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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I.

Objective: Describe the structure and functions of the circulatory system Values: Appreciation of the works of the circulatory system.

II. Subject Matter: Functions of the Circulatory System A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Specific functions of the circulatory system are: Carry oxygen and digested food to all cells of the body Carry carbon dioxide, water and other wastes to the respective excretory organs Permits white blood cells and anti-bodies to travel to places where they are needed to fight off foreign bodies/ invaders Helps regulate and maintains body temperature The organs of the circulatory system are: heart, blood, blood vessels, lymphatic system. B. Processes: Observing, inferring, communicating C. Materials: Chart of the circulatory system; Cut-out pictures References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: Describe what a body system is. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Present the digestive system What are the parts? Give the function of each part. 2. Presentation Activity: Divide the class into three groups. Provide each group with cut parts of the circulatory system and strip of papers with written function of each part of the system. Let the pupils do these: 1. Examine the drawing/pictures. 2. Put them together to form a body system. a. What body system was formed? b. What organs are found in the body system that you formed?

3. Read the statements on the strips of paper and infer the function of each body organ by matching the strips with the drawing. What is the relationship of these organs to the body system? 4. Write answers on a sheet of paper. 5. Check your inferences with answers found in the module. 3. Concept Formation Class will come up with their definition or circulation. Give parts of the circulatory system Give the function of the organs of the circulatory system IV. Evaluation: Match the function with the part. 1. heart a. carry oxygenated blood to the body tissues 2. blood b. transport medium of the body 3. blood vessels c. pumping organ 4. lymphatic system d. responsible in introducing anti-bodies into the blood stream V. Assignment: What causes blood to circulate? Remarks: ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe the structure and functions of the circulatory system Values: Appreciation of the works of the circulatory system.

II. Subject Matter: Practice desirable habits to care and protect the heart A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The Heart is the pumping organ of the circulatory system. It is about the size of a man's fist. It is located in the breastbone between the lungs with the lower and somewhat to the left. The heart is a powerful and strongest muscle in the human body called cardiac muscle. B. Processes: Observing and identifying C. Materials: Drawings of treated blood samples References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review functions of the circulatory system. B. Presentation: 1. Show an illustration of the human heart. Identify the parts. 2. Activity 1 What are the parts of the human heart? C. Concept Formation: Answer the observation part of the activity. IV. Evaluation: Identify the parts of the heart. Write the name of the part that is corresponding to each letter. A to J. V. Assignment: 1. Name the four chambers of the human heart. 2. What prevents the back flow of blood? 3. Bring film canister, rubber balloon, rubber band, plastic or rubber tube.

Remarks: ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Investigate the effect of exercise on the rate of heartbeat Values: Participate in worthwhile projects

II. Subject Matter: Heartbeats A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The pumping action of the heart is known as the heartbeat. Heartbeat is due to the rhythmic contraction and relaxation of the cardiac muscles. The heart beats at an average of 70 times per minute. Heartbeat between 50 and 90 are within normal range. The stethoscope is the doctor's instrument for listening to heartbeats. B. Processes: Observing, communicating, inferring C. Materials: Stethoscope, watch References: Teacher's Module, p. 2 Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review parts of the heart.

B. Presentation:
1. Show a red stethoscope. Where do you see this instrument? What is the use of the stethoscope? What is a heartbeat? 2. Illustrate how the heartbeat can be felt on the arteries of the temples, wrists or ankles. 3. Activity: How does exercise affect the rate of heartbeat? C. Concept Formation: 1. What is the number of heartbeats per minute while sitting down? 2. What is your heartbeat per minute after an exercise? IV. Evaluation: Give measures to the observations and inferences of the activity. V. Assignment: Count the number of heartbeats per minute of: a. your mother b. younger brother or sister

Remarks: ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Name and describe the different blood vessels Values: Maintaining physical fitness through health. Habits

II. Subject Matter: Blood Vessels A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Arteries and arterioles carry the blood from the heart to the body tissues. Veins and venules carry the blood from the cells back to the heart. Capillaries are the fine microscopic tubes that connect veins and arteries. B. Processes: Observing, identifying, describing C. Materials: Picture with a network of arteries, veins and capillaries References: Teacher's Module, p. 6 Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Check assignment 2. Review activity: How does exercise affect the rate of heartbeats?

B. Presentation:
Show an illustration of the network of arteries; veins and capillaries. Let the pupils identify and differentiate the blood vessels. C. Concept Formation: Teacher explains through the illustration, the description and function of each blood vessel. Reading of the module for verification, page 6. D. Application Activity No. 3 Blood Vessels What is your SCIQ?

E. Enrichment Discuss guidelines on preparing posters. Example: Rhyme, message and number of words

IV. Evaluation: By groups, make posters on how to take care of the blood vessels. V. Assignment: Fill in the Blanks. The circulatory system is made up of the heart and a network of ______ that distribute ______ to the body in the form of blood containing dissolved ______, ______carbon dioxide, and ______. Remarks: _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Identify and name parts of the blood Values: Appreciation of the importance of blood as transport medium of the body.

II. Subject Matter: The Human Blood A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Blood, the red fluid that flows through the blood vessels, is the transport medium of the body. Blood consists of the following: plasma, red blood corpuscles, white corpuscles and platelets. B. Processes: Observing, identifying, describing C. Materials: Microscope, drop of blood on a glass slide, drawing of the parts of the blood References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6, p. 2 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: The use and important parts of a microscope.

B. Presentation:
Describe blood. What are the three kinds of cells in the blood? 1. Activity 1 With the use of a microscope, observe a drop of blood on a slide. 2. Require pupils to draw on a 1/4 piece of paper what they have seen under the microscope. 3. Let them compare their drawing with the drawing on the chart. C. Concept Formation: 1. Pupils will give their description of the different blood cells. 2. Teacher explains through an illustration the different blood cells and their functions. 3. Reading of the textbook for verification. IV. Evaluation: Activity 4 - What is your SCIQ? V. Assignment:

Give the function of each part of the blood.

Remarks: _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Identify the different blood types Values: Knowing one's blood type is important in cases of emergency

II. Subject Matter: Blood Type and Blood Typing A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Blood is classified into four types: Type A, Type B, Type AB and Type 0. Blood is typed acct ding to the presence of antigens in the erythrocytes. If antigen A is present, it is Type A. If antigen B is present, it is Type B. If both antigens are present, it is Type AB. If both antigens are absent, it is Type 0. B. Processes: Observing and describing C. Materials: Drawings of treated blood samples References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6, p. 3 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: Game - "Guess What" Pupil will describe a part of the blood and another pupil will identify the part. 2. Motivation: Do you know your blood type? How did you know it?

B. Presentation:
What are the different blood types? C. Concept Formation: Activity 5 - How is blood type determined? IV. Evaluation: Answer observations and inferences of the activity. V. Assignment:

Get information from your parents, brothers and sisters about their blood types. Ask some information about situations when knowing their blood type was very valuable/helpful.

Remarks: _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe how blood substitution is made Values: Have the proper attitude about blood donation

II. Subject Matter: Blood Transfusion and Blood Substitution A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Blood transfusion or chemotherapy is the transfer of blood into the veins. Blood transfusion is necessary in severe cases of hemorrhages, burns, shock, bleeding disorders and major surgeries. Blood type 0 is called the universal donor. Blood type AB is the universal recipient. B. Processes: Observing, communicating, inferring C. Materials: Blood Type "Sociometric" Diagram References: Teacher's Module,. p. 2 Science & Health 6, p. 4 by Jessie A. Villegas Principles of Science Book Two, p. 345 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review - Blood Typing What is the blood type if there is agglutination or clumping in Serum A? What is the blood type if there is no agglutination or clumping in both serums A and B? 2. Motivation: Pictures of blood letting Have you ever seen a person receiving blood transfusion? What is blood transfusion? 3. Presentation: Have can you determine if you can receive or donate blood? Can a person receive blood from anybody? Can a person donate blood to anybody?

4. Activity 6 How is blood substitution made? Blood Type Sociometric Diagram 5. Concept Formation

IV. Evaluation: Answer observations and inferences of the activity. V. Assignment: Interview some persons in your neighborhood about their blood type. Ask them which blood type so they prefer to have if it is type 0, type B or type A and justify their answers.

