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Kay Ahten of Delphos

is among eight local 2012
Jefferson Award winners who
hope to be chosen to attend the
National Jefferson Awards
ceremony in Washington,
D.C., in June.
Judges selected eight indi-
viduals from 46 nominations
submitted for the prestigious
national public service award.
All eight winners will receive
bronze medallions, cash
awards for their volunteer
organization and recognition
at the Jefferson Awards ban-
quet on March 27 at The City
Club in Lima.
“Although we have select-
ed eight of the 46 nomi-
nees to receive this award,
every nomination is a win-
ner because everything these
people do makes our commu-
nity a better place to live and
raise a family,” Leila Osting,
chair of the Jefferson Awards
judges’ committee, said.
The local 2012 Jefferson
Award Winners are:
Kay Ahten
In 1971, Kay Ahten
became a member of the
Delphos community and
since that time, she has qui-
etly and selflessly served her
community as an outstanding
volunteer.
Over the past 40 years,
her work at Trinity United
Methodist Church has
touched many members and
ministries at the church. She
has served as president of
Trinity United Methodist
Women, headed the Missions
Committee, is craft direc-
tor at vacation Bible School
and served as Sunday School
teacher. Over the years, Ahten
and her husband, the late Ron
Ahten, planted a very large
garden and she canned pro-
duce to sell to raise money
for missions.
In 2005, she and her hus-
band became trustees and vol-
unteers at the Delphos Canal
Commission Museum. Over
the years, she has stripped,
recaned, glued and refinished
furniture, as well as various
kinds of repair work and main-
tenance at the museum. When
the museum began plans to
expand to their second floor,
Ahten drew up the organiza-
tional plans and did a large
part of the sanding, staining
and sealing of the floors.
Linda Baker, who volun-
teers with Ahten at the muse-
um, said, “She was really
the driving force behind the
renovations to the second
floor of the canal museum. If
it hadn’t been for her, we’d
still be working on it. None
of us really knew how to get
started and Kay came in and
wrote up some plans and we
used that as a road map to get
it done.”
Ron passed away in 2008
after a battle with cancer.
Instead of giving up her vol-
unteer work, she seemed to
take on more.
Her nominator wrote, “She
has made a profound differ-
ence in her church benefiting
all of its members in mul-
tiple ways. She played a huge
part in the expansion of our
museum. Because Kay is so
humble about her volunteer-
ism, I believe she deserves
special recognition — not
from the world — but from
the Delphos community.”
Art Brinkman and Jim
Sherrick
Brinkman and Sherrick are
two barbers, two friends, who
run a shop that has been in
the same neighborhood loca-
tion for 36 years — across
the street from North Middle
School in Lima, giving them
an excellent view of the chil-
dren as they come and go.
Over the years, it became
apparent to the two that
some of the children always
walked to school, while oth-
ers enjoyed riding bikes. This
resulted in them two men
starting a program, “Barbers
Giving Bikes,” that within
5 years has gone from giv-
ing away two bikes to giv-
ing away 163 bikes this past
1
Thursday, March 8, 2012
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Elida FFA, p7A

