors, saturation pressures,  compressibilities, and solution gas oil ratios, given raw PVT data from a reservoir fluid study  and pressure‐production field production history of oil and gas.  Design optimal separator conditions from a simulated virtual PVT laboratory test by  maximizing the API gravity of the oil.  Determine and analyze the dependence of oil viscosity with temperature and oil gravity, by  conducting laboratory experiments.  Determine and analyze the dependence of interfacial tension with temperature and type of  mixtures: oil, water and surfactant solution; by conducting laboratory experiments.  Calculate phase boundaries (bubble point or dew points), and two‐phase phase equilibrium  separations given overall mixture composition, pressure (or temperature), and equilibrium  ratios (k‐values) from: ideal solution models, from correlations or from table lookup.  Evaluate and Design a hydrate inhibition scheme using the virtual PVT lab by assessing the  economic a technical impact of inhibitors and inhibitor concentrations upon the temperatures  and pressures at which hydrate formation occurs.    Related Program Outcomes:  No.  PETE graduates must have…  1  An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.  2  An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.  An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic  3 
constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,  manufacturability, and sustainability. 

Program  Outcomes 

11  1 

5  5 

1,3,5 

5  2,3,5  2  2 

1,5 

2,11 

5  11 

An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.  An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for  engineering practice 

  Prepared by: Maria Barrufet, August, 7, 2009. 

2

Petroleum Engineering 311 Reservoir Petrophysics Credit 4: (3-3) Required for Sophomores Catalog Description: Systematic theoretical and laboratory study of physical properties of petroleum reservoir rocks; lithology, porosity, elastic properties, strength, acoustic properties, electrical properties, relative and effective permeability, fluid saturations, capillary characteristics, and rock-fluid interaction. Prerequisites(s): MEEN 221; GEOL 104; MATH 308 or registration therein Textbook Required: Tiab, D., Donaldson, E.C.: Petrophysics: Theory and Practice of Measuring Reservoir Rock and Fluid Transport Properties, 2nd edition, Elsevier, New York, NY, 2004. Recommended Optional Texts: (i) Von Gonten, W.D., McCain, W.D., Jr., Wu, C.H., Petroleum Engineering 311 Course Notes (available on web) (ii) Jorden, J.R. and Campbell, F.L.: Well Logging I—Rock Properties, Borehole Environment, Mud and Temperature Logging, SPE Monograph Series No. 9, SPE, Richardson, TX (1984); (iii) Jorden, J.R. and Campbell, F.L.: Well Logging II—Electric and Acoustic Logging, SPE Monograph Series No. 10, SPE, Richardson, TX (1984); (iv) Schon, J.H. Physical Properties of Rocks: Fundamentals & Principles of Petrophysics, 2nd edition, Pergamon Press. New York, NY, 1996 Topics Covered: 1. Introduction 2. Pore space properties, Porosity, permeability 3. Elastic properties of rocks; Rock Compressibility 4. Acoustic properties of rocks 5. Darcy’s Equation, Liquid and Gas Permeability 6. Application of Darcy’s Equation 7. Boundary Tension, Wettability 8. Capillary Pressure 9. Fluid Saturations 10. Two-Phase Relative Permeability 11. Rock fluid interactions 12. Statistical Analysis of Reservoir Data 13. Examinations Class/Laboratory Schedule: Three 50-min lecture sessions and a 1.5 hr lab session per week Method of Evaluation: Laboratory Sessions Homework Weekly Quizzes Major Examinations Total

25% 15% 15% 45% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students a detailed understanding of the rock and rock-fluid properties of oil and gas reservoirs; an understanding of the Darcy equation and how to apply it to various geometrics; an understanding of laboratory measurements of rock and rock-fluid properties; and a basic understanding of fluid flow in porous media. General Education Provides students an understanding of the design of experiments; how to analyze and interpret experimental data; and an ability to prepare laboratory reports.

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Define porosity, discuss the factors which effect porosity, and describe the methods of determining values of porosity Define elastic and acoustic properties and rock strength and factors affecting them Define compressibility of reservoir rocks and describe methods for determining values of formation compressibility Define permeability and its determinants and measurement Reproduce the Darcy equation in differential form, explain its meaning, integrate the equation for typical reservoir system, calculate the effect of fractures and channels Explain boundary tension and wettability and their effect on capillary pressure, describe methods of determining capillary pressure, and convert laboratory capillary pressure values to reservoir conditions Describe method of determining fluid saturations in reservoir rock and show relationship between fluid saturation and capillary pressure Define electrical properties of rock, resistivity index, saturation exponent, and cementation factor and show their relationship and uses; conduct experiments to measure electrical properties of rocks; and demonstrate the calculations necessary in analyzing laboratory measurements Define effective and relative permeability; reproduce typical relative permeability curves and show effect of saturation history on relative permeability; and demonstrate some uses of relative permeability data Develop data analysis skills and be able to report in written form

Program Outcomes 1,5 1,5 1,2 1,2,5 1,2,5

1,2,5

2,1,5 1,2,5

1,2,5

2, 7

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 7 An ability to communicate effectively.

Prepared by: Ahmad Ghassemi, 6 August, 2009

2

PETE-311 - Lab Safety Syllabi Requirement

Petroleum Engineering 314 Transport Processes in Petroleum Production Credit 3: (3-0) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: The course covers basics and applications of fluid mechanics (statics; mass, energy, and momentum balances; laminar and turbulent flow, Reynolds number, Moody diagram; flow of non-Newtonian fluids; multi-phase flow; flow in porous media, non-Darcy flow) and of heat transfer (heat conduction and convection). It emphasizes analogies within transport phenomena and provides tools to the analysis and selection of pumps, compressors and heat exchangers. Prerequisites(s): PETE 311; CVEN 305; MEEN 315; MATH 308 Textbook Required: Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers – Noel De Nevers –3rd (or higher) Edition, McGraw-Hill. Topics Covered: 1. Introduction: Transport processes and fluid mechanics; Concepts, properties, and techniques 2. Fluid statics: Calculation of pressure, force, area; Pressure measurement 3. Mass balance: steady state and unsteady state 4. Energy balance: the extended Bernoulli’s equation; Fluid-flow measurements 5. Fluid friction characterization, Reynolds number, Laminar and turbulent flow, Minor losses 6. Non-Newtonian fluid flow: models and calculations; Starting and stopping flows, water hammer 7. Gas flow; Chokes, Flow in gas wells 8. Dimensional Analysis 9. Pumps and compressors: Positive displacement and Centrifugal, axial 10. Gas-liquid flows; Surface tension effects 11. Flow in porous media, Darcy flow, non-Darcy flow, Ergun equation 12. Heat and mass transfer: conduction and convection 13. Heat exchangers 14. Analogies and differential models