Remarks: _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Illustrate the movements of blood throughout the body Values: Maintaining physical fitness through health habits

II. Subject Matter: Paths of blood A. Science Concepts/Ideas: a. Blood circulates throughout the body in specific routes or paths called circuits. b. These circuits are: Pulmonary circulation is the blood circuit between the heart and the lungs. Systematic circulation is the blood circuit between the heart and various organs of the body. Portal circulation is a special blood circuit from the arteries through the main organs of digestion. Renal circulation is the blood circuit through the capillaries to the kidneys. Coronary circulation is the blood circuit within the heart. B. Processes: Observing, communicating, describing C. Materials: Drawing of the circuit of the blood Red and blue ball pen/pencil References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6, P. 4 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review Blood type sociometric diagram Which blood type can donate to all but can receive only from the same type? Which blood type can donate only to its own type but can receive from all? 2. Motivation Flow of traffic especially during the rush hours

B. Presentation:
1. Show an illustration of the flow of blood through the body. 2. Teacher explains through an illustration how blood circulates in the body. a. pulmonary circulation b. systematic circulation

3. Activity 7 How does blood flow throughout the body? Artwork and proper coloring of the diagram C. Concept Formation: Tracing the pulmonary and systematic paths of blood on a diagram IV. Evaluation: Describing pulmonary circulation The path of blood is from the (1) _____ to the (2) _____ out through the pulmonary artery into the lungs, then back to the (3) _____ through the (4) _____ . In the lungs, the red corpuscles take a new supply of oxygen and gives off (5 ) _____ . V. Assignment: 1. Which chamber of the heart contains blood rice in oxygen? 2. Which chambers of the heart contain blood low in oxygen? 3. Which chamber of the heart exerts the greatest force? Remarks: _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Define blood pressure Values: Accuracy in recording blood pressure

II. Subject Matter: Blood Pressure A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Blood Pressure is the force against .the walls of the arteries as the blood is pumped out from the heart. Systole is the highest level of pressure caused by the expansion of the arteries. Diastole is the lowest level of pressure of the arteries. B. Processes: Observing, describing and recording C. Materials: Sphygmomanometer References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6, P. 5 by Jessie A. Villegas Pupil's Text, Science VI Program on Prevention and Control of Cardiovascular Diseases, Philippine Heart Center, DepEd. III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review of the different paths of blood (Game K N B Style) 2. Presentation: Listen to a heartbeat with a stethoscope. What sound do you hear? Teacher explains that lub is produced by the contraction of the ventricles. The dub sound is produced as the ventricles relax. Heartbeat consists of two phases - systole and diastole written as two numbers. Example: 120(systole) and 70(diastole) = 120/70 3. Activity 8 How is blood pressure measured? Invite a resource person to help perform the activity. A resource person may be a school nurse or the clinic teacher. 4. Concept Formation Reading of the sphygmomanometer

Which is the systolic pressure? Which is the diastolic pressure? Recording of the blood pressure systole over diastole. Check how pupils record the readings. IV. Evaluation: 1. What causes the arteries to expand? 2. Where is systolic pressure felt? 3. When do the arteries experience the lowest level of pressure? 4. What blood pressure is commonly used as the normal reference level? V. Assignment: Give some variables that must be considered in determining whether blood pressure is normal, high or low. Remarks: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Identify the dangers of blood loss Values: Develop skills in controlling bleeding to save lives

II. Subject Matter: Blood Clotting and Control of Bleeding A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Clotting of homeostasis refers to the hardening of blood when a blood vessel is ruptured or injured. The dangers of bleeding are hemorrhage and infection. Applying finger pressure and tourniquet can stop bleeding from arteries and veins. B. Processes: Observing, identifying, describing C. Materials: Red marker pen, handkerchief, wooden stick, and pressure point chart References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6, p. 5 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: Blood pressure, systolic and diastolic pressures

B. Presentation:
1. Do you know what a blood clot is? 2. When does it happen? C. Concept Formation: 1. Teacher explains the following: a. Blood clot is a defense mechanism of the body against blood loss. b. Blood clot is produce when platelets disintegrate and produce a substance that unite with calcium and fibrinogen in the blood to form fibrin, which forms a network of sticky threads in which red corpuscles and plasma get entangled. c. Hemophilia is a disease of the blood if it fails to produce clot. d. Danger of bleeding e. How can bleeding be controlled? 2. Activity Let us be first ciders and practice how we can control/stop bleeding. Activity 9 - How can bleeding be controlled?

IV. Evaluation: 1. Pressure points are places where veins and arteries are near the skin and a bone. Give examples of pressure points in the body. (at least 3) 2. Why must a tourniquet be loosened from time to time? 3. What blood cell helps in blood clotting? V. Assignment: Select a partner and bring a big handkerchief. Let us continue our practice of applying finger pressure and the application of tourniquet. Remarks: _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Name common ailments of the circulatory system Values: Maintaining physical fitness through health habits

II. Subject Matter: Common Ailments of the Circulatory System A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The blood diseases are: anemia, leukemia, hemophilia and gangrene. The diseases of the heart are: hypertension or high blood pressure, coronary thrombosis or heart attack, and stroke. B. Processes: Observing, demonstrating, describing C. Materials: Chart of Circulatory Ailment References: Teacher's Module Science & Health 6, p. 6 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: Blood clotting and how to stop bleeding Demonstration on how to apply finger pressure and application of tourniquet

B. Motivation:
Make some word out of the letters on the board. 1. KETSTRO (stroke) 2. HHGIDBLOOPSREUSRE (high blood pressure) 3. TRHAECTTAAK (heart attack)

C. Presentation:
Our lesson is some of the words you made from the letters. These are some of the ailments of the circulatory system. D. Activity: With the use of the chart and a module from the heart and a module from the Heart Center and DepEd, pupils will prepare a chart. First Group char for the disease of the heart Second Group chart for the disease of the blood Blood/Heart diseases Causes treatment

E. Discussion and checking their chart F. Demonstration first aid treatment for coronary thrombosis and stroke IV. Evaluation: Answer the following question. 1. The most serious outcome of coronary disease is a. Kidney trouble c. Heart attack b. Stomach ache d. Cancer of the lungs 2. Narrowing of the arteries is due to a. sugar c. iodine b. cholesterol d. calcium 3. When a person smoke cigarettes, he inhales a. oxygen c. carbon monoxide b. carbon dioxide d. nitrogen V. Assignment: Read from books in the library about the following disease of the heart. a. Rheumatic fever b. Congenital heart diseases Remarks: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Identify the organs of the Human Nervous System Values: Parts are as important as a whole

II. Subject Matter: Organs of the Human Nervous System A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The human nervous system has three major parts: the brain, the spinal cord, and the nerves. The brain and the spinal cord make up the central nervous system. The brain is located in the cranium or skull, is responsible for the processing, sending and receiving the signals that control the body. The spinal cord in the spinal column serves as the main highway for these signals. The network of nerves all over the body makes up the peripheral nervous system. B. Processes: Identifying, describing, communicating C. Materials: Big illustration of the nervous system showing the three major parts References: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6 Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas pp. 22-23 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review What are the different systems of the body? What does each system have? What system regulates all other systems?

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity When you eat, why can you tell the taste of the food you're eating? What tells your tongue the taste? Why can you tell the color or shape of a certain object? 2. Presentation Activity 1 Group the pupils. Give each group jigsaw puzzle of the nervous system with the parts. In the form of a contest, let the pupils arrange the jigsaw puzzle of the nervous system.

Activity 2 Read the following. The human body is made up of cells, tissues, and organs that perform numerous, complex, but well-coordinated tasks, such as voluntary and involuntary movements, thinking, memory and speech. It is obvious that the body must have some kind of central communication network to control, regulate and coordinate all these activities. Activity 3 Answer the attached activity sheet 3. Concept Formation What is the communication network of our body? What are the three main parts of the nervous system? Where is the brain found? What is the function of the brain?

IV. Evaluation: Identify where each part of the nervous system is located. 1. Brain 2. Spinal Cord 3. Nerves V. Assignment: Draw in your drawing booklet the nervous system. Write 2 to 3 sentences about it.

Remarks: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe the structure and enumerate the various functions of the major parts of the brain Values: Respecting others; Being grateful for having a brain

II. Subject Matter: Parts of the Human Brain A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Man is supreme over all living things primarily because of his brain. The brain enables him to see, hear, feel, smell and taste. It is the seat of all thoughts, emotions, imaginations, and intelligence. The brain enables man to perform all conscious and sub-conscious tasks; to experience all unconscious acts, such as breathing, digesting food, perspiring, dreaming, etc. The human brain has a very complex structure. Its three major parts are: the cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the medulla oblongata. The cerebrum is the largest portion of the brain. The cerebrum is divided into: the right hemisphere and the left hemisphere. The cerebrum controls mental processes such as thinking, memorizing and decisionmaking. The cerebellum is also known as the little brain. The medulla oblongata is located at the base of the skull in front of the cerebellum. B. Processes: Identifying, describing, communicating C. Materials: Drawing of the human brain showing its parts References: Teachers Module n Science and Health 6 Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas pp. 24-25 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of assignment 2. Review: Name Game It is found in the skull. It is protected by the spinal column. It is all over the body. Make up the central nervous system. It is the main highway of all signals. It is responsible for processing, sending, and receiving the signals that control the body.