Elida stays alive in tourney, p6A
Upfront
Sports
Obituaries 2A
State/Local 3A
Politics 4A
Community 5A
Sports 6-7A
Farm 7A
World News 8A
Classifieds 1B
TV 4B
Index
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR WEEKEND WEATHER OUTLOOK
FRIDAY
EXTENDED
FORECAST
SATURDAY SUNDAY
Mostly
sunny
and
colder
Friday
with
highs
in the lower 40s and
lows in the mid 20s.
Mostly
clear.
Highs
in the
upper
40s.
Lows
in
the upper 30s.
Partly cloudy Monday with a 40 percent chance of
showers. Highs in the lower 60s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Mostly cloudy
Sunday with
a 40 percent
chance of
rain show-
ers. Highs in the mid 50s.
Lows in the mid 40s.
Chance of precipitation 60
percent Sunday evening.
SUEVER’S TOWN HOUSE
419-692-2202
944 E. Fifth St.
•FISH SANDWICHES • FISH & FRIES
• TUNA SALAD CROISSANT
•SHRIMP BASKETS
• VEGGIE CROISSANT
$
12
15” CHEESE
5 ITEM PIZZA
Nancy Spencer photos
Delphos Relay for Life teams have been challenged to support breast cancer awareness in the “Decorate the
Girls” contest. The Jim’s Restaurant team has several entries. Jonathan Burgei, left, Rick Burgei and Nathan
Burgei show them off as they are displayed in the window at WDOH. The first bra, to the right of Jonathan, is
entitled “Cookin’ for a Cure,” the second is “Dicing up a Cure” and the third, “Dots for Ta-Tas,” which includes
braille. Teams can submit entries of decorated bras for judging by Wednesday at First Federal Bank. The winner
of the contest will be announced during the Bra-vo Dinner and Comedy Night at 5:30 p.m. April 28 at the Delphos
Eagles. Tickets are $25 each.
‘Decorate the Girls’ entries due Wednesday
First Federal Bank
employees Mark
Altenburger and Elaine
Evans show off some of
the “Decorate the Girls”
entries the bank has
received. Altenburger
is hiding behind the
bank’s entry entitled
“Un‘mask’ Cancer: Get
a Mammogram.” He is
holding the Union Bank’s
entry, “Be a Star —
Support the Cure.” Evans
is holding the Franklin
Elementary entry entitled
“Masquer‘bra’ade: The
Phantom of the Op‘bra’.”
Fortener
Committee
taps Fortener
for council
Ahten among local Jefferson Award winners
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The Allen
County Republican Central
Committee has chosen Jim
Fortener to fill the Delphos
City Council seat left vacant
by the untimely death of
Second Ward Councilman
Dick Feathers in January.
Fortener, a Delphos
native, recently returned from
Tennessee, where he managed
a Home Depot store.
“I’m back in Delphos and
I’ve always loved the com-
munity and spent most of my
life here helping with com-
munity projects, involved in
Little League and St. John’s
Schools and the parish coun-
cil,” Fortener said. “I think I
have expertise and knowledge
to help the existing members
of council and I have the time
to do it.”
Fortener lives up the block
from the Feathers home and
often stopped to talk with his
predecessor.
“Dick was all about
Delphos and doing whatever
he could to make it better,”
Fortener said. “He did it all
quietly. I am a little more
outspoken than Dick was but
I think it will work for me and
for council. I have big shoes
to fill. Dick was a model citi-
zen.”
The 1959 St. John’s High
School graduate and his wife,
Sharon, are parents of two
boys and have three grand-
sons. He will be sworn in next
week, prior to the March 19
meeting.
Trivia Challenge
set April 6
The Delphos Union
Bank Relay For Life
team will host the 10th
annual Trivia Challenge
at 8 p.m. on April 6 at the
Delphos Eagles Lodge.
Teams consist of eight to
10 members who put their
heads together to answer on
paper 10 rounds of questions
in a variety of categories.
A $10 donation per
person is collected.
To register, or for more
detailed information, contact
Judy Fetter at 419-339-
1954, Doris Neumeier at
419-692-3382 or Margie
Rostorfer at 419-692-5106.
Library offers
‘Luck of the Irish’
The children’s depart-
ment of the Delphos Public
Library has announced an
after-school arts and crafts
program with special guest
Cathy Fought entitled The
“Luck of the Irish.”
It will be held from 4-5
p.m. on Tuesday and is open
to children in grades K-5
and includes leprechaun
craft, stories and fun.
Registration is required as
there is a limit of 30 kids.
Call the library at
419-695-4015.
Ahten
See AWARDS, page 3A
Elida selling tourney
tickets
The Elida Athletic
Department will sell
boys basketball ONU
District final tournament
tickets from 5:30-7 p.m.
today in the High School
Activities Office and
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday in the Commons
at the high school.
Pre-sale tickets
are $6 for adults and
$4 for students.
Elida plays Lexington 7
p.m. Saturday evening at
Ohio Northern University.
TODAY
Boys Basketball Districts
Division III
at Lima Senior
Spencerville vs.
Liberty-Benton, 6:15
p.m.; LCC vs. Bloomdale
Elmwood, 8 p.m. (win-
ners 7 p.m. Saturday)
Girls Basketball Regionals
Division IV
at Elida
Stryker vs. New Riegel,
6:15 p.m.; Ottoville vs.
Arlington, 8 p.m. (winners
play 7:30 p.m. Saturday)
2
Jill Miller, DDS
Steven M. Jones, DDS
General Dentistry
experienced, gentle care
WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS
Located on S.R. 309 in Elida
419-331-0031
myddsoffice.com
daytime, evening and weekend hours available.
It’s time to
PUT THE SNOW SHOVELS AWAY!
Let us worry about the maintenance
so you can start enjoying the snow.
420 East Fourth St.
Spencerville, OH 45887
419-647-4115 Fax: 419-647-6744
www.roselawnmanor.com
ROSELAWN MANOR
a t r a d i t i o n o f c a r i n g
Learn what a maintenance free
lifestyle can do for you.
1365 N. Cable Rd.
Lima 419-224-5080
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is William
Buettner.
Congratulations
William!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Serenna
Moening.
Congratulations
Serenna!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Thursday, March 8, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERALS
VAN WERT COUNTY COURT NEWS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 202
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Delphos weather
Corn: $6.35
Wheat: $6.31
Beans: $13.05
Thomas Edward
Klaus
Tabatha Sue (Stant)
Beining
Thomas H. “Tom”
Eutsler
The high temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
68 and the low was 47. A
year ago today, the high was
52 and the low was 30. The
record high for today is 79, set
in 2000 and the record low of
-9 was set in 1943.
Nov. 21, 1932
March 6, 2012
Thomas Edward Klaus, 79,
of Landeck, died at 9:20 p.m.
Tuesday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center.
He was born Nov. 21, 1932,
in Venedocia to Frank and
Helen (Freund) Klaus, who
preceded him in death.
On Sept. 29, 1956, he mar-
ried Janet Klaus, who survives
in Landeck.
Survivors also include chil-
dren Tim (Kathleen) Klaus
of Delphos, Denise Klaus
of Avon and Mark (Valerie)
Klaus of Spencerville; broth-
ers Edward (Therese) Klaus
of Delphos, Howard (Eileen)
Klaus of Venedocia and Keith
(Peggy) Klaus of Glasbury,
Conn.; grandchildren Jason
(Brooke) Klaus, Megan
(Kyle) Goedde and Kirkland
Klaus; stepgrandchildren Kara
(Kizuku) Kitano, Kami (Mike)
Whitten and Byron Rhodes;
great-grandchildren Noah
Klaus and Connor Goedde;
and stepgreat-grandchildren,
Blake Williams, Isiah, Kansas,
Georgia Ann and Ellie Whitten
and Kyo Kitano.
He was also preceded
in death by his stepmother,
Rosemary A. Vinke Klaus; two
sisters, Patricia A. Brandehoff
and Clara M. Giesken; and a
brother, Charles F. Klaus.
Mr. Klaus was an Army
veteran serving as a sergeant in
the Korean War, where he was
awarded the Bronze Star. He
retired in 1997 from Fruehauf
after 30 years and retired again
in 2010 from Krendl Machine.
He was an avid donor with the
Red Cross, having donated 19
gallons of blood. He enjoyed
spending time with his wife,
children, grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Private family services will
be held at a later date with
burial in the Dayton National
Cemetery.
There will be no visitation.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Wounded
Veterans Foundation.
Arrangements are by
Chiles-Laman Funeral &
Cremation Services.
April 18, 1969-March 3, 2012
Tabatha Sue (Stant)
Beining, 42, of Ruskin, Fla.,
and formerly of Delphos, died
at 1:20 a.m. Saturday at South
Bay Hospital in Ruskin.
She was born April 18,
1969, in Lima to Roger and
Virginia Stant. Her father sur-
vives in Delphos.
Other survivors include her
fiance, Ed Stoner of Ruskin; a
daughter, Nicole (Drew) Drage
of Lynn, Ind.; three sisters,
Michelle Dearth of Defiance
and Tessie (Jeff) Deuel and
Jamie Lucas of Delphos; and
nieces and nephews, Jessica
and Cody Monroe, Zac
Reames, Lindsay and Delaney
Deuel and Caleb and Jaden
Lucas.
She was also preceded in
death by a brother-in-law,
Bryan Reames.
The body has been cremat-
ed. Graveside services will
be held at noon Saturday at
Walnut Grove Cemetery.
July 14, 1929
March 7, 2012
Thomas H. “Tom” Eutsler,
82, of rural Venedocia, died
at 2:50 p.m. Wednesday at
Van Wert Manor Nursing
Home, where he had resided
since August 2011.
He was born July 14,
1929, in Jennings Twp., Van
Wert County to Gaylord and
Mildred (Davies) Eutsler.
Services will begin
at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at
Thomas E. Bayliff Funeral
Home in Spencerville, the
Rev. John Medaugh offici-
ating. Burial will follow at
Wright Cemetery in Jennings
Township, with graveside
rites by the Spencerville
VFW and American Legion
posts.
Friends may call from 2-4
p.m. and 6-8 p.m. Friday and
for an hour prior to the ser-
vice at the funeral home.
Memorials are to the
American Heart Association
in care of the funeral home.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
THURSDAY: Mostly
clear. Much colder. Lows in
the upper 20s. West winds 10
to 15 mph.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny.
Colder. Highs in the lower
40s. Northwest winds 10 to 15
mph with gusts up to 25 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Lows in the mid 20s.
North winds around 10 mph
shifting to the east after mid-
night.
EXTENDED FORECAST
S A T U R D A Y ,
SATURDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Highs in the upper 40s.
Lows in the upper 30s.
SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 40 percent chance of rain
showers. Highs in the mid 50s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Show-
ers likely. Lows in the mid
40s. Chance of precipitation
60 percent.
The following individuals
appeared Wednesday before
Judge Charles D. Steele Van
Wert County Common Please
Court:
Michael D. Closson, 62,
Delphos, was arraigned on an
indictment charging him with
two counts of gross sexual
imposition.
According to a Delphos
City Police investigation,
Closson allegedly had sexual
contact with a young female
twice during 2011.
Closson was released on
a $5,000 unsecured personal
surety bond with an order
to have no contact with the
alleged victim.
Each count of gross sexual
imposition carries a maximum
prison sentence of 60 months.
A pretrial has been set for
March 21.
Ian D. Taylor, 18, was
indicted five counts of theft;
all counts were felonies of
the fifth degree. Taylor also
was indicted on four counts
of breaking and entering, all
felonies of the fifth degree.
The indictment also charged
him with trespassing in a place
of habitation, a felony of the
fourth degree, along with bur-
glary, a felony of the second
degree.
Taylor was arrested by
the Van Wert City Police
Department after a rash of
thefts and breaking and enter-
ing crimes in the southwest
section of the city. The thefts
took place from the first part of
February to approximately the
middle of February.
Taylor entered not guilty
pleas to all counts in the
indictment, was ordered held
a $100,000 together with a
$5,000 unsecured personal
surety bond.
A pretrial has been sched-
uled for March 14.
Larry R. Brown, 63,
Delphos, was sentenced to
three years of community con-
trol on a charge of assault to a
police officer.
According to a Delphos
Police report, Brown allegedly
assaulted a Delphos officer in
July 2011. The police were
called to the Brown residence
for a domestic situation at
which time the assault took
place.
Judge Steele ordered that
Brown pay court costs and be
placed on electronic moni-
tored house arrest for 60 days
and Brown a six-month pris-
on sentence but deferred the
imposition of the prison sen-
tence pending the successful
completion of the community
control program.
Shay Ringwald, 23, Middle
Point, entered a not guilty plea
to a charge of possession of
heroin, a felony of the fourth
degree.
Ringwald was released on
a $5,000 unsecured personal
surety bond with a pretrial
hearing being scheduled for
March 21.
Cycle J. Black, 25, Van
Wert, entered a plea of guilty
to a negotiated plea of traffick-
ing in drugs, a felony of the
fifth degree.
Black had been arrested
after he allegedly sold drugs to
an undercover agent working
for the Van Wert City Police
Department in August 2011.
Judge Steele ordered a pre-
sentence investigation and
scheduled sentencing for April
3.
Jimmy D. Vibert, was
sentenced to spend 180 days
in the Van Wert County Jail
on a charge of domestic vio-
lence, a misdemeanor of the
first degree.
Judge Steele found that
Vibbert was not a candidate for
community control because of
his past record before sentenc-
ing him to spend 180 days in
jail. Vibbert was granted work
release if he is fully employed
and qualifies for work release,
he was also ordered to pay all
costs associated with his court
case.
Damian J. Smith, 19,
Elgin, was sentenced to spend
30 days in the Van Wert
County Jail on a charge of
theft, a misdemeanor of the
first degree.
According to a Van Wert
City Police investigation,
Smith, while employed for
Walmart, was found to be
stealing merchandise from the
store in November.
Smith will serve up to one
year on community control,
must pay all costs associated
with his case and, make restitu-
tion in the amount of $1,000 to
Walmart.
Judge Steele gave Smith a
180-day jail sentence and a
fine of $1,000 but deferred the
imposition of the jail and fine
pending the successful comple-
tion of community control.
Ryan J. Schaadt, Van
Wert, had the conditions of his
personal surety bond revoked
and was ordered held on a
$10,000 cash bond.
According to the Van
Wert County Adult Probation
Department, Schaadt had vio-
lated the conditions of bond by
testing positive for the use of
opiates and failing to report to
a rehabilitation clinic.
Judge Steele ordered him
held until immediately prior
to him having arrangements
made for entry into the reha-
bilitation clinic.
Tanisha Agler, 21,
Buckland, was sentenced to a
basic prison term of 12 months
on a charge of breaking and
entering, a felony of the fifth
degree.
According to a Van Wert
County Sheriff’s Department
investigation, Agler, along
with others, broke into the
Electric Polishing Company in
Venedocia in July 2011.
Agler is presently servicing
a prison sentence from Allen
County and one from Auglaize
County for similar offenses.
Judge Steele gave her the
12-month prison sentence
which is to run concurrently
with the sentences of Allen and
Auglaize counties.
Colt A. Morris, 25, Lima,
entered a plea of guilty to a
charge of robbery, a felony of
the third degree.
Morris was responsible
for the robber of the Pak N
Sac Nov. 1, at which time
approximately $226 in cash
was taken.
Judge Steele ordered a pre-
sentence investigation and
scheduled sentencing for April
18.
Morris is currently being
held in Allen County Jail for
similar offenses.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
03-07-13-20-25-49
Estimated jackpot: $5.09
million
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $148
million
Pick 3 Evening
1-3-9
Pick 4 Evening
5-9-0-0
Powerball
1 2 - 3 5 - 4 5 - 4 6 - 4 7 ,
Powerball: 12
Estimated jackpot: $60
million
Rolling Cash 5
06-10-11-24-27
Estimated jackpot:
$120,000
Ten OH Evening
02-04-07-09-12-13-22-24-
32-34-38-43-45-47-49-55-
60-65-66-74
LINDEMAN, Timothy
A., 20, of Delphos, Mass
of Christian Burial will be
at 11 a.m. Friday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home,
the Rev. Jacob Gordon offi-
ciating. Burial will follow in
Wood Land Cemetery in Van
Wert. Friends may call from
2-8 p.m. Thursday and for
an hour prior to the service.
Memorials are to the family
to help with expenses.
WANNEMACHER,
Evelyn, 90, of Ottoville,
Mass of Christian Burial will
begin at 10:30 a.m. Friday
at Ottoville Immaculate
Conception Church, the
Rev. John Stites officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Ottoville.
Friends may call from
4-9 p.m. today at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, corner
of St. Rts. 224 and 634, with
a scripture service at 4 p.m.
Memorials may be given to
St. Mary’s Cemetery Board
or the charity of donor’s
choice. Condolences may be
expressed to: www.lovefu-
neralhome.com.
STEMEN, Carl David,
60, of Van Wert, funeral ser-
vices will begin at 10 a.m.
Friday at Cowan and Son
Funeral Home, Van Wert,
the Rev. Charles Obinwa
officiating. Burial will be in
Woodland Cemetery, Van
Wert, with military grave-
side rites conducted by the
honor guard of the VFW
and American Legion posts
of Van Wert. Friends may
call from 2-8 p.m. today at
the funeral home. Preferred
memorials are to St. Rita’s
Hospice or the family.
BOGGS, Thomas M.,
38, of Fort Jennings, funeral
services will begin at 2 p.m.
Friday at St. Joseph Catholic
Church, Fort Jennings,
Deacon Larry Schimmoeller
officiating. There will be a
private burial at a later date
in West Virginia. Visitation
will be from 2-8 p.m. today
at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral
Home, Jackson Township.
Memorial contributions
may be given to the fam-
ily for his daughters’ educa-
tion. Condolences may be
expressed at www.lovefu-
neralhome.com.
Toledo police
probe corpse
abuse allegations
TOLEDO (AP) — Two
siblings say a funeral home
offered them a free funeral
and casket in exchange for
not calling police about an
allegation their mother’s
body was fondled by a work-
er.
Toledo police are inves-
tigating the fondling allega-
tion, with Sgt. Joe Heffernan
saying the employee could
face an abuse of corpse
charge.
The Blade newspaper
reports Thursday that the
adult children of a 51-year-
old woman who died Sunday
were told by the H.H.
Birkenkamp Funeral Home
that their mother’s body was
mistreated.
Lisa Marshall, a Houston-
based spokeswoman for
the funeral home, says the
employee accused of the
abuse has been fired.
The newspaper says police
took an initial report at the
funeral home Sunday but a
special victims unit inves-
tigation didn’t begin until
Wednesday.
(Continued from page 1A)
Christmas
“There’s something about
a bike at Christmas,” Sherrick
said. “It’s something every kid
at a certain age looks forward
to.”
A simple act of kind-
ness started the program in
2007, just before Christmas.
That’s when the Silver Shears
Barbershop owners decided to
donate two bikes for under-
privileged children instead of
exchanging presents with each
other. The following year, the
barbers put out a jar for cus-
tomers to contribute to the bike
fund. The first week the jar
was in the shop, they collected
enough to purchase four bikes
and by that Christmas, they
raised enough for 37 bikes.
The program is extra spe-
cial for Brinkman, who has
been cutting hair for 55 years,
and as a child grew up during
tough times and never had a
bike.
“I can’t imagine what it
would have been like to come
down on Christmas morning
and see a bike,” Brinkman
said.
Brinkman talked to other
barbers around Lima. They
have placed Barbers for Bikes
collection jars in their shops
and now they and their cus-
tomers are donating to pur-
chase bikes. The next three
years, they set up a golf tour-
nament, raising enough funds
to purchase more than 100
bikes each year. Walmart has
offered special pricing for the
purchase of the bikes and the
Lima Rotary Foundation has
donated money to purchase
bike helmets to go along with
the bikes.
This all happened because
two men in the community
wanted to do something for
area kids at Christmas. Each
year, the project continues
to grow. Local barbers, Art
Brinkman and Jim Sherrick
giving back to their commu-
nity — one snip at a time.
Marlene Froning
After Froning’s son, Keith,
was killed in a bicycle acci-
dent, she became an advocate
for safer roadways and more
education on bicycle safety in
Wapakoneta. In 1998 she par-
ticipated in the first attempt
to win passage of a bicycle
helmet law in the Ohio General
Assembly. A decade later,
the bill was being considered
again, and she was contacted
by Gary Smith of Nationwide
Children’s Hospital because of
a letter she had written years
earlier. He was so moved by
her words he asked her to come
and speak at the hearing. After
some very deep soul searching,
Froning knew she had to go
and speak, there was no other
option.
The bill ended up pass-
ing in Columbus and became
law. From that point, Froning
knew she had to do something
locally to improve awareness.
She could not let someone
else’s family suffer the way
hers had.
Within six weeks, she con-
nected with the Wapakoneta
police and fire departments,
Auglaize County Sheriff
DARE Program, the Brain
Injury Association of Ohio and
the Revolution Cycling Team,
plus many more community
sponsors to create the first
annual Bicycle Safety Day for
Wapakoneta. This day provides
free properly fitted helmets to
children, inspects their bicycle,
and has them ride through a
bicycle rodeo course. Now in
its fourth year, she has people
in the community asking her
when the next date is and if
they can volunteer. Through
her drive and determination
she has created a safer, smarter
community.
Marlene also looks beyond
the needs of her own com-
munity to help others in des-
perate times of need. During
the flooding of the Mississippi
River in the early 1990’s
and after the devastation of
Hurricane Katrina, she orga-
nized water drives to bring
relief to the victims of these
disasters. Froning knows that
by bringing together the com-
munity to help the greater good
of another, you notice a posi-
tive change in how the people
of the community interact with
one another, gaining a greater
appreciation for their neighbor.
It makes a community stron-
ger, more united because one
person decided they needed
to stand up and make a dif-
ference.
For the past 25 years,
Froning has served as the
Auglaize County Recycling
Center coordinator. She sched-
ules non-profit groups to work
Saturday mornings at the cen-
ter allowing these groups to
earn money for their organi-
zation. She gets to know the
youth who are there to serve
court-ordered community ser-
vice hours. She doesn’t look
at them as “bad kids” or just
assume the worst of them;
she finds out who they are,
where they come from; and
what they aspire to be. She lets
them know that someone does
care about them and that just
because you make one mistake
in your life, it does not mean
you cannot be somebody. She
teaches them to have respect
for others, as well as for them-
selves.
Froning continues to make
a difference in her community
as she freely gives of her time
and talents to make her com-
munity a better place to live,
work, and raise a family.
Bill Hanz
Bill and Kitty Hanz have
called Lima their home for
35 years. One might typically
look at a new community as
to what it has to offer but for
Hanz, it has always been what
he could offer the community.
He has been a volunteer at the
YMCA for over 30 years. He
has been a mentor to kids as a
volunteer youth soccer coach.
When you talk to him about his
soccer team, it really is never
about the skill of his players
but rather about their attitude
or how he can help them to
feel good about themselves no
matter what their skill level.
Although winning is fun, the
bigger picture to Hanz is each
individual player feeling good
about being part of a team and
being accepted.
Parents wrote that when
their children were older and
playing junior and high school
soccer, Hanz could be found
on the sidelines watching
and encouraging the kids he
coached as very young soccer
players.
Hanz is also a mentor to
young bike riders in the com-
munity. A member of a local
biking group said, “Bill will
slow his pace to ride with
young riders and encourage
them.” He believes Hanz is
the reason some of the youth
have developed a lover for the
sport.
Much of what Habz does
goes undetected, for he does
not limit his contributions to
a specific program or organi-
zation. He is a true volunteer
to the community. He sees
a need and steps up without
being asked. For more than
five years, he has provided
what he refers to as “driving
Miss Daisy” several hours on
Sunday, picking up individu-
als lacking transportation or
who need assistance to get to
their various places of wor-
ship or various other places to
meet their needs. Throughout
the years, he has reached out
to those others may pass by
and assisted them emotionally,
through friendship, tutoring,
mentoring and financially.
Margie Basinger said, “Bill
Hanz doesn’t think twice, for
he feels he’s been blessed and
volunteering is what you do
when you see the community
as your home”.
Chas and Beth Myers
Chas and Beth Myers were
nominated for a Jefferson
Award for their volun-
teer efforts with the Putnam
County Habitat for Humanity.
They have been involved in the
Habitat cause since its 2009
inception in Putnam County.
They have been instrumental
in the development of the local
Habitat Charter and the cre-
ation of the Putnam County
Habitat for Humanity Board
of Directors. Their efforts
combined with others brought
about the successful construc-
tion of three habitat homes in
Putnam County with plans for
two more to be constructed in
2012.
Chas and Beth have pro-
vided a strong foundation, out-
standing leadership and expe-
rienced foresight which has
allowed the Habitat movement
to succeed in Putnam County.
Chases leadership as president
of the organization has encour-
aged the recruitment of resi-
dents to become involved in
board and committee work as
well as construction projects.
Beth has given countless hours
to the organizational and paper
work detail that is so necessary
for all organizations. Beth has
been outstanding in working
with board members, volun-
teers and outside organiza-
tions to make Putnam County
Habitat efforts successful and
admirable.
Because of their efforts and
leadership, the Putnam County
Habitat homes have been
built to green specifications
and approved and recognized
by the state as Energy Star
homes.
Beginning in 2007 Chas
organized a flood relief proj-
ect through the Presbyterian
Church Disaster Assistance
program. Following the 2007
flood, which devastated
Ottawa and several Putnam
County communities, Chas
was the coordinator for flood
rebuilding projects in approxi-
mately 15 homes in Ottawa.
These projects went on for 2
1/2 years following the flood
when Chas and Beth donated
countless man hours to those
who needed help in recovery
from the flood.
Edward Noble
Noble is 94 years old. He’s
lived a life worth living. His
legacy to St. Marys is the uni-
versity which he helped bring
to town. Ed is truly a treasure
to the people of St. Marys.
His volunteer service to his
community has touched thou-
sands of lives. By word and
by deed, Ed has throughout his
life brought help to families in
need, and in doing so an entire