Class/Laboratory Schedule: 3 50-min lecture sessions per week Method of Evaluation: Class work & Mini-quizzes Homework Mid-term Examinations Final Examination Total

10% 5% 60% 25% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students the basics and petroleum engineering applications of fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer and related transport phenomena. Prepares students for design and analysis of fluid and heat flow systems, including wells, pumps, and heat exchangers. General Education Improves the ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems, equip.

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Write and apply macroscopic mass, energy, and momentum balances for flow systems. Calculate frictional losses in pipes for the cases of laminar and turbulent flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Solve flow problems involving compressible and two–phase fluids. Calculate pressure losses in porous medium for the case of Darcy and nonDarcy flow. Design and analyze the operation of pumps and compressors. Utilize the analogy between fluid mechanics and other transport processes and apply the techniques to well-reservoir systems. Design and analyze the operation of heat exchangers.

Program Outcomes 1, 5 1,5,11 1, 5 1, 5 3,11 1,11 3

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. An ability to design a system component or process to meet desired needs within realistic 3 constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering 11 practice.

Prepared by: Peter P. Valko, 6 Aug. 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 321 Formation Evaluation Credit 4: (3-3) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: Introduction to well logging methods & evaluation of well logs for formation evaluation. Basic logging principles, theory of tool operation, analysis of open hole logs to estimate, rock and fluid description and evaluation from open hole logsproperties, including determination of porosity, net pay thickness and saturation. Capillary pressure-saturation relationships, shaly sand analysis, core-log integration and resource determination. Prerequisites(s): PETE 301, 310, 311; GEOL 404; or approval of instructor Textbook Required: Halliburton “Open Hole Log Analysis and Formation Evaluation” obtained at TEES Copy Center Room 221 in WERC. Topics Covered: 1. Logging Principles 2. Passive Logs 3. Acoustic Logs 4. Density/Neutron Logs 5. Porosity, Lithology Determination 6. Resistivity Logging 7. Capillary Pressure & Saturation 8. Shaly-Sand Analysis 9. Core-log integration 10. Net pay, Resources, and Reserves

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Three 50-min lecture sessions & one lab session per week Method of Evaluation: Quizzes Mid-Term Project Report Final Examination Total

20% 25% 25% 30% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering All topics relate to the application of scientific principles to the solution of formation evaluation problems. General Education None

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Identify the basic physical principles of the common open hole logging measurements in order to evaluate formation properties. Interpret common open hole logging measurements for lithology, porosity, and water saturation estimates and their associated limitations and uncertainties. Calculate basic wireline log evaluations on a representative, commercial software package. Integrate wireline logging data with basic core data in order to assess formation lithology, porosity, and permeability. Manipulate log data to make cross sections and maps and calculate reservoir volumes and hydrocarbons in place. Identify the ability of wireline logging surveys to be incorporated into integrated reservoir studies.

Program Outcomes 1, 11 1,5,11

1,4,5,11,12 1, 2, 5, 11 1, 4, 5, 11, 12 3, 5, 10, 11, 12

Related Program Outcomes:
No. 1 2 PETE graduates must have… An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems A knowledge of contemporary issues An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. An ability to deal with the high level of uncertainty in definition and solution of petroleum reservoir problems.

3 4 5 10 11 12

Prepared by: David S. Schechter, 10 August 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 322 Geostatistics Credit 3: (3-0) Technical Elective Catalog Description Introduction to geostatistics; basic concepts in probability and univariate statistics; bivariate statistics and spatial relationship; covariance and correlation; second order stationarity; variogram estimation and modeling; spatial estimation and reservoir modeling; simple and ordinary kriging; uncertainty analysis; estimation versus conditional simulation; sequential Gaussian simulation. Prerequisite(s): Instructors Permission. Text Book Kelkar M., Perez G., (2002): Applied Geostatistics for Reservoir Characterization. Society of Petroleum Engineers, Texas. Reference Texts You may find the following texts as useful references for this course. 1. Jensen J.L., Lake L.W., Corbett P.W.M, and Goggin D.J., (2000): Statistics for Petroleum Engineers and Goescientists, 2nd edition, Elsevier Science. 2. Goovaerts P., (1997): Geostatistics for Natural Resources Evaluation. Oxford University Press. 3. Deutsch C.V., Journel A.G., (1998): GSLIB: Geostatistical Software Library and User's Guide. Oxford University Press, New York. Topics Covered

1. Introduction to Geostatistics and Spatial Modeling 2. Review of Probability and Statistics; 3. Univariate Distributions (PDF and CDF); Statistical Measures; Statistical Moments and
Expectations; Properties of Moments and Expectations

4. Common PDFs; Normal Distribution; Properties of Normal PDF and Test of Normality;
Log-Normal Distribution

5. Probability Mapping and CDF Transformation; Normal Score Transform; Monte Carlo
Method;

6. Bivariate Analysis (Joint Distributions); Covariance and Correlation; Joint Normal
Distribution 7. Linear Regression & Least-Squares; Estimators and Their Properties; Residual Analysis and Coefficients of Determination 8. Confidence Intervals; t-Student-test and F-test; 9. Spatial Relationships and Basic Concepts; Stationarity, Autocovariance, and Autocorrelation 10. Stationarity; Variograms Estimation and Variograms; 11. Modeling Geological Media; Linear Interpolation (Kriging); 12. Simple Kriging; Ordinary Kriging; and Universal Kriging 13. Estimation versus Simulation; Sequential Gaussian Simulation Class/Laboratory Schedule: Three 50-min lecture sessions per week

1

Evaluation Method The final grade in the course is calculated as a weighted average of the required assignments and examinations during the course with the following weights: HOMEWORK: QUIZZES: EXAM 1: EXAM 2: FINAL EXAM: FINAL PROJECT: 20% 15% 15% 15% 20% 15% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Provides students with an understanding of the stochastic nature of Engineering reservoir properties and the uncertainty in performance forecasting. Students learn about statistical approaches to quantify variability in geologic media, spatial relationship amongst data and uncertainty in estimates and demonstrate the ability to build simple geologic models by integrating diverse data types. General Education The students learn about the interdisciplinary nature of Petroleum Engineering and need for interaction with geoscientists.

