CIVIL AIR PATROL AIR RESCUE S~UADRON 150

THE YELLOW JACKET MARCH 1992 NEWSLETTER

SQ. ASSISTS IN SEARCH FOR MISSING PIPER
Rules & Regs for Corporate Aircraft
Anytime a squadron member acts as a pilot or passenger in a cotpoteie aJrcraft he/she must dress in approved Civil Air Patrol flight attire. The aircraft must have a flight release signed by a flight release officer. For those of you who use the Varga on the flight line, please be sympathetic of your neighbors .... make an effort to pull the aircraft out on the taxi line prior to engine start. These efforts will avoid the "rock blast· to the neighboring aircraft

Squadron 150 assisted in the search for a chartered twin-engine Piper carrying six Mexican Na-

tional skiers last month. The Piper Cheyenne was last heard from at 4:20 p.m. Sunday, February
16th.

Twelve squadron members and six aircraft reported lO the search base at Big Bear airport Monday morning. While we're not sure who was credited with the "find", it was determined thaI the Civil Air Patrol was responsible for spouing the tail section of the aircraft sticking OUlof the snow al the 7,000 fOOL level near Angelus Oaks, about 10 miles from the planes destination, Big Bear air-

pon.

The wreckage and bodies were located by ground search crews Monday afternoon. The crash

victims included five adults and two children. The identities of the vicums were not immediately available. The weather at Big Bear the afternoon of the crash included variable low ceilings, fog and mountain obscuration. The pilOl radioed Big Bear Unicom several times during his attempt to reach the airport and was advised that the runway was partially obscured in fog. The wreckage was found on the ridge just west of Big Bear Lake. Search credits go to: Bill Gosland, Tom Sering, David Starks, Linda Regan, John Marushak, Lou Silberling, Terry Harmon, Winn Kinner, Jacquie Sprague, Jack Moralce, Bob Langford. and Ron Hodge. L. Crecion.

OFFICERS CALL - GREAT PLANS AHEAD
On March 19, 1992 thequartcrly planning meeting for April. May and June was held. It was decided that April is booked up with the El Taro Air Show. The Palm Springs High Aluuide Clinic and some expected bad weather. so we moved into May quickly. May will bring something new for Squadron 150, we have planned a simulated SAR mission. This mission will be a table-top only mission designed lO familiarize everyone with the proper procedures and techniques used at mission bases. The simulated mission will take place in our meeting room at Los AJ. The alert lisl will be run and the regular meeting lime of 2000 hours will find everyone signing into the "Mission Base". Dave Starks volunteered to be the project officer and will be calling on quite a few members Cor assistance. This wiU be treated just like a regular mission, proper auire will be expected, i.e., flight suits and approved uniforms. AJI persons planning LO "fly" the search will bring grided charts and all necessary parafanalia. Make sure your ES cards are up lO date and you have all proper documentation required lO assist in the search. All documentation will be checked, assignments will be given and simulated breifings and debreifings will take place. This will give all of us a chance lO make sure our gear is "up to snuff' and we are truly ready lO "seek and save". June is time to do something we have been remiss in doing ...awards. MOSlof us just do the job and don't seek recognition. Well that's going to change slightly. Leland Kolb has agreed to assist the awards committee in puling together the awards recommended by the C.A.P. and some additional ones just for fun. We plan on combining the awards event with our first annual "Pig Roast" It's not really our first one, however, in the six years I've been a member we have not had a single pig roast, so we will still remember those pig roasts of years ago, but this will be dubbed as the "first annual". Quite a bil of preperaiion has to go into this but we have ume and the talented folks lO do il in grand style. June 14th is our targeted date. The next quanerly officers call is scheduled for June 19th. I am having a ball with this unit and hope you are half as pleased as I am with the way things are going. Everybody is pitching in and making a contribution. Your combined efforts are greatly appreciated. Commander Russ Owens

A SPECIAL THANKS
I would like to extend a special thanks to those who assisted in my "shed raising" ... Jack Van Ausdeln, Art Kimball, Floyd DeBolt, Tom Peg, Jacquie Sprague, Chuck Green, Greg Weiss and the many otbot» who gave their physical and "technical· support.
Your efforts were GBEA TL Y appreciated. Lynn Crecion

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Civil Air Patrol- 50 Years

0.[ Service
tic affairs. professionalism and tax deductions. Counseling seminars with role playing were also very helpful in solving squadron problems. This weekend wasn't all work though, The food at the base was very inexpensive and pretty good. Expecially good at the "0" Club were the prime rib and Santa Maria Bar-B-Que. Shopping was also fun at the uniform store and BX (no tax to pay). An 0 ther advantage of auending was that we got to know each other better, expecially while we were doing OUI "homework". Those who did their homework, didn't have to take the final exam (sure wish regular school would have been Lhatliberal). C. Eiger

SLS SCHOOL HELD AT VANDENBERG
Know Your Sqadron Officers
The Squadron Leadership School (SLS) held at Vandenberg AFB February 8th & 9!.hwas intense. Squadron 150 members in auendence were Don Abrams, Dee Bowers, Don Bunker, Carla Elger. Monica Havelka, Ron Roberson. Tom Sering, Lou Silberling, and David Starcks. Completion of the SLS is a necessary step in completing Level U to attain the rank of Captain. The sessions began each day at 8 am. and ended around 4:30 p.m. Proper uniforms were required each day. The following subjects were covered well by a variety of good instructors: E.S., training and specialty tracks, medical officer. problem solving, communication and listening skills, uniforms, pub-

Carla Elger: Admin Officer Responsibilities include implementing policies and procedures, control correspondence, prepare local publications and forms, perform other duties assigned by the commander.

Deanna Bowers: PersonnelOfficer ResponsIbilities include managing member rocora« and applications, appointments, promotions and demotions, awards and decorations, retirements end saparations.

BUCKING FOR A PROMOTION?
Senior members may qualify for promotion in four ways. First. through Duty Performance. Second, through Mission Related Skills. Third, by Special Appointments. Fourth. through Professional Appointments. General requirements for promotion through Duty Performance are as follows: Second Lieutenant complete Level Iand serve six months as a senior member. Firs! Lieutenant: complete Technical Rating in your specialty track and serve 12 months as a 2L T. Captain: complete Level D by; being a graduate of SLS (Squadron Leadership School), completing the ECI Course 13. auain Technician rating in specialty track. and serve 18 months as 1LT. M.W.!lr: complete Level ill by: holding staff or command position for one year, complete CLC (Corporate Learning Course), auain Senior rating in specialty track, and attend two National, Regional or Wing conferences; and serve 3 years as CPT. Lieulenam Colonel: complete Level IV by: holding command or staff position for two years, completing a Region Staff College or Squadron Officer School, auain Master rating in specialty track, serve as a staJI member at a National, Region or Wing conference or Squadron Leadership School. prepare and deliver a presentation to a non-CAP group on a CAP-related subject; and serve four years as a Major. Next month we will discuss promotions through Mission Related Skills. Any questions, please feci free to ask. C. Eiger

Clifford Rolins: Records Officer Responsibilities include assisting administration, personnel, and ES OfflC6rs in filing items in the members mes.

David Starcks Safety OffICer: Responsibilities include developing overall accident prevention program to include: safety inspections, direct accident investigation, preparation of safety reports, planning safety programs, conducting safety studies and recommending corrections, preparing training guides, publicizing safety through bulletin boards, newspapers, etc. Assistants: John Maurshak and Ron Roberson

MEMBER PROFILE - JACK MORALEE
Captain Jack Moralee is our featured member
this month. Jack is the Squadron Facilities Engi-

neer and assistant Flight Line Maintenance Officer for 1992_ Jack joined the CAP back in 1961 because he was interested in the promotion of General Aviation. Also, he was tired of just "flying around the patch". Building models as a boy got him interested in aviation and he's now been flying for over 32 years. Experience, so important to success, is what Jack has with over 4.500 hours to his credit, Ratings? Plenty of these too: Commercial, Instrument. and A&P. He owns his own Cessna 210 and keeps it tied down and the CAP Iligfu Line at the Long

Beach airport Mr. Moralee was in the Navy in WWII as a radarman on a gun boat, He worked as a senior engineer at Ford Motor Company. Hazel Parle, Michigan is his home town. He came to California in 1949. Evelyn. his wife, is also a CAP member. they have one son, Raymond. Jack's bobbies are hunting and Iishing. Some of his interesting experiences are: flying medical teams into Mexico; flying for McDonnell Douglas noise evaluation; and flying to Alaska with his two brothers and other CAP pilots. Jack is also well known within the CAP ranks for his CJtce11entability to teach. C. Eiger

Squadron 150 Membership Alert Roster
AJerting Officers: Russ Owens, Jim Dible, Uland Kolb
Sec 1 Rate A B C C C C C C C Last Dible Boggio Boggio Buschek Flores Mlllhone Terry Oosland Pelers Hunter Sliberling Bul Hunter Paoli Van Der Neut Weiss Wolrhae Robinson D'AIo Marushak Name First Don James Jac:it Karen Adolph Michael Ralph Dewyane Bill Oreg James louis Son Janice Sylvia John Greg Ron John Allan John W.P. Don Robert Chid James Kathryn Carroll Albert Earl Alan Michael AI Monica David Leonard Gary Terry William Jo. Charlene Don Bob Robert David De. Carla Jack Sherwin Donald Winfield Bob Evelyn Name R.n. 1lT CPT 1lT 1lT CPT 1lT S, MAJ MAJ COT 1lT 1lT 2LT 1LT MAJ 2LT MAJ CPT 1LT 2LT CPT 2LT CPT MAJ 1lT 1LT 1LT CPT SM 1LT 2lT SM 2LT 2LT 1LT 2LT SM SM CPT 1LT CPT 1LT MAJ SM 2LT 2lT CPT CPT 1LT 1LT CPT CPT MPT H Phon. 714-680-5840 310-943-0827 714-739-2919 714-739-2919 818-913-1461 818-338-3467 714-529-4259 714-827-1138 714-529-6841 714-670-8279 714-636-6248 714-527 -4529 714-530-1331 714-636-6248 714-521-5333 714-892-9115 714-971-8248 714-892-9782 714-893-3637 310-863-8362 213-865-7448 310-925-1541 310-866-3043 310-860-8747 310-429-4<458 310-924-3361 310-924-3361 310-429-8415 310-803-1814 310-927 -4078 310-428-5028 310-426-4569 310-866-0381 310-925-1600 310-750-7498 213-567-6521 310-860-3969 310-860-3969 310-305-8711 114-995-1356 714-821-3711 714-585-5047 714-373-081 310-596-3914 310-434-5929 310-427 -3331 310-427-3331 310-598-9174 310-434-4843 310-439-3119 310-498-2302 310-598-6149 310-596-9174 W Phone

MARCH

1991

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Abrams

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ES SCS ADT MPT

Acft NO NO YES YES NO NO NO YES MPS NO NO NO YES NO YES YES YES

714-870-1236 310-946- 7204 213-946-7204 310-485-2510 213-337 -2498

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310-430-0096 310-941-5842

Me

Clellan

3
3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5

Cleland Green Oreen Proctor Proctor Thomas Reyes Bolinger Hughes Baslain Hall Havelka Starcks Woodard Mickey Mickey Cumming Pus hc:itor Aikman Fox PenlZke Van Hom Adams Bowers Elger Moralee Basil Bogart Kinner Lankford Morale9

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310-602-6737 310-325-4744 714-891-9230 310-595-7502 310-948-8204

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Sec Rate 6 C 6 C 7A 7B 7C 7C 7C 7C 7C 7C 7C 7C 7P 8A 8C 8C 8C 8C 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9 9 9 9