community has learned the les-
sons of service to others, and
has emulated his example.
Goodfellows is an infor-
mal organization at distributes
food baskets to families in
need at Christmas. Tracing its
roots to the Great Depression,
Goodfellows really got a
shot in the arm after World
War II when Ed Noble as the
Rotary Club’s representa-
tive to the organization. He
quickly assumed the leading
role, which he continued for
the next 60 years. Ed was the
person who oversaw the food
orders and coordinated con-
tents of the baskets for the
recipients. He was the driv-
ing force to make sure needy
families were added to the list.
It must be emphasized that
Goodfellows is an organiza-
tion with no official structure.
It was no coincidence that
the community responded to
the leadership of Ed Noble
as the unofficial coordinator.
With Ed’s retirement in 2011,
the program continues under
the auspices of the St. Marys
Community Foundation.
Every year, Nobel comes to
a Rotary luncheon and passes
the same hat he has for the past
50-60 years to collect funds
for the Goodfellow baskets.
This year alone, Goodfellows
touched over 340 families
with deliveries of toys and
food. Noble has been a mem-
ber of the St. Marys Rotary
Club since 1947 and recently
received their Distinguished
Service Award.
Noble was an initial trust-
ee and president of The St.
Marys Community Foundation
which was formed in 1974.
The foundation was the first
of its kind in Auglaize County,
and Ed Noble served as presi-
dent until 2011. The St. Marys
Community Foundation start-
ed with an initial bequest of
$7,000 and has grown to assets
of almost $5 million dollars;
this from a rural farming com-
munity of 8,159 people. The
foundation awards scholar-
ships and loans to students
who may have no other way of
obtaining funds to further their
education.
Suzanne Kaliher-Plumb
Plumb’s volunteer roles in
the community have involved
a number of organizations. As
with many young mothers, she
began volunteering in her com-
munity through her church,
moving on to become a Den
Mother for her Cub Scout sons
and was soon canvassing her
neighborhood to raise money
for the American Cancer
Society and the American
Heart Association.
When Suzanne’s daughter
wanted to take tumbling les-
sons, she contacted the YW
only to learn they did not have
tumbling mats; thus, her first
volunteering at the YW was to
raise money to purchase gym
mats. Her relationship span-
ning another forty years with
the YW began and has flour-
ished since then.
Her skill at fundraising was
noted as the YW decided to
build a new gymnasium. She
was asked to raise money for
the project; and this conversa-
tion led to the YW Thursday
Night Bingo events. Not only
did she start them, she volun-
teered at bingo for 30 years
— approximately 1,500 nights
of bingo. The gymnasium
was built and other physical
improvements followed. For
a time, bingo was even instru-
mental in balancing the operat-
ing budget.
Plumb’s involvement with
the YW continued as she
moved from vice-president of
the board, to board president
and was eventually asked to
serve as a trustee. She accept-
ed and ultimately chaired the
board of trustees for 25 years.
The future of the Lima
YWCA became blurred some-
what during the 2000s as its
mission underwent a reevalu-
ation and economic pres-
sures became burdensome.
Ultimately, the facility was
closed and historical YW oper-
ations were suspended. Plumb
and the board of trustees
acknowledged the need to con-
tinue programs designed for
girls and women and keep the
YW operable in different quar-
ters until a new direction could
be designed. Ultimately, a
decision was reached to merge
Lima and Toledo YWCA to
form the YWCA of Northwest
Ohio. Programs for girls and
women will continue in Lima
into the future.
In 2004, a group of area
pastors and church leaders
working with the West Ohio
Food Bank, formed a new
organization, Church United
Pantry. The food pantry was
formed to help local families
through occasional emergen-
cies. Plumb became a volun-
teer from the first day and
almost immediately joined the
CUP Board of Directors. She
currently serves as board presi-
dent, leading an organization
of volunteers that coordinates
an annual $30,000 budget and
serves more than 20,000 per-
sons annually.
Plumb’s nomination for
the Jefferson Award continues
with her work with the annual
Christmas Tree Festival and
her seat on the City of Lima
Planning Commission. Her
nominator wrote, “Her volun-
teer efforts began more than 50
years ago with walks through
her neighborhood on behalf
of both the cancer and heart
association. She continues to
step forward to volunteer for
her community.”
Tami Shobe
Shobe was struck by the
fact that so many children
in Third World nations with
severe medical problems could
be helped if they could be
brought to the U.S. She knew
that Americans would open
their hearts and volunteer their
homes, time, knowledge, and
money to such a cause. Shobe
founded Children’s Medical
Missions West (CMMW), a
mission dedicated to making
life-changing differences for
children with medical needs,
in the United States, from all
over the world. This powerful
objective explains why Shobe
is a Jefferson Award winner in
her community.
Many families in poverty-
stricken nations cannot afford
or do not have necessary medi-
cal services available to them in
their homeland. CMMW offers
children an opportunity to
come to the United States from
Third World Countries, and
finds them free medical care.
The children stay in the homes
of host families. The host
families care for the children
as they recover from surger-
ies for spina bifida, club feet,
cleft palates and other medical
problems prior to them return-
ing to their homes. CMMW has
no paid staff, all services are
donated. To date, CMMW has
secured free medical care for
over 240 kids from all over the
world. They work entirely on
donations from generous peo-
ple. All donations go directly
to purchase airplane tickets for
the children’s travel.
Childrens Medical Missions
West is a one-woman show.
Shobe spends many hours
searching for host families,
hospitals, and physicians who
are willing to donate their time
and services to the needs of
these children, as well as orga-
nizing all of the fundraising
activities. She does this for no
pay or compensation for her
materials.
Prior to her full time “job” as
director of CMMW, Shobe and
her husband, Greg, were fos-
ter parents for 27 years. They
hosted more than 200 children
in their home, assisting them in
getting off to the right start as
stable, mature and responsible
adults. She has donated count-
less hours to her church and
the Waynesfield community.
She has made mission trips to
Africa and Haiti and is always
willing to help other chari-
table organizations. She has
offered her network of local
host families to Guiding Light,
a developing Teen Maternity
Home for otherwise homeless
pregnant teens.
More than 240 lives have
seen major benefits come
about through life changing
and lifesaving care admin-
istered in medical facilities
located throughout the coun-
try, all because of the singular
efforts of this Jefferson Award
winner.
The Lima News, Your
Hometown Lima Stations and
the United Way of Greater
Lima sponsor the local
Jefferson Awards for volunteer
service in the community.
Judges for the Jefferson
Awards are Leila Osting,
chair; Alberta Lee, retired
Allen County commissioner;
Greg Myers from Auglaize
County; Tom Hendrixson,
WLIO videographer; Louis
Jennings, employee resource
coordinator with UAW 1219,
Lima Engine Plant, Ford Motor
Company; Jeanne Beutler,
executive director of United
Way of Putnam County; Susan
Munroe, president of the Van
Wert Chamber of Commerce;
Dave Roach from Delphos;
and Tom Thompson, labor rep
with United Way of Greater
Lima.
1
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Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Herald –3 A
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
Awards
“The intelligent man who is proud of his intelligence is like the condemned man
who is proud of his large cell.”
— Simone Weil, French philosopher (1909-1943)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4A — The Herald Thursday, March 8, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• After three days of matches at the 73rd annual state wres-
tling tournament, Tyler Obringer from Spencerville and Greg
Dailey of Independence were the last two wrestlers remaining
on the mats at the Schottenstein Center in Columbus. Obringer
finally won the state title pinning Dailey in 47 seconds
into overtime after the match was tied at 1 when regulation
expired.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• The February meeting of the Leatherwood Garden Club
was held at NuMaude’s Restaurant in Delphos with a lun-
cheon. Esther Jostpille was hostess. President Mildred Ricker
called the meeting to order and welcomed the members.
Annette Kahle gave an interesting report on mulching.
• Sgt. 1st Class John L. Metcalfe recently participated in
“Roadrunner 87,” a corps-level command post exercise staged
throughout a sixteen-county area of central Texas. Metcalfe,
son of Betty Metcalfe of Delphos, is a cannon crewman with
the 2nd Armored Division at Fort Hood, Texas.
• Bowling Green women’s basketball Coach Fran Voll was
named the Mid-American Conference coach of the year in bal-
loting by the MAC News Media Association. Voll, in his third
season as head coach, led the Falcons to a 16-0 record in the
MAC, winning the conference by five games. Voll coached St.
John’s girls for nine seasons, compiling a 208-17 record with
three state championships.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• The Delphos Rotarians elected officers for the 1962-63
year and heard an exceptionally interesting talk at their meet-
ing Wednesday in NuMaude’s Restaurant. Paul Harter, Jr.
was elected president, and other officers named are Dr. Burl
Morris, vice president; Gene Stites, secretary; and Paul G.
Korn, John Shenk and D. Arnold Scott, board members.
• The March social event for members of Delphos Country
Club, Inc., will be in the form of a St. Patrick’s Day party on
March 17. Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. and dancing, games
and cards will form the evening’s entertainment. Mr. and
Mrs. Mack Endsley will be the general chairmen for the party
with Mr. and Mrs. Richard Thompson and Mr. and Mrs. Ray
Pohlman as co-chairmen.
• The Worthy Grand Matron of the Order of the Eastern
Star Grand Chapter of Ohio, Grace W. Grether of Dayton,
presented a fifty-year pin to Past Matron Nelle Judkins Henne,
during the annual inspection ceremonies held here by Delphos
Chapter No. 26, Wednesday night. Also participating in the
ceremony were local worthy matron Reba May, and the worthy
patron of Delphos Chapter, Robert McDonald.
75 Years Ago – 1937
• Jefferson High lost its first battle of the sectional basket-
ball meet at Shawnee High Saturday night, taking the short end
of a 23-28 count in a game with Lima St. Rose. The last quarter
was packed with thrills. The locals came within one point of
knotting the count, 19-20, and again narrowed the margin to
two points, 23-25 when Adams scored a field goal. A free toss
and a fielder brought the Lima lead to five points, 28 to 23, as
the game ended.
• People of Delphos and vicinity are being given a chance
to give their impressions of the earthquake which shook this
territory on March 2. Father V. O. Stechschulte, director of the
Xavier University Seismological Observatory at Cincinnati, is
asking that people here fill out a questionnaire and mail it to
him. There was no great damage in the Delphos area but the
shock was quite noticeable.
• The Troy Cleaners of Fort Wayne defeated the Delphos
Eagles Sunday afternoon at St. John’s auditorium by a score
of 37 to 20. The St. John’s Juniors won from the Sophomores
in the preliminary by the score of 24 to 8. The Troy Cleaners
took the jump in the early minutes of the game and were never
headed. The game was fast and interesting and marked the
final home game of the season for the Delphos team.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
U.S. companies will have
to keep hiring steadily to
meet their customers’ rising
demand.
That’s the message that
emerged from a report today
that employers are finding it
harder to squeeze more output
from their existing staff. It
also helps explain why ADP,
a payroll provider, estimated
today that companies added
216,000 workers last month.
Those findings reinforced
confidence that 2012 will
mark a turning point for the
long-suffering job market and
the economy. Applications for
unemployment benefits have
tumbled. Consumer confi-
dence is at its highest point in
a year. And the stock market
has been on a tear since the
year began.
Feeding on themselves,
those trends tend to fuel fur-
ther economic growth.
The brighter signs come
two days before the govern-
ment will issue the February
employment report. It’s expect-
ed to show a third straight
month of strong hiring.
Business executives are
sensing the shift. A sur-
vey released today by Duke
University’s Fuqua School
of Business found that confi-
dence among U.S. chief finan-
cial officers has risen to its
highest point in a year. As a
result, the survey found that
companies expect to increase
hiring for full-time jobs by 2.1
percent over the next year, up
from 1.5 percent in a survey in
December.
The survey was released
the same day that the govern-
ment reported a paltry gain in
worker productivity at the end
of last year. The 0.9 percent
annualized increase was half
the growth rate from the July-
September quarter. Similarly,
for the year, U.S. worker pro-
ductivity grew at its slowest
pace in nearly a quarter of
century.
By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta and the nation’s top
military leader delivered a
sober assessment today of
Syria’s sophisticated air
defenses and its extensive
stockpile of chemical weap-
ons in a strategic reality check
to the demand for U.S. mili-
tary action to end President
Bashar Assad’s deadly crack-
down on his people.
President Barack Obama’s
2008 rival — Republican Sen.
John McCain — has called
for the president to launch
airstrikes against Assad to
force him from power and end
the bloodshed. The United
Nations estimates that more
than 7,500 Syrians have been
killed, with hundreds more
fleeing to neighboring nations
to avoid the slaughter.
Army Gen. Martin
Dempsey, the chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told
the Senate Armed Services
Committee that Obama has
asked the Pentagon for a pre-
liminary review of military
options, such as enforcement
of a no-fly zone and humani-
tarian airlifts. He insisted that
the military would be ready if
the commander in chief made
the request.
“What are the potential
missions, what is the enemy
order of battle, what are
the enemy’s capabilities or
potential enemies? What are
the troops we have available,
and how much time. So, mis-
sion, enemy, terrain, troops
and time. That’s a command-
er’s estimate,” Dempsey said
of the initial step.
Panetta said they are wait-
ing on Obama before doing
more detailed contingency
planning.
In Congress, only
McCain’s closest Senate col-
leagues have echoed his plea.
War-weary Republicans and
Democrats have expressed
serious reservations about
U.S. military involvement
in Syria after more than a
decade of war in Iraq and
Afghanistan, the divisive
political fight last summer
over U.S. intervention in
Libya, and the possibility of
an Israeli attack on Iran.
Panetta summed up the
situation in stark terms.
“The fundamental issue
that is before us is whether or
not the United States will go
in and act unilaterally in that
part of the world, and engage
in another war in the Muslim
world unilaterally. Or wheth-
er or not we will work with
others in determining what
action we take,” Panetta said.
Still, McCain pressed for
military involvement, point-
ing to Democratic President
Bill Clinton’s willingness to
act during the Bosnian war in
the 1990s. He engaged in one
sharp exchange with Panetta.
“As secretary of defense,
before I recommend that we
put our sons and daughters in
uniform in harm’s way, I’ve
got to make very sure that
we know what the mission
is,” Panetta said. “I’ve got to
make very sure that we know
whether we can achieve that
mission? At what price? And
whether or not it will make
matters better, or worse?”
“Well, let me tell you
what’s wrong with your state-
ment,” McCain said. “You
don’t mention American lead-
ership. Americans should lead
in this. America should be
standing up. America should
be building coalitions.”
Late last month, Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton traveled to Tunisia
to rally the Friends of Syria,
60 U.S, Arab and European
nations determined to force
Assad and his allies to agree
to a democratic transition.
By CHARLES
BABINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Republican activists foresee
a long, lumbering presidential
campaign that almost certain-
ly will nominate Mitt Romney
but may leave him weak-
ened in a fall battle against
President Barack Obama.
Interviews today with
GOP officials and strategists
in several states found no
panic or calls for Romney
to crank up his criticisms
of Rick Santorum to secure
the nomination. But they
expressed varying degrees of
worry that Santorum’s and
Newt Gingrich’s attacks on
Romney are inflicting wounds
that might not fully heal by
Nov. 6.
“The shelf life is 48 hours
for a lot of this,” including
small-bore disputes over
policy differences, said Steve
Lombardo, a veteran of many
GOP campaigns.
“The bigger concern is the
negatives the governor has
built up on his unfavorable rat-
ing,” Lombardo said, referring
to impressions that Romney,
the former Massachusetts
governor, waffles on key
principles and can’t relate to
working-class people. “Those
can be harder to reverse,” he
said, and Romney would like
to address them without pot-
shots from his own party.
South Carolina Republican
Chairman Chad Connelly is
more upbeat. He says Romney
won’t suffer from a protracted
nominating process.
“A longer, drawn-out pri-
mary engages people across
the nation,” Connelly said.
He said Obama put the Rev.
Jeremiah Wright controversy
behind him because he dealt
with it forcefully in the spring
of 2008, months before the
general election. The “swift-
boat” attacks hit Democratic
presidential nominee John
Kerry much later in the 2004
election cycle, “and he never
recovered,” Connelly said.
But Mike McKenna, a GOP
consultant from Richmond,
Va., said Romney’s struggles
in the primaries and caucuses
point to serious problems this
fall. Romney won 41 percent
of the primary vote in his native
state of Michigan to Santorum’s
38 percent, McKenna noted,
calling it “hardly a dazzling
performance.”
Romney’s margin was even
smaller in Ohio, even though
he again heavily outspent
Santorum. McKenna, who
conducts focus groups and
polls, sees ominous trends.
He predicts that one-fourth to
one-third of all Republicans
“will not vote for Romney” if
he’s the nominee this fall.
Nelson Warfield, an adviser
in Bob Dole’s 1996 presiden-
tial campaign and Texas Gov.
Rick Perry’s recently ended
bid, is nearly as gloomy.
“The mathematics of the
race are very troubling for
Mitt Romney,” Warfield said.
“He can’t put this away. The
big question for Republicans
is: Will his problems go away
when he’s the nominee, or
will they carry on into the
general election?”
John Ullyot, a Republican
strategist and former Senate
aide, said the long, diffi-
cult primary “just weakens
Romney in the general elec-
tion. It saps resources, it
keeps him from focusing on
President Obama.”
Other Republican cam-
paign veterans are more opti-
mistic, although few predict
an easy path for Romney.
Rich Galen, a former aide
to Gingrich and former Vice
President Dan Quayle, said
Romney’s hard-hitting TV
ads are having less impact
than they did a few months
ago. Voters now know
Gingrich and Santorum much
better, Galen said, and they
are less shocked by negative
information and more willing
to draw independent conclu-
sions about the candidates.
BY SENATOR
SHERROD BROWN
Some of the most important
work I do has nothing to do
with votes cast on the Senate
floor. As your sena-
tor, my most impor-
tant job is serving
you and helping con-
stituents cut through
red tape when deal-
ing with the fed-
eral government.
That means helping
seniors access Social
Security benefits
they have paid into,
assisting veterans
and their families
in obtaining military records
and medals they earned but
never received, and helping
small businesses that are look-
ing to create jobs and access
federal tax credits or lending
programs.
In more than 200 round-
tables that I have held all
over the state, I’ve heard from
constituents who must spend
hours on the telephone cor-
recting a paperwork problem
with a federal agency. They
shouldn’t have to do this and
my office is here to help ease
this burden.
That is why my offices
in Cincinnati, Cleveland,
Columbus, and Lorain are
open every business day to
serve you. With field offic-
es in every region of the
state – including rural areas
in Southeast and Northwest
Ohio – my top priority is con-
stituent services.
Ohioans in need of assis-
tance can visit brown.senate.
gov/ohio/constituent_servic-
es/ or call my office toll-free
at 1-888-896-OHIO (6446).
Still wondering
if we could help
you? Let me pro-
vide a few recent
examples of ways
my constituent ser-
vices team have
assisted Ohioans.
A constituent
from Southwest
Ohio who was
being denied
Social Security
benefits she earned
recently contacted my office
to try to resolve the issue
with the Social Security
Administration. She received
a letter from SSA stating
that her Social Security ben-
efits had been terminated
“as she requested” – but she
had made no such request.
The Ohioan was instructed
to call again in 15 days, then
in another 15 days, then in
48 hours. My office reached
out to the SSA regional office
to explain the problem. They
found that nothing was in the
record about her inquiry, and
a change was made to ensure
that she received the benefits
she earned.
A widow of a soldier
from Stow who was killed
in Vietnam asked my office
to help replace several med-
als she had lost in a move
more than 30 years ago. My
office discovered that in addi-
tion to the four medals iden-
tified, the widow’s husband
was also eligible for a Purple
Heart, Bronze Star, and other
awards for his bravery. As a
proud member of the Senate
Committee on Veterans’
Affairs, it is always a privi-
lege for me to help veterans
and military families obtain
replacements for lost med-
als and new medals that ser-
vicemembers may have never
received.
Earlier this month, a
veteran was referred to my
office after being denied den-
tal care at the Louis Stokes
VA Medical Center even
though he had 100-percent
service-connected disabilities.
My office contacted the VA
Medical Center Director who
determined that an error had
been made and our veteran
was indeed eligible for dental
care. The veteran was imme-
diately scheduled for a com-
prehensive dental evaluation.
Veterans and military fam-
ilies – who often move from
base to base – may not always
have easy access to the docu-
mentation and records needed
to receive service-related ben-
efits and medals. Last year,
my office helped more than
500 Ohio veterans and their
families find these records so
that they could apply for their
medals or the benefits they
earned.
Sometimes, there are
Ohio companies who want
to expand operations and
hire new workers, but federal
bureaucracy stands in their
way. Cool Containers, LLC, a
Marietta-based company, pro-
duces specialized containers
used to ship high value phar-
maceuticals and other tem-
perature sensitive materials.
This Ohio company struggled
for years to secure approval
from U.S. Federal Aviation
Administration (FAA) until
my office intervened. With
our help, the FAA approved
the PharmaPort 360™ tem-
perature controlled shipping
container developed and man-
ufactured by Cool Containers,
LLC for use in commercial
and military air transport. The
FAA airworthiness certifica-
tion follows over 1½ years of
formal testing and review of
design, systems integration,
manufacturing practices and
documentation.
There is important work to
do to improve the quality of
life for Ohio seniors, veter-
ans, families, and businesses.
Legislation is a paramount
aspect of that work, but mem-
bers of Congress who are con-
cerned about their neighbors
do more than give speeches
on the Senate floor.
One of my most important
jobs as Senator is fulfilling
constituent services—from
helping Ohioans cut red tape
to assisting with government
resources. If you or your fam-
ily needs assistance, please
contact my office at 1-888-
896-OHIO. It’s an honor to
serve you.
Constituent service is Brown’s priority
Sen. Brown
GOP activists fear primary takes a toll on Romney
Talk of US military in
Syria divides Congress
Hiring grows
as companies
hit limits
1
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✦ Purina Feeds
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NOW
OPEN
Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Herald – 5A
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Fort Jennings
Memorial Hall
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
8 p.m. — American Legion
Post 268, 415 N. State St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
8:30-11:30 a.m. — St.
John’s High School recycle,
600 block of East Second
Street.
9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
Cloverdale recycle at vil-
lage park.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Middle Point
Village Council meets
7-9 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
7 p.m. — Marion Township
trustees at township house.
Middle Point council meets
at town hall.
MARCH 9
Doris Bricker
Edward Fischer
Mary Gerdeman
Billy Tracy
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Dena Martz photo
St. John’s Elementary School K-A class
Students in St. John’s Elementary School K-A class include, front from left, Andrew Bockey, Tess Vonderwell, Emma Lindeman, Helena
Bewsey, Keilik Cross, Coehn Martz, Aubrey Milligan and Eric Youngpeter; and back, Collin Feathers, Camden Schafer, Abby Kerner, Dillon
Shough, Evelyn Mueller, Aaron Moenter, Alex Kessen, Grant Ulm, Ella Wilson, Aidan Pohlman and Alivia Hines.
Here is a delicious
meal to prepare for your
family or friends. Don’t
be surprised if they go
back for seconds.
Tomato Tortellini
Soup
1 package (9 ounces)
refrigerated cheese tor-
tellini
2 cans (10-3/4 ounces
each) reduced sodium con-
densed tomato soup, undi-
luted
2 cups vegetable broth
2 cups 2% milk
2 cups half-and-half
cream
1/2 cup chopped oil-
packed sun-dried tomatoes
1 teaspoon onion pow-
der
1 teaspoon garlic pow-
der
1 teaspoon dried basil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup Parmesan
cheese
Additional shredded
Parmesan cheese, optional
Cook tortellini accord-
ing to package directions.
Meanwhile, in a Dutch
oven, combine the soup,
broth, milk, cream, toma-
toes and seasonings. Heath
through, stirring frequent-
ly. Drain tortellini; care-
fully add to soup. Stir in
cheese. Sprinkle each serv-
ing with additional cheese
if desired.
Yield: 10 servings.