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will Program Outcomes be able to… Students will combine statistical methods and geological information to 1, 2, 11, 12 analyze and explore subsurface data. Students will produce and interpret estimation errors for their 1, 2, 11, 12 calculations of reservoir properties. Students will use geostatistical methods to model reservoir properties. 4, 5, 11,12

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 4 Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 11 An ability to deal with the high level of uncertainty in definition and solution of 12 petroleum reservoir problems.

Prepared by: Akhil Datta-Gupta, August 13, 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 323 Reservoir Models Credit 3: (3-0) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: Determination of reserves; material balance methods; aquifer models; fractional flow and frontal advance; displacement, pattern, and vertical sweep efficiencies in waterfloods; enhanced oil recovery processes; design of optimal recovery processes. Prerequisites(s): PETE 301, 310, 311; GEOL 404 Textbook Required: Fundamentals of Reservoir Engineering, L. P. Dake, Elsevier Scientific Publishing Co, New York, 1978. The Reservoir Engineering Aspects of Waterflooding, Forrest F. Craig, Jr., Monograph 3, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Dallas, 1971. The Properties of Petroleum Fluids, William D. McCain, 2nd Edition, PennWell Publishing Co., Tulsa, OK, 1990. Class Notes (handouts and power point presentations available at http://pumpjack.tamu.edu/~daulat/PETE323). Selected SPE papers available online from the Image SPE library.

Topics Covered:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Introduction Reservoir classification PVT properties of oil and gas; adjustments for separator conditions Volumetric estimate of hydrocarbons-in-place Fluid gradients and pressure regimes Gas material balance, gas recovery factor and gas production forecasting General material balance equation Havlena-Odeh linear material balance equation and examples Reservoir drive mechanisms and recovery factors Darcy’s law Two-phase flow, relative permeability, mobility ratio Natural water influx; steady state models, van Everdingen-Hurst unsteady state model; Klins-Bouchard-Cable method; history matching; Carter-Tracy model Wettability, capillarity, interfacial tension Immiscible displacement; vertical and diffuse flow Fractional flow Buckley-Leverett 1D displacement Oil recovery by Buckley-Leverett-Welge method Segregated flow and oil recovery: Dietz model Waterflooding – Intro, patterns recovery efficiency 5-spot areal sweep efficiency Well injectivity for various patterns Quantifying permeability variation Vertical sweep efficiency: Dykstra-Parsons model 5-spot waterflood forecast using Buckley-Leverett model; waterflood example Reserves estimation Introduction and principles of EOR: CO2 flooding, alkali-surfactant-polymer flooding; steam injection

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

Class/Laboratory Schedule: Three 50-min lecture sessions per week

1

Method of Evaluation: Attendance and Quizzes Homework First Exam Second Exam Final Examination Total

15% 20% 20% 20% 25% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Fundamental background on the use of material balance methods to determine oil and gas in place given reservoir, production, and fluid property data. Tools to estimate reserves and to determine the performance of oil and gas reservoirs. A critical overview of currently used methods to improve oil recovery and criteria for determining the appropriate method. General Education None Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Understand and use basic project economic evaluation. Derive and use the gas material balance coupled with forecasting. Derive and use the oil material balance coupled with forecasting. Derive and describe immiscible frontal advance theory and applications. Recognize mechanisms and understand appropriate application situations and advantages of common assisted and enhanced recovery methods.

Program Outcomes 1 2, 5 2, 5 5 11

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Prepared by: Daulat D. Mamora, August 13, 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 324 Well Performance Credit 3: (3-0) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: Steady-state, pseudosteady-state, and transient well testing methods to determine well and reservoir parameters used in formation evaluation; applications to wells that produce gas and liquid petroleum; rate forecasting; deliverability testing. Prerequisites(s): PETE 301; 310; 311; GEOL 404 Textbook Required: 1. Fundamentals of Formation Testing, Schlumberger (2006). (Schlumberger donation) 2. Earlougher, R.C., Jr: Advances in Well Test Analysis, Monograph Vol. 5, SPE (1977). 3. Horne, R.N.: Modern Well Test Analysis: A Computer-Aided Approach, Petroway (1995). 4. Dake, L. P.: The Practice of Reservoir Engineering, Elsevier (2001). 5. Dynamic Flow Analysis, Kappa Engineering (2007). (free — distributed electronically) Topics Covered: Module 1: Introductory Materials, Objectives of well tests, reservoir models, and plotting methods. Module 2: Fundamentals of Flow in Porous Media, Material balance concepts (constant compressibility and dry gas systems), Steady-state and pseudo-steady state flow concepts, Inflow Performance Relations (IPRs) for Gas-Oil and Gas-Condensate Reservoir Systems, and Development of the diffusivity equation: Liquid and gas systems. Module 3: Solutions/Models for Well Test Analysis, Steady-state, pseudosteady-state, and transient radial flow. Dimensionless variables — radial flow diffusivity equation, Solutions of the diffusivity equation (various cases — concept of "type curves"), Variable-rate convolution: general and single-rate drawdown cases, and Wellbore Phenomena. Module 4: Well Test Analysis, Variable-rate convolution: Single-rate pressure buildup case. Conventional analysis of pressure drawdown/buildup test data, Analysis of gas well tests, Unfractured and fractured wells, and dual porosity reservoirs, Design of well tests, and Software for the analysis of well test data. Module 5: Analysis and Modeling of Production Data, Production analysis: Introduction, empirical analysis/forecasting, and deliverability testing, Fetkovich-McCray decline type curve analysis, and Software for the analysis of production data. Class/Laboratory Schedule: Three 50-min lecture sessions per week Method of Evaluation: Homework/Quizzes Exercises Homework Problems/Computing Projects Examinations (2) Class Participation/Pop Quizzes Total 10% 10% 35% 35% 10% 100%