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity

Memory Game Show some pictures posted on a cartolina to the class. Then remove. Let them name the pictures they remember. How many pictures did you remember? What makes you remember them? 2. Presentation Activity 1 Show the illustration of the human grain. Show also the sample brain of a pig. Let them describe the sample. a. How big is the brain? b. What covers the brain? Touch the surface of the brain. Ho'.', does it feel? Cut the brain crosswise. Compare the brain with the illustration. Read the following: Man is supreme over all living things primarily because of his brain. The brain enables him to see, hear, smell, feel and taste. It is the seat of all thoughts, emotions, imaginations, and intelligence. It enables him to perform all conscious and subconscious tasks; to experience all unconscious acts, such as breathing, digesting food, perspiring, dreaming, etc. The human brain has a very complex structure. Its three major parts are: the cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the medulla oblongata. 3. Concept Formation What are the parts of the brain? Where is the cerebrum found? What are the functions of the cerebrum? What is the cerebellum? 4. Application What makes you remember the names of people, events, and places? What gives you the ability to solve problems? What controls the vital functions of the heart, stomach, diaphragm and esophagus? IV. Evaluation: Craw the picture of the brain. Color the cerebrum red, the cerebellum green, and the medulla blue. Write the functions of each part opposite label. V. Assignment: How is your brain different from the brain of an animal? Remarks: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Map the cerebral cortex of its various functions and infer what area of the cortex is used to perform a particular function Values: Protecting ones cerebral cortex; Honesty

II. Subject Matter: The Cerebral Cortex A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The cerebral cortex is that wrinkled and folded outer layer of the cerebrum that really makes man more superior in terms of brain functions and intelligence than all animals. The cerebral cortex is the clearinghouse of all signals being flashed by the nerves from the sensory organs and those signals that are being sent by the brain to the motor muscles and other operative parts of the body. B. Processes: Mapping, inferring, communicating C. Materials: Drawings References: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6 Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas pp. 26-27 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1 Checking of Activities 2. Review: Game Ka Na Ba? Which is not the major parts of the brain? a. medulla c. cerebellum b. cerebrum d. spinal cord It is a part of the brain located at the base of the skull. a. medulla c. cerebellum b. cerebrum d. cortex B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity Do dogs think as we do? How about other animals? What make us different from animals?

2. Presentation

Activity 1 1. Let the children arrange the pieces of cardboard until they form the picture of the cerebrum. 2. In the form of a context, let the pupils match the pats with the picture. 3. Read the following: What really makes man more superior in terms of brain functions and intelligence than all animals is the wrinkled and folded outer layer of the cerebrum, called cerebral cortex. The wrinkles and folds in the cerebral cortex are known as convolutions: They are responsible for giving the cerebral cortex a large surface area that is characteristic of highly developed animals. The cerebral cortex is the clearinghouse of all signals being flashed by the nerves from the sensory organs, and those signals that are being sent by the brain to the motor muscles and other operative parts of the body. Activity 2 Answering the attached activity sheet 3. Concept Formation What is the cerebral cortex? What are the parts? What are the functions of each part? 4. Application Draw 5 examples of activities that involve all the regions of the brain. IV. Evaluation: Match the activities in Column A with the regions of the cerebrum in Column B. A B 1. Hearing a. occipital lobe 2. Walking b. parietal lobe 3. Tasting c. frontal lobe 4. Falling in love c. temporal lobe V. Assignment: Write the specific function of each lobe of the cerebral cortex.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe the structure of a neuron and the function of its parts Values: Communication is important in 1ife.

II. Subject Matter: Network of nerves A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Nerve cells are called neurons. They are the basic unit of the nervous system. They carry impulses, or signals, from every single part of the body to the brain and back. Neurons come in various shapes and sizes, but in general they consist of (1) cell body (2) an axon and (3) dendrites. The cell body contains protoplasm and nucleus. Axons and dendrites are extensions of the cell body, and are called nerve fibers. The axon is a long projection that carries impulses away from the cell body. Dendrites are the fingerlike projections that carry signals to the cell body. B. Processes: Describing, communicating C. Materials: Drawing of the nerve cell and its parts References: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6 Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of Assignment 2. Review: Classify the activities into the regions or lobes ofthe cerebral cortex where they belong. Recalling Feeling Explaining Painting Hearing Seeing Dancing Singing

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity What part of the nervous system is all over the body? Imagine if there are no nerves in the body. What would happen? 2. Presentation Activity 1

a. Observing and identifying the parts of a neuron. b. Reading information. The peripheral nervous system is made up of a vast network of nerves to ensure the steady flow of signals and information into and out of the brain. Nerve cells are called neurons. They carry electrical impulses, or signals, from every single part of the body to the brain and back. c. Performing activity 4 3. Concept Formation What are the parts of a neuron? What does a cell body have? What are the extensions of the cell body? IV. Evaluation: Draw the picture of a neuron and label its parts. V. Assignment: What is the basic unit of the nervous system? What would happen if these nerves damaged? Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe how toe nervous system works Values: Cooperation, unity, teamwork

II. Subject Matter: How the nervous system works A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Nerve impulse is actually a combination of chemical and electrical changes that start from a stimulus at the end of a nerve fiber. A stimulus can be a light, heat pressure, chemical substance or a sound that canbe perceived by any of the senses. The nerves that carry nerve impulses from the organs of the body to the brain and spinal cord are called afferent or sensory nerves. The nerves that carry messages from the brain back to the organs of the body via the spinal cord are called efferent of motor nerves. B. Processes: Describing, communicating C. Materials: flashcards References: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6 p, 11-14 Science & Health 6 by Jessie A. Villegas pp. 40-41 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of Assignment 2. Review: A group of five members dray the picture of a nerve cell by part. The first to finish the game, wins. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity Ask pupils to get a partner. Then let them pinch each other. Then ask. What did you feel? Why did you feel it? Where did the pain come from? 2. Presentation Activity 1 Read the following Nerve impulse is actually a combination of chemical and electrical changes that start from a stimulus at the end of a nerve fiber. A stimulus can be a light, heat pressure, chemical substance, or sound that can be perceived by any of the senses. The impulse travels from one

neuron to another over the length of the nerve fiber. When the dendrites are stimulated, the neuron becomes positively charged inside and negatively charged outside. This difference in electrical charge causes a movement of ions through the cell membrane and travels through the length of the nerve cell as a wave. As the signal reaches the end of an axon, it causes the axon to release the substance called neurotransmitters. This substance diffuses through synapse to the dendrites of the next neuron and begins a new impulse through that neuron... and so on from one neuron to another. Activity 2 Through a game (relay) show how the whole nervous system works a. Sensory nerves receive impulses. b. Sensory nerves send the messages to the brain through the spinal cord. c. Brain interprets the message. 3. Concept Formation What is a nerve impulse? Give examples o stimulus? What nerves receive the impulse? What sends it to the brain for interpretation? IV. Evaluation: Rearrange the following steps how the nervous system works. _____ Brain interprets the message. _____ Sensory nerves send the message to the rain through the spinal cord _____ Motor nerves bring the information back to the muscles and glands. _____ Motor nerves receive the impulse. _____ Brain sends the message to the motor nerves through the spinal cord. V. Assignment: How the nervous system works? Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Tell what a reflex is Values: Alertness

II. Subject Matter: Reflex A. Science Concepts/Ideas: A reflex is a voluntary action that originates from the spinal cord and not from the brain. A reflex is some kind of short-circuit by which the pain signal (the stimulus) from a part of your body triggers motor nerves in the spinal cord to instantaneously jerk (the response) the part of the body that will free itself of the stimulus causing the pain. B. Processes: Identifying, communicating C. Materials: A classmate, plastic sheet, piece of paper References: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6, pp. 11-14; Science and Heath 6, pp. 34-35 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of Assignment 2. Review: If you like to pick up an object, what part or parts of the neuron carry the image of the object from your eyes to the brain? What part or parts of the neuron carry the message from the brain to the muscles of your hands and backbone?

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity How does your body react, when you sniff a dust or anything alike? Are you conscious about it? 2. Presentation Activity 1 Cross your legs with one knee on top of the other. Using his knuckles let your partner tap your leg just below the knees. Tell your partner to hold tight a plastic before his eyes, covering his face, while he looks straight at you through the transparent plastic. Throw a crumpled sheet of paper against the sheet towards his eyes. What happens to your legs as your partner's knuckles tap it just above your knee? Can you consciously control your reaction?