Speedy Doughnuts
Oil for deep frying
7. 5-ounce can
PILLSBURY Refrigerated
Biscuits
Sugar, cinnamon-sugar
mixture, powdered sugar
or glaze
In a deep fat fryer or
heavy saucepan, heat
about 1 quart oil to 350
degrees. Separate dough
into 10 biscuits. Cut holes
in center of biscuits. Fry
biscuits and holes in oil
for about 1 1/2 minutes on
each side or until golden
brown. Drain. If desired,
roll doughnuts and holes
in sugar, cinnamon-sugar
mixture, powdered sugar
or drizzle with glaze. Serve
warm. 10 doughnuts.
If you enjoyed these recipes, made changes or have
one to share, email kitchenpress@yahoo.com.
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
SENIOR
LUNCHEON CAFE
WEEK OF MARCH 13-17
MONDAY: Salisbury
steak, mashed potatoes, peas
and onions, bread, margarine,
peaches, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Chicken patty
on bun, pasta salad, baked
beans, crushed pineapple, cof-
fee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked
ham, sweet potatoes, cabbage,
bread, margarine, fruit, coffee
and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Chicken
tender with dipping sauce,
potato wedges, green beans,
fruit cup, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Baked fish with
tartar sauce, redskin potatoes,
cole slaw, bread, margarine,
Mandarin oranges, coffee and
2% milk.
MARCH 8-10
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Sandy Hahn, Gwen
Rohrbacher, Valeta Ditto and Ruth Calvelage.
FRIDAY: Irma Buettner, Darlene Kemper, Judy Kundert
and Mary Jane Watkins.
SATURDAY: Millie Minning, Millie Spitnale, Mary Lou
Schulte and Cathy Hammons.
REGULAR THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday;
1-4 p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440;
Alice Heidenescher, 419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-
7145; or Lorene Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
If you want to see your kids read
more, let them see YOU read more.
SUBSCRIBE TO THE DELPHOS HERALD
419-695-0015
EVERYBODY’S
SHOPPING HERALD
CLASSIFIEDS
CALL 419-695-0015
to place an ad
6 – The Herald Thursday, March 8, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 12,837.33 +78.18
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,935.69 +25.37
S&P 500 INDEX 1,352.63 +9.27
AUTOZONE INC. 383.74 -1.49
BUNGE LTD 65.82 +0.76
EATON CORP. 48.75 +0.05
BP PLC ADR 46.54 +0.31
DOMINION RES INC 50.49 -0.03
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 38.23 +0.04
CVS CAREMARK CRP 44.71 -0.08
CITIGROUP INC 33.24 +1.12
FIRST DEFIANCE 15.10 +0.07
FST FIN BNCP 16.52 +0.27
FORD MOTOR CO 12.24 +0.15
GENERAL DYNAMICS 71.25 +0.40
GENERAL MOTORS 24.88 +0.30
GOODYEAR TIRE 12.21 -0.04
HEALTHCARE REIT 54.20 +0.14
HOME DEPOT INC. 47.39 +1.00
HONDA MOTOR CO 37.06 +0.66
HUNTGTN BKSHR 5.70 +0.14
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 64.30 -0.05
JPMORGAN CHASE 39.95 +0.63
KOHLS CORP. 48.22 -0.01
LOWES COMPANIES 28.87 +1.03
MCDONALDS CORP. 100.18 +0.29
MICROSOFT CP 31.84 +0.29
PEPSICO INC. 62.62 +0.34
PROCTER & GAMBLE 66.58 -0.26
RITE AID CORP. 1.69 +0.03
SPRINT NEXTEL 2.43 +0.04
TIME WARNER INC. 36.59 +0.08
US BANCORP 28.64 +0.27
UTD BANKSHARES 7.38 +0.18
VERIZON COMMS 38.87 +0.18
WAL-MART STORES 59.86 +0.90
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business March 7, 2012
Senior Logan Heiing of St. John’s and Jefferson junior
Colin McConnahea met in the finals of the first two meets of
the year at Lincolnview and the Allen County Invitational,
so it was only fitting that the two meet once more — for
the final time — at the last meet, the Lima Area Wrestling
Coaches Association All-Star event held at the new Elida
High School Wednesday.
Photo submitted
For The Delphos Herald
The Lima Area Wrestling
Coaches Association All-Star
event was held Wednesday
evening at the new Elida High
School.
The meet, which allows
underclassmen to wrestle
instead of the usual seniors-
only format, featured 18 state
qualifiers, including 220-
pound senior state champion
Curtis Miller from Jefferson,
fellow seniors Logan Looser
and Logan Heiing of St.
John’s and Dylan Kleman of
Columbus Grove.
The meet was expanded this
year from the previous format
of pitting the Western Buckeye
League against the independents
to include the Green Meadows
Conference, Midwest Athletic
Conference and the Northwest
Conference.
In the first round of the
wrestling, the MAC hooked
up with the GMC while the
WBL battled the NWC, which
featured two state qualifiers at
220 pounds with Miller taking
on Wyatt Karhoff of Ottawa-
Glandorf.
Other local wrestlers on the
NWC squad featured Jefferson
wrestlers Gaige Rassman,
Quinten Wessell and Darren
Edinger. Spencerville was
represented by Cory Binkley,
while Columbus Grove’s Alec
Gladwell also participated.
The MAC squad included
Austin Martin, Will Buettner
and Brett Schwinnen of St.
John’s.
The coaching staff for the
four conferences also includ-
ed some local names. The
NWC was led by the Coach
of the Year Mike Wilson of
Jefferson and Spencerville’s
Tom Wegesin. St. John’s
head coach Derek Sterling
guided the MAC along with
Rob Schmidt while George
Clemens of Wayne Trace and
Bill Ondrus led the GMC.
The WBL was coached
by Elida’s Kevin Bowers and
Bath’s Clayton Westerbeck.
The All-Star meet was the
last wrestling meet for the
three Delphos seniors: Miller,
Looser and Heiing, as well as
Kleman. The Delphos trio had
a long successful career for
the Delphos schools and their
years of hard work paid off
with a trip to the state wres-
tling tournament in Columbus
last weekend.
All-Star meet ends
grappling season
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
ADA — Willard scored the
first four points of its Division
II District semifinal with Elida
at Ohio Northern University’s
King Horn Center.
In the mind of Crimson
Flashes’ coach Dave
Hirschey, that may
have awakened the
Bulldogs.
The Orange and
Black scored the next
15 points on their
way to a 72-46 rout
Tuesday night.
Elida (20-3) will
play Lexington (19-3)
at 7 p.m. Saturday for
the district title.
Willard (12-11) got hoops
by Scott Buurma and Kolin
Phillips in the first minute
before the Bulldogs hit back.
With sophomore Dakota
Mathias (20 markers, 4 boards,
4 dimes) scoring eight markers
and senior Reggie McAdams
(game-high 30 markers on 6
treys; 6 blocks of a team total
of 10, 5 rebounds, 4 steals,
3 assists) netting four, the
Bulldogs grabbed a 15-4 edge
on a 3-point transition layin
by Mathias at 1:09 before
Willard’s Phillips (12 coun-
ters, 6 caroms) scored inside
with 30 ticks left for a 15-6
edge.
“After coming off a win
over Wapak in which we
didn’t score a basket from the
field in the first quarter, we
wanted to come out strong.
We wanted to establish our
style and our pace and we
did that,” Elida coach Denny
Thompson acknowledged.
“We felt it was important to
get a lead and make them play
the pace we wanted. I was
pleased with that.”
McAdams credited his
teammates for his great all-
around game, especially on
the defensive end.
“I get a lot of
blocks because of the
way my teammates
defend. They force
them to go a certain
way — to the base-
line — and I can get a
lot of blocks from the
backside,” McAdams
noted. “This was no
cakewalk, despite the
score. We had to keep
playing hard because they can
go on a run at any time. That is
our mindset.
Mathias also relies a lot on
teammates.
“When you’re getting the
wide-open looks we’re get-
ting, it’s because of great ball
movement and good screens
my teammates set,” he said.
Hirschey wishes they could
have let the sleeping dog stay
asleep.
“I think our start woke
them up. Once that happened,
we really had a difficult time
matching up,” he acknowl-
edged. “We have struggled
defending the 3s all year —
that has been our biggest
weakness. We did not do a
very good job of finding and
getting out to their 3-point
shooters. Their length was
also a major concern.”
Elida, especially using its
3-point shooting in the sec-
ond period (5-of-10, 12-of-
27 for the night for 30.8%),
began to take command. With
McAdams registering 11 coun-
ters and Mathias and junior Aric
Thompson (13 points) downing
seven each, Elida built a lead
of 25 points twice, the last at
42-17 on a McAdams transition
layup-and-harm with 20.3 ticks
on the board.
Elida canned 14-of-28
shots in the half (21-of-49
overall for 42.9%), while
Willard netted 7-of-32 shots
in the half, 0-of-3 from deep
(17-of-53 overall, 4-of-13
downtown, for 32.1%).
Elida couldn’t quite match
that pace in the third peri-
od as their scoring slowed
down. Their biggest lead of
the canto was 48-19 on a
3-ball by Thompson early on
but Phillips scored six of his
points in the stanza, including
a layup before the horn, for a
56-35 deficit.
“It’s sometimes hard to
maintain your focus and effort
with such a big lead. I thought
we had some good looks in
the third that were so wide
open, sometimes those are
difficult to make,” Thompson
said. “We stressed that at half-
time to keep playing with the
same intensity as we had the
first half and I felt we did.”
In the finale, Elida built a
lead of 30 — 70-40 — on two
free throws by Mathias as the
benches began to empty.
“Our goal at halftime was
to tell the kids ‘let’s win the
third quarter and get the defi-
cit down to 20’,” Hirschey
added. “As far as McAdams,
he reminds me of a ‘poor
man’s Jon Diebler (former
Ohio State star)’; I coached
against him several years ago.
Reggie’s the real deal.”
Willard hit 8-of-10 singles
(80%) for the contest; secured
44 caroms, 17 offensive, as
Marcus Hahler nabbed seven
and Phillips six; 17 turnovers;
and 21 fouls.
“Lexington presents some
concerns with their length and
size. They have two Division
I football recruits who are also
very athletic and they have
great size overall,” Thompson
added.
Elida finished 18-of-26
from the 15-foot line (69.2%);
seized 26 boards (6 offensive)
as junior Ebin Stratton —
who missed part of the second
period due to blood — had
five; added a mere six turn-
overs; and 10 fouls. Senior
Mike McDonald added three
assists and four thefts.
Kudos to Curtis Miller for winning
his state wrestling championship.
I only imagine how hard it must be to
wrestle at that level and take all the pres-
sure that the environment puts on you.
Throw in the pressure all competitors
put on themselves, as well as him being
unable to wrestle last year at state, and
you have to give him all the credit.
His past two matches were probably
the two toughest of his season as he went
56-0 in this, his senior season, but likely
they were the most satisfying.
It’s almost what you want and expect;
you don’t figure it to be easy once you
get to the state semifinals and finals,
especially when you have the top 16 in
each weight class in each division.
He and his brother, Stuart, lived up to
those expectations as seniors.
I have a couple of other reflec-
tions on the recent State Wrestling
Championships.
It continues to amaze me how it goes
down.
The Parade of Champions is an awe-
some, awe-inspiring spectacle. If you
can EVER get the chance to go and
watch, even if you might not be the best
wrestling fan, I encourage you to do so.
It’s almost like a heavyweight cham-
pionship boxing or MMA match, with
the glitz, the spotlights, the fans going
crazy; I can only imagine the butterflies
in each participant’s stomach.
It pays to be one of the first on the
mat because you can ride that adrenaline
rush.
How much more difficult it is for the
heavier weights; I can figure that those
butterflies became bowling balls.
It’s “official”; Peyton Manning and
the Indianapolis Colts are splitsville.
I guess it’s no surprise, really; I
imagine that they tried to restructure the
$28 million roster bonus he was due and
couldn’t, with Colts’ owner Jim Irsay
deciding they couldn’t stay the course.
He claims it was never about money!
I’m not sure I buy that at all but without
Peyton, this franchise would not have a
new stadium.
I imagine they know they must rebuild
this team and a 35-year-old signal-caller
coming off numerous neck injuries was
not a good place to start.
Whatever you think of the sure first-
ballot — and perhaps unanimous —
future Hall-of-Famer, that has to scare
even his most loyal fans.
Can he play at a high level again?
Does anyone really know?
Can anyone predict that the beating
he will take in the future won’t cause the
same problems he has had to deal with
because of those beatings over the past
14 years?
He was never the most mobile guy to
begin with and methinks he will be even
less so; that’s an inviting target for any
defense.
Let no one feel sorry for him, either;
he will end up somewhere and continue
his career.
Will it be Washington? The New
York J-E-T-S? Miami? Heck, how about
even in Big D playing in the Jerry Jones
Temple?
This would not be out of the realm of
possibility for Mr. Jones to throw his hat
in the ring, though it is unlikely because
of salary cap issues.
Let’s face it; Tony Romo hasn’t got-
ten it done and he is nearing the dreaded
30. Cowboy fans are getting irate about
the way this team is being run — all
you have to do is read the blogs and
forums and the vast majority of posters
— including me on occasion — put the
blame — most vociferously and angrily
— on one person: the de facto coach,
director of player personnel and general
manager, Mr. Jerry Jones.
Let’s also face it: this team is not
getting any younger and the window of
opportunity is closing. You can only say
“we’re a Super Bowl contender” — as
he again claims now with all seriousness
— for so long before people laugh you
into the ocean, especially when you’ve
won one playoff game since your last
Super Bowl in 1995.
Unfortunately, who’s going to fire
him? Who’s going to replace him?
Until and unless Dallas fans decide to
not go to games in droves and not buy
the team’s merchandise, the status quo
will remain.
Look at the Bengals and owner Mike
Brown and the Redskins under owner
Dan Snyder: we can commiserate, can’t
we?
Yes, the Bengals come off a playoff
berth but can they sustain this?
Here’s another observation; the Colts
are going to draft Andrew Luck number
1. No matter how polished he is coming
from Stanford, it is not the pros and he
will still be a rookie behind an unsettled
offensive line.
Perhaps not a formula for success.
So Randy Moss is now “motivated”
and wants to get back in the game.
I’m not holding my breath!
Unfortunately, you know that a wide
receiver that stands 6-4 and still runs a
4.3 40 will get attention, even at 36.
Hey, maybe Jerry will get it on this,
too; after all, he blew that draft when he
bypassed him because of some character
issues in the past and yet kept guys like
Leon Lett that had demonstrable major
problems.
Good luck, Randy.
Now there’s the rumor that Kobe
Bryant might be on the trading block
for the Los Angeles Lakers.
The thinking is they are no longer
contenders for the NBA title and instead
of having their superstar complain — as
he did several years ago — about the
situation, they might as well see what
they can get for him to rebuild.
I don’t imagine he wants to stick
around for a rebuilding unit if they
cannot remain viable contenders in the
process.
I can’t blame him; at this stage of his
career, rings are what’s important. He’s
shooting more than ever — he almost has
to — and is averaging 38-plus minutes a
night — the second-most in the NBA.
Hey, Mike Brown; do you NOT know
he is an “old” 33 and you are wearing
him out for the playoffs? Remember
the playoffs? The playoffs are what it’s
about in the NBA and staying healthy
and relatively rested will be crucial in
this shortened season.
I cannot see Jerry West trading Lamar
Odom for a cup of coffee, as Mitch
Kupchak has done; or letting young and
athletic guys like Jordan Farmar and
Shannon Brown go free agent while
keeping old, slow and unathletic Derek
Fisher (he was slow and unathletic in
his prime, let alone at 36, in this age
of speedy point guards that run circles
around him) and then depending on
a couple of draft picks and free-agent
pickups that aren’t even point guards!
WILLARD (46)
Matt Cok 1-1-0-5, Kolin Phillips
5-0-2-12, Carson Ebert 0-0-0-0, Scott
Buurma 3-0-1-7, Marcus Hahler 2-0-2-
6, Hunter Wiers 0-0-0-0, Kyle Fluharty
1-1-1-6, Aaron Adelman 0-1-0-3,
Corey Bolach 0-0-0-0, Jay Cok 0-0-
0-0, Hayden Adams 2-0-0-4, Bronson
Owens 0-0-0-0, Jared Tittle 0-1-0-3.
Totals 13/40-4/13-8/10-46.
ELIDA (72)
Ebin Stratton 0-0-1-1, Mike
McDonald 1-1-1-6, Reggie McAdams
2-6-8-30, Aric Thompson 1-3-2-13,
Dakota Mathias 4-2-6-20, David Diller
0-0-0-0, Max Stambaugh 0-0-0-0,
Louis Gray 1-0-0-2, Trent Long 0-0-
0-0, Brandon Stinson 0-0-0-0, Austin
Allemeier 0-0-0-0, Bryan Romey 0-0-0-
0. Totals 9/22-12/27-18/26-72.
Score by Quarters:
Willard 6 11 18 11 - 46
Elida 15 27 14 16 - 72
Three-point goals: Willard 4-13
(M. Cok, Fluharty, Adelman, Tuttle),
Elida 12-27 (McAdams 6, Thompson 3,
Mathias 2, McDonald).
Bulldogs overwhelm
Crimson Flashes
McAdams
State wrestling; a sight to behold
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 23 17 .575 —
Boston 20 18 .526 2
New York 18 21 .462 4 1/2
Toronto 13 26 .333 9 1/2
New Jersey 13 27 .325 10
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 30 9 .769 —
Orlando 25 15 .625 5 1/2
Atlanta 23 16 .590 7
Washington 9 29 .237 20 1/2
Charlotte 5 32 .135 24
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 33 8 .805 —
Indiana 23 14 .622 8
Milwaukee 15 24 .385 17
Cleveland 14 23 .378 17
Detroit 13 26 .333 19
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 26 12 .684 —
Memphis 23 15 .605 3
Dallas 23 17 .575 4
Houston 21 19 .525 6
New Orleans 9 30 .231 17 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 31 8 .795 —
Denver 22 18 .550 9 1/2
Minnesota 21 19 .525 10 1/2
Utah 19 19 .500 11 1/2
Portland 19 20 .487 12
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 22 15 .595 —
L.A. Lakers 23 16 .590 —
Phoenix 17 21 .447 5 1/2
Golden State 15 21 .417 6 1/2
Sacramento 13 26 .333 10
———
Wednesday’s Results
Utah 99, Charlotte 93
Toronto 116, Houston 98
Washington 106, L.A. Lakers 101
Philadelphia 103, Boston 71
Miami 89, Atlanta 86
Oklahoma City 115, Phoenix 104
Minnesota 106, Portland 94
Chicago 106, Milwaukee 104
New Jersey 101, L.A. Clippers 100
San Antonio 118, New York 105
Cleveland 100, Denver 99
Sacramento 99, New Orleans 98
Memphis 110, Golden State 92
Today’s Games
Orlando at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
New Jersey at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Utah at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Portland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
The Associated Press
Big Sky Conference
At Reed Gym, Pocatello, Idaho
Today’s First Round
Eastern Washington vs. Sacramento
State, 7 p.m.; Montana State vs.
Montana, 9:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Northern Colorado vs. higher-remain-
ing seed, 7 p.m.; Idaho State vs. lower-
remaining seed, 9:30 p.m.
Big South Conference
At The Millis Center, High Point,
N.C.
Friday’s First Round
Liberty vs. UNC Asheville, Noon;
Campbell vs. Charleston South., 2 p.m.;
High Point vs. Coastal Carolina, 5:30
p.m.; Winthrop vs. Radford, 7:30 p.m.
Big 12 Conference
At Municipal Auditorium, Kansas
City, Mo.
Wednesday’s First Round Results
Texas Tech 81, Texas 58; Missouri 72,
Oklahoma State 68
Today’s Quarterfinals
Iowa State vs. Kansas State, Noon;
Baylor vs. Texas Tech, 2:30 p.m.;
Oklahoma vs. Missouri, 6 p.m.; Texas
A&M vs. Kansas, 8:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Iowa State-Kansas State winner vs.
Baylor-Texas Tech winner, 1 p.m.;
Oklahoma-Missouri winner vs. Texas
A&M-Kansas winner, 3:30 p.m.
Big West Conference
At Honda Center, Anaheim, Calif.
Friday’s Semifinals
Cal Poly vs. Long Beach St., 3 p.m; UC
Santa Barbara vs. Pacific, 5:30 p.m.
Colonial Athletic Association
At Show Palace Arena, Upper
Marlboro, Md.
Today’s First Round
Old Dominion vs. Towson, Noon; UNC
Wilmington vs. Georgia State, 2:30 p.m.;
George Mason vs. Northeastern, 5 p.m.;
VCU vs. William & Mary, 7:30 p.m.
Friday’s Quarterfinals
Delaware vs. Old Dominion-Towson win-
ner, Noon; Hofstra vs. UNC Wilmington-
Georgia St.e winner, 2:30 p.m.; James
Madison vs. George Mason-Northeastern
winner, 5 p.m.; Drexel vs. VCU-William &
Mary winner, 7:30 p.m.
Conference USA
At Elma Roane Fieldhouse,
Memphis, Tenn.
Wednesday’s First Round Results
East Carolina 59, Tulsa 49; SMU 53,
Marshall 52; Southern Mississippi 71,
UCF 49; Rice 64, Houston 50
Today’s Quarterfinals
Tulane vs. East Carolina, Noon;
Memphis vs. SMU, 2:30 p.m.; UTEP vs.
Southern Mississippi, 6 p.m.; UAB vs.
Rice, 8:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Memphis-SMU winner vs. Tulane-
East Carolina winner, 11 a.m.; UTEP-
Southern Mississippi winner vs. UAB-
Rice winner, 1:30 p.m.
Great West Conference
(Non-automatic bid)
At The Jones Convocation Center,
Chicago
Today’s First Round
NJIT vs. Houston Baptist, 6 p.m.;
Texas-Pan American vs. Chicago State,
8:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Utah Valley vs. NJIT-Houston Baptist
winner, 6 p.m; No. Dakota vs. Texas-Pan
American-Chicago St. winner, 8:30 p.m.
Horizon League
Wednesday’s Quarterfinals Results
Detroit 79, Cleveland State 43; Wright
State 91, Loyola of Chicago 67; Green
Bay 77, Valparaiso 53; Illinois-Chicago
66, Butler 53
At Green Bay, Wisconsin
Friday’s Semifinals
Detroit vs. Wright State, TBA; Green
Bay vs. Illinois-Chicago, TBA
Mid-American Conference
At Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland
WOMEN’S CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT
See WOMEN’S, page 7A
1
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distributions can be taken free of penalties or taxes.