1

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science Uses calculus and differential equations, use of graphics (hand and computer) for problem solving. Experimental component of course typically includes a flow and shut-in test on an existing water well. This course provides a complete cycle for modeling flow in porous media from concept to mathematical model to pressure time solution to well test design. The review, analysis, interpretation, and integration of reservoir performance data are employed systematically to assess the properties of the reservoir system. Inverse modeling is used (via a match of the data to a model) as a mechanism to estimate reservoir properties from well test and production data responses. Specifically, the student will master graphical techniques to estimate reservoir properties from well test and production data responses. The condition of the well and the well completion are also addressed, and the state of damage or stimulation is assessed. None

Petroleum Engineering

General Education

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Describe terminology and commonly-applied methods for quantifying well performance. Apply Well Test Analysis using Conventional Plots. Apply Well Test Analysis using Type Curve Analysis. Apply Production Data Analysis. Related Program Outcomes: No. 1 2 5 11 12 PETE graduates must have… An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. An ability to deal with the high level of uncertainty in definition and solution of petroleum reservoir problems. Program Outcomes 1, 5, 11,12 2, 11,12 2, 11,12 2, 11,12

Prepared by: Thomas A. Blasingame, 14 August 2009.

2

Petroleum Engineering 325 Petroleum Production Systems Credit 2: (1-3) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: Introduction to production operations and oil field equipment, multiphase flow in pipes, bottomhole pressure prediction, inflow/outflow performance, production systems and backpressure analysis, hydraulic fracturing fluids and equipment; downhole and artificial lift equipment, tubulars, workover/completion nomenclature and procedures; produced fluids, fluid separation and metering, safety systems, pressure boosting and monitoring. Prerequisites(s): PETE 301, 310, 314 Textbook Required: Petroleum Production Engineering: A Computer-Assisted Approach, Boyun Guo, William C. Lyons and Ali Ghalambor. ISBN 0750682701. Elsevier Science & Technology Books (2007) (PPE in attached schedule). There will be some reading assignments from other sources. Instructions for accessing such additional material will be provided as needed. Topics Covered: The connecting theme of the topics is to follow flow of fluids from the reservoir/well interface through the well and surface facilities, with emphasis on hardware components, their functions and importance: 1. Reservoir performance as it pertains to well inflow 2. Overview of well hardware and completions—connection of well to the reservoir and the surface 3. Fundamentals of Single Phase Fluid Flow in Pipe (vertical, horizontal, angled) 4. Multiphase Flow in Pipes 5. Surface equipment—safety valves, chokes, separation and metering 6. Overview of artificial lift methods—rod pump, gas lift, ESP Class/Laboratory Schedule: One 50-min lecture session & one 3-hour lab session per week Method of Evaluation: Homework Assignments 15% Classroom, Field Trip, Lab & Workshop Participation 10% In-classs quizzes 10% Laboratory Reports & Quizzes 25% Midterm Exam 20% Final Exam 20% Total 100% Grades: A = 90 or greater; B = 80 – 89; C = 70 – 79; D = 60 – 69; F = below 60

1

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students with the vocabulary and hands-on equipment experience to function in the modern oil field. Develops basic skills needed for more advanced senior level design classes. General Education Equips students with laboratory skills and decision process of selecting from competing technologies. Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, you will be able to… …describe the basic components and methods used to complete and produce oil and gas wells …describe the basic components that comprise oil and gas production and separation surface facilities …calculate expected fluid pressure losses through components of a basic petroleum production system. …choose appropriate size and materials for components of well completions, flowlines and separation facility equipment based upon expected fluid properties and throughput. …describe appropriate well stimulation technologies and/or artificial lift based upon well construction, fluid properties and inflow characteristics …design, conduct and analyze laboratory experiments to confirm physical properties of completion and stimulation fluids. …design, conduct and analyze laboratory experiments to compare different flow and pressure measuring devices. …design, conduct and analyze laboratory experiments to confirm fluid pressure losses in tubing/piping in single and two-phase flow, to confirm separator performance in two-phase flow and to confirm single phase pump flow performance. …design, conduct and analyze laboratory experiments to confirm conditions for various flow regimes during gas and liquid production from a production well. Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data 3 An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems 7 An ability to communicate effectively Prepared by: Robert H. Lane, 10 August 2009 Program Outcomes 7 7 1, 5 1, 3, 5 1, 3 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2 1, 2

2

PETE-325 - Lab Safety Syllabi Requirement

Petroleum Engineering 335 Technical Presentations I Credit 1: (1-0) Required for Sophomores Catalog Description: Preparation of a written technical paper on a subject related to petroleum technology and an oral presentation of the paper in a formal technical conference format; oral presentations judged by petroleum industry professionals. Prerequisites(s): COMM 205; approval of department head. Textbook Required: SPE Style Guide, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX, 2007; excerpts from other sources provided as class notes Topics Covered: 1. Introduction; library notes 2. Determining audience and purpose; writing abstracts 3. Writing lab reports, conclusions, titles 4. Citations and references, introductions 5. Figures and tables 6. Equations, lists 7. Introduction to library and literature database resources; avoiding plagiarism, copyright infringement 8. Conducting and writing a review of technical literature 9. Engineering method vs. scientific method 10. Writing a technical proposal 11. Writing titles, abstracts for technical papers 12. Writing the technical paper 13. Designing and developing PowerPoint slides 14. Developing and delivering the oral presentation Class/Laboratory Schedule: One 50-min lecture session per week Method of Evaluation: Weekly class exams Weekly Written Assignments Presentation Slides Written Report Total