How does your partner react to the paper striking the sheet in front of his eyes? Activity 2 Read the following. Your spinal cord has an extraordinary characteristic, apart from being the main highway for all nerves going to and coming from the brain. it has the ability to make a specific part of the body to automatically respond to a stimulus. Under certain circumstances, even before the brain gets the message, the spinal cord can already send back the impulse to the motor nerve that dictates the response. This reaction is known as reflexes. A reflex is an automatic response, almost always involving one specific part of the body rather than the whole. For example, when you touch something that is hot, you automatically withdraw your hand even before the brain receives the sensation. 3. Concept Formation What is a reflex? Where does a reflex originate? How does a reflex action help one? Give examples of reflex actions. 4. Application Make a list of reflex actions you did today. How did these actions help you? IV. Evaluation: Which of the following actions are not reflex actions? 1. blinking of the eye 2. hiccupping 3. sneezing 4. running 5. answering a question V. Assignment: Give two examples of reflex actions and their importance.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Test one's response time Values: Be responsive

II. Subject Matter: Functions of the Circulatory System A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The nerve impulse travels a speed of about 100 meters per second. It starts from the receptor nerves of a sense organ to the nerve center in the spinal cord and then to the brain. The brain recognizes the message and sends command to the motor nerve, which is turn stimulates the muscle to respond. The time takes the muscles to respond from the time the nerve is started is called response time. B. Processes: Identifying, communicating C. Materials: Plastic/wooden ruler References: Teacher's Nodule in Science and Health 6, pp. 11-14; Science and Health 6, p. 36 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of Assignment 2. Review: Give as many reflex actions as you can in ten seconds.

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity Play a game with the class that requires a quick response. Example: How many colors have the flag? (Question and answer) 2. Presentation Activity 1 Response time 3. Concept Formation Can you catch the ruler at the first trial? After how many trials were you able to catch the ruler? How far from the top of the ruler were you able top catch it? Compare your response time with those of your classmates.

What can you infer from these observations? IV. Evaluation: Playing other games that will test one's response time.

V. Assignment: Compare the response time of a child like you with an adult like your grandmother. What affects one's response time?

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Name and describe some common disorders of the nervous system, their causes/effect and their prevention Values: Awareness, respect for others.

II. Subject Matter: Disorders of the Nervous System A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Mental depression, neurosis, psychosis, amnesia, mental retardation, and paranoia are some examples of mental diseases and disorders. While most mental disorders are hereditary or genetic in nature, others are acquired personality disturbances related to emotional and psychosomatic problems, traumatic experiences, environmental influences, and improper training. Happiness, affection, sense of security, pleasant disposition, and personal discipline are very important aspects of the physical, mental, and emotionally well being of growing children. B. Processes: Describing, identifying, communicating C. Materials: Pictures References: Teacher's Module in Science and Heath 6, pp. 11-14; Science and Health 6, p. 40 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of Assignment 2. Review: What are your physical needs to be healthy? social needs? Mental needs? emotional needs?

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity Do you know Myla of Iingatan Ka? Whats wrong with her? Why did that happen? Do you know other mental disorders? 2. Presentation Activities a. Sharing the group some mental disorders. b. Read the following. Mental depression, neurosis, psychosis, amnesia, mental retardation, and paranoia are some of mental diseases and disorders. While most mental disorders are hereditary or

genetic in nature (meaning, involving the genes in the chromosomes), others are acquired personality disturbances related to emotional and psychosomatic problems ,traumatic experiences, environmental influences, and improper training. 3. Concept Formation What are the examples of mental disorders? How are they acquired? What are the effects of these disorders? How can these be avoided/prevented? 4. Application There are quite a number of people around with mental disorders. What can you do to help them? Write your answer in a paper bag. IV. Evaluation: Classify the following mental disorders into Acquired and Hereditary. 1. Mental depression 2. Neurosis 3. Psychosis 4. Amnesia 5. Mental retardation V. Assignment: Are there any mentally depressed people around your place? Observe how they move, talk, or think.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Practice desirable habits that help prevent and control common ailments of the nervous system Values: Cheerfulness, positive thinking

II. Subject Matter: Desirable habits to prevent ailments of the nervous system A. Science Concepts/Ideas: There are desirable habits that help prevent and control common ailments of the nervous system. There are: Think clearly and positively Make wise decision Be happy Be friendly Tell well about oneself Get along with others well B. Processes: Practicing desirable habits, identifying, inferring C. Materials: pictures References: Into the Future: Science and Health 6, pp. 44-48 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of Assignment 2. Review: What are the common ailments of the nervous system? Describe each.

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity Have you seen mentally ill people? What do you fell about them? Would you like to experience the same? Why? 2. Presentation Activity 1 a. Listening to the resource speaker who will talk about desirable habits to prevent ailments of the nervous system. b. Open forum. 3. Concept Formation What are the desirable habits to practice to prevent illness of the nervous system? How will you help people suffering from mental illness?

4. Application Rosita is depressed because of the sudden death of her mother. What will you do to help her so that she could overcome her depression? Donna has a fear of the crowd. How can you help her overcome this fear? IV. Evaluation: List down the desirable habits you should practice to avoid mental illness. V. Assignment: Practice the desirable habits given the guest.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Observe and describe a healthy person Values: Be healthy. Be happy

II. Subject Matter: Healthy Person A. Science Concepts/Ideas: A healthy person has certain characteristics which show that he is mentally, physically, emotionally, and socially healthy. B. Processes: Observing, describing C. Materials: Pictures References: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6, Science and Health 6 by J.A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of Assignment 2. Review: Guessing Game What "D" receives electrical impulses and conducts them to the brain? What "A" carries impulses away from the cell body? What "S" is the relay point between two neurons?

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivational Activity When do you say a person is healthy? Is a chubby boy or girl healthy? 2. Presentation Activity Identifying the healthy children in class. Describing the healthy children physically, emotionally, and mentally. Read the following. Ben is a healthy boy. He has a strong body. He can play, work, study, and exercise regularly. Being physically fit, he does not easily get tired after ach activity. He's neither very stout nor thin. He weighs just right for his age. On the other hand, Liza thinks clearly and positively. She makes wise decision. She can distinguish right from wrong. She is always mentally alert and acts according to her age. She is mentally healthy. What are the characteristics of Ben? Liza? How are they healthy?

3. Concept Formation What are the qualities of a healthy person? Use this table to answer the question. State of Health Characteristics Physical Health _____________ Mental Health _____________ Emotional Health _____________ 4. Application Answer the questions honestly by checking the proper column. Qualities Yes No I have strong body I thing fast. I get mad easily I get along with friends IV. Evaluation: Check before the number the corresponding characteristics of as healthy person. ____ He is very fat. ____ He is very thin. ____ He is pale. ____ He thinks fast. V. Assignment: Draw a picture/cut picture of healthy person.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Identify some of the physical, emotional needs of healthy person. Values: Health is wealth

II. Subject Matter: Needs of a healthy person A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Every individual has physical, mental, emotional and social needs. For a person to be healthy, he or she should be physically, emotionally, and socially healthy. The physical needs of a person are her basic needs like food, water, clean air, exercise, and sleep The mental needs of a person are good books, good education, good school, and good teachers, and healthy mind. The emotional needs of a person are love, care, attention, wholesome books, television shows, good friends, and supportive parents. The social needs are good friends, supportive parents, and understanding teachers. B. Processes: Identifying, describing, communicating C. Materials: Pictures of healthy children References: Teachers' Module in Science and Health 6 Science and Health 6 by J.A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of assignment: 2. Review: How do you describe a physically healthy person? An emotionally healthy person? Socially healthy person? Mentally healthy person?

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivation: What do you need to be healthy? 2. Activities: a. Individual work List down reasons why you say you are healthy. b. Group work Make a summary of the listings for group report.

c. Group reporting d. Summarizing group reports to come up with a class report. 3. Concept Formation: a. Classifying things into physical, mental, emotional needs by asking: Which will make you bright? Which will make you friendly? Which will make you happy? b. What do we need to be healthy? c. What are your physical needs? Social needs? Mental needs? Emotional needs 4. Application: Are you a healthy person? Why? IV. Evaluation: Identify whether the following are physical, mental, emotional, or social needs. _____ 1. parent's love _____ 2. good books _____ 3. rest and exercise _____ 4. good friends _____ 5. good diet V. Assignment: Make a list of your physical, mental, social, or emotional needs. Evaluate whether your parents and other people have provided them for you.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe the effect of physical, mental, and emotional state on one's health Values: Respect for others, recognizing others.

II. Subject Matter: Effect of physical, mental, and emotional state on ones health A. Science Concepts/Ideas: A persons physical, mental and emotional state can affect his overall health. B. Processes: Describing, inferring C. Materials: Chart, pictures References: Into the Future: Science and Health 6, pp. 30-31: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6; Science and Health 6 by .J.A. Villegas, p. 40 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of assignment: 2. Review: What desirable habits do you practice to be mentally healthy?