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* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a 10% penalty if the
account is less than ve years old and the owner is under age 59½.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Herald — 7A
www.delphosherald.com
AGRIBUSINESS
Photos submitted
Elida Greenhand Quiz Team takes 5th
The Elida FFA Greenhand Quiz Team placed 5th out of 109 schools in the Ohio FFA Greenhand Career Development Event. This contest is an
internet test taken by 1,455 first-year Ohio FFA members. The contest tests students’ knowledge about the Ohio FFA, National FFA, FFA history
and parliamentary procedure skills. Elida team members are, front from left, Lexi Shafer - 45th individual; Ali Skinner - 134th; Will Legge - 44th;
Trey Wheeler - 225th;Travis Watkins - 18th; Andrew Troyer - 297th; Vanessa Stoltzenburg - 49th; Hailey Skeins -115th; C’era Savage - 142nd; and
back, Makenzie Poling - 40th; Sierra Harris - 132nd; Grace Nartin - 63rd; Tyler Heaphy -
688th; Jared Carmean - 165th; Taj Jackson - 278th; Jake Hunter - 100th; Ashland Cotrell
- 125th; Riley Overholt - 52nd; Jared Blymyer - 21st; and Trey Archer - 113th.
Legge places
third at District
4 FFA Creed
Contest
Elida FFA member Will
Legge placed 3rd out of 8
contestants at the District
4 FFA Creed Contest held
at Hardin Northern High
School. To qualify for the
district contest, Legge
placed 2nd out of 10 con-
testants at the sub-district
contest which was held at
Jefferson High School. The
FFA Creed contest consists
of memorizing the FFA
Creed and answering ques-
tions on its meaning.
The Associated Press
Atlantic Coast Conference
At Philips Arena, Atlanta
Today’s First Round
Maryland vs. Wake Forest, Noon; N.C.
State vs. Boston College, 2:30 p.m.;
Clemson vs. Virginia Tech, 7 p.m.; Miami
vs. Georgia Tech, 9:30 p.m.
Friday’s Quarterfinals
North Carolina vs. Maryland-Wake
Forest winner, Noon; Virginia vs. N.C.
State-Boston College winner, 2:30 p.m.;
Duke vs. Clemson-Virginia Tech winner,
7 p.m.; Florida State vs. Miami-Georgia
Tech winner, 9:30 p.m.
Atlantic 10 Conference
At Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, N.J.
Friday’s Quarterfinals
Temple vs. UMass, Noon; Saint
Bonaventure vs. Saint Joseph’s, 2:30
p.m.; Saint Louis vs. La Salle, 6:30 p.m.;
Xavier vs. Dayton, 9 p.m.
Big East Conference
At Madison Square Gar, New York
Wednesday’s Second Round Results
UConn 71, West Virginia 67, OT;
Georgetown 64, Pittsburgh 52; Louisville
61, Seton Hall 55; USF 56, Villanova 47
Today’s Quarterfinals
Syracuse vs. UConn, Noon; Cincinnati
vs. Georgetown, 2:30 p.m.; Marquette
vs. Louisville, 7 p.m.; Notre Dame vs.
USF, 9:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Syracuse-UConn winner vs. Cincinnati-
Georgetown winner, 7 p.m.; Marquette-
Louisville winner vs. Notre Dame-USF
winner, 9:30 p.m.
Big Sky Conference
Wednesday’s Championship Result
Montana 85, Weber State 66
Big Ten Conference
At Bankers Life Fieldhouse,
Indianapolis
Today’s First Round
Iowa vs. Illinois, 11:30 a.m.; Indiana
vs. Penn State, 1:55 p.m.; Northwestern
vs. Minnesota, 5:30 p.m.; Purdue vs.
Nebraska, 7:55 p.m.
Friday’s Quarterfinals
Michigan State vs. Iowa-Illinois win-
ner, Noon.; Wisconsin vs. Indiana-Penn
State winner, 2:30 p.m.; Michigan vs.
Northwestern-Minnesota winner, 6:30
p.m.; Ohio State vs. Purdue-Nebraska
winner, 9 p.m.
Big 12 Conference
At The Sprint Center, Kansas City,
Mo.
Wednesday’s First Round Results
Texas A&M 62, Oklahoma 53;
Oklahoma State 76, Texas Tech 60
Today’s Quarterfinals
Baylor vs. Kansas State, 12:30 p.m.;
Kansas vs. Texas A&M, 3 p.m.; Missouri
vs. Oklahoma State, 7 p.m.; Iowa State
vs. Texas, 9:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Baylor-Kansas State winner vs. Kansas-
Texas A&M winner, 7:30 p.m.; Missouri-
Oklahoma State vs. Iowa State-Texas
winner, 10 p.m.
Big West Conference
At The Honda Center, Anaheim,
Calif.
Today’s First Round
UC Santa Barbara vs. Pacific, 3 p.m.;
Cal State Fullerton vs. UC Irvine, 5:30
p.m.; Long Beach State vs. UC Davis, 9
p.m.; Cal Poly vs. UC Riverside, 11:30
p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Highest-remaining seed vs. lowest-
remaining seed, 9:30 p.m.; Middle-
remaining seeds, Mid
Conference USA
At FedEx Forum, Memphis, Tenn.
Wednesday’s First Round Results
East Carolina 68, Rice 66; Marshall
74, SMU 56; UTEP 67, Houston 62, OT;
UAB 72, Tulane 64
Today’s Quarterfinals
Southern Mississippi vs. East Carolina,
1 p.m.; Tulsa vs. Marshall, 3:30 p.m.;
Memphis vs. UTEP, 7:30 p.m.; UCF vs.
UAB, 10 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Southern Mississippi-East Carolina win-
ner vs. Tulsa-Marshall winner, 4 p.m.;
Memphis-UTEP winner vs. UCF-UAB
winner, 6:30 p.m.
Great West Conference
(Non-automatic bid)
At Emil and Patricia A. Jones
Convocation Center, Chicago
Today’s First Round
NJIT vs. Houston Baptist, 3:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Utah Valley vs. NJIT-Houston Baptist
winner, 1 p.m.; North Dakota vs. Texas-
Pan American, 3:30 p.m.
Mid-American Conference
At Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland
Wednesday’s Second Round
Results
Western Michigan 71, Northern Illinois
54; Toledo 75, Central Michigan 72
Today’s Third Round
Kent State vs. Western Michigan, 7
p.m.; Ohio vs. Toledo, 9:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Akron vs. Kent State-Western Michigan
winner, 7 p.m.; Buffalo vs. Ohio-Toledo
winner, 9:30 p.m.
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
At Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial
Coliseum, Winston-Salem, N.C.
Wednesday’s Quarterfinals Results
Hampton 59, Savannah State 46;
Norfolk State 71, Howard 61
Today’s Quarterfinals
Delaware State vs. Florida A&M, 6 p.m.;
N.C. Central vs. Bethune-Cookman, 8
p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Hampton vs. N.C. Central-Bethune-
Cookman winner, 6 p.m.; Norfolk State
vs. Delaware State-Florida A&M winner,
8 p.m.
Mountain West Conference
At The Thomas & Mack Center, Las
Vegas
Today’s First Round
San Diego State vs. Boise State, 3
p.m.; Colorado State vs. TCU, 5:30 p.m.;
New Mexico vs. Air Force, 9 p.m.; UNLV
vs. Wyoming, 11:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
San Diego State-Boise State winner
vs. Colorado State-TCU winner, 9 p.m.;
New Mexico-Air Force winner vs. UNLV-
Wyoming winner, 11:30 p.m.
Northeast Conference
Wednesday’s Championship Result
LIU 90, Robert Morris 73
Pacific-12 Conference
At The Staples Center, Los Angeles
Wednesday’s First Round Results
Oregon State 69, Washington State 64;
UCLA 55, Southern Cal 40; Stanford 85,
Arizona State 65; Colorado 53, Utah 41
Today’s Quarterfinals
Washington vs. Oregon State, 3:10
p.m.; Arizona vs. UCLA, 5:40 p.m.;
California vs. Stanford, 9:10 p.m.; Oregon
vs. Colorado, 11:40 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Washington-Oregon State winner
vs. Arizona-UCLA winner, 9:10 p.m.;
California-Stanford winner vs. Oregon-
Colorado winner, 11:40 p.m.
Patriot League
Wednesday’s Championship Result
Lehigh 82, Bucknell 77
Southeastern Conference
At New Orleans Arena
Today’s First Round
LSU vs. Arkansas, 1 p.m.; Alabama vs.
South Carolina, 3:30 p.m.; Mississippi
vs. Auburn, 7:30 p.m.; Mississippi State
vs. Georgia, 10 p.m.
Friday’s Quarterfinals
Kentucky vs. LSU-Arkansas winner,
1 p.m.; Florida vs. Alabama-South
Carolina winner, 3:30 p.m.; Tennessee
vs. Mississippi-Auburn winner, 7:30 p.m.;
Vanderbilt vs. Mississippi State-Georgia
winner, 10 p.m.
Southland Conference
At The Leonard E. Merrell Center,
Katy, Texas
Wednesday’s First Round Results
Stephen F. Austin 68, Sam Houston
State 46; Lamar 76, Northwestern State
69; Texas-Arlington 96, Nicholls State
48; McNeese State 78, UTSA 74, OT
Today’s Semifinals
Stephen F. Austin vs. Lamar, 7:05
p.m.; Texas-Arlington vs. McNeese
State, 9:33 p.m.
Southwestern Athletic Conference
At The Special Events Center,
Garland, Texas
Wednesday’s First Round Results
Texas Southern 75, Alabama A&M 62;
MVSU 63, Jackson State 60
Today’s First Round
Prairie View vs. Alcorn State, 1:30
p.m.; Alabama State vs. Arkansas-Pine
Bluff, 9 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Texas Southern vs. Prairie View-
Alcorn State winner, 3:30 p.m.; MVSU
vs. Alabama State-Arkansas-Pine Bluff
winner, 9 p.m.
Western Athletic Conference
At Orleans Arena, Las Vegas
Today’s First Round
Idaho vs. Hawaii, 3 p.m.; New Mexico
State vs. Fresno State, 5:30 p.m.;
Nevada vs. San Jose State, 9 p.m.; Utah
State vs. Louisiana Tech, 11:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Idaho-Hawaii winner vs. New Mexico
State-Fresno State winner, 9 p.m.;
Nevada-San Jose State winner vs. Utah
State-Louisiana Tech winner, 11:30
p.m.
MEN’S CONFERENCE
TOURNAMENT
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
No. 1 versus No. 2.
A matchup wor-
thy of the state title
game.
Instead, that
matchup involving
top-ranked Ottoville
(23-0) and number
2 Arlington (23-1)
will occur in the
Elida Division IV
Regional semifinal
on the Union Bank
Court of the Elida
Fieldhouse.
Lady Big Green mentor
Dave Kleman figures that the
veteran Lady Red Devils will
be very aggressive
with six seniors out
of their top seven,
especially since they
reached this point
last year.
“I expect them to
be hungry with their
seniors. They start
five seniors and
bring one off the
bench, as well as a junior,”
Kleman began. “They will
press us all over the court
with a lot of different looks;
they remind me a lot
of teams we played
during the regular
season and tourna-
ment like Bath, Kalida
and Jefferson in their
desire to force the
tempo. We’re used to
that. They aren’t very
big: they have two of
the Recker triplets that
go 5-9 and are strong
and powerfully-built
but everyone else is not very
big but very quick. They also
shoot the ball extremely well.
The Hunter girl is a dead-eye
3-point shooter.
“For us, we have
to handle that pres-
sure. That is the key
tonight; if we do that,
I like our matchups
inside, especially with
the size advantage.”
The Lady Green
employ a starting
five of senior guards
Lauren Koch (5-4) and
Lauren Kramer (5-8), along
with senior forward Megan
Bendele (5-10), 6-2 junior
center Abby Siefker and 5-6
junior guard Rachel
Turnwald.
Off the bench
are 5-5 junior
guard Nicole Vorst,
6-0 junior forward
Rachel Beining
and 5-6 sopho-
more guard Tonya
Kaufman.
As well, Kleman
can also dig deep-
er with 5-8 senior Krista
Schimmoeller and 5-10 soph-
omore guard Taylor Mangas.
It’s that depth and versatil-
ity, plus the team’s
share-t he-weal t h
mentality, that has
keyed the Lady
Green unbeaten
season.
“Of f ensi vel y,
we have a variety
of people that can
score points. We
really distribute and
share the ball well,” Kleman
added. “You might think that
Abby (averaging 14 points
as the team’s leading scorer)
would get a lot of shots but
she averages under
10 a game. There are
nights when she will
get more — depend-
ing on the matchups
and the situations
— and other nights
she will get less and
it doesn’t matter. We
average over 50 shots
a game, so we spread
the offense out.
“We score over 60 points a
game and give up 35. Defense
has always been what we build
around. We give up around
33-percent shooting
to our opponents and
shoot around 50 per-
cent ourselves. We also
have made more free
throws than our oppo-
nents have shot. That
is usually the sign of a
good team.”
Tipoff tonight is at
approximately 8 p.m.
Ottoville/Arlington matchup tonight
Basketball preview
Bendele
Kramer
Koch Schimmoeller
Wednesday’s Second Round
Results
Central Michigan 58, Ohio 55; Northern
Illinois 61, Akron 60
Today’s Third Round
Miami (Ohio) vs. Cen. Michigan, Noon;
Toledo vs. Northern Illinois, 2:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Bowling Green vs. Miami (Ohio)-Cen.
Michigan winner, Noon; East. Michigan vs.
Toledo-Northern Illinois winner, 2:30 p.m.
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
At Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial
Coliseum, Winston-Salem, N.C.
Wednesday’s Quarterfinal Results
Hampton 61, Norfolk State 40; Howard
57, S.C. State 42
Today’s Quarterfinals
Florida A&M vs. Maryland-Eastern
Shore, Noon; Coppin State vs. N.C. A&T,
2:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Hampton vs. Coppin State-N.C. A&T
winner, Noon; Howard vs. Florida A&M—
Maryland-Eas. Shore winner, 2:30 p.m.
Missouri Valley Conference
At Family Arena, St. Charles, Mo.
Today’s First Round
Bradley vs. Southern Illinois, 5:05 p.m.;
Drake vs. Evansville, 8:05 p.m.
Friday’s Quarterfinals
Missouri State vs. Bradley-Southern
Illinois winner, 1:05 p.m.; Creighton vs.
Northern Iowa, 3:35 p.m.; Illinois State
vs. Drake-Evansville winner, 7:05 p.m.;
Wichita State vs. Indiana State, 9:35 p.m.
Mountain West Conference
At Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas
Wednesday’s First Round Results
San Diego St. 68, Air Force 58; Wyoming
61, TCU 44; New Mexico 61, UNLV 58;
Boise State 68, Colorado State 63
Friday’s Semifinals
San Diego State vs. Wyoming, 3 p.m.;
New Mexico vs. Boise State, 5:30 p.m.
Pacific-12 Conference
At The Galen Center, Los Angeles
Wednesday’s First Round Results
Washington 72, Oregon 56; Arizona
61, UCLA 57; Colorado 55, Utah 41;
Washington State 65, Oregon State 56
Today’s Quarterfinals
Stanford vs. Washington, 3 p.m.;
Arizona State vs. Arizona, 5:15 p.m.;
California vs. Colorado, 8 p.m.; Southern
Cal vs. Washington State, 10:15 p.m.
At The Staples Center, Los Angeles
Friday’s Semifinals
Stanford-Washington winner vs.
Arizona State-Arizona winner, 3 p.m.;
California-Colorado winner vs. Southern
Cal-Washington State winner, 5:30 p.m.
Southland Conference
At Leonard E. Merrell Center, Texas
Today’s Semifinals
McNeese State vs. Texas State, 1:05
p.m.; Nicholls State vs. Stephen F.
Austin, 3:33 p.m.
Friday’s Championship
Semifinal winners, 8 p.m.
Southwestern Athletic Conference
At Special Events Center, Texas
Wednesday’s Quarterfinal Results
Alcorn State 54, Southern 44; MVSU
70, Texas Southern 47
Today’s Quarterfinals
Alabama A&M vs. Grambling St., 11 a.m
Alabama St. vs. Prairie View, 6:30 p.m.
Friday’s Semifinals
Alcorn St. vs. Alabama A&M-Grambling
State winner, 1 p.m.; MVSU vs. Alabama
State-Prairie View winner, 6:30 p.m.
Western Athletic Conference
At Orleans Arena, Las Vegas
Wednesday’s First Round Results
Louisiana Tech 63, Hawaii 54; Utah
State 75, Nevada 66; Fresno State 66,
New Mexico State 58; Idaho 67, San
Jose State 63
Friday’s Semifinals
Louisiana Tech vs. Utah State, 3 p.m.;
Fresno State vs. Idaho, 5:30 p.m.
Women’s
Continued from Page 6A
Shell shines in win
over Baldwin-Wallace
KISSIMMEE, Florida -
The Bluffton University soft-
ball team picked up where it
left off Wednesday afternoon
when the Beavers avenged
their only loss of the season
(5-1) with a convincing 6-1
victory over Baldwin-Wallace
on Wednesday at the Rebel
Spring Games.
The Beavers jumped out to
a 2-0 lead in the first inning
of game two despite a pair of
groundouts to start the game.
Lindsay Robertson (Cincinnati/
Northwest), who leads the team
with a .533 batting average,
continued her torrid play with
a 2-bagger to left field which
picked up fellow freshman Katie
Clark (New Palestine, Ind.).
Emily Manahan (Columbus/
Watterson) followed with a
run-scoring single to left.
Chel si e Osborne
(Chillicothe/Waverly) knocked
in Alexandra Haugh (Highland,
Ind./Andrean) following her
double over the third base bag
in the top of the fourth inning
and two frames later, pinch-hit-
ter Amanda Wooley (Tipp City/
Miami East) plated Osborne for
a 4-0 advantage.
Following a walk to Brittany
Baker (Springboro) in the sev-
enth, Clark launched an RBI
double to the wall in right cen-
ter. Pinch-runner Jo Bondra
(Highland Heights/Mayfield)
crossed the dish on Manahan’s
base hit to left.
The Yellow Jackets picked
up three of their seven hits for
the game in the seventh frame
but one run was all the Yellow
Jackets could muster in the 6-1
loss to the Beavers.
Freshman Chloe Shell (2-0)
was lights out for the second
consecutive day, allowing just
a seventh-inning run on seven
hits in her complete-game vic-
tory. She continued to make
batters earn their way on base,
having tossed 18 innings this
season without giving up a
walk.
Robertson went 3-of-4.
Manahan, Osborne and Clark all
rapped two hits apiece. Bluffton
pounded 13 hits, including four
doubles in the 6-1 win over the
Yellow Jackets, avenging a 7-3
loss at the hands of B-W on
Tuesday.
Bluffton returns to Oren
Brown for a 9 a.m. meet-
ing today with Westminster
College before a clash versus
Methodist at 11 a.m.
Bluffton University 6 (5-1)
Player ab-r-h-rbi
Meagan Price c 4-0-1-0, Brittany
Baker 2b 3-1-1-0, Katie Clark dh 3-1-2-
1, Chelsea Weitz pr 0-0-0-0, Johanna
Bondra pr 0-1-0-0, Lindsay Robertson
3b 4-1-3-1, Jessica Kuzara 3b 0-0-0-
0, Emily Manahan 1b 4-0-2-2, Jenelle
Theisen pr 0-0-0-0, Alexandra Haugh
rf 4-1-1-0, Chelsie Osborne lf 4-1-2-1,
Shelby Wade cf 4-0-1-0, Shelby Erford
ss 2-0-0-0, Amanda Wooley ph 1-0-0-
1. Totals 33-6-13-6.
Baldwin-Wallace 1 (5-3)
Player ab-r-h-rbi
Brittany Lightel ss 3-0-2-0, Ashley
Elber cf 3-0-0-0, Tabitha Murray dh/p
3-0-1-0, Alyssa Brown rf 3-0-0-0, Kaity
Mullen 1b 3-1-2-0, Sarah Baker lf 3-0-
1-0, Katie Carabin pr 0-0-0-0, Lauren
Feciuch 3b 2-0-0-1, Katie Finley 2b 3-0-
1-0, Justina Wise p 1-0-0-0, Mackenzie
Brua dh 2-0-0-0. Totals 26-1-7-1.
Score by Innings:
Bluffton University. 200 101 2 - 6 13 0
Baldwin-Wallace..... 000 000 1 - 1 7 1
E - Sarah Baker. DP - Bluffton 1.
LOB - Bluffton 8; B-W 5. 2B - Clark,
K.(2); Robertson(3); Haugh, A.(2);
Osborne, C.(2); Kaity Mullen. SF - L.
Feciuch. CS - Price, M.(1).
WP - Wise. Pitches/strikes: Shell
88/61; Wise 44/31; Murray 51/32;
Peskura 25/12.
----
Beavers fall to
No. 12 Heidelbarg
By Keisha Holtsberry
Sports information assistant
PORT CHARLOTTE,
Florida - The Bluffton
University baseball team fell to
#12 Heidelberg University 5-4
on Wednesday. The Beavers
stand 2-5 overall and 2-3 in the
Snowbird Classic. Heidelberg
improved to 3-2 with the vic-
tory.
The Beavers plated two runs
in the second inning and one in
both the fifth and sixth innings.
Heidelberg plated three runs
in the first inning, one run in
the third, and one run in the
seventh. The three runs in the
first inning gave Heidelberg the
advantage over the Beavers.
Mark Hadaya (Beavercreek)
started the game for the
Beavers and went six innings.
He allowed four runs while
striking out four batters and
walking four. Kyle Stover
(Tipp City) pitched the seventh
inning and took the loss when
Heidelberg scored the go-ahead
run thanks to a stolen base,
a wild pitch and a Bluffton
error. Kelly Barnes (Toledo/
Christian) came in to finish out
the game and struck out one
batter in two shutout innings
of relief.
Airic Steagall (Hillsboro)
was the first Beaver to cross the
plate. He reached on a fielder’s
choice and moved to second on
Greg Franks’ (Smithville) sin-
gle. Steagall went to third when
Doug Paullin (Jeromesville/
Hillsdale) walked and he
crossed the dish when Kyle
Niermann (Napoleon) deliv-
ered a run-scoring single which
also picked up Franks.
Miles Richardson
(Granville/Newark Catholic)
scored in the fifth inning. He
ripped a double, advanced to
third on a Tyler Stephenson
(Springfield/Northwestern) sin-
gle and crossed the plate when
Tyler Wright (Troy) followed
with a base knock.
Franks was the only Beaver
to cross the plate in the sixth
inning. He reached first on
an error by Heidelberg and
advanced to second on the
same play. Franks moved to
third on a base hit by Paullin
and crossed the plate when
Richardson laced a single.
Richardson led the Beavers
with four hits and one RBI.
Wright and Paullin both had
two hits in the loss. Niermann
finished with two RBIs and
Franks scored twice.
Bluffton returns to action
today when the Beavers meet
Baldwin-Wallace at 12:30 p.m.
Heidelberg 5 (3-2)
Player ab-r-h-rbi
E. Williams cf 4-1-2-1, A. Squibb lf 1-1-
0-0, L. Long ph 1-0-0-0, D. Kilger lf 0-0-0-0,
R. Lizcano ss 4-0-0-0, D. Cooper dh 4-0-0-1,
S. Kisan 2b 4-2-1-0, E. Monroe 1b 3-0-0-0,
D. Miller 1b 0-0-0-0, R. Pruitt rf 4-1-2-2, T.
Oldham 3b 2-0-1-0, J. Martin c 4-0-0-0. Totals
31-5-6-4.
Bluffton University 4 (2-5)
Player ab-r-h-rbi
Kyle Niermann rf 5-0-1-2, Miles Richardson
cf 5-1-4-1, Nick Broyles ss 5-0-1-0, Tyler
Stephenson 3b 5-0-1-0, Tyler Wright dh 5-0-
2-1, Airic Steagall 1b 5-1-1-0, Greg Franks c
4-2-1-0, Doug Paullin 2b 3-0-2-0, Kevin Martin
lf 4-0-1-0. Totals 41-4-14-4.
Score by Innings:
Heidelberg................ 301 000 100 - 5 6 1
Bluffton University... 020 011 000 - 4 14 3
E - T. Oldham(1); Broyles, N.(7); Steagall,
A.(1); Franks, G.(1). DP - HEID 1. LOB - HEID
12; BLUF 11. 2B - Richardson(2). HBP - S.
Kisan; E. Monroe 2; T. Oldham. SH - A.
Squibb(1); T. Oldham(1). SF - D. Cooper(1).
SB - A. Squibb 2(3); S. Kisan 2(1).
WP - Stover, K.(1). HBP - by Hadaya, M. (S.
Kisan); by Hadaya, M. (E. Monroe); by Hadaya,
M. (T. Oldham); by Stover, K. (E. Monroe).
COLLEGE ROUNDUP
8A – The Herald Thursday, March 8, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The Terminator, played by Arnold Schwarzenegger,
was included as both a hero and a villain on the American
Film Institute’s list os “100 Years...100 Heroes and
Villains.” He placed 22nd as a villain in the film The
Terminator (1984), and 48th as a hero in Terminator 2:
Judgement Day (1991).
When it comes to geography, a col is a gap or saddle-
like depression between mountain peaks that often serves
as a pass.
Today’s questions:
How did the Daily Telegraph newspaper help the
British Secret Intelligence Service find code-breaking
recruits during World War II?
What Revolutionary War hero was the inspiration
behind actor Marion Morrison’s name change to John
Wayne?
Answers in Friday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Domiculture: home economics
Qhythsontyd: the obsolete form of the seventh Sunday
after Easter
More work needed to stop youth tobacco use
By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM
Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. — More work needs to
be done to keep young Americans from using
tobacco, including creating smoking bans
and increasing taxes on tobacco products, the
U.S. Surgeon General’s office said in a report
released today.
Almost one in five high school-aged teens
smokes, down from earlier decades, but the
rate of decline has slowed, the report said.
It says it’s particularly important to stop
young people from using tobacco because
those who start smoking as teenagers can
increase their chances of long-term addiction.
They also quickly can experience reduced
lung function, impaired lung growth, early
heart disease and other health problems like
asthma.
More than 80 percent of smokers begin by
age 18 and 99 percent of adult smokers in the
U.S. start by age 26, according to the 920-page
report, which is the first comprehensive look
at youth tobacco use from the surgeon gen-
eral’s office in nearly two decades.
“In order to end this epidemic, we need to
focus on where we can prevent it and where we
can see the most effect, and that’s with young
people,” Surgeon General Regina Benjamin
said in an interview with The Associated
Press. “We want to make our next generation
tobacco-free, and I think we can.”
The report details youth tobacco use, health
impacts, and tobacco marketing and pre-
vention efforts in the U.S. Officials hope
the information will reinvigorate anti-tobacco
efforts and spark public activism in reducing
death and disease caused by tobacco use.
The report also recommended anti-smoking
campaigns and increased restrictions under the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s author-
ity to regulate tobacco as other ways to pre-
vent adolescents and young adults from using
tobacco products.
Benjamin did not point fingers on why
youth tobacco use continues in the U.S.
Instead, she wants to see how the nation as a
whole can best address the issue, she said.
“I don’t want to focus on blame, I want
to focus on prevention,” she said. “I want to
make sure we’re doing everything that we can
to prevent kids from ever starting to smoke or
use tobacco products.”
The surgeon general’s office last issued a
report on youth tobacco use in 1994, the first
wide-ranging report on the topic by federal
health officials. The new report is the 31st
issued by U.S. surgeons general to warn the
public about tobacco’s risks. The first report in
1964 declared tobacco to be deadly.
Since the 1994 report, smoking among
high school students has declined from 27.5
percent to 19.5 percent, or about 3 million
students, but the rate of decline has slowed in
recent years. About 5.2 percent, or 600,000
middle school students also are current smok-
ers. According to the report, every day in the
U.S., more than 3,800 people under the age of
18 smoke their first cigarette and more than
1,000 of them become daily smokers. They
replace the 1,200 people who die each day in
the U.S. from smoking.
The report also examined advertising and
promotional activities by tobacco companies,
which have been shown to “cause the onset
and continuation of smoking adolescents and
young adults.”
Tobacco companies have spent increasing
amounts of money on marketing efforts to
reduce prices, which health officials said in the
report could influence access to price-sensitive
youth and make cigarettes more affordable.
Nearly $10 billion was spent in 2008 on
cigarette marketing by the nation’s five big-
gest tobacco companies, a 48 percent increase
from what was spent in 1998, when some of
the companies agreed with state attorneys gen-
eral to curtail or stop some of their marketing
efforts. That 25-year, $206 billion settlement
also pays states for smoking-related health
care costs and to support tobacco prevention
and cessation programs.
“We have come a long way since the
days of smoking on airplanes and in college
classrooms, but we have a long way to go,”
Secretary of Health and Human Resources
Kathleen Sebelius said in a statement accom-
panying the latest report. “The prosperity and
health of our nation depend on it.”
In a statement today, Richmond, Va.-based
Altria Group Inc., parent company of the
nation’s largest cigarette maker, Philip Morris
USA, which makes the top-selling Marlboro
brand, said it agrees that kids shouldn’t use
tobacco products and that it markets its prod-
ucts to adult tobacco users through age-verified
direct communications and at retail stores.
“Underage tobacco use is a difficult issue,
and there is not a simple solution,” the com-
pany said. “We agree there’s still more work
to be done.”
US big at world cheese contest
NJ FBI: NYPD monitoring
damaged public trust
Hackers charged in NY,
Chicago united by discord
Retweets becoming digital
version of autographs
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Watching 40 judges in white lab
coats nibble on cheese and then spit the samples into garbage
cans might not sound like the most elegant evening. But hun-
dreds of cheese lovers have paid $25 each for a close-up view of
Wednesday’s World Championship Cheese Contest finals.
This is the first year the international contest has charged
admission to its finals, which historically have been low-key
affairs, drawing just a handful of spectators and reporters. As a
growing number of foodies try to outdo one another in their pur-
suit of local, sustainable, organic and handcrafted fare, the artisan
cheese competition has become a hot ticket for those looking to
get their gouda on.
The sold-out contest, held every two years in Madison,
typically draws more than 2,000 entries from nearly two-dozen
nations. Usually, only the judges taste the cheese, but this year’s
400 ticketholders will be able to sample 15 of the top entries while
they mingle with Wisconsin cheesemakers and the international
panel of judges.
“In the past, unless you were a super cheese geek, this is not
something you went to,” said Jeanne Carpenter, executive director
of Wisconsin Cheese Originals, an organization of artisan cheese
fans. “But getting to try 15 different cheeses from 15 different
countries, plus meeting the best of Wisconsin’s cheesemakers,
people love that.”
Experts compare specialty cheeses to wines: Both have subtle
variations based on their region of origin, year of creation and the
techniques employed by master craftsmen.
Judging in cheese and wine contests is similar as well. Judges
roll entries in their mouths, search for nuanced characteristics and
then discard the samples. Some cheese judges wipe their tongues
with napkins between tastings.
One of the paid spectators was Steve Ceder, a painting contrac-
tor from Madison.
“This is Wisconsin,” he said, as he nibbled on a few samples.
“I enjoy cheese a lot, and to have a chance to try so many different
cheeses is just such a wonderful experience.”
The three-day contest began Monday, with judges grading
2,500 entries in 82 cheese and butter classes on flavor, texture,
body and color. The winner in each class advanced to the semifi-
nals, where the top 16 were chosen for Wednesday night’s finals.
As expected, cheesemakers from the U.S. and Switzerland
came out strong. Seven finalists are from the U.S. — five from
Wisconsin and one each from Utah and Vermont.
Five other finalists are from Switzerland, which has produced
champions in each of the last three contests. The Netherlands has
two finalists, and Canada and Spain each have one.
Landing best in show can translate into big business. Some
previous winners have talked about crushing demand for their
cheese following the announcement. When Swiss cheesemaker
Christian Wuethrich won in 2006 with an Emmentaler, he raised
its price more than 10 percent, from $8 to $9 per pound.
Switzerland has dominated recent championships, taking top
honors in each of the past three contests. Wisconsin is consistently
the top-performing U.S. state. True to form, the Dairy State won
30 of the 82 categories this year.
Estela Roustan, a Spanish teacher from the Wisconsin Dells,
tried several cheeses from Switzerland and France, and said she
was eager to try the samples from Croatia and Spain.
“There’s so much variety and diversity here,” the 67-year-old
said. “It’s so wonderful. When you get to taste them, it’s almost
like you’re traveling to different countries.”
By SAMANTHA HENRY
Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. — In a rare public criticism of the New
York Police Department, the top FBI official in New Jersey
said Wednesday that the department’s surveillance of Muslims
in the state has hindered investigations and created “additional
risks” in counterterrorism.
The monitoring of Muslims in Newark and across the state
has damaged the public’s trust in New Jersey law enforcement
and jeopardized some of the relationships agents had sought to
build in the community since 9/11, said Michael Ward, agent
in charge of the FBI’s Newark division.
“When people pull back cooperation, it creates additional
risks, it creates blind spots,” Ward told reporters at a press
briefing that he called to address the FBI’s role in the NYPD
monitoring of Muslims, reported in a series of stories by The
Associated Press. “It hinders our ability to have our finger on
the pulse of what’s going on around the state, and thus it causes
problems and makes the job of the Joint Terrorism Task Force
much, much harder.”
Ward said the NYPD had worked effectively in the state
multiple times on terror cases — “we have a great relationship
with the NYPD” — citing the arrests last year of two New
Jersey men who admitted to conspiring to join an al-Qaida
affiliate. But he said he knew little about the department’s
intelligence operations in the state.
“When you have someone that’s conducting a unilateral
investigation and it’s not being coordinated” with the terror
task force, he said, “you run the risk of missing something, of
not connecting the dots.”
NYPD spokesman Paul Browne responded Wednesday
by pointing to several cases worked in conjunction with New
Jersey law enforcement, such as the June arrests of Mohamed
Alessa and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, who admitted to plan-
ning to travel to Somalia to get training with a group with ties
to al-Qaida.
“The NYPD has established strong ongoing relations in the
Muslim community, and our intelligence gathering has led to
the capture of the radical converts Almonte and Alessa in New
Jersey,” Browne said. He cited other cases where relations in the
community have led to terror prosecutions, most notably a plot
to bomb the Herald Square train station in New York in 2004.
By DON BABWIN, VERENA DOBNIK
and DAVID B. CARUSO
Associated Press
NEW YORK — Online, he was the elite, combustible
hacker known as Sabu. But at home, Hector Xavier Monsegur
seemed like the white sheep of a troubled family.
After his father and an aunt went to jail for drug dealing, the
28-year-old took over the job of raising his two young nieces,
his New York neighbors said. At the large public housing proj-
ect where he lived, in a building where the elevator reeks of
urine, he looked to some outsiders like a family man avoiding
the trouble plaguing his relatives.
“He was a quiet man, but he would smile when he passed
by, and he talked to everybody,” said neighbor Jorge Santiago,
a 78-year-old retired truck driver who said he has known
Monsegur all his life. “Everybody knew him.”
All the while, federal prosecutors said, Monsegur was living
a double life as an Internet saboteur. During the Arab spring,
he hacked into government websites in Tunisia, Yemen and
Algeria. He helped coordinate attacks on credit card companies
after they refused to accept donations to Wikileaks, the orga-
nization that spilled a trove of U.S. military and diplomatic
secrets. Then, they said, he added another layer to the subter-
fuge by informing on his accomplices after he was caught by
the FBI last spring.
His cooperation led to charges filed Tuesday against five
people in the United States, Scotland, Ireland and England,
including one other American, Jeremy Hammond, a 27-year-
old from Chicago.
Hammond’s mother told The Associated Press on
Wednesday that her son was a brilliant computer whiz but
apparently couldn’t stop himself from applying his genius to
“get the goat of America.”
“He does have a good heart, but, I don’t know, he just wants
to make those who disagree with him suffer,” Rose Collins in a
telephone interview from her home outside Austin, Texas. “He
thinks America is evil, has done everything wrong.”
That made for some tension in the family. Collins described
herself as a staunch conservative who has attended tea party
rallies. Hammond’s father, now jailed in a Chicago suburb
awaiting trial on a charge of aggravated sexual abuse of a
minor, was “very, very far left,” Collins said. “So far off the
charts that one more step he’s going to fall off the planet.”
Hammond, she said, was raised by his father after the
couple split up and adopted his politics.
“He wants to end capitalism,” she said.
Collins said her son could have done anything with his com-
puter skills but had a penchant for using them to raise a ruckus.
In high school, she said, he hacked into the school’s mainframe
computer to demonstrate its security vulnerabilities. He did the
same thing when he went to college at the University of Illinois
at Chicago, which earned him an expulsion, Collins said.
The university confirmed that Hammond was a computer
science major but left without a degree in 2004. It wouldn’t say
whether he was kicked out, citing federal privacy laws.
A year later, Hammond was caught hacking in to a conser-
vative website and stealing credit card information. He pleaded
guilty and was sentenced to two years in prison.
Collins said she hopes her son is innocent.
“I’m praying for that,” she said.
But she added that she has long admired his courage and
passion for his political beliefs, even if she didn’t share them.
“He’s a braver man than me,” she said.
Hammond is now jailed pending transport to New York,
where he will face charges in a case in which Monsegur has
already pleaded guilty.
By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press
Forget standing in line for hours, hoping for a scribbled, barely
legible autograph on a wrinkled piece of paper. Or jockeying for
spots behind the dugout, on the off chance a signed ball or batting
glove gets tossed your way.
When it comes to souvenirs from your favorite athlete, the
retweet is where it’s at these days.
Fans have turned Twitter into a digital version of the autograph
session, asking — sometimes begging — stars from every sport
for a shoutout. Oh, sure, some requests are designed to raise the
profile of a charitable cause. But most fans are simply looking for
a little love from their favorite athletes.
“(at)SHAQ the real superman, can i get a birthday retweet
from the most dominant big man of all time?”
“It’s my birthday and all I want is for (at)KingJames to tweet
me !!
“(at)Donald—Driver80 I love you so much. I have a piece of
your jersey, I want more. I want(need) an RT from you. See ya in
a lambeau leap!!
“(at)serenawilliams please don’t let me go 0-5 for (hash)ser-
enafriday RT from my favorite female tennis player?”
“It’s almost like capturing a photo of yourself with that per-
son,” said Chris Abraham, senior vice president at Social Ally,
a social media firm. “For a second there, you’ve breached their
celebrity. They’ve actually allowed you to come over and take
a camera shot of you two together, and you can share it with all
your friends.”
Now, a retweet might not sound all that thrilling. You can’t
frame it and hang it on a wall (though you could do a screen grab
and print it out), and it can’t be passed down to your kids and
grandkids. You can’t collect retweets in a book and show it off to
your friends. And no one’s going to pay six figures for a retweet,
as someone once did for a baseball signed by Babe Ruth.
But that’s the old-school way of thinking. An autograph is
going to be seen by 15, maybe 20 people. Get a retweet from
Shaquille O’Neal, and you’re now the coolest thing ever with the
5 million-plus people who follow the Big Tweeter. To say noth-
ing of the bragging rights you’ll get when the folks who follow
you see it.
DNA tests link convicted killer to other murders
By P. SOLOMON BANDA
Associated Press
DENVER — Authorities all along had the DNA evidence
to link a convicted triple-murderer to three additional murders
from 1979, and they say he could have been responsible for as
many as 20 slayings.
But the process of developing an identifying DNA ‘’ finger-
print” was still five years away when authorities say Vincent
Groves killed a prostitute, a banker, and a store clerk.
By the time Groves had been let out of prison in 1987 and
went on a suspected killing spree that left police discovering a
body a month in and around Denver for about a year, authori-
ties were still struggling with how to handle DNA. Colorado
was the first state to require DNA but only from sex offenders
in 1988 and the FBI’s national database was a decade away
from becoming fully operational.
On Wednesday, Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey
announced that through federal grants for a cold case unit in
the Denver Police Department and his office, four slayings
had been solved though DNA matches.
Groves, who died in prison in 1996 at age 42, was tied
by DNA to the 1979 killings of women found strangled and
partially nude in an alley, an industrial park and a bathtub in
Denver. Police used a DNA profile of Groves they recently
found from an old murder investigation and linked it to the
four separate crime scenes, authorities said.
“So often times, a serial offender can fly below the DNA
radar screen, maybe leaving DNA, but because their criminal
history occurred at a time when they weren’t eligible to go
into the database or there was no database, they stay at large
continuing to commit their crimes,” Morrissey said.
The 1979 slayings of Emma Jenefor, 25; a store clerk in a
tony area of Denver; Joyce Ramey, 23, a suspected prostitute,
and Peggy Cuff, 20, a banker, bore strong resemblances to
Groves’ past killings and the disappearance of a woman that
Groves was suspected in, authorities said. Police also linked
Groves to the 1988 strangulation death of Pamela Montgomery,
35, a suspected prostitute found dead in an alley.
Groves would target women he knew who were addicted to
cocaine or prostitutes he picked up on Colfax Avenue, a street
in Denver historically known for prostitution, said Morrissey
and Mylous Yearling, cold-case investigator for Denver’s
police department.
Groves strangled most of his victims; many were found
nude or partially clothed, left in the mountains west of Denver,
alleys and fields outside the city, police said.
When he died, Groves was serving a life sentence for the
1980s strangling of two young women. He had been released
on parole in 1987 after serving five years in prison for killing
a third woman in suburban Denver.
Authorities launched a task force in the late 1980s to
investigate a string of slayings after authorities began finding
an average of a body a month, all possibly killed by the same
person, Morrissey said. At that time, Grove was suspected of
up to 20 killings between 1979 and 1988, he said. In one case
from 1980, investigators had seminal fluid, but could only
develop a blood type from the sample.
“It was frustrating in that we didn’t have DNA like we do
now,” Morrissey said of their efforts.
More DNA testing is pending to determine if Groves is
linked to other victims, Morrissey said.
“There’s families out there that deserve answers and that’s
what this work’s about,” Morrissey said. “If they’re (the sus-
pects) still there, still alive, we want to hold them accountable.
So when they’re not still alive, we’re able to give families
answers, tell them what happened to their loved ones.”
Groves’ DNA profile was recovered from the case file
related to 17-year-old Tammy Woodrum. Groves brought her
body in a camper to a suburban Denver police department in
1981, according to a court document, after his wife convinced
him to turn himself in.
Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Herald - 1B www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Pets
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
950 Welding
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Q
uality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARMMACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STE EL
STAINLESS STE EL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
950 Lawn Care
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Car Care
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Advertise
Your Business
DAILY
For a low, low
price!
419 695-0015
AT YOUR
S
ervice
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
If you like
to meet people and build
relationships,
we have an opportunity
for you!
The Delphos Herald has an
immediate opening for
Advertising Sales
Representative
Responsibilities include selling a va-
riety of print and online products to
new and existing customers in a de-
fined geographical territory.
Hourly rate of pay, commission,
bonus, mileage reimbursement
and more.
Interested applicants should
send cover letter and resume
to:
The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Attention: Advertising Sales
VANAMATI C
Vanamatic Company in Delphos, Ohio
is seeking Screw Machine Operators
with 2+ years experience.

Ideal candidates will have the
following skills and experience:

• Blueprint Reading
• Basic Gaging and Measurement
• Screw Machine Operation
• Tool Adjustments
• Set-Up Experience a Plus

Starting wage commensurate with
skills and experience.

Vanamatic has served the precision
machining industry for 57 years.

Stable employment with flexible shifts,
climate controlled manufacturing
facility and competitive wage and
benefit programs including
gainsharing.

Please submit resumes to:
Vanamatic Company
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, OH

Attn: Scott Wiltsie
scottw@Vanamatic.com
(p) 419-692-6085
(f) 419-692-3260

Unity, Empowerment, Teamwork
“The Right People, Making the Right
Decision, At The Right Time”
SCREW MACHINE OPERATORS
Positions Open
Roberts Manufacturing Co., Inc. of Oakwood, OH is
looking for a qualified Quality Assurance Inspector.
Roberts is an established manufacturer with an out-
standing quality and delivery reputation. Roberts is
a growing business and is looking for people to grow
with us.
Web site www.robertsmanufacturing.net
Quality Assurance Inspector
Desired qualifications and abilities:
• Geometric Tolerancing
• Blueprint Reading
• CMM operation and programming
• Gaging usage and knowledge
• Must be self-motivated and dependable
• ISO background a plus
• Experience a major plus
CNC Machinists
Desired qualifications and abilities:
• Blueprint Reading
• Gage Usage
• CNC program knowledge
• Strong mathematics background
• Must be self-motivated and dependable
• Experience a major plus
We offer a quality benefit package including 401k,
health insurance, paid vacation, paid holidays, profit
sharing and competitive wages (commensurate with
experience).
Walk in applications accepted Monday-Friday be-
tween 8:30 am and 4:00 pm or you can send your
resume to:
Roberts Manufacturing Co., Inc.
Attn: Chuck Behrens
24338 CR 148
Oakwood OH 45873
Phone: (419)594-2712 or Fax (419)594-2900
Or email to: chuckbehrens@rmci1.net
005

Lost & Found
FOUND - Medium size
Black Dog near Jefferson
Middle School. Please call
419-692-1182 to identify.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
010

Announcements
Kreative
Learning
Preschool
340 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH
45833
419-695-5934
2012/2013
Registration
Going On
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
Are you looking for a child
care provider in your
area? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
BLUE STREAM DAIRY
Blue Stream Dairy located
in Convoy, OH has open-
ings for the following posi-
tions:
MILKER , milks cows in
double 20 parlor, sorts any
animal needing medical
attention or breeding.
Night shift 5pm ‘til 4am
day rotation. Experience
wi th cattl e preferred.
Housing available.
FEEDER, feeds herd daily
and keeps feed areas
clean. Operate pay loader
and tractors. Day shift
5am ‘til 4pm, day rotation.
ASSI STANT HERDS-
MAN, duties include gen-
eral cow health, vaccina-
tions, calving, and record
keeping. Must have prior
experience and be bi-lin-
gual. Day or night shift
with variable hours and
days.
If interested apply in per-
son between the hours of
9-3 Monday-Friday at:
Blue Stream Dairy
3242 Mentzer Church Rd.
Convoy, OH 45832
080

Help Wanted
DRIVER NEEDED: Local
business is seeking a
part-time driver for late
night/early morning. Ap-
proximately 10 hours per
week plus additional deliv-
eries as needed, up to 30
hours per week. No CDL
required. Driver must sub-
mit to pre-employment
physical/drug screening
and random drug screen-
ing during employment.
Retirees welcome. Please
send replies to Box 166
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
FULL TIME Graphic Artist
is needed by local com-
pany. Website knowledge
and able to do page lay-
outs a plus. Benefits pack-
age includes: Health, Den-
tal, 401K & Vacation.
Send replies to Box 165
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
HELP WANTED - Local
embroidery shop needs
computer literate self
starter. $10-13 per hour.
Send replies to Box 167
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
501

Misc. for Sale
FIREWOOD FOR Sale.
$70.00 a truckload. Deliv-
ery available for a fee. Call
419-286-3861
800

House For Sale
FOR SALE Beautiful Old
Home brought back to life.
110 W Main St., Pandora.
2,500 SqFt, 4 bedroom, 2
bath. 14x26 eat-in kitchen
wi th new cupboards,
counter seating and appli-
ances. Wood floors on
main level, enclosed porch
with Electric Fireplace.
Pack your things, it’s
ready t o move i n.
$114,900. 419-302-9308
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
CLOSET DOORS - 2 pair
with rollers and track.
$50.00. Call 419-605-8255
FOR SALE - Darkish
brown 2 piece bathroom
cabinets -each 27” long x
21” wide. Also Top Lighted
bathroom cabinet - 36”
long x 13” wide. Set all for
$40.00. Leave message
419-286-2821
HOSPITAL BED with con-
trols for head and foot.
$50.00. Call 419-905-7458
Classifieds Sell
Find it in the
Classifieds
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
080

Help Wanted
080

Help Wanted
Wanted: Diabetic Test
Strips. Paying up to $15.00
per 100 strips. Call Alan
(888) 775-3782. www.
diabeticteststripswanted.
com.
Adoption A happily
married couple seeks to
adopt. Financial security.
Expenses paid. Christa &
Paul. 1-800-936-1631.
Automotive CARS
WANTED! PayMax Car
Buyers pays the MAX!
One call gets you TOP
DOLLAR offer on any
year, make or model car.
1-888-PAYMAX-7 (1-888-
729-6297).
Business Services REACH
2 MILLION NEWSPAPER
READERS with one ad
placement. ONLY $295.00.
Ohio’s best community
newspapers. Call Kathy
at AdOhio Statewide
Classified Network, 614-
486-6677, or E-MAIL at:
kmccutcheon@adohio.net
or check out our website
at: www.adohio.net.
Business Services REACH
OVER 1 MILLION OHIO
ADULTS with one ad
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Help Wanted Averitt Starts
Regional CDL-A Drivers at
37-42.5cpm w/1+ Year’s.
Experience (Depends on
Location). 4-12 Months
Experience? Paid Refresher
Course. 888-362-8608
or AVERITTcareers.
com Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Help Wanted Class A
CDL Drivers Midwest
Regional 38-40 CPM. Paid
Orientation Paid from 1st.
Dispatch. Full Benefits.
$1500 Sign On. Online
Transport 877-997-8999
www.DriveForOnline.com
Help Wanted Driver - $0
Tuition CDL (A) Training
& a Job! Top Industry
Pay, Quality Training.
Stability & Miles! Short
employment commitment
required. 800-326-2778
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Help Wanted Driver
- CDL-A. Drive With
Pride. Up to $3,000 Sign-
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Drivers! CDL & 6 mo.
OTR exp. Req’d USA
Truck 1-877-521-5775
www.usatruck.jobs
Help Wanted Drivers
- CDL-A. DRIVERS
NEEDED! Plenty of
Miles! Including West
Coast Runs! Top Pay for
Experienced Drivers.
Even More for Hazmat!
800-942-2104 Ext. 7307 or
7308 www.totalms.com.
Help Wanted Drivers -
Daily Pay! Up to $.42/
mile plus $.02/mile
quarterly safety bonus
- New trucks - Van and
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months recent experience
required. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
Help Wanted Drivers: No
Experience? Class A CDL
Training. We Train and
Employ! New Pay Increases
coming soon. Experienced
Drivers also Needed!
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Help Wanted Drivers
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$7500 Solo & Teams. 1
year OTR. High Pay &
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Help Wanted Experienced
CDL-A Van Drivers
Needed. $1,500 Sign-on/
Stay-on Bonus! Hometime
Options! National &
Regional Fleets include
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Call Roehl at 877-774-
5313 or GoRoehl.com
Help Wanted Owner
Operators: Up to a $2,000
Sign-On Bonus. Great
Pay & paid FSC. Paid
OH & IN Tolls. Fuel &
Tire Discounts. Hometime
throughout the week. 3rd
Party Lease Purchase
program available. Call
Comtrak at 866-722-0291,
or apply online at www.
comtrakinc.com
Help Wanted Werner
Needs Driver Trainees
Now! Tired of living
paycheck to paycheck?
Stop the cycle! No CDL?
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training w/Roadmaster!
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Help Wanted WOOD
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mile radius of Wauseon,
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Also, Hiring Drivers!
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Direction” OTR Drivers
APU Equipped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass. Pets/Passenger
Policy. Newer equipment.
100% No touch. 1-800-
528-7825.
Instruction Attend College
Online from Home. Medical,
Business, Criminal Justice,
Hospitality. Job Placement
Assistance. Computer
Available. Financial Aid
if Qualified. SCHEV
certified. Call 877-295-
1667. www.CenturaOnline.
com.
Misc. Airlines Are Hiring -
Train for hands on Aviation
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualified - Job Placement
assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance.
877-676-3836.
Misc. CABINS FOR
RENT IN CANADA.
Walleyes, perch,
northerns, birds, wildlife,
pristine nature. Boats,
motors, gas included. Call
Hugh 800-426-2550 for
free brochure. website
www.bestfishing.com
OHIO SCAN NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS
Answer
to
Puzzle
Today’s Crossword
Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Kickback
4 Extremely
8 Crumple
11 Melt
13 Jazzy -- James
14 Iron source
15 One, in Munich
16 Fridge device
18 “Love -- No. 9”
20 Try a case
21 Helium or neon
22 ESPN feature
24 Radiance
27 Stood in line
30 Informal talk
31 Deli sandwich
32 Clock numeral
34 Pixel
35 Change
36 Sure thing
37 Men and women
39 Like some stadi-
ums
40 Wyo. clock setting
41 Install tile
42 Then (2 wds.)
45 Warm-up act
49 Glance off
53 Plump and juicy
54 -- Ray Hutton
55 Drive the getaway
car
56 Lose traction
57 9-digit no.
58 Mrs. Lennon
59 Kind of system
DOWN
1 Dance move
2 Michigan neigh-
bor
3 Struggle for air
4 Places for ore
5 Common abbr.
6 AAA sugg.
7 Candied tuber
8 Roused up
9 Region
10 Earl -- Biggers
12 Pounds
17 At the drop of -- --
19 Feedbag morsel
22 None at all
23 Thumbnail sketch
24 Arith. term
25 Flapjack chain
26 Slalom obstacle
27 Wolf lead-in
28 Quiz
29 Reno rollers
31 Sentry’s command
33 -- be an honor!
35 CEO aides
36 Vestibules
38 Melville novel
39 Skip stones
41 Jackpot game
42 Purple flower
43 Shark giveaways
44 Read
46 Winged goddess
47 DeMille genre
48 Change decor
50 Low reef
51 Cable movie chan-
nel
52 Mouse alert
FIND IT
FAST
in the
CLASSIFIEDS
2B - The Herald Thursday, March 8, 2012 Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Herald – 3B
CONGRATULATIONS
CURTIS
from Jefferson
High School
Bank with the people you know and trust
DELPHOS
230 E. Second St.
(419) 695-1055
MEMBER
FDIC Visit us online: www.first-fed.co
KNIPPEN
CHRYSLER-DODGE-JEEP
800 W. Fifth St. • Delphos, OH 45833
www.knippenchrysler.com
Over 30 years in Business
419-695-4976 or 800-464-8434
Check us out on
our new website
www.spearslawncare.com











Corner of 5
th
& Main St. in Delphos, Ohio
419-695-1060

Congratulations Curtis!!!!!
150 W. Fifth St., Delphos
(corner of Fifth and Canal)
419-692-BACK (2225)
Dr. Jay M. DeWitt 924 E. Fifth St., Delphos 419-695-1632
MARY’S
A&W ROOT BEER
John Odenweller’s
Lion Clothing
Formalwear Headquarters
206 N. Main St.
Phone 419-692-9981
For Weddings
Groomʼs tux
FREE
with party of
5 or more.
234 S. Jefferson St.
Delphos, Ohio
Ph. 419-692-6010
Curtis Miller
State Champion
Delphos Jefferson
CLARA L. HANF, CPA
Financial Advisor
T 419.692.4133 202 N. Main Street
T 800.999.2701 Delphos, OH 45833
F 419.692.2260 clara.hanf@raymondjames.com
www.raymondjames.com/clarahanf
Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC
939 E. Fifth St, Delphos
419-692-2695 (BOWL)
Delphos
Recreation
Center
Proudly Serving the Tri-County Area Since 1869
Delphos Herald
News
419-695-0015 Ext. 134
Fax 419-692-7704
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Advertising
419-695-0015 Ext. 138
Fax 419-692-7116
dhemple@delphosherald.com
405 North Main Street,
Delphos, Ohio
visit our website at:
www.delphosherald.com
The
The UNION BANK Co.
www.theubank.com
114 E. Third St., Delphos
Member FDIC
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ... 419-234-5202
Amie Nungester ............... 419-236-0688
Janet Kroeger .................. 419-236-7894
CONGRATULATIONS CURTIS MILLER!
Krista Schrader ................ 419-233-3737
Jodi Moenter ............ 419-296-9561
Stephanie Clemons .. 419-234-0940
Judy M.W. Bosch ..... 419-230-1983
WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET
CONGRATULATIONS CURTIS!
from your friends at
DELPHOS
TRADING
POST
WE’RE AN ANYTHING
YOU NEED STORE!!
528 N.Washington St., Delphos
419-692-0044
•MAN CAVE ITEMS
•WOMEN’S
JEWELRY
•NAME BRAND
TOOLS
WE BUY
GOLD & SILVER
•DVDs, •GAMES,
•CONSOLES •MUCH MORE!
PRICES HARD
TO BEAT!
DISCOUNT PRICES DAILY!
More value for your buying $$.
Large enough to serve you, small enough to know you
www.ottovillebank.com
The Ottoville
Bank Co.
MAIN OFFICE
161 W. Third St.
Ottoville, OH 45876
419-453-3313
LENDING OFFICE
940 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-3313
Michelle Snyder
419-879-3491
John Fisher
419-879-3489
Joe Laudick
419-879-4840
Steve Oren
419-879-3498
Timothy A. Sprague
419-879-3497
Mark Stechschulte
419-879-3493
SuperiorFCU.com
Delphos
485 Moxie Ln.
419-692-3405
OUTPATIENT ~ HOME HEALTH ~ FITNESS
mwrehab@live.com • www.midwestrehab.net
'HOSKRV
3K\VLFDO7KHUDS\
Physical~Occupational~Speech
Therapy Centers
Better, Stronger, Faster!
Van Wert
1196 Westwood Dr.
419-238-3405
Lima
3077 W. Elm St.
419-225-3405
Ada
1200 S. Main St.
419-634-8655
419-695-PEAK (7325)
Stadium Park Office Complex • 333 North Street
Delphos, OH
Email: peak24hrfitness@aol.com
Phone: 419-692-8055
Fax: 419-692-8065
209 W. Third St., Delphos, OH 45833
Harter and Schier
Funeral Home
“Locally Owned and Operated”
NATIONAL
LIME & STONE COMPANY
SINCE 1903
419-692-0931
Locations in:
Delphos, Rimer, Buckland
Health Care and Rehabilitation Center
Independent Plus
and Assisted Living Apartments
VANCREST
1425 East Fifth Street, Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-695-2871
www.vancrest.com
306 N. Main St. • Delphos
(419) 692-2207
“Dreams Happen Here Everyday”
Gary Suever, Agent
An Independent Associate Representing Aflac
PO Box 225 • Delphos, Ohio 45833
419.692.1030 office • 419.303.9510 cell
419.692.1030 fax
gary_suever@us.aflac.com aflac.com
Delphos II
24086 State Route 697, P.O. Box 393
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Phone: 419-692-6022
FAX: 419-692-8058
Toledo Molding & Die, Inc.
12805 W. State Rd.
Delphos, Oh 45833
419-692-2624
W
C
WOOD
CREATIONS
CUSTOM CABINETRY &
INTERIOR DOORS & TRIM
Mark Wurst, owner
• Cabinetry • Woodworking • Laminate Flooring
• Hardwood Flooring
For Remodeling Or New Construction
• Interior Doors & Trim
Complete Finishing & Installation
by Delphos Discount • East of St. John’s •
Open 5 a.m.-9 p.m.
662 Elida Ave.,
Delphos
419-692-0007
The Delphos Tri-County Wrestling Club says ...
CONGRATULATIONS
CURTIS MILLER
FROM ALL THE CURRENT
TRI-COUNTY WRESTLERS!
Grothouse Plumbing & Heating, Inc.
901 S. Main Street, Delphos
419-695-3081
grotph@wcoil.com
HVAC/Refrig/Hydronics Lic#25576
Plumbing Lic # 14379
Plumbing • Heating • A/C • Sewers
Septic Tanks • Water Treatment • Geothermal
Restaurant Equipment Parts & Service
CONGRATULATIONS
TO ALL STATE QUALIFYING WRESTLERS
We’re On Your Side!
Gilden Insurance Agency
403 North Main Street
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Phone 419-695-4656 or
1-800-234-9899
email: gildenj@nationwide.com
217 N. Market Street
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone 419-238-6580
On Your Side
®
NATIONWIDE
INSURANCE
Nationwide Mutual Insurance
Company and Affiliated Companies
Home Office: Columbus, OH
43215-2220 MISC22 11/00
Since 1928
STOP IN AT
ONE OF OUR
3 LOCATIONS
• EAST • WEST
• DOWNTOWN
K
TIRE
4
226 S. Pierce St.
Delphos
419-692-2034
Martin Auto Service
Tim Martin
Martin
Auto
Service
567 204 8209
7442 Bliss Road
Elida, Ohio 45807
www.blissful-bride.com • delphosblissfulbride@yahoo.com
Congratulations Curtis!
Delphos
Hardware
242 N. Main St. Ph. 419-692-0921
Mon.-Fri. 8-7:30; Sat. 8-5
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — In wrestling, as in any sport, to get to the
heights of the sport, one must be talented, lucky and healthy,
with the last two more a function of hard work than chance.
Plus, he had the previous example of his older brother,
Stuart, winning a state title just three years before.
That is what Jefferson senior Curtis Miller had going for
him as he celebrates his 220-pound Division III state cham-
pionship.
“It felt good to have my hand raised after winning the title
Saturday, as well as a sense of relief. It was a great feeling
to finally accomplish what I had set out to do,” Miller noted.
“There was pressure. One, because I had qualified the year
before but couldn’t wrestle. There was that concern from oth-
ers that I had to stay healthy and get back down there. I was
confident I would and I worked hard all year to make sure of
that; that was my motivation — last year and that bad luck.”
That was after qualifying to state as a sophomore but not
placing.
As with his older brother, Stuart, who claimed the 215-
pound title in 2009, he had to wait after the impressive Parade
of Champions.
“Actually, it wasn’t too bad to wait. That is, until I was
called to the warm-up room; then the nerves started to hit me,”
Miller acknowledged. “Fortunately, I was able to calm my
nerves, go out there and wrestle my style.”
He had a different perspective as a freshman while watch-
ing Stuart win his title in 2009, his senior campaign.
“I was pretty nervous then; I remember constantly getting
up and down in my seat. I can imagine he went through the
same thing this year watching me,” he continued. “His match
was a dominant one, while my match was a lot closer. Still we
came out on top.
“I had a lot of support during this whole thing. I was con-
fident because of that: coaches, family, teammates, even oth-
ers. I wanted to be dominant all year and for the most part, I
was.”
As for his immediate future, that means healing up a sore
shoulder before getting ready for the upcoming baseball sea-
son.
“Beyond that, I am leaning more toward playing football in
college. Saturday’s match then would be my final match ever,”
he added. “I am open to the possibility of wrestling in college
should the right offer come along that matches what I want
and need. I will wait and see there.”
First-year Jefferson head coach Mike Wilson was happy to
go along for the ride.
“I wish I had coached him all four years. That would have
been great for me,” Wilson noted. “Curtis deserves everything
he’s gotten over the years. He has worked hard to get to this
point.”
Wilson also credited the family aspect of the success.
“Stuart won his title. It’s in the blood,” Wilson added. “All
you had to do was watch the emotion that Stuart, his dad
(Scott) and mom (Cammy) had to see how much this meant to
them. This is what they wanted to accomplish all along.
“One thing that I noticed that Curtis did well — perhaps the
key to his success — was he never got caught out of position;
he was always in the right spot, even when he was shooting.
That is why I was never worried about him during the finals.
“Again, that is a function of his work ethic and how much
time he put in.”
Miller finished at 56-0 this campaign and 167-11 for his
four seasons.
It’s all in the family
C
o
n
g
r
a
t
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
s
C
u
r
t
i
s
Photos courtesy of June Orr & Linda Cermule
2B - The Herald Thursday, March 8, 2012 Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Herald – 3B
CONGRATULATIONS
CURTIS
from Jefferson
High School
Bank with the people you know and trust
DELPHOS
230 E. Second St.
(419) 695-1055
MEMBER
FDIC Visit us online: www.first-fed.co
KNIPPEN
CHRYSLER-DODGE-JEEP
800 W. Fifth St. • Delphos, OH 45833
www.knippenchrysler.com
Over 30 years in Business
419-695-4976 or 800-464-8434
Check us out on
our new website
www.spearslawncare.com











Corner of 5
th
& Main St. in Delphos, Ohio
419-695-1060

Congratulations Curtis!!!!!
150 W. Fifth St., Delphos
(corner of Fifth and Canal)
419-692-BACK (2225)
Dr. Jay M. DeWitt 924 E. Fifth St., Delphos 419-695-1632
MARY’S
A&W ROOT BEER
John Odenweller’s
Lion Clothing
Formalwear Headquarters
206 N. Main St.
Phone 419-692-9981
For Weddings
Groomʼs tux
FREE
with party of
5 or more.
234 S. Jefferson St.
Delphos, Ohio
Ph. 419-692-6010
Curtis Miller
State Champion
Delphos Jefferson
CLARA L. HANF, CPA
Financial Advisor
T 419.692.4133 202 N. Main Street
T 800.999.2701 Delphos, OH 45833
F 419.692.2260 clara.hanf@raymondjames.com
www.raymondjames.com/clarahanf
Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC
939 E. Fifth St, Delphos
419-692-2695 (BOWL)
Delphos
Recreation
Center
Proudly Serving the Tri-County Area Since 1869
Delphos Herald
News
419-695-0015 Ext. 134
Fax 419-692-7704
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Advertising
419-695-0015 Ext. 138
Fax 419-692-7116
dhemple@delphosherald.com
405 North Main Street,
Delphos, Ohio
visit our website at:
www.delphosherald.com
The
The UNION BANK Co.
www.theubank.com
114 E. Third St., Delphos
Member FDIC
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ... 419-234-5202
Amie Nungester ............... 419-236-0688
Janet Kroeger .................. 419-236-7894
CONGRATULATIONS CURTIS MILLER!
Krista Schrader ................ 419-233-3737
Jodi Moenter ............ 419-296-9561
Stephanie Clemons .. 419-234-0940
Judy M.W. Bosch ..... 419-230-1983
WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET
CONGRATULATIONS CURTIS!
from your friends at
DELPHOS
TRADING
POST
WE’RE AN ANYTHING
YOU NEED STORE!!
528 N.Washington St., Delphos
419-692-0044
•MAN CAVE ITEMS
•WOMEN’S
JEWELRY
•NAME BRAND
TOOLS
WE BUY
GOLD & SILVER
•DVDs, •GAMES,
•CONSOLES •MUCH MORE!
PRICES HARD
TO BEAT!
DISCOUNT PRICES DAILY!
More value for your buying $$.
Large enough to serve you, small enough to know you
www.ottovillebank.com
The Ottoville
Bank Co.
MAIN OFFICE
161 W. Third St.
Ottoville, OH 45876
419-453-3313
LENDING OFFICE
940 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-3313
Michelle Snyder
419-879-3491
John Fisher
419-879-3489
Joe Laudick
419-879-4840
Steve Oren
419-879-3498
Timothy A. Sprague
419-879-3497
Mark Stechschulte
419-879-3493
SuperiorFCU.com
Delphos
485 Moxie Ln.
419-692-3405
OUTPATIENT ~ HOME HEALTH ~ FITNESS
mwrehab@live.com • www.midwestrehab.net
'HOSKRV
3K\VLFDO7KHUDS\
Physical~Occupational~Speech
Therapy Centers
Better, Stronger, Faster!
Van Wert
1196 Westwood Dr.
419-238-3405
Lima
3077 W. Elm St.
419-225-3405
Ada
1200 S. Main St.
419-634-8655
419-695-PEAK (7325)
Stadium Park Office Complex • 333 North Street
Delphos, OH
Email: peak24hrfitness@aol.com
Phone: 419-692-8055
Fax: 419-692-8065
209 W. Third St., Delphos, OH 45833
Harter and Schier
Funeral Home
“Locally Owned and Operated”
NATIONAL
LIME & STONE COMPANY
SINCE 1903
419-692-0931
Locations in:
Delphos, Rimer, Buckland
Health Care and Rehabilitation Center
Independent Plus
and Assisted Living Apartments
VANCREST
1425 East Fifth Street, Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-695-2871
www.vancrest.com
306 N. Main St. • Delphos
(419) 692-2207
“Dreams Happen Here Everyday”
Gary Suever, Agent
An Independent Associate Representing Aflac
PO Box 225 • Delphos, Ohio 45833
419.692.1030 office • 419.303.9510 cell
419.692.1030 fax
gary_suever@us.aflac.com aflac.com
Delphos II
24086 State Route 697, P.O. Box 393
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Phone: 419-692-6022
FAX: 419-692-8058
Toledo Molding & Die, Inc.
12805 W. State Rd.
Delphos, Oh 45833
419-692-2624
W
C
WOOD
CREATIONS
CUSTOM CABINETRY &
INTERIOR DOORS & TRIM
Mark Wurst, owner
• Cabinetry • Woodworking • Laminate Flooring
• Hardwood Flooring
For Remodeling Or New Construction
• Interior Doors & Trim
Complete Finishing & Installation
by Delphos Discount • East of St. John’s •
Open 5 a.m.-9 p.m.
662 Elida Ave.,
Delphos
419-692-0007
The Delphos Tri-County Wrestling Club says ...
CONGRATULATIONS
CURTIS MILLER
FROM ALL THE CURRENT
TRI-COUNTY WRESTLERS!
Grothouse Plumbing & Heating, Inc.
901 S. Main Street, Delphos
419-695-3081
grotph@wcoil.com
HVAC/Refrig/Hydronics Lic#25576
Plumbing Lic # 14379
Plumbing • Heating • A/C • Sewers
Septic Tanks • Water Treatment • Geothermal
Restaurant Equipment Parts & Service
CONGRATULATIONS
TO ALL STATE QUALIFYING WRESTLERS
We’re On Your Side!
Gilden Insurance Agency
403 North Main Street
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Phone 419-695-4656 or
1-800-234-9899
email: gildenj@nationwide.com
217 N. Market Street
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone 419-238-6580
On Your Side
®
NATIONWIDE
INSURANCE
Nationwide Mutual Insurance
Company and Affiliated Companies
Home Office: Columbus, OH
43215-2220 MISC22 11/00
Since 1928
STOP IN AT
ONE OF OUR
3 LOCATIONS
• EAST • WEST
• DOWNTOWN
K
TIRE
4
226 S. Pierce St.
Delphos
419-692-2034
Martin Auto Service
Tim Martin
Martin
Auto
Service
567 204 8209
7442 Bliss Road
Elida, Ohio 45807
www.blissful-bride.com • delphosblissfulbride@yahoo.com
Congratulations Curtis!
Delphos
Hardware
242 N. Main St. Ph. 419-692-0921
Mon.-Fri. 8-7:30; Sat. 8-5
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — In wrestling, as in any sport, to get to the
heights of the sport, one must be talented, lucky and healthy,
with the last two more a function of hard work than chance.
Plus, he had the previous example of his older brother,
Stuart, winning a state title just three years before.
That is what Jefferson senior Curtis Miller had going for
him as he celebrates his 220-pound Division III state cham-
pionship.
“It felt good to have my hand raised after winning the title
Saturday, as well as a sense of relief. It was a great feeling
to finally accomplish what I had set out to do,” Miller noted.
“There was pressure. One, because I had qualified the year
before but couldn’t wrestle. There was that concern from oth-
ers that I had to stay healthy and get back down there. I was
confident I would and I worked hard all year to make sure of
that; that was my motivation — last year and that bad luck.”
That was after qualifying to state as a sophomore but not
placing.
As with his older brother, Stuart, who claimed the 215-
pound title in 2009, he had to wait after the impressive Parade
of Champions.
“Actually, it wasn’t too bad to wait. That is, until I was
called to the warm-up room; then the nerves started to hit me,”
Miller acknowledged. “Fortunately, I was able to calm my
nerves, go out there and wrestle my style.”
He had a different perspective as a freshman while watch-
ing Stuart win his title in 2009, his senior campaign.
“I was pretty nervous then; I remember constantly getting
up and down in my seat. I can imagine he went through the
same thing this year watching me,” he continued. “His match
was a dominant one, while my match was a lot closer. Still we
came out on top.
“I had a lot of support during this whole thing. I was con-
fident because of that: coaches, family, teammates, even oth-
ers. I wanted to be dominant all year and for the most part, I
was.”
As for his immediate future, that means healing up a sore
shoulder before getting ready for the upcoming baseball sea-
son.
“Beyond that, I am leaning more toward playing football in
college. Saturday’s match then would be my final match ever,”
he added. “I am open to the possibility of wrestling in college
should the right offer come along that matches what I want
and need. I will wait and see there.”
First-year Jefferson head coach Mike Wilson was happy to
go along for the ride.
“I wish I had coached him all four years. That would have
been great for me,” Wilson noted. “Curtis deserves everything
he’s gotten over the years. He has worked hard to get to this
point.”
Wilson also credited the family aspect of the success.
“Stuart won his title. It’s in the blood,” Wilson added. “All
you had to do was watch the emotion that Stuart, his dad
(Scott) and mom (Cammy) had to see how much this meant to
them. This is what they wanted to accomplish all along.
“One thing that I noticed that Curtis did well — perhaps the
key to his success — was he never got caught out of position;
he was always in the right spot, even when he was shooting.
That is why I was never worried about him during the finals.
“Again, that is a function of his work ethic and how much
time he put in.”
Miller finished at 56-0 this campaign and 167-11 for his
four seasons.
It’s all in the family
C
o
n
g
r
a
t
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
s
C
u
r
t
i
s
Photos courtesy of June Orr & Linda Cermule
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday Evening March 8, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
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4B - The Herald Thursday, March 8, 2012
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Friend belittles
husband in
public
Dear Annie: My best
friend, “Maggie,” and I are
like sisters. We have great
fun, can talk about nearly
anything and have supported
each other through our tough-
est times. Our husbands also
get along well, and we often
do things together.
Over the past year, Maggie
has become
increasingly criti-
cal of her husband,
“Scott.” He is a
likeable guy, but
Maggie scolds and
picks on him, rolls
her eyes and basi-
cally treats him
with contempt.
Granted, Scott can
be a little blunt,
and his attempts
at humor don’t
always succeed,
but her responses are worse.
She will say, “You’re such
an idiot. Why don’t you just
keep your mouth shut?” Yet,
the next minute, they will
have their arms around each
other.
We often see Maggie and
Scott at parties, and it is clear
that others feel embarrassed
by this behavior. Maggie
has never mentioned marital
problems to me. In fact, she
says sweet and complimen-
tary things about Scott when
it’s just the two of us. I don’t
want to jeopardize our ter-
rific friendship, so how do I
approach this subject? She
doesn’t take criticism well,
no matter how gentle. --
Baffled Friend
Dear Baffled: Some mar-
ried couples fall into the habit
of letting criticisms become
common and public. We
think Maggie might sim-
ply need a little push in the
right direction. The next time
she says or does something
critical of Scott, you might
take her aside and say, “Are
you angry with Scott? You
seem to dislike him so much
lately.” You also could give
positive reinforcement when
you witness affection, add-
ing, “It’s so nice to see you
two getting along.”
Dear Annie: I’ve been
asked to be the maid-of-hon-
or for a friend. I was planning
to throw a bridal shower with
10 to 15 guests at my apart-
ment. I had a nice luncheon-
type party in mind.
The other day, my friend
informed me that she wants
to invite 65 guests and, since
my apartment is too small
for that crowd, said I should
host it at a local restaurant.
I checked with the venue,
and it is way too pricey for
my budget. Even if I involve
the other two bridesmaids,
this will be a much bigger
expense than I can afford.
Are there rules when it
comes to bridal shower guest
lists? I don’t want to hurt her
feelings or lose her friend-
ship, but combined with the
expense of the dress, shoes,
hair and bachelorette party, I
may need to take out a loan.
How can I handle this? After
all, it’s her wedding. -- Soon
To Be Poor Maid of Honor
Dear Maid: The bride is
allowed to give you the guest
list, but she must keep to
the hostess’s limit.
When you told her
you would give a
shower for 15 peo-
ple, she should have
kept the guest list
at 15. It is incon-
siderate of a bride
to force anyone to
shell out more than
they can afford for
a shower. We rec-
ommend you tell
her “so sorry,” this
isn’t in your bud-
get, and you will have to
decline as hostess, but that
you would be happy to give
a smaller event in your apart-
ment for 15 guests. We don’t
care if it’s her wedding. It
doesn’t entitle her to become
Bridezilla.
Dear Annie: Your
response to “Stuck in the
Middle” was spot on. It’s
never too late to learn good
fiscal behavior, but it’s never
too early, either. America’s
Credit Unions sponsors a
public television series called
“Biz Kid$” that teaches
young people the impor-
tance of good money man-
agement and business skills
they can use for life. With a
website of resources and a
free curriculum that teach-
ers and parents can access,
“Biz Kid$” teaches kids that
being fiscally responsible can
be fun. Will you tell them,
Annie? -- Jamie Hammond,
Executive Producer
Dear Jamie Hammond:
With pleasure. We hope our
readers, young and old, will
check out Biz Kid$ at biz-
kids.com.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 2012
You’re likely to form two new
alliances in the year ahead, both
of which you’ll be able to rely on.
Although each will be totally different
from the other and formed for different
reasons, both will be successful
relationships.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Even if you’re usually pragmatic
when it comes to the management
of your resources, today might be
an exception. Unfortunately, you
could yield to powerful, impractical
inclinations.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- If you are especially bewitched by
a certain product, you might not be
able to distinguish between a good
deal and a bad one. Take some time to
check out its true worth, and don’t be
fooled by the razzle-dazzle.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- It’s good to be optimistic and
hopeful, but be sure your thinking is
grounded in realism as well. If your
thoughts are founded upon illusions,
disappointment is probable.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If
a certain clique you’ve been hanging
out with contains a few members who
think they are superior to other people,
you might want to take some time to
reconsider your involvement.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- You should take care that you
don’t lower your standards if you
find yourself hanging out with a few
people who seem to be operating on
a substandard level. If you sense this,
excuse yourself immediately.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Although normally you’re a pretty
easy person to get along with, there are
times that you can be contrary. If you
find you are challenging everything
that others say or do, get a grip.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
There are certain hot spots pertaining
to your material affairs that need to
be handled with asbestos gloves. Be
particularly cautious when it comes to
any financial dealings.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Keep
in mind that what may be important to
you might not be of equal significance
to your associates. Face the facts and
you won’t get caught off guard.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- It
behooves you to pay closer attention
than usual to assignments or tasks that
you consider to be unpleasant. When
we resist doing something, there is
greater risk of blowing the job.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- If you find that someone in your
group is doing something that you
consider to be dishonest or stupid,
back away quietly, without making a
huge fuss.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Try to be open-minded and
forgiving if there is someone in your
household who is acting rebellious. If
you respond in kind and make waves,
the storm will only linger longer.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Be above it all and don’t take it
personally if every suggestion you
make is rejected or put down. There
is nothing wrong with your ideas, it’s
just that others will be promoting their
own.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.

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