20% 25% 15% 40% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides skills to identify and propose plans for solution of petroleum engineering problems General Education Provides skills to formulate technical proposals, present them in written form and orally in a professional setting

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Identify an engineering problem in the oil and gas industry, either general in nature or related to a specific field Search modern electronic databases containing literature in petroleum technology to find papers related to the engineering problem identified, and compile a bibliography in SPE format Read papers found in the literature search, identify those that are relevant to the problem chosen, and summarize the relevance of each in two or three sentences Prepare a literature review, properly citing references using the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) guidelines, summarizing what has been done by previous authors to address the problem of interest, the weaknesses in previous solutions or what has not been done, and the need for further study Set objectives (consistent with identified study needs) for an independent study (that can be completed using only resources that are reasonably certain to be available to the student) of the petroleum engineering problem identified Prepare a plan, consisting of proposed methodology, available data and a list of tasks, to accomplish the study objectives Identify the significance, potential benefits, and possible applications of the anticipated results of the independent study Write a title and abstract for the study proposal consistent with SPE standards Prepare Microsoft PowerPoint slides for an oral presentation of the proposed study Present the proposal orally to a panel of practicing engineers from the petroleum industry and faculty members in 10 to 15 minutes, using PowerPoint slides

Program Outcomes 5, 9 5, 9, 11

5, 9

5, 6, 7, 9

3, 5, 9

3, 5, 9, 11 3, 8, 9 7 7, 11 7

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 3 An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems 6 An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility 7 An ability to communicate effectively 8 The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context 9 A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Prepared by: W. John Lee, 19 August 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 400 Cross-listed with Geology 400 Integrated Reservoir Design Credit 3: (2-3) Required for Seniors Catalog Description: An integrated geoscience and reservoir engineering design experience for senior students in petroleum engineering, geology and geophysics; includes using geophysical, geological, petrophysical and engineering data; emphasis on reservoir description (reservoir and well data analysis and interpretation), reservoir modeling (simulation), reservoir design (production optimization) and economic analysis (property evaluation). Prerequisites(s): GEOL 404; PETE 310, 321, 323, 324, 401, 403, 435 Textbook Required: None Topics Covered: 1. Introduction to integrated reservoir studies 2. Log analysis 3. Geological description-facies, mapping 4. Geophysical description 5. Integrated reservoir characterization 6. Reservoir model construction 7. Reservoir model calibration 8. Economic and risk analysis 9. Optimization of development plan 10. Final Presentations Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 50-min lecture sessions & one 3-hr lab session per week Method of Evaluation: Oral Presentations Written Reports Weekly Tests Participation, Professionalism Total

30% 45% 20% 5% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students with skills in the application of geoscience and engineering data and methods to develop petroleum reservoir descriptions and models and to design optimum reservoir development plans. General Education Provides students with experience working in multidisciplinary teams.

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Work effectively, as measured by peer and instructor evaluations, on a multidisciplinary team consisting of geophysicists, geologists, and petroleum engineers. Explain how to conduct an integrated reservoir study, including the components of a study and the data required. Develop a complete description of a hydrocarbon reservoir using geoscientific and engineering methods. Given a complete reservoir description and well data, design, construct, execute, and quality check a reservoir simulation model. Successfully calibrate a reservoir simulation model against observed performance data. Predict and optimize reservoir performance using reservoir simulation, economic modeling, and uncertainty assessment. Effectively communicate the results of an integrated reservoir study orally and in written reports.

Program Outcomes 4

4, 5, 11, 12 2, 4, 11, 12 3, 4, 11, 12 4, 11, 12 3, 4, 5, 11, 12 4, 7, 12

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret 2 data An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability. 3 4 Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 7 An ability to communicate effectively. 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 12 An ability to deal with the high level of uncertainty in definition and solution of petroleum reservoir problems.

Prepared by: Duane A. McVay, 23 July 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 401 Reservoir Simulation Credit 3: (2-3) Required for Seniors Catalog Description: Solution of production and reservoir engineering problems using state-of-the-art commercial reservoir simulation software, using data commonly available in industry. Emphasis on reservoir description, reservoir model design and calibration, production forecasting and optimization, economic analysis and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites(s): PETE 310, 321, 323, 324, 325, 403 Textbook Required: None. Mattax, C.C. and Dalton, R.L.: Reservoir Simulation, Monograph Series, SPE, Richardson, TX (1990) 13, is optional. Lecture Topics Covered: 1. Introduction to reservoir simulation 2. Reservoir simulation fundamentals 3. Data required for a simulation study 4. Model design concepts 5. Interpreting simulation results 6. Fieldwide simulation 7. Aquifer modeling 8. History matching 9. Performance prediction 10. Reservoir optimization 11. Uncertainty quantification Lab Topics Covered: 1. Software Tutorial 2. Pressure transient test simulation 3. Hydraulic fractured well modeling 4. Horizontal well modeling 5. Coning simulation 6. Pattern waterflood simulation 7. Gas field simulation 8. Volatile oil reservoir simulation Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 50-min lecture sessions & one 3-hr lab session per week Method of Evaluation: Laboratory Reports Daily Quizzes Mid-Term Examination Final Examination Total

30% 15% 25% 30% 100%

1

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students with knowledge of the theory and application of petroleum reservoir simulation. Students acquire skills in designing and calibrating reservoir simulation models, and using them to optimize reservoir development plans. General Education Provides skills in career goal-setting, life-long learning motivated by career goals, and personal finance.

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Explain reservoir simulation fundamentals- the underlying equations and the numerical techniques used to solve them. Design a reservoir simulation model, construct the data set, execute the simulator, and view simulation results visually using post-processing software. Plan and conduct the calibration of a reservoir simulation model. Predict and optimize future performance of petroleum reservoirs using reservoir simulation and economic models. Apply reservoir simulation technology to solve production and reservoir engineering problems in individual wells or patterns. Apply reservoir simulation technology to solve production and reservoir engineering problems in entire fields or reservoirs. Effectively present results of an engineering study in a written report. Set personal career and financial goals, including personal investment planning, financial management, and a life-long learning plan.