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivation: Who is a healthy person? What are the signs of good health? Let pupils complete the table on page 45 Into the Future 2. Activity: Do Activity 1.10, p. 45 3. Concept Formation: What are the effects of physical state or one's health? What are the effects of mental state on one's health? What are the effects of emotional state on one's health? 4. Application: If you are physically healthy person, at can you? If you are mentally healthy person, what can you do? What do you?

IV. Evaluation: Classify the following effects into physical health, mental health, and emotional health. 1. Can play very well. 2. Can move fast. 3. Can solve problems easily. 4. Can identify wrong and right. 5. Has many friends. V. Assignment: Are you physically healthy? Why do you say so?

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe the effect of relationship with family, friends, and society on mental, emotional, and physical well being. Values: Wholesome relationship with family and friends

II. Subject Matter: Relationships with family, friends, and society A. Science Concepts/Ideas: A person's physical, mental, and emotional well being can affect his relationships with family, friends, and others. B. Processes: Describing, making inferences C. Materials: Chart, picture, checklist References: Into the Future: Science and Health 6, pp. 44-47; Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6 Science and Health 6, p. 40 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of assignment: 2. Review: What should you do in order to be physically healthy? What can people who are physically fit do? What about a mentally healthy person?

B. Developmental Activities:
1. Motivation: Imagine a sick person. Can he play with his/her friends? Can he/she go with his/her family for pleasure? 2. Activity: Performing Activity 11.1 p. 47 Into the Future Copy the table on you^ notebook. Answer the questions honestly by checking the appropriate column. Questions Always Sometimes Never With Family 1. Do you respect members of your family? ______ ________ ______ 2. Do you help in household chores? ______ ________ ______ With friends 1. Do you quarrel with your friends? ______ ________ ______

2. Do you apologize with a wrong doing? With others in the Community 1. Do you listen well with others? ______ 2. Are you shy and withdrawn?

______

________

______

________ ______ ______ ________ ______

3. Concept Formation: How do you relate with your family? With friends? With other people in the community? Can you have a good relationship with others if you are not physically, mentally, and emotionally healthy? 4. Application How does health affect one's relationship with family, friends, and others? What does a healthy person usually do at home? In school? Outside? IV. Evaluation: Modified True of False If the statement is correct, write True. If it is not, change the underlined word/s to make the statement correct. _____ 1. A healthy person smiles at others. _____ 2. Avoiding people is a result of an emotional well being. _____ 3. If a person gets easily irritated: he is mentally healthy. V. Assignment: Interview an outstanding pupil in the school. Ask him/her activities. Ask how he/she relates with his/her parents, brothers and sisters, teachers and classmates.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Enumerate and practice ways of maintaining one's health Values: Obedience, faithfulness, cleanliness

II. Subject Matter: Ways of maintaining one's health A. Science Concepts/Ideas: There are many practices to stay healthy. These include eating a well balance diet, exercising regularly, getting enough rest and sleep. Avoid harmful substances such as drugs, tobacco, alcohol, coffee, and carbonated drinks. Be at peace with oneself, with others and with the Almighty. B. Processes: Enumerating, communicating, inferring C. Materials: Resource speaker (nurse, health personnel) References: Teacher's Module in Science and Health 6 Science and Health 6 by .A. Viilegas, p. 40 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of assignment: 2. Review: Does a person's health affect his/her relationship with family, friends, and society? How does an unhealthy boy behave? B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivation: Do you take care of yourself? How do you do it? 2. Activity: a. Setting up standards to follow in the activity. b. Reading guide questions. What are some ways of maintaining our health? How do we avoid getting sick? Who are the people who can help us to be healthy? c. Introducing the resource speaker. d. Listening to the speaker. e. Open forum with the resource speaker.

3. Concept Formation: What are the good practices to maintain good health? What is a balance diet? Why do we need enough sleep, rest, and exercise? What substances should you avoid? Why? Give some of the health habits. Why are vaccinations important? When do we have physical and dental check ups? 4. Application: If you lose your health, you lose everything. What will happen if you overeat and do not exercise? Why should you avoid self-medication? IV. Evaluation: Check the statements below that tell the proper way of maintaining one's health. _____ 1. Going to the dentist only when tooth aches. _____ 2. Eating junk foods everyday. _____ 3. Keeping the environment clean. _____ 4. Seeking the help/advice of a faith healer. _____ 5. Eating a balance diet. V. Assignment: List down your health habits to maintain your good health.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Operationally define an ecosystem Values: Awareness of the importance of every living and non-living things in one's environment

II. Subject Matter: Ecosystem A. Science Concepts/Ideas: An ecosystem is a distinct community in which different organisms interact with the biotic and abiotic components of their environment. An organism refers to any living thing. An environment refers to the living (biotic) and nonliving (abiotic) things that surround an organism and effects its growth and development. B. Processes: Observing, classifying, communicating C. Materials: Clean jar with lid; Aquatic plants; Snails; Sand and gravel; Water; Fish Smaller fishes as food for the big fish References: Science Book - Jesse A. Villegas Exploring Science and Health 6 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Checking of assignment. 2. Review: Ask the children to give examples of living, and nonliving things that they see around them. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivation Activity: What comes into your mind when you hear the words "No man is an island"? 2. Presentation: Place the gravel and sand in the jar. Put the aquatic plants into the jar. Drop the snails into the jar. Fill the jar with water. Put a big fish into the jar and drop smaller fishes that serve as food to the big fish. Close the lid. Let the pupils observe. Tell the class that the aquarium is an example of an ecosystem. Ask them to read the following.

An ecosystem is a distinct community in which different organisms interact with the biotic and abiotic components of their environment. An organism refers to any living thing. An environment refers to the living (biotic) and nonliving (abiotic) things that surround an organism and affect its growth and development. These things can influence an organism's habitat, ecological niche, breeding conditions, and feeding relationships with other organisms. Let the pupils answer the following questions: 1. What are the biotic components of the aquarium? 2. What are the abiotic components of the aquarium? 3. What is an ecosystem? 4. How do the living things and nonliving things work together?

3. Concept Formation: Guide the children to come up with their own definition of an ecosystem. Ask them to give other examples of ecosystem. Take one sample and lead the children to tell how the components interact. 4. Application: Draw a sample of a balanced ecosystem. Identify the biotic and abiotic components. IV. Evaluation: The earth is the main ecosystem. What do you think will happen if there is no enough food on earth? Explain your answer in one to two paragraphs. V. Assignment: Give at least 5 examples of ecosystem.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Identify the producers, consumers and decomposers in an ecosystem Values: Care for the living organisms

II. Subject Matter: Components of an Ecosystem A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The producers are the green plants. They are so called because they are the makers of food in the ecosystem by the process of photosynthesis. The consumers are the animals. They cannot make their own food. There are primary consumers; these are the animals that eat only plants, called herbivores. There are also secondary consumers; these are the carnivores that eat the herbivores. Then the tertiary consumers are carnivores that eat other carnivores. Omnivores are animals that eat both plants and animals. The decomposers are the microorganisms that feed on dead plants and animals. B. Processes: Observing, comparing, inferring C. Materials: Aquarium; Three pieces of bond paper References: Science Book - Jesse A. Villegas III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Ask the children to give examples of animals and the food that they eat. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: What would happen to man and animals if there were no plants and trees on earth? 2. Presentation. Let the children observe an aquarium. Ask the children to read: Food is a basic requirement of all living things in any ecosystem. The biotic components of the ecosystem through which food is transferred are the producers, consumers, and decomposers. Let the pupils answer the following questions: 1. In the aquarium, which is the producer? 2. Which is the consumer? 3. Which is the decomposer? 3. Concept Formation:

a. Guide the children to operationally define the terms producer, consumer and decomposer. b. Ask them to give other examples of ecosystem and identify the components. c. Present examples of groups of animals/organisms and plants and lead the children to determine their feeding relationship. 4. Application: Ask the children to get three pieces of bond paper. Let them draw three examples for each kind in each paper: producer, consumer and decomposer. IV. Evaluation: Tell whether the thing is a producer and/or consumer, or decomposer. 1. mango tree 4. pig 2. earthworm 5. chicken 3. man 6. caterpillar V. Assignment: Identify whether the animal is a herbivore, carnivore or omnivore. 1. tiger 4. bird 2. fish 5. dog 3. man

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Illustrate the feeding relationships between organisms through a food chain Values: Every creature, big or small, is important because each has a role to play in this world.