Last Nama Sprague Vilianveva Grimshaw Hardie Creclon Cupp Duhamel Hardie Harmon Lyman Metcalf Vestermari( Kimball Serlng Davis Jones Reagan Schymld( Umana Zlttrer Roberson Owens Kolb Weuve Owens Schnapp Bragg Hodge Hughes La Clair Muir Villamil
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First Name Jacqule Ruben Brian Beverly Lynn Bobble Leon Lyman Terry Bob Nancy Kyle Arthur Tom Bill Gary Linda William Lenardo Ken Ron Russell Leland James Dorothy Jerome Donald Ron Dave Billie Chris Mike David Jack Chuck Mack Roy Daniel Elwin Dunn Phil Carl lola Albert Don David Barbara Alex Ralph Robe"

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H Phone 310-596-6902 310-596-4629 310-425-1832 310 ....25-0310 310-424-2492 310-420-2288 310-425-8288 310 ....25-0310 310-430-2685 310 ....21-5831 310-422-2360 310-434-2367 310-420-2286 714-544-0488 310-596-2932 714-554-1888 714-665-6679 714-838-1857 714-279-1888 714-770-3260 714-542-1216 714-827-V743 714-827-9552 714-597-4782 714-827-9743 714-738-1050 310-882-5295 310-431-0456 714-952-1513 714-875-7844 714-892-1740 310-421-6068 714-990-5148 310-498-1875 310-498-0805 310-430-7494 213-592-2712 714-840-7585 310-431-9625 714-432-7017 714-847-0785 714-842-6953 714-982-8945 714-845-1202 714-980-4708 714-847-4207 714-963-0101 714-969-4738 714-848-8438 714-848-9002

W Phone

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310-439-0988 310-331-8545

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310-595- 7782 714-751-8588 310-590-8992

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310-426-9411 714-957 -6400 310-616-4364 714-836-8677 714-591-3902 714-537-4451 714-779-8716 714-553-8880 310-718 ....748 714-380-9709 310-800-4707

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714-229-6618 714-995-4570 213-748-3919 800-777-0897 714-895-1667

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10 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11

Van Ausdeln Metz Harris Rhodes Stellrecht Sullens Voyes Gregg Jacobson Baylis Brutsche Bunker Gautschy Hartman Herron Ricks Rudloff

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213-431-9825 714-898-7557

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714-540-8900

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714-841-2447 310-430-1055 714-547-8139

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310-982-6751 310-593-9963 310-834-5208 310-420-1414

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"We Seek To Save"

SAFETY CORNER - CARB HEAT
Following are some thoughts on a guy who had fuel icing or carb ice in very cold weather. I won't auernpt to diagnose his problem.just relate my experiences. Remember, different engines react differently. These scenarios involve a 1946 BELLANCA CRUlSAIR 14-13. a 1934 FRANKLIN OLYMPIC 18C, l00hp air cooled 6cyl inline engine , and a 165hp Franklin 6cy1 opposed engine. My first chill from carb ice came on my first unsupervised solo a13,OOO feet over Los AI. Running at economy cruise, my good old C·150 began losing altitude for no apparent reason. The engine was running smoothly. With recent ground school and instructor's warnings about carb ice, I looked around-sure enough, puffy clouds were close by. A pull of the carb heat knob jerked that Continental out of its slumber. Watch Conunentals at pan throttle. My next memorable carb ice event occurred a few years later at 5,500 feet over that big atomic power plant on the Colwnbia river near Portland. The 150 Franklin went into heavy rough. at full throttle. That monster cooling LOwerapparently dumps lots of moisture ~nLO air. I had LO full the run carb heal almost all the way LO unplanned landan ing at Hillsboro. The flight was uneventful after thaL Several years mere went by before my next big chill. This time I had a 165 Franklin in my Bellanca. I was climbing out of Lindbergh Field. full throule, passing 1500 feel, when it went very rough and lest a lot of power. Nothing appeared abnermal on the gauges. I pulled the throttle part way, and lest mere power. Throule back in, I tried a little pull of the mixture-it almost died. Mixture back in. it was decision Lime. De I declare an emergency and go back into Lindbergh and into the jaws of the Federa1es? Do 1 try limping over LOMomgornery Field, or back home LO Meadowlark? Just as 1was composing a speech of my predicament LO San Diego Departure, 1 remembered a convcrsauon with a Lower controller from Orange
apparent

County. He said they have a checklist in the LOwer that they read to a pilot in need. He said it sounds dumb, but it ofLenhclps. You know, Fuel Selector to Fullest Tank, Throule In, Mixture In, Carb Heal On. CARB HEAT! A dose of carb heat smoothed out that old Franklin in no Lime,and I headed home - older, grayer, and maybe wiser. Franklins ice up at full throttle. Lycomings are a different story. The carburetor is mounted directly to the bouorn of the oil pan (sump), where it may be warmed by the oil - after it's hot, The amount of carburetor heating from the oil depends on the thickness of the gasket or fiber spacer between the carb and the oil pan. Too much heating will cause fuel evaporation in the carb, and possibly vapor lock. Carb icing in Lycomings is relatively rare, but probably less predictable because of the effect of the variable oil temperature, All the above is based on limited experience with a few carbureted engines. Your airplane has icing modes that may differ widcly (rem those above. Either you drive around with carb heat on most of the Lime,which is very wasteful, or you risk learning your engine's icing idiosyncrasies. Or you do like me, and install a carb temperature gauge. You can then study thc gauge and learn which conditions are conducive LOicing of your engine. Another option is a carb ice detector that lights an idiot lamp. It is an optical device that trips when covered with ice. You then apply carb heal only when you REALLY need it. Its drawback it that it can fail with no warning and there's no easy sure
integri £y LeSL

FLIGHT LINE NEWS & INFORMA nON

Please be sure you make your comtibution for all soda pop and beer taken from the flight line refrigera· tor. The kitty has been a little shy lately. Soda Pops .50e and Beer .75~

We now have a Porta Pottie on the flight line ... please feel free to take advantage whenever nature calls. It is located at the west end of the flight line near th9 line sh~.

As a result of our new

"pot:... effective

April

1.

1992, there will be a $2.00
charge added to all monthly tie down fees.

I like idiot lamps because they allow you LO scan other things, such as the sky, and because Murphy says things go bad when you are preoccupied with other tasks. An idiot lamp grabs your auenuon like no gauge can. Gauges are necessary for noting actual values and trends, and as a backup check of the idiot lamps. My plane has idio; lamps and audio alarm as well as the standard gauges fer oil pressure, generator. and fuel pressure, but that's another story. SM, Ralph Ricks

Spring is upon us and it's time for some spring cleaning. Please take the time to clean-up around your tie-down area and sheds. Remember. the rules aIe ..... everything should be kept in your shed and not around and in back of it. Please see that all weeds ale cut down and all trash picked up .

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and

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS
April 10-12: Mini Acrofest, Borrego Springs Airport. Basic OJId sportsman levels. Contact Rob Jacobsen 619452-4231 Apr 10,11 & 12: Palm Springs High Altitude Flight Clinic and SAR. Contact Project Officer Toby llildner for more information (714) 835-9666 Apr 19: Easter Sunday Apr 24.25 & 26: EI Toro Air Show, CAP members welcome in the Officers Club. May 1·3: Camarillo Calif EAA 12th Annual Fly-In OJIdAircraft Display. WWI/ Aircraft. homebuilts, experimentals, pancake breakfasts. antiques. seminars. displays. vendors and more. Contact: Bob Koeblitz (310) 443-8056 May 23·25: Watsonville Air Show. Contact Northern Calif. Antique Airplan Association (408) 496·9559 May 29,30 & 31: High Altitude Clinic scheduled for Bishop.

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Civil Air Patrol Air Rescue Squadron 150 P.O. Box 8036 Long Beach, Ca. 90808

P.O. Box 9117

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