Program Outcomes 1 1, 5, 11, 12

1, 3, 5, 11, 12 1, 3, 5, 11, 12 1, 5, 11, 12 1, 5, 11, 12 7 9

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 3 An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 7 An ability to communicate effectively. 9 A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning. 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 12 An ability to deal with the high level of uncertainty in definition and solution of petroleum reservoir problems. Prepared by: Duane A. McVay, 5 August 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 403 Petroleum Project Evaluation Credit 3: (3-0) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: Analysis of investments in petroleum and mineral extraction industries; depletion, petroleum taxation regulations, and projects of the type found in the industry; mineral project evaluation case studies. Prerequisites(s): PETE 301, 310, 311, 314 Textbook Required: Mian, M. A., Project Economics and Decision Analysis, Volume I: Deterministic Models and Volume II: Probabilistic Models, PennWell (Tulsa) 2002. Topics Covered: 1. Time value of money 2. Personal investments 3. Reserves and resources classification 4. Reserves estimation a. Decline curves b. Volumetric method and analogy c. Gas material balance 5. Before-tax cash flow 6. After-tax cash flow 7. International contracts 8. Yardsticks 9. Selecting investments 10. Statistics and probability 11. Expected value and decision trees 12. Risk preference 13. Simulation Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 75-min lecture sessions per week Method of Evaluation: Homework Daily Quizzes Exam 1 Exam 2 Final Examination Total

15% 20% 20% 20% 25% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students the tools required to analyze investments in the petroleum industry. Emphasizes the risk and uncertainty in petroleum investments and the stochastic nature of petroleum reservoir operations. Illustrates how petroleum investments are tied to the commercial system dominant in the western world and in much of the rest of the world. General Education Emphasizes the cultural, governmental, and environmental constraints on petroleum engineering projects. Discusses personal finance and investment planning.

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Be able to categorize petroleum reserves and to estimate proved reserves using volumetric, decline curve, and material balance (p/z) methods; also, be able to forecast future production rates vs. time. Be able to state, in concise summary form, the fundamental forms of ownership of petroleum resources, and laws, fiscal systems and financial interests pertinent to their exploitation in the United States and internationally. Be able to perform basic cash flow analysis for petroleum projects and determine whether proposed projects are acceptable or unacceptable and, in a given list of acceptable projects, be able determine which projects are most attractive. Be able to evaluate uncertainty in reserve estimates and economic appraisal. Be able to set personal financial goals and establish an investment plan to reach these goals. Be able to incorporate social, political, cultural, and environmental factors into decision making.

Program Outcomes 11

8

11,

11, 12 9 8, 10

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 8 The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context 9 A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning. 10 A knowledge of contemporary issues 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 12 An ability to deal with the high level of uncertainty in definition and solution of petroleum reservoir problems. Prepared by: W. John Lee, 10 August 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 405 Drilling Engineering Credit 3: (3-0) Required for Seniors Catalog Description: The design and evaluation of well drilling systems; identification and solution of drilling problems; wellbore hydraulics, well control, casing design; well cementing, wellbore surveying. Prerequisites(s): PETE 225, 321, 325, 403 Textbooks Required: Applied Drilling Engineering, by Adam T. Bourgoyne Jr., Martin E. Chenevert, Keith K. Millheim and F.S. Young Jr., Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX, 1991. Topics Covered: 1. The drilling rig, terminology, drilling fluids 2. Drilling problems and solutions 3. Wellbore hydraulics and design of circulation system 4. Casing design procedures; collapse, burst, tension 5. Abnormal pressures prediction, well control 6. Fracture gradient prediction 7. Well design for safety and efficiency 8. Design of primary and secondary cementing jobs 9. Liner cementing, setting of cement plugs 10. Directional drilling, wellbore surveying techniques 11. Horizontal drilling, coiled tubing drilling Class/Laboratory Schedule: Three 50-min lectures per week. Method of Evaluation: Weekly Tests Examinations Design Project Total

20% 50% 30% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Petroleum Engineering science and design General Education None

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Design and evaluate well drilling systems; identify and solve drilling problems for all well geometries including directional and horizontal wells. Calculate the pressure requirement at every stage of the drilling operation from the pump to the bit and back to the surface based on rheological models and drilling hydraulics procedures and the API recommended practices. Design casing, taking into consideration the pore pressure and the fracture gradient of the formation. Establish a proper procedure for well control to ensure the safety of the personnel and to protect the environment. Design a proper cementing procedure for cementing the casing or abandoning a well, taking into considerations the environmental and legal issues.

Program Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5 1, 2, 5

1, 2, 3 1, 3, 5, 7 1, 5, 6

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 3 An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 6 An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. 7 An ability to communicate effectively.

Prepared by: Jerome Schubert, 10 August 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 406 Advanced Drilling Engineering Credit 3: (3-0) Satisfies Technical Elective Requirement Catalog Description: Well control; underbalanced drilling; offshore drilling; horizontal, extended reach, multi-lateral drilling; and fishing operations. Prerequisites(s): PETE 405 Textbooks Required: Applied Drilling Engineering, by A.T. Bourgoyne Jr., M.E. Chenevert, K.K. Millheim, and F.S. Young. Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX. 1991. Topics Covered: 1. Introduction to class, review of important topics of previous classes 2. Advanced Well Control topics causes of kicks, kick detection, shut-in procedures, Managed pressure drilling, dual gradient drilling 3. Well Control- Well control equipment, unusual well control operations, shallow gas, subsea operations. 4. Underbalanced Drilling- Introduction to UBD, UBD techniques, benefits of UBD equipment, Selecting an appropriate candidate, and UBD well engineering. 5. Advanced drilling technologies – casing drilling, HPHT, Introduction to Horizontal/Extended Reach/and Multilateral Drilling Fishing Operations 6. Non-conventional drilling methods and equipment including environmental aspects of drilling activities 7. Special topics covered by industry experts Class/Laboratory Schedule: Three 50-min lecture sessions per week Method of Evaluation: Exams (2) Final Project Total

40% 20% 40% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students with an introduction to advanced drilling topics such as well control, underbalanced drilling, modern drilling technologies, designer wells, and fishing operations. General Education None

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… The students will demonstrate knowledge in Blowout Prevention and the environmental and safety consequences of poor well control. The students will demonstrate knowledge of new technology developed for UBD, and governmental, societal, and corporate concerns for Underbalanced Operations. The students will demonstrate knowledge in modern drilling technologies and make decision when to apply them The students will demonstrate knowledge of various Drilling operations including Offshore, costs, and other differences as compared to land operations. The students will demonstrate knowledge of contemporary well design of designer wells (e.g. horizontal, extended reach, and multilateral wells). The students will demonstrate knowledge of the tools and techniques in fishing operations.