II. Subject Matter: The Food Chain A. Science Concepts/Ideas: A food chain shows the relationship between organisms: the producer as food maker; the consumer as food user; and the decomposer, the one which helps in the continuous flow of the food cycle. Trophic level is every step of the way along food chain. B. Processes: Observation, comparison, classification, making inferences C. Materials: Article on Food Chain 1/4 sheet of cartolina; Group picture of animals Aquarium References: Science Book - Jesse A. Villegas Exploring Science and Health 6 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: a. Review: Ask the pupils to explain the food nutrient cycle. b. Set up standards for the trip to the Science Garden. c. Read guide question: What do living things in the garden eat in order to live? B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: Do you want to know how food is transferred from one organism to another? 2. Presentation: Let the children observe the living things in the garden. Ask the children to identify the living things. Have them choose a group of living things in the garden that may show a food link or a food chain. Let the pupils identify each organism in the food chain like producer, consumer and decomposer. Follow up questions:

Why plants are called producers? Why animals are called consumers? What are decomposers and why are they part of the food chain? Give more examples of food chain in the garden.

3. Concept Formation: What is a food chain? Why should there be decomposers in the food chain? 4. Application: Ask the children to write two examples of a food chain in the sea ecosystem and let them identify the first order consumers to the fourth order and finally the decomposers IV. Evaluation: Construct a pictorial poster of a food chain on a 1/4 sheet of cartolina, and explain the feeding relationships involved. Use the following organisms: 1. mosquitoes, frog, men, snake, chicken 2. mouse, bird, cat, big fish V. Assignment: Prepare a list of plants or plant parts, herbivores, carnivores that eat herbivores and carnivores that eat herbivores. Write the names of the plants, herbivores and carnivores in pieces of paper. One name per piece of paper. If you wish, draw pictures. Arrange the pieces of paper showing "who's eating whom?Start with a plant and end with a carnivore at the top. This is a food chain. Do as many food chains as you like. Cut pieces of yarn. Lay a piece of yarn between each part of the food chain. Glue the yarn to the pieces of paper. Pass your food chain mobiles after a day or two.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Construct a food web by joining together several food chains Values: Awareness of the interdependence of living things

II. Subject Matter: Food Web

A. Science Concepts/Ideas: A food web is an overlapping food dependency among organisms in the ecosystem. B. Processes: Observations, making inferences C. Materials: Cut-outs of animals References: Science Book - Jesse A. Villegas Exploring Science and Health 6

III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: What is a food chain? Give an example of a food chain at home. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: What happens when food chains overlap? 2. Presentation: Recall the experiences in the school garden. Present cut-outs or pictures of snail, tadpole, duck, frog, algae, fish. Ask the pupils to make as many food chains as they can with the use of cutouts or pictures and arrows on the board. What can you say about the food chains? Let the pupils put arrows between the food links to show an overlapping dependency. How would you describe the system? Let the pupils summarize the overlapping of food chains using the constructed system. How many food chains are found in this system? 3. Concept Formation: What is a food web? 4. Application: Is man part of the food web? If so, how can he improve the food web in his community?

IV. Evaluation: Make a pictorial illustration of s food web using these organisms: Cat Chicken Spider Corn Man Caterpillar V. Assignment: Observe the living things in your home and construct a food web.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Construct a diagram for the nitrogen cycle Values: Awareness of the importance of decomposers in nitrogen cycle

II. Subject Matter: Nitrogen Cycle A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Nitrogen-fixing bacteria are the process of converting nitrogen into a usable form. Decomposing bacteria break down the proteins to ammonia and nitrates. Denitrifying bacteria release the nitrogen back to the atmosphere. Nitrogen fixation is the process of converting nitrogen to usable form. B. Processes: Observing, inferring, constructing and interpreting a diagram C. Materials: Leguminous Plant; Article on Nitrogen Cycle; A sheet of cartolina Flowchart of the Nitrogen Cycle References: Science Book Jesse A. Villegas; Exploring Science and Health 6 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: What does the Carbon Dioxide-Oxygen Cycle indicate? Where lo you find this cycle? B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: Ask the children: What is your talent? Do you show your talent to other people? Your talent is like nitrogen. If you keep it, it is good for nothing. It is only when you show your talent that it becomes useful. You may have the talent of singing, but if you do not sing, your talent is useless. Today, you will learn about the common thing between your talent and nitrogen or how they are alike. What food is needed to build and repair muscles and bones of the body? What food nutrient does it contain? Do you know where we get the protein in our foods? 2. Presentation: Let the pupils examine a mongo or bean plant. What food nutrient do we get from mongo or bean? Let them observe the root structure of the leguminous plants. What do you think is the reason why a legume has nodules in the roots? Let the children read article on nitrogen cycle.

Show the flowchart of the Nitrogen Cycle unlabeled. Then ask the following questions: 1. Where does nitrogen come from? 2. What happens to nitrogen to become useful? 3. Where will the nitrate go? 4. What will happen to nitrate? 5. What bacteria will act on it? Let the pupils trace the flow chart of the cycle again while asking the following questions: 1. What decomposers are needed to make the nitrogen cycle continue? 2. What is the function of each bacteria? 3. How are living things able to get nitrogen from the air? 3. Concept Formation: After a thorough explanation of the flowchart on nitrogen cycle, ask the children to explain in their own words how nitrogen is cycled in nature. Let them explain what decomposers do in the food nutrient cycle 4. Application: Are all bacteria harmful? What should we do to keep the valance in our soil so that the necessary bacteria will thrive?

IV. Evaluation: A. Explain the importance of each organism below: 1. nitrogen-fixing bacteria 2. decomposing bacteria 3. denitrifying bacteria B. Draw and illustrate the nitrogen cycle applying it to human beings. V. Assignment: What do you have inside you? Do you have a talent? Remember that your talent is like nitrogen. Nitrogen has to be changed into a usable form. Just like your talent, it has to be discovered, developed and exposed. Write about it and tell how you can make use of it.

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Illustrate the interdependence of plants and animals for gasses through the oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle Values: Appreciation of the importance of give and take relationship

II. Subject Matter: Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Cycle A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle refers to the manner by which these materials are used and reused in nature. Plants give off oxygen taken in by man animals. In turn, man and animals give off carrion dioxide taken in by plants. B. Processes: Constructing and interpreting diagram C. Materials: Article on Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Cycle Illustration of oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle References: Science Book - Jesse A. Villegas Exploring Science and Health 6 Living with Science 6 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Ask the children to do "Breath in, breath out" exercise. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivation Activity: Sing to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. Ox-y-gen Car-bon Di-o-xide 6x 2. Presentation: Ask the children to breath inside a plastic bag. Ask: "What do you feel while breathing inside a plastic bag?" Solicit their observation. Let the children read the article on "Oxygen - Carbon Dioxide Cycle". Show the aquarium and terrarium in the science room. Let the pupils observe the living things in the aquarium and terrarium. Ask the children to answer the following questions: 1. What makes the animals live in the aquarium and terrarium? 2. Why do plants live there, too? 3. Do these living things depend on each other? How? Ask the pupils to go to the board and draw a representation of a group animals. Have them draw arrows to trace the oxygen-carbon dioxide cycle, an arrow to represent where

the carbon dioxide come from and where it will go and another arrow to represent where the oxygen will go and from where. What do we have now in our diagram? How do we call it?

3. Concept Formation: By showing the illustration, lead the children to explain how oxygen and carbon dioxide cycled in nature are. 4. Application: Since we need oxygen in order to live, and we get it from plants, what then must we do to have more and cleaner supply of oxygen in the air? IV. Evaluation: Ask the pupils to draw a diagram of oxygen and carbon-dioxide cycle and show the cycle with the use of arrows. V. Assignment: If a person normally inhales 20 times in a minute, how many times does he inhale in one hour? In a day? In a week? In a month? In a year?

Remarks: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe the effects of deforestation Values: Protect the Forests

II. Subject Matter: Effects of Deforestation A. Science Concepts/Ideas: The Philippines is losing 14 hectares of forests per hour due to illegal logging, forest fires, slash and burn agriculture. Acid rain in one devastating effect of air pollution. Emissions from coal-burning factories, electric plants, transport vehicles and volcanic eruptions contain sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. B. Processes: Describing, inferring, investigating, observing C. Materials: Plate of shallow basin; Soft drank crown; Glass jar; Water; Bromthymol blue (BTB) A slab of concrete or hollow block References: Science and Health VI, Module and Work text - pp. 64-65 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Check on the pictures they cut. Describe and tell the importance of the forests. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: Show a picture of a forest in fire/trees is cut down. Ask what may happen if the forests are burned/if, trees are cut down. 2. Presentation: Activity 1 Give the meaning of deforestation. Tell some causes of deforestation Name the gases emitted by coal-burning factories, electric plants, transport vehicles and volcanic eruptions. Infer how acid rain works. Read the following: The Philippines is losing 14 hectares of forests per hour due to illegal logging, forests fires, slash and burn agriculture. The threat of acid rains could completely obliterate forest ecosystems. Acid rain is one devastating effect of air pollution caused by coal-burning

factories, electric plants, transport vehicles and volcanic eruptions. Their emissions contain sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides forming sulfuric and nitric acids when they dissolve in water, thus acid rain seeps into the ground, leaches minerals from the soil, thus retarding the growth of trees. Answer the following questions. 1. Why are the Philippines losing 14 hectares per hours? 2. How is acid rain formed? 3. Why is acid rain a threat to the forest ecosystem? 3. Concept Formation: State conclusions regarding their activity. Tell how destructive acid rains are to the forests. 4. Application: How would you protect the forests? Name some friendly activities to avoid deforestation. IV. Evaluation: Choose the letter of the correct answer. 1. All of the following may cause deforestation except a. illegal logging c. forest fires b. planting young trees d. acid rain 2. What gases come from the emissions of coal-burning factories, electric plants, transport vehicles and volcanic eruption? a. carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide c. nitrogen oxide ad oxygen b. oxygen and sulfur dioxide d. sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide V. Assignment: Make a slogan on a 1/4 white cartolina giving emphasis on how to protect and save the forest.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Explain that some activities of people disrupt the cycles of an ecosystem Values: Care for the Ecosystem

II. Subject Matter: Disrupting the Cycles in an Ecosystem A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Ecosystemic pollution refers to an excess of materials in an ecosystem which changes its biological, chemical and physiological properties. Ecosystemic pollution comes in many forms such as air, water, land and thermal (heat) pollution. Life in the biosphere depends upon a delicate balance. Every ecosystem is a life-support system-equipped with natural means of protecting itself from the ill-effects of natural and manmade disturbances. B. Processes: Identifying, describing, observing, inferring C. Materials: Pictures; Paper and ball pen References: Science and Health VI, Module and Work text pp. 66-67 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Show the slogan they have made on how to save and protect the forest. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: Ask how the cycles in an ecosystem are disrupted. 2. Presentation: Activity 1 Identify the people's activity in each of the picture shown to the class Tell the cycles in the ecosystem that are disrupted in every activity. Read the following Ecosystemic pollution refers to an excess of materials in an ecosystem, which changes it biological, chemical, and physiological properties. Pollution affects the ability of the ecosystem to self-regulate. Answer the following questions: 1. What is ecosystemic pollution? 2. What affects the ability of the ecosystem to self-regulate? 3. What other substances are carried throughout the ecosystem?

Activity 2 Get your paper and ball pen. Write your observations about some human activities that cause pollution. Infer how these activities can disturb the balance of nature. Read the human activities that cause pollution that they have written down. Tell the cycles in the ecosystem that are disrupted in every activity. Observe what happens. 3. Concept Formation: Give their own definition of ecosystemic pollution. Ask how pollution disrupts the cycles in an ecosystem. 4. Application: The place where you live in is your immediate ecosystem. What favorable activities should you do so as not to disturb the cycles in an ecosystem. IV. Evaluation: Identify the following activities. Put a check on the activity that disrupt the cycles in an ecosystem. _____ Covering garbage cans _____ Spraying insecticides more often _____ Burning rubber tires in thickly populated areas. V. Assignment: Observe and write down the activities of the people that disturb the cycles in your barangay.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Identify some activities that disrupt the cycles in an ecosystem Values: Make a personal sacrifice not to use things containing CFCs.

II. Subject Matter: Ozone Layer: Earth's Protective Shield A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Air is the primary source of life - supporting and life - protecting gases. Air pollutants come in many forms. They can be solid or liquid particles suspended in the air and can also be gases. The more hazardous of the gases are CFCs; they destroy the ozone layer - our only means of protection against the deadly cosmic radiations coming from the sun. CFCs are used as propellants in aerosol sprays, refrigerants in refrigerators and air conditioners and one of the raw materials in the production of styropores. B. Processes: Inferring, describing, observing, surveying C. Materials: Community References: Science and Health VI, Module and Work text - pp. 68 - 69 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Give the activities of the people in your barangay that disrupt the cycles in an ecosystem. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activities: Ask what would happen if they stay under the sun for a long time. 2. Presentation: Activity 1 Describe air, when is air not safe for all kinds of living things. Give examples of pollutants found in the air. Infer how these air pollutants affect us. Read the following: Air is the primary source of life-supporting and life-protecting gases such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and ozone. Because of air pollution, the capability of the atmosphere to do its job is threatened. Answer the following questions: 1. Why is the job of the air/atmosphere threatened? 2. What are the forms of air pollutants?

3. What harm can air pollutants do? 3. Concept Formation: Tell who made the hole in the ozone layer. Give examples of air pollutants. Tell the particular gas that destroys the ozone layer. 4. Application: What should everyone do to protect the ozone layer? IV. Evaluation: 1. All of the following materials contains CFCs except a. aeirosol spray c. air conditioner b. refrigerator d. electric fan 2. Which gas in the air destroys the ozone layer? a. methane c. CFCs b. nitrogen d. carbon dioxide 3. Above what part of the Earth is the hole in the ozone layer found? a. North Pole c. Equator b. South Pole d. Mid Latitude V. Assignment: Make a list of the materials you use at home that contain CFC.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Infer harmful effects of certain activities on a bigger or more complex ecosystem, such as the ocean, river or pond systems Values: Save and protect the bigger or more complex ecosystem

II. Subject Matter: Poisoning the Food Chain A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Toxic substances from fertilizers, pesticides and plastic products contaminate the environment through food chain. Food chain is the pathway of nutrients and energy from organism to organism. Every link in a food chain is called a trophic level. An eater has to eat more food than its own weight, so the concentration of the toxic substance becomes greater and greater as it moves up the food chain. B. Processes: Inferring, investigating, observing, illustrating C. Materials: Drawing paper; Red ball pen References: Science and Health VI, Module and Work text - pp. 71-72 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Give examples of materials you use at home that contain CFCs. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: Ask what a food chain is the organisms in a food chain. 2. Presentation: Activity 1 Show an illustration of a food chain. Identify the organisms in the food chain. Tell what every link is called/the diminishing energy. Infer how a food chain is poisoned. Read the following: One way in which the toxic substances contaminate the environment is through the food chain, which is the pathway of nutrients and energy from organism. Every link in the food chain is called a trophic level. But each time energy is passed on, a lesser amount of energy is made available to the next level. Answer the following questions:

1. What happens to the toxic substances as it move up the food chain? 2. What is red tide phenomenon? 3. Concept Formation: How is poison passed through the food chain 4. Application: What would you do to protect the more complex ecosystem such as the ocean, river and pond system? Discuss how they would participate to address the above problem such as adopt a river or lake. IV. Evaluation: Illustrate a food chain poisoning in a river ecosystem indicating red dots to each trophic level. V. Assignment: Write a slogan stating how to save and care for the ocean, river 'id pond ecosystem.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Infer that storage of food, water and space may occur due to a growing population Values: Work harmoniously and cooperatively Protection on the basic needs of living things

II. Subject Matter: Unit - Animals, Plants and Environment (Interrelationship in the environment) Topic - Effects of our Population on a Community A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Population is the number of organism in a particular group living in a specific area or place. Rapid population of growth results in food, water and space storage. B. Processes: Observing, Describing and Inferring C. Materials: Picture of thickly populated place Bar graph showing the world's population percentage References: Into the Future Science and Health VI pp. 88-92; Science and Health VI pp. 99-100 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Ask the pupils about their ideas when they hear the word population. Let them define population through discussion. Ask: What is the class population? What is the school population? B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivation: Show a picture of a thickly populated place. Let the pupils describe the place. What problems might arise in this quickly population place? Lets find out. 2. Presentation: a. Activity: Study the bar graph below 1. 2. 3. Answer the following questions: What was the worlds population in 1970? What was the increase from 1970 to 1990? What was the worlds population in the year 2000? b. Group work: Divide the class into three groups and give group a picture of the following: Group I - A thickly populated space with small houses. Group II - A big family where members are malnourish.

Group III - A water faucet with file of cans waiting for the turn to get water. c. Let each group describe the picture and answer the following questions: 1. What problem arises when the population increases rapidly? 2. Explain the effect of the problem. d. Let the pupils read the textbook for verification on pages 89-92 - Into the Future Science and Health and pp. 99- 100 - Science and Health VI. 3. Concept Formation: What problems come up when the population of a certain place increases rapidly? 4. Application: You have noticed that many rice fields are now being converted into housing areas. The increase in the number of families requires the increase of housing units. If more and more rice field were used for housing purposes, how would this affect the food production and supply? IV. Evaluation: Read the situation and identify the problem connected to it. 1. A big family cannot provide enough food for all its members. 2. There is no enough sanitary source of water. 3. There are many squatters built along vacant lots. V. Assignment: Write a short paragraph on about the disadvantages of over population in your locality.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Infer the land, water and air may become limited and eventually polluted due to over population Values: Environmental consciousness Cleanliness and Neatness

II. Subject Matter: Unit - Animals, Plants and Environment (Interrelationship in the environment) Topic - Effect of Over Population A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Land, water and air may become polluted. Increasing population means more users. There are more wastes produced and released in the environment. B. Processes: Observing, Describing and Inferring C. Materials: Paper, ball pen, library resources References: Science and Health VI by: Jessie A. Villegas p. 72 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: What problems occur due to a growing population? B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivation: Is population a pollution issue? Find out. 2. Presentation: a. Activity: Write a short essay on the topic: Why is population a pollution issue? Points to ponder: 1. What are the effects of over population on air water and land pollution? 2. What strategies are to be followed to control the harmful effect of human activities on land, air and water? 3. What is your roll as a pupil and as a member of your community in improving and helping fight pollution on land, air and water? b. Let the pupils read their essays. c. Point out to the pupils the bad effects of pollution due to over population. d. Discuss with them their role in maintaining cleanliness, and neatness in their community. 3. Concept Formation: What happens to land water and air due to rapid population growth?

4. Application: How can you prevent land, water and air pollution? IV. Evaluation: Is population a pollution issue? Why? Support your answer. V. Assignment: Draw a poster or cut out pictures depicting air and water pollution and people with infections diseases. Tell something about the drawing or picture.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Infer that over copulation affect one's health and that of the community Values: Health consciousness, cleanliness and neatness; Eating the right kind of food.

II. Subject Matter: Unit Animals, Plants and Environment (Interrelationship in the environment) Topic Effects of Over Populated A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Poor health conditions such as poor diet, poor health habits and dirty surrounding are effects or results of over population. B. Processes: Observing, Describing, Inferring and Comparing C. Materials: Pictures depicting poor diet, poor health habits, dirty surroundings, clean surroundings References: Science and Health VI for Better Life p. 50 Science and Health VI Into the Future pp. 96-98 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: Why is pollution an ill effect of over population? B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivation: Have you read the newspaper or heard over` the radio, reports on the number of people who died of pneumonia or Cholera? In crowded areas or places, diseases germs easily spread or transfer from one person to another person due to poor health conditions in a community. Let us see why this is so? 2. Presentation: Activity: a. Show a picture of a clean community and a picture of unsanitary area. Ask: What picture shows the effect of rapid population growth? The healthier community? What is the effect of a clean community to the people? what is the effect of a dirty community to the people? why do people in a dirty community gets sick easily? Discuss the effect of dirty surroundings on health. b. Show a picture of an area where populated rivers and canals, waste and smoke belching vehicles are found.

Ask: What are the sources of waste? How do they cause pollution? When do waste become pollutant? Discuss the effect of these pollutants on health. What disease can man have due to pollutants? 3. Concept Formation: What is the ill effect of over population on the health of the people? 4. Application: a. Show the pupils insects that bread on dirty places and discuss the diseases they cause. b. Ask the pupils to relate what factors contribute to the sad conditions of polluted rivers and dirty surrounding. Relate this to the harmful effect on the health of people living in this area. c. Give some practices to prevent spread of diseases and prevent malnutrition in an over population place. IV. Evaluation: Modified True or False: Write True if the underlined word makes the statement correct and if False change the underline word to make it true. _____ 1. Disease such as Cholera, spread fast in an over populated area. _____ 2. Poor diets makes person healthy. _____ 3. Pollutants in polluted rivers, canals, waste and smoke belching have bad effects on the health of the people. V. Assignment: Make a list of the latest scientific research on health and nutrition. The research should be applicable in crowded communities. Prepare a report from this selection to be read and explained in the class.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Infer that rapid population growth upsets the ecological balance. Values: Environmental consciousness

II. Subject Matter: Unit - Animals, Plants and Environment (Interrelationship in the environment) Topic - Effect of Over Population A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Rapid population growth upsets the ecological balance. Some conditions that upsets the ecological balance include deforestation, production of too much waste and the presence of pollutants on land, water and air. B. Processes: Observing, Describing, Inferring and Enumerating C. Materials: Pictures showing deforestation, Kaingin, Dynamite fishing, spraying of pesticide References: Into the Future Science and Health VI pp. 99-102 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: 1. Review: What is the effect of rapid population growth on one's health and that of the community? B. Developmental Activities: 1. Presentation: Activities: a. Recall the components and needs of an ecosystem. Discuss how the balance is maintain. b. Ask the pupils: How does rapid population growth affect ecological balance? c. Pupils work on activity 2.19 Ecological Balance by groups. Let them find the answers by examining the pictures provided in the activity. d. Show pictures of deforested lands, kaingin, dynamite fishing, and spraying of pesticide Ask: What do these activities show? Discuss the adverse effects of each practices. 2. Concept Formation. What upset ecological balance? What are the conditions that upset ecological balance? 3. Application; Divide the class into four (4) groups. Let them illustrate on a cardboard paper (cartolina) the activities that may create. An imbalance in nature. Write five (5) to six (6) sentences on how as a pupil he or she can contribute to prevent the upsetting of the ecological balance.

IV. Evaluation: Put a () if it upset the ecological balance and (x) if not. _____ 1. Spraying insecticide that destroys the ozone layer. _____ 2. Planting of trees. _____ 3. Using dynamite in fishing. V. Assignment: Write five (5) activities that upset the ecological balance. Explain your answers.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Describe strategies for coping with rap increase in population Values: Appreciation of the importance of population control.

II. Subject Matter: Coping with Rapid Population Growth A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Population control through responsible parenthood, awareness of importance of family planning and importance of community living by improving community resources and health services. B. Processes: Description, comparison, inference and hypothesis C. Materials: charts References: PELC II 6 p. 13; The Science Connection 6 pp. 86-88 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Name the bad affects of over population. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: Compare a family of four children to a family of twelve. Do the four children get more than the twelve children? Are the four children sure of finishing school? 2. Presentation: Activity Study the diagram presented on the chart. Answer the following questions. 1. What is the current population in each barangay? 2. Which among the 3 barangays on the chart is considered normal or already case of over population? Why? Note: The discussion is started by presenting a concept which the pupils can interact with. For example, limiting the number of children in a family versus no limit. The pupils can take note of the pros and cons. 3. Concept Formation: Population can be controlled through responsible parenthood, awareness of importance of family planning and importance of community living by improving community resources and health services.

Community life can be improved through population control. 4. Application: What can you do to promote population control in your community? IV. Evaluation: Explain in a few words the meaning and the advantages of population control. V. Assignment: Visit the nearest health center in your barangay. Ask about the following: 1. Current population of the people in their area. 2. Community health services/other services being provided. 3. Top five health needs of the community 4. Sources of food and water. 5. Available housing facilities. Based on the data you gathered, how can the community members, including you, help in solving the problems of the barangay? Give at least 3 examples.

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SCIENCE VI Date: ____________ I. Objective: Demonstrate commitment and concern in preserving/conserving the balance of life in an ecosystem Values: Appreciation of one environment and the importance to one's well-being

II. Subject Matter: Balance of life in the ecosystem A. Science Concepts/Ideas: Balance of life is important in the ecosystem. Conservation helps in maintaining balance of life. Sustained ecological balance is important for survival of future generations. B. Processes: Observation, description, inference C. Materials: Pictures and sketches of ways and means of conserving natural resources References: PELC II 7 p. 13/ESH 6 pp. 125-128 III. Procedure: A. Preparatory Activity: Give the strategies for coping with rapid population growth. B. Developmental Activities: 1. Motivational Activity: How is garbage disposal practiced in one's community? How is it done? Will it help protect the environment? 2. Presentation: Using the drawings and pictures, identify the ways and methods used to conserve natural resources. Answer the following questions: How will tree planting help preserve t soil? How will plants use as soil cover prevent erosion? What is erosion? Do you have rivers, streams, or similar water bodies in your community? Why are other fishes dead? Is it because of erosion, garbage, or pollution? How can wild life be protected, Enumerate ways that you can do tc preserve and conserve the environment. 3. Concept Formation:

The class will come up to the conclusion that conservation of natural resources is very important because it is the way to restore and keep the balance in the ecosystem. 4. Application: Is conservation important? How is balance of life n the environmentpromotes sustained ecosystem? How will a sustained ecosystem benefit future generations? How can you show your concern in preserving the balance of life it the ecosystem? IV. Evaluation: Identify the following practices as good or bad to the environment. 1. Planting trees 2. Throwing garbage in canals 3. Burning the grass V. Assignment: Look around your neighborhood. List down what the neighbors do to protect the environment. For example: The neighbors dont throw rubbish anywhere. They have garbage pits.

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