You are on page 1of 8

CONSCIOUSNESS

DEFINITION

The General state of being aware of and responsive to events in the environment, as well as ones own mental processes. Consciousness refers to individual awareness of unique thoughts, memories, feelings, sensations and environment. Your conscious experiences are constantly shifting and changing. For example, in one moment you may be focused on reading this article. Immediate awareness of the Environment Function of the mind Consciousness refers to inner awareness, knowledge of own thoughts, feeling and memories

For instance, a 27-year-old woman, suffers a heart attack that results in her losing consciousness. The continuum of consciousness refers to a wide range of experiences, from being acutely aware and alert to being totally unaware and unresponsive.

THEORIES OF CONSCIOUSNESS

Bicameralism (the philosophy of "twochamberedness") is a hypothesis in psychology that argues that the human brain once assumed a state in which cognitive functions were divided between one part of the brain which appears to be "speaking", and a second part which listens and obeys - a bicameral mind. The term was coined by psychologist Julian Jaynes, who presented the idea in his 1976 book The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind,

ROBERT ORNSTEIN

Two modes of Consciousness each controlled by its own side of the brain. Active Mode controlled by the left Receptive mode controlled by the right Active mode is more automatic, Experiences, events and stimuli that do not relate to ability to survive are shut out. Receptive mode is evaluation of what is being done.

DANIEL DENNETT

Human Beings have many sources of Information That in combination create conscious experiences The experiences are constantly being analyzed

RESTAK

The Modular Brain Brain has sections that control behaviors, Consciousness is not central but resides in modules. Lose a section and lose certain key abilities Damasio and Calvin follow similar line, where former asserts that sections are hierarchically organized and the latter notes that modules are at work, generating and synthesizing throughout our lives .

STEVEN PINKER

Mind has evolved as an evolutionary response to the world.