Program Outcomes 1, 3, 5 3, 5, 6

3, 5, 11 3, 11

3,5, 10 5, 11

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, 3 health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 6 An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. 10 A knowledge of contemporary issues 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Prepared by: Jerome J. Schubert, and Catalin Teodoriu, 10 August, 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 410 Production Engineering Credit 3: (3-0) Required for Seniors Catalog Description: Fundamental production engineering design, evaluation, and optimization for oil and gas wells, including well deliverability, formation damage and skin analysis, completion performance, and technologies that improve oil and gas well performance including artificial lift and well stimulation. Prerequisites(s): PETE 321, 323, 324, 325, 403 Textbook Required: Economides, M.J., A.D. Hill, and C.E. Ehlig-Economides: Petroleum Production Systems. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1994). Suggested Textbooks: Beggs, H. Dale: Production Optimization Using Nodal Analysis. OGCI Publications, Tulsa (1991); Economides, M et al. Petroleum Well Construction, Wiley, 1998; Ely, John W.: Stimulation Engineering Handbook. PennWell Publishing Company, Tulsa, Oklahoma, (1994); Holditch et al. Advances in hydraulic fracturing, SPE Monograph No 12 (1989); Penberthy, W.L. Jr. and C.M. Williams, B.B., J.L. Gidley, and R.S. Schechter: Acidizing Fundamentals; and SPE Monograph Volume 6, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, Texas (1979). Topics Covered: 1. Overview of production system concepts, completion, stimulation and artificial lift 2. Inflow performance of oil, gas and two-phase wells 3. Inflow performance of horizontal wells 4. Formation damage and damage skin factor 5. Completion hardware 6. Completion performance and completion skin factor 7. Flow in wellbore for single phase and multi-phase 8. Well deliverability and nodal analysis 9. Hydraulic fracturing design 10. Fractured well performance diagnosis 11. Other stimulation options 12. Artificial lift, rod pump, ESP and gas lift 13. Production related environmental problems Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 75-min lecture sessions per week Method of Evaluation: Homework assignments Design Project Midterm Examinations (25% each, 2) Final Examination Total

15% 10% 50% 25% 100%

1

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Provides students with practical skills most often required in everyday Engineering petroleum production. Develops the ability to analyze and design well completions, stimulation treatments and artificial lift systems. General Education Equips students with design and problem solving skills, improves ability to work with a team, and develops analysis and presentation skills. Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students Program Outcomes will be able to… Be able to estimate production performance for oil, gas and two1,3, 5, 11 phase flow wells including reservoir inflow and wellbore flow Be able to evaluate near wellbore problems in oil and gas well 1, 3, 4, 5, 11 production, identify the problems cause by formation damage and well completion and estimate their effect on production Be able to provide – justification for selecting a completion option 3 including perforation, screen, slotted liners and gravel packs. Be able to diagnosis production problems, to identify the source of 3, 5, 11 the problem in the production system, and to select the correct method, stimulation or artificial lift to solve the problems. Be able to design and optimize hydraulic fracture treatment. 1, 3, 5, 11 Be able to select correct stimulation methods for improving 1, 4, 5, 11 production performance (hydraulic fracturing or acid stimulation) Be able to select appropriate artificial lift system including sucker 1,3,5,11 rod pumping, electric submersible pump, progressive cavity pump, hydraulic pump systems and gas lift. Be able to design sucker rod pumping, electric submersible pump, and gas lift. Be able to recognize environmental sensitive issue in production 6,8,11 engineering practice
Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have…

1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and 3 sustainability 4 An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems 6 An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering 8 solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools 11 necessary for engineering practice.

Prepared by: Ding Zhu, August 14, 2009.

2

Petroleum Engineering 416 Production Enhancement Credit 3: (3-0) Senior Technical Elective Catalog Description: Design, diagnosis and solution of production problems, and optimization of the technologies that increase oil and gas well performance. Integration of the different elements of a production system to maximize recovery from a field. Prerequisites(s): PETE 410 Recommended Study Material: • Well Performance, M. Golan, C.H. Whitson, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1991. • Reservoir Engineering Handbook, T. Ahmed, Gulf Professional Publishing, 2001. • Petroleum Production Systems, M. J. Economides, A. D. Hill, and C. Ehlig-Economides, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1994. • Petroleum Engineering Handbook, edited by H.B. Bradley, Society of Petroleum Engineers, 1987. • Supplemental papers from the literature and course notes. Topics Covered: 1. Introduction to integrated production systems: the production system as a network of components through which underground hydrocarbons must flow to reach the surface. 2. Review of reservoir inflow characterization and modeling tools: inflow performance relationships; numerical vs. analytical modeling; steady-state, pseudo steady-state and transient reservoir flow. 3. Review of multiphase flow modeling in wellbores, risers and flowlines: empirical vs. mechanistic models; nodal analysis; steady-state flow models vs. transient flow models; tuning of multiphase flow models; flow assurance issues (i.e. hydrates, asphaltenes, waxes, scales). 4. Choke valves: the function of production choke valves; empirical vs. mechanistic models; critical and subcritical flow; the use of choke valves to handle back-pressure effects along the production system. 5. Surface facilities: production and test separators; treatment facilities; export lines; points of sale. 6. Production optimization techniques: solutions to boost oil production; liquid unloading techniques in gas wells; downhole and seabed water separation. 7. Diagnosis of systems performance: real-time monitoring; production logging; multiphase flow metering; downhole monitoring. 8. Production Allocation: commingling of produced hydrocarbons from different fields through the same export facilities; well testing; fiscal allocation; metering points; metering accuracy; “value adjustment” for hydrocarbons of different quality. 9. Linking the reservoir, the near-wellbore, the wellbore and the surface facilities: the concept of boundary conditions in steady-state flow and transient flow; the “near-wellbore” region; limitations of current modeling tools. 10. Planning short-, medium and long-term optimization of field management: water and gas shutoffs; re-perforation; stimulation; re-completion; debottlenecking of topsides facilities; handling transient flow situations in the system; issues around the chosen export route; offshore vs. onshore scenarios. Class/Laboratory Schedule: Two 75-min lecture sessions per week Method of Evaluation: Homework Mid-term Examination Final Project Total

20% 35% 45% 100%

1

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides students with a clear understanding of the importance of an integrated approach to production enhancement (from reservoir to surface, through the wells and the production network), which is fundamental in modern petroleum engineering. General Education Provides students with experience working in teams, and develops analysis and presentation skills.

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Explain the fundamentals of integrated production systems – the underlying principles and the coupling techniques used to solve them. Build an integrated production model – construct the dataset, execute the simulator, review the results using post-processing software. • Perform a critical review and screening of available input data. • Use sound engineering judgment to estimate values of missing data required to execute the simulator. • Generate and review results to extract relevant information from which the conclusions required to make business decisions can be drawn. Select methods to optimize a production system and maximize the recoverable reserves from a field, given the physical constraints dictated by the production system itself and knowing the limitations of current modeling tools. Identify bottlenecks in a production system Define the concept of “flow assurance” and recognize situations where under- and over-designed production systems can affect the ultimate recovery from a reservoir. Effectively present the results of an engineering study, both orally and in written reports. Work effectively in a team environment, under time constraints.

Program Outcomes 1, 5, 10,11 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12

1, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12

1, 5, 10, 11, 12 1, 5, 7, 10, 12

7 4, 7

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 1 An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering. 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data 3 An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability 4 Ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams. 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. 6 An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. 7 An ability to communicate effectively. 10 A knowledge of contemporary issues 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 12 An ability to deal with the high level of uncertainty in definition and solution of petroleum reservoir problems.

Prepared by: Gioia Falcone, 12 August 2009

2

Petroleum Engineering 435 Technical Presentations II Credit 1: (1-0) Required for Seniors Catalog Description: Preparation of a written technical paper on a subject related to petroleum technology and an oral presentation of the paper in a formal technical conference format; oral presentations are judged by petroleum industry professionals at the departmental student paper contest held during the same academic year. Prerequisites(s): PETE 335; satisfactory performance in PETE 335 student paper contest Textbooks: Required: SPE Style Guide, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX, 2007; Writing Reports With Confidence and Style (downloadable from course website at elearning.tamu.edu) EndNote software (available from sell.tamu.edu) or Zotero software (available from zotero.com); excerpts from other sources provided as class notes Recommended: Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (available from www.amazon.com) Topics Covered: 1. Review of library and literature database resources 2. Conducting and writing a review of technical literature 3. Engineering method vs. scientific method 4. Conducting an independent study of an engineering problem 5. Analysis/interpretation of results and drawing conclusions 6. Organizing the technical paper 7. Writing titles, abstracts 8. Preparing and submitting the technical paper 9. Designing and developing PowerPoint slides 10. Developing and delivering the oral presentation Class/Laboratory Schedule: One 50-min lecture session per week Method of Evaluation: Weekly class exams Weekly Written Assignments Oral Presentation Written Report Total

15% 25% 30% 30% 100%

Contributions to Professional Component: Math and Science None Petroleum Engineering Provides skills to conduct an independent study of a petroleum engineering problem, and to synthesize results and draw appropriate conclusions from the study General Education Provides skills to write technical papers and give oral presentations in a professional setting

1

Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship to Program Outcomes: Course Learning Outcome: At the end of the course, students will be able to… Outline in detail an Introduction for your paper/presentation consisting of problem statement, review of previous work presented in the literature, need for further study, and study objectives Outline in detail a Methodology section for your paper/presentation, including planned tasks, data and methods you will use, and assumptions you will make in the study Prepare a References section, consistent with the SPE style guide, listing all literature cited in the Introduction and Methodology sections Gather information, make calculations and/or analyze data to achieve the specific objectives set in your proposal for an independent study Summarize the results of your independent study in appropriate textual, tabular and graphical forms, consistent with engineering and Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) presentation standards Outline in detail a Discussion section for your paper/presentation, including your analysis and interpretation of study results Draw appropriate conclusions from your study consistent with your project objectives and properly supported by data, calculations and/or analysis Identify limitations of your work and prepare recommendations for further work, if appropriate, supported by evidence presented in the results and discussion of your study Identify the significance, potential benefits, and possible applications of the results and conclusions of your independent study Write a title and abstract for the independent study consistent with SPE standards Prepare the paper describing your independent study consistent with SPE presentation standards Prepare Microsoft PowerPoint slides for your independent study that can be used in an oral presentation to persuade others that the study results, conclusions and recommendations are correct and useful Present the study orally to a panel of practicing engineers from the petroleum industry and faculty members in 10 to 15 minutes, using PowerPoint slides

Program Outcomes 5, 7, 9, 11

3, 5, 7, 9, 11

5, 6, 7, 9 2, 3, 5, 9, 11 2, 7, 11

2, 5, 7, 9, 11 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 2, 3, 5, 7, 9

3, 5, 7, 8, 9 7 7, 11 7, 11

7

Related Program Outcomes: No. PETE graduates must have… 2 An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability 3 5 An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems 6 An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility 7 An ability to communicate effectively. 8 The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context. 9 A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning. 11 An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Prepared by: W. John Lee, 10 August 2009

2

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful