Satanism In New Zealand

An exploration of Satanism and Black Magick in Aotearoa

Satanism - In New Zealand!?!
By satanismnz

Yesterday I came across a news item today (syndicated across numerous web based news services). It said Thesis on Neo-Nazism pulled by university. It relates to a Masters Degree thesis by philosophy and religious studies student Roel Van Leeuwen and is titled ‘Dreamers of the Dark: Kerry Bolton and the Order of the Left Hand Path, a Case-study of a Satanic/Neo Nazi Synthesis’. Some chatter on the net asks if this removal is Academic Freedom? Well it is too early to tell exactly why Waikato University removed the thesis, as according to the news reports both the thesis’ author and his University Supervisor weren’t even notified that the thesis would be removed. It just happened. It is hoped that the thesis will be back in the library soon, so then maybe the public can read the thesis and make up their own minds as to what is going on. According to the Waikato Times the “[The university's student newspaper, Nexus,] said it established that no legal threat had been received against either Mr Van Leeuwen or the University of Waikato. Rather, the thesis was the subject of a mere complaint…” However 3News writes that “Waikato University is surprised it has been threatened with legal action over a well-regarded thesis exploring a neo-Nazi group.” It appears that a complaint from Kerry Bolton, who is the subject of the thesis, has lead to it being removed. So what is this synthesis “Satanic/Neo Nazi” ideologies? The Wikipedia entry for Neo-Nazism states: “The term neo-Nazism refers to postWorld War II political movements, social movements, and ideologies seeking to revive Nazism, or some variant that echos core aspects of Nazism such as racial or ethnic nationalism or Völkisch integralism.” According to Wikipedia, Satanism “can refer to a number of belief systems depending on the user and context. The word, in basic context, can refer to the worship of the Christian devil, thus being a Christian denomination, the Occult/Ritual Magic, and the left hand path belief system founded by Anton LaVey. It is often the practice of any given Satanist not to refer to themselves with a hyphenated prefix. Each “type” of Satanist will usually refer to themselves only as Satanists.” The alt.satanism FAQ states that: “Throughout history, the label of ‘Satanism’ has been applied variably by the opposing religious factions, by the practitioners

themselves, by historical revisionists some time later, and by combinations of the above. This document will focus on active modern forms of self-proclaimed Satanism, and modern religious groups of undeniably dark character. It should be considered that since dark and/or forbidden gods exist in many cultures other than European-descended Christianity, forms of Satanism other than those familiar to English-speakers do exist and in some cases flouris … The one unifying theme among the Satanisms is the last of the three dictionary definitions; one can say with some certainty that all Satanisms and Satanists have diabolical or satanic dispositions in that they are ‘like Satan.’ They possess the virtues of antinomianism, self-reliance, rebellion and adversarialism.” There is no immediate grounds for seeing some global conspiracy linking Satanists and Neo-Nazis. However I have come across some interesting search results which I will post in a further entry. The New Zealand Census figures show how widespread Satanism is in New Zealand (not very!) but of course there is no indication of political affiliations. The Religious Affiliation statistics from the past three census nights show that in 1996 there were 909 individuals listing their religion as Satanism, dropping to 894 in 2001, and growing to 1,167 in 2006. Satanism is listed in the New Zealand census under Spiritualism and New Age Religions. The number of people listing their religion within this category has increased dramatically over the past decade. In 1996 there were 9,786 people in this grouping, growing to 16,062 in 1996 and up to 19,800 in 2006. The 2006 Census figures certainly show a European majority in Spiritualism and New Age Religions with 14,373 being identified as European, 4,026 identified only as New Zealander, and 2,946 as Maori (the other ethnicities all being well under 1,000 individuals). While it would seem that Satanism is alive and well in New Zealand it is not possible to know how many of those listing themselves as Satanists have any real active interests in this religion and how many put it down for a joke or reason known only to them. Here is a recorded interview with those involved, from the Radio New Zealand website: University of Waikato Thesis Removed From Website. “A former secretary of the National Front says it’s fraught with errors in its research and analysis. (duration: 3′43″)” Breaking news stories about this topics can be found here: http://news.google.co.nz/news?q=Roel+van+Leeuwen+thesis Yahoo Group from Australian and New Zealand Satanists: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AustralianSatanists/ Tags: Roel van Leeuwen, Waikato University, Kerry Bolton, Satanism, neo-Nazism

This entry was posted on October 7, 2008 at 8:48 am and is filed under Satanism in New Zealand. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Apparently there are Satanists in New Zealand
By satanismnz

In his book Islands of the Dawn, Robert S. Ellwood writes: “Apparently there are Satanists in New Zealand. I have heard rumors of a Satanist church in Eastbourne, and a motorcycle gang, Satan’s Slaves, was in the news in 1988. The 1986 census reported 186 self-professed Satanists (165 males and 21 females), a category unreported in previous cenuses. Although some of the responses may have been frivolous, it could well be the case that in 1986, for the first time, there were scores of New Zealanders, mostly male, who seriously thought of themselves as worshippers of he whom the dominant faith considers the antagonist of God and of all that is good. I was able to learn nothing about these people. But they must not be confused with those who are merely followers of what they account the old religion revived.” Statistics from Adherents.com suggest that the census results for 1986 may have listed 240 listing the source as a no defunct website VisionNet. On this page something more interesting caught my eye: Satanism, United Kingdom, 5,500,000 individuals, 10.00% of the population. Source: Harvey, G. “Satanism in Britain Today ” in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 3, October 1995; pg. 284. The quoted listed beside this figure puts it into some perspective: “It has been alleged that 10 per cent of the population of Britain are Satanists (that is about five and a half million people) and that at least one (unnamed) member of the Royal Family is a Satanist (Jim Phillips, in Thomas, 1993)… Logan calls Phillips’ claim ‘outlandish’… There are alleged to be Satanists in every profession, social class, age group, interest group, and in every other division and subdivision of British society. Most spiritual traditions other than evangelical Christianity have been accused of being Satanic either in inspiration or in practice. Not only is feminism ‘Satanic’ but some seemingly quiet ‘unliberated’ housewives are alleged to be Satanists. People whose grandmothers read horoscopes in their newspapers, even casually, may be possessed by Satan. Children who play with Carebears or read C.S. Lewis’s Narnia tales are in the company of those who play their heavy-metal records backwards to hear Satanic messages.” This is a good example of a researcher fitting the facts around a preconceived conclusion about what exactly constitutes Satanism. Going by this “10%” rule we would currently have around 400,000 Satanists in New Zealand! We don’t have a Royal Family in New Zealand, but perhaps this would mean that at least one (unnamed) member of Parliament is a Satanist??? Satan’s Excellent Adventure in the Antipodes (New Zealand) by Michael Hill, Professor of Sociology, Victoria University of Wellington has a fascinating history of a ’satanic panic’ as it spread from overseas to New Zealand. An extract from his well researched article follows:

“In the latter part of the 1980s, first in Australia and subsequently in New Zealand, there was a mounting panic about alleged satanic activity. The activities that were claimed to be performed by satanic cults involved horrifying rituals in which children were said to be sexually abused, tortured, murdered, cannibalised, and even bred for use in these gothic practices. Belief in the existence of such cults spread not only among Christian fundamentalists but also among secular professionals, especially those involved in social work and counselling. To date there is no physical corroboration of the atrocities allegedly perpetrated by these satanists. What I hope to do in this paper is to show how these claims originated and how they were disseminated in this part of the world. To do this I need to examine the role played by a key network of American claims-makers who brought the Satanic Ritual Abuse (SRA) scenario to Australia, and later to New Zealand: I will examine the contorted logic that often accompanied the claims. Then I will show how local ‘experts’ took the scenario further, sometimes with disturbing results.” “I will preface this account with two important qualifiers. First, there is no intention in what follows to question the existence of child abuse, which has been increasingly recognised as a problem of considerable proportions since the recognition of a ‘battered child syndrome’ in 1962 (Best, 1990). Quite the contrary, my concern over alleged SRA is partly motivated by concern that the pursuit of a mythical form of child abuse diverts resources from the genuine cases. Second, there is no disputing the existence of people who label themselves satanists: there were just over 900 of them in the 1996 New Zealand census. But as Jean La Fontaine points out in her study of the British allegations, published this year, ‘the existence of satanists does not prove that they abuse children in these rituals; it merely means that care must constantly be taken to emphasise that the actual practices of occultists, witches and satanists are different from what is being recounted as satanic abuse’ (La Fontaine, 1998:41). Her own work (La Fontaine, 1994; 1998), the firm conclusions of an FBI specialist in sexual abuse (Lanning, 1992), and the results of a very large study in the United States (Goodman, 1994) all amount to the same result: ‘no bodies, no bones, no bloodstains, nothing’ (Waterhouse 1990).” Of course, those wishing to discredit the research of people can easily smear them with the label of Satanist or accuse them of being an apologetic or Satanist sympathizer. However, the sources of information are there for examination, and if anyone can produce evidence that shows either “bodies, bones, and bloodstains” or a coverup at the highest levels then let them put forward their evidence. It seems that often those claiming outrageous occurrences or smearing individuals don’t require facts, and others are happy to take up the claims and turn it in to somewhat of an industry. It is worrying to note that this SRA hoax was brought to New Zealand, and given credibility at the expense of genuine victims of child abuse. Now, if 10% of the population are Satanists, or even if only a little more then 1,000 there are possibly a number who are child abusers also. However, as more of the population in New Zealand identify with the Christian faith, then there will likely be more child abusers who are Christian than there are child abusers who are Satanists or other religions. It was only recently that Graeme Capill, former leader of Christian Heritage Party was found guilty of multiple sex offences against girls under the age of 12 years of age. Tags: New Zealand, Satanism

This entry was posted on October 8, 2008 at 5:32 am and is filed under Satanism in New Zealand. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Article That Alerted The World
By satanismnz

I am guessing that the online article Waikato Uni pulls thesis after ‘neo-Nazi Satanist’ complaints by Joshua Drummond is the same article that appeared in Nexus. Being that they are from Waikato University I am sure they will have been lucky enough to see this “first-class piece of work”, given that it was published electronically and Roel van Leeuwen will likely have sent them a copy so they have the facts to work with. Van Leeuen is quoted as saying, “I unequivocally stand by my thesis. There is nothing at all in there that’s defamatory in any way to Bolton.” Unfortunately the rest of us are at present unable to view the thesis to make up our own minds on whether this thesis is defamatory in any way. It would seem very unlikely that the University of Waikato would have allowed a thesis to be published that is defamatory or even highly questionable. The University’s Code of Ethics for Academic Staff lists the following guidelines for Academic Staff as Teachers and Supervisors of Students which I would imagine are relevant to the production of such a thesis:
• •

• • •

* develop and maintain expertise in areas in which they teach; develop assessment procedures that are fair and effective and that contribute to student learning, and administer them in a fair and efficient manner, and provide timely and constructive feedback to students; ensure that they are familiar with current University degree and other regulations relating to their teaching and assessment procedures; continually seek to improve their teaching effectiveness on the basis of all available information about their performance and its impact on students; where appropriate, provide suitable advice and assistance to former students in their academic and professional development;

Although the University supervisors are not responsible for the student’s thesis per se, they do uphold the following ethics:
• • • • •

treat other researchers and research subjects with respect at all times; seek to develop new understanding of their areas of expertise, both for the increase of knowledge for its own sake and for the wider public interest; scrupulously acknowledge the contributions that others have made towards their research and scholarship, especially colleagues and students; accept an obligation to disseminate the results of their research through publication, conference presentations, and in other appropriate ways; comply with the standards and ethics of their own professional societies, and with nationally and internationally accepted standards.

It can therefore be take as a given that all University of Waikato staff will act with great integrity to ensure that a student’s research is accurate. It is therefore surprising that the University would withdraw a thesis that had been supervised by someone with such high standards in supervision and research. Students themselves will be familiar with Ethical Conduct in Human Research and Related Activities Regulations. The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences has a Handbook on Ethical Conduct in Research. Anything that the student, supervisor or University think may be covered under their codes of ethics will likely be brought before the Human Research Ethics Committee. According to this Handbook “Oversight and monitoring of postgraduate policies, standards and procedures, is the responsibility of the Postgraduate Studies Committee.” It is therefore unthinkable that this thesis could contain anything defamatory. But… and a big but… Mr Bolton’s website alleges that Mr van Leeuwen offered to change, and eventually did change, the thesis as it was offered online. Without access to the “original” and the supposedly “edited” thesis it is impossible to know if this is true or not. It certainly seems unlikely and would seem to fit in with Mr Bolton’s claim of a “Zionist Conspiracy”, as why would a reputable New Zealand University allow a thesis to be edited after it has been awarded top marks? I am surprised that news media hasn’t asked the University or author if it is correct that the thesis was edited to removed supposedly defamatory comments as if this was true it would seem to contradict the Mr van Leeuwen’s: “I unequivocally stand by my thesis. There is nothing at all in there that’s defamatory in any way to Bolton.” Perhaps we can expect a counter-claim from Mr van Leeuwen and his supervisor Dov Bing to prove that it is a lie that anything was edited, as there was nothing defamatory to be removed? And, how could a published thesis be so easily edited? I must say I am skeptical of this. Tags: Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 8, 2008 at 10:44 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Plot Thickens
By satanismnz

While investigating these bizarre claims I found a link to a video on YouTube. It claims to show a small extract from the thesis that has been edited. Unfortunately due to the poor quality of the video it is not easy to verify exactly where in the thesis this was, or if it was even genuinely the thesis in question. It seems strange that someone has gone to the effort to show an edit in a thesis which the author claims is accurate

and contains nothing defamatory. I’m sure this allegation will be easy to disprove once the thesis is put back online. Of course, there is already an alleged letter from Mr van Leeuwen on Kerry Bolton’s website that states: “The passage you have objected to on page 30 has been deleted as you requested.” If this letter is genuine, then what can be made of the statement by Mr van Leeuwen that “I unequivocally stand by my thesis. There is nothing at all in there that’s defamatory in any way to Bolton.” Does it mean that after the removal of information from this page 30 that the thesis no longer contains defamatory statements, which would indicate a breach of ethics and call into question not just Mr van Leeuwen but his supervisors, the University of Waikato, and the external assessors. If there was nothing defamatory about the statements from page 30, and Mr Van Leeuwen stands by his thesis, why was it removed? This seems a rather unusual step. From my understanding of academic processes, editing an already approved and accepted thesis is a serious ethical issue and would only happen under extreme circumstances. It would be more likely an embargo would be placed upon it, or it would be withdrawn (and the degree revoked) if it breached the Code of Ethics. This seems to be an incredibly bizarre set of circumstances. It comes hot on the heels of a claim that Kiwi degrees ‘worth less’. Although it is a typical media stunt to grab headlines (obviously implying that Kiwi degrees are worthless) it will be a huge embarassment to the University to be hitting the headlines over removing a thesis from what media sources suggest is a mere complaint. Tags: Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 8, 2008 at 2:57 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Raiders of the Lost Thesis
By satanismnz

The thesis has returned to online viewing. Someone has uploaded what is claimed to be copies of the original thesis and the edited version. At very first glance they appear to be the same, but I will read through and find out what all the fuss is about. Tags: Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 8, 2008 at 8:06 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

A revealing confession by the University
By satanismnz

A comment on the news blog of The Chronicle of Higher Education makes some interesting observations: “… this is a revealing confession by the University of its lack of confidence in its own standards of evaluation. If the thesis was inaccurate, defamatory or libellous, Waikato should never have passed it, far less given the author honors for it. If it is of sufficently high quality to earn a Master’s degree, however, the University should stand over it.” - Gustave (Oct 8, 12:14 PM) It is certainly a good point. Does the University really lack confidence in its own standards of evaluation, and those of external assessors? I imagine the University would take the usual course of action and seek legal advice as to whether the thesis contained defamatory comments and would have taken it down on legal advice. What does this say for the assessors at other Universities. I can see a large dark cloud looming over New Zealand Universities, obscuring that beautiful “Long White Cloud”. Tags: Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 8, 2008 at 9:41 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Speculation
By satanismnz

It is interesting to see the wide and wild amount of speculation going on around the internet, both from the news media and also on blogs and blog comments. Today I see that a Media Law Prof Blog has made a posting and is actually linking to the two versions of the thesis. It will be interesting to see if any international or New Zealand legal opinions get offered as to whether the thesis contains slanderous comments. The Chronicle of Higher Education blog is continuing to get some interesting comments: “It is extremely disturbing that the University of Waikato folded in the face of such pressure. This issue should unit in common protest all faculty and students, whatever their political beliefs. The thesis must be returned immediately, and the University should issue an apology to the academic community, one that reaffirms its commitment to scholarly ideals.” - Publius

“Hmmm…don’t see many job or grad school applications from University of Waikato, but I’ll sure not trust a transcript or diploma from that institution…who knows what it might mean?”- perplexed “The points above are well made. Succinctly, if the contents of the thesis are not defensible, it should never have been approved. If they are defensible, there is no excuse for not publishing it intact.” - ap “The thesis has been removed while the complaint is being investigated—ie, it is a temporary measure. This seems a sensible response given the risks involved. The alternative is the university paying thousands of dollars to a Holocaust denier, which I expect most of us would not like to see happen. The fault here lies with whoever supervised this student. They should have realized the dangers involved at the outset, sought relevant advice, and advised the student accordingly. This clearly did not happen.” - Bonzer It is interesting to note that most of those commenting don’t appear to have read the thesis but are making their minds up to support “Academic Freedom” rather than entertain the idea that a “neo-Nazi revisionist” (not his description of himself) could be correct in saying the thesis is heavily flawed. I will start posting some comments on the thesis in the coming days. Tags: Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 9, 2008 at 8:53 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Minimum Standards
By satanismnz

Wikipedia is considered an unacceptable source for students to cite, as there is no real credibility or checks made regarding the accuracy of articles. However, even Wikipedia have a set of minimum standards that contributors and editors are expected to adhere to and work towards. The important pages for bibliographic entries are the regulations on Biographies of living persons and Reliable sources. It would be expected that any institution, such as a prestigious University would have even more rigorous checks to ensure that information used for research projects and theses was as accurate as humanly possible to ascertain. This ensures high standards are set and kept by students and staff alike. Reputations of the University, the staff, and students can be easily damaged should an error in protocols occur. Two important points from Wikipedia are Neutral point of view (NPOV) and Verifiability. NPOV isn’t so important in a theses, as it is certainly possibly to deconstruct an argument, point out the problems and flaws in the logic, and offer an alternative. However, verifiability is critical. Unless you are very clearly stating an opinion (which counts for little in Academic research) or can show clear evidence for

your reasoning at drawing a conclusion the validity of an argument will likely be drawn into question. The reliability of sources for Wikipedia is fairly straight forward and fair: “Wikipedia articles should use reliable, third-party, published sources. Reliable sources are credible published materials with a reliable publication process; their authors are generally regarded as trustworthy or authoritative in relation to the subject at hand. How reliable a source is depends on context. As a rule of thumb, the more people engaged in checking facts, analyzing legal issues, and scrutinizing the writing, the more reliable the publication. Sources should directly support the information as it is presented in an article and should be appropriate to the claims made; if an article topic has no reliable sources, Wikipedia should not have an article on it.“ It could be suggested that for a thesis all sources should also directly support the information being written and that only appropriate claims should be made. Tags: Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 10, 2008 at 4:10 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Notability
By satanismnz

Is such a small group, such as the Order of the Left Hand Path, with such as short existence (about 6 years from what I can find) really considered notable? Wikipedia, the bastions of “free speech” certainly didn’t think so:

The result was delete. - Mailer Diablo 11:41, 7 November 2006 (UTC)

Examples of those against keeping the entry on Wikipedia:
• •

Zines do not establish notability. Leibniz 21:34, 29 October 2006 (UTC) Non-notable. The references provided by Encyclopaedia Editing Dude don’t look to me like ‘mainstream research publications’ (at least, the English ones don’t).

It could be asked, what has Kerry Bolton done that is enduring in legacy? Having articles archived on the internet hardly prove notability, as anyone can post to blogs and web pages and these in turn can be copied and archived on various websites. What political effects has Mr Bolton had in New Zealand? How many seats in parliament has his political parties held? What has been particularly notable that a Masters degree thesis adds to the sum total of knowledge in New Zealand or overseas? Tags: Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, Waikato University

This entry was posted on October 11, 2008 at 7:54 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

About Roel van Leeuwen
By satanismnz

According to the Temple of the Dark Moon page on New Zealand Occult and Academic Fraternities: “Roel van Leeuwen is a graduate student in History, with a particular interest in military history and alternative spiritualities. He is currently working towards his Ph.D. thesis, ‘Child of Earth: the Legacy of Dr Robert Felkin’ and the History of Esoteric Societies in New Zealand. As well as his academic interests, Roel is, or has been, a member of various Orders and Societies in New Zealand since 1987. These include the Builders of the Adytum, SRIA and Order of the Table Round.” According to this page Roel van Leeuwen is a freemason in the Waikato Lodge of Research. In the magazine Inside it states that Roel van Leeuwen was a Kellerman Lecturer. The article New Zealand’s Kellerman Lecturer explains that “The lectures are named after the late RW Bro Harry Kellerman … who was the driving force in getting the Australian Masonic Research Council started in 1992″. Amazon.com has a page entitled Reviews Written by Roel van Leeuwen. These reviews are actually quite insightful. For example, in the review on “The International Encyclopedia of Secret Societies and Fraternal Orders” by Alan Axelrod, Roel van Leeuwen writes that “Arguably, membership in one or a number of fraternal organizations would be a necessary prerequisite before embarking on a work of this nature as fraternal societies are, in most instances, a society apart and thus have their own idiosyncrasies in terminology and approach to matters. Frequently he simply ‘misses the point’.” Could it be that membership in one or a number of Satanic organizations would be a necessary pre-requisite before embarking on a work such as his thesis? If the thesis is accurate, then can we assume by his statement that Roel van Leeuwen was or is a member of one or more Satanic organizations? If not, then has he simply missed the mark? Alas what is not so good is an historian who, when he cannot bend a source to fit his thesis, ignores it. Tags: Roel van Leeuwen
This entry was posted on October 12, 2008 at 12:19 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Satanism and Nazism
By satanismnz

In Lanning’s Guide To Allegations of Childhood Ritul Abuse, Part 4 Kenneth Lanning writes that he has “heard all of the following referred to as satanism: Church of Satan, Ordo Templi Orientis, Temple of Set, Demonology, Witchcraft, Occult, Paganism, Santeria, Voodoo, Rosicrucians, Freemasonry, Knights Templar, Stoner Gangs, Heavy Metal Music, Rock Music, KKK, Nazis, Skinheads, Scientology, Unification Church, The Way, Hare Krishna, Rajneesh, Religious Cults, New Age, Astrology, Channeling, Transcendental Meditation, Holistic Medicine, Buddhism, Hinduism, Mormonism, Islam, Orthodox Church, Roman Catholicism.” This is a mixed bag of philosophies and ideologies where no doubt the followers do not claim to be Satanists themselves. It is interesting to see groups such as KKK, Nazis, and Skinheads listed as Satanists, but of course so are Freemasons (by proxy making Roel van Leeuwen a Satanist by these definitions). However, Lanning provides a typology of Satanism that provides a more practical classification of the types of Satanism. It was “adapted from the investigative experience of Officer Sandi Gallant of the San Francisco Police Department, who began to study the criminal aspects of occult activity long before it became popular.” It lists the following types: The first is “Youth Subculture”. Lanning notes that “Most teenagers involved in fantasy role-playing games, heavy metal music, or satanism and the occult are going through a stage his of adolescent development and commit no significant crimes.” The second is “Dabblers” (Self-Styled). For this type Lanning notes that “for these practitioners there is little or no spiritual motivation. They may mix satanism, witchcraft, paganism, and any aspects of the occult to suit their purposes.” The third type is “Traditional” (Orthodox) Satanists. “These are the so-called true believers. They are often wary of outsiders.” It is interesting to note that there is no mention of mixing Satanism with neo-Nazism at least no specific “type” amongst these three classification types. The alt.satanism FAQ has a slightly more detailed topology: 1. The Dabblers: adopt Satanic trappings for a brief period of time, usually for entertainment rather than serious purposes. 2. Churches of Satan: are patterned after the teachings of Anton LaVey. These groups believe in individualism, gratification of the ego, self-reliance and the ideal of the Nietzchean Superman. 3. Gnostics - Promethean Gnostics: Believe in a literal “Satan”, but believe that the creator of the world (Jehovah) is the evil deity. Satan is seen as the “bringer of light”; a beneficent god. Dark Gnostics: Worship the dark force in nature.

4. Secondary Satanists: follow a faith outside the Christian mainstream. Most would not consider themselves as being “Satanic” and strictly speaking should not be defined as Satanists. 5. Hellfire Clubs: Were a phenomenon of the 18th century, mentioned because of historical relevance to modern Satanisms. 6. Romantic/Promethean Satanists Literary/historical “Satanists” -William Blake, Charles Baudelaire, Maupertin, Carducci, Lautremont and Gabriele D’Annunzio. 7. Left-Hand Path Pagans. There are several European groups, most of them consisting of small “covens” of several people, that are or could be considered Satanists. Two of the larger of these groups are The Fraternity of Baelder and the Order of Nine Angles (ONA). So far I’ve been unable to find any form of Satanism that is explicity neo-Nazi. However, given that Satanism is generally considered an individualistic ideology whose membership is extremely varied in race, culture, and even core beliefs it is not difficult to see that some Satanists will also identify with being Neo-Nazis. Of course, the label of Nazi can be applied to others. As mentioned above, looking back at Kenneth Lanning’s statements Freemasonry, KKK, Nazis, Skinheads and Scientology have all be described as Satanic. A page called Pages and sites by Satanists opposing neo-Nazism or neo-Nazi Satanist groups has links to various articles generally rejecting links between Satanism and neo-Nazism. Diane Vera comments on an article (Satanism and Fascism) “LaVey’s statements quoted in this article exemplify his fondness for being shocking, which seems to be the main reason for some LaVeyans’ fascination for Nazism and fascism despite vast ideological differences between LaVeyan Satanism and Nazism/fascism. Unfortunately, this fascination seems to have attracted the real thing to Satanism as well.” In the Satanic Bible, Anton LaVey wrote: “From every set of principles (be it religious, political or philosophical), some good can be extracted. Amidst the madness of the Hitlerian concept, one point stands out as a shining example of this ’strength through joy!’” By adopting one concept from Nazism it would be enough to put LaVeyan Satanism into the category of neo-Nazism by some people’s narrow definitions. Tags: neo-Nazism, Satanism
This entry was posted on October 12, 2008 at 3:24 pm and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

2 Responses to “Satanism and Nazism”
1. gfish Says:
October 13, 2008 at 4:41 am

Well when it comes to Nazi or racist attitudes in Satanism, I’ve heard a number of complaints for people involved with the Church of Satan and some of its spin-off groups that there’s an awful lot of racism in the atmosphere there and in the new groups and Grottos. When I tried shooting a scene which would feature a recreation of the Satanic Virgin Sacrifice myth, I was warned by them not to use a black actress because way too many racist Satanists and black magicians might take it the wrong way. Maybe they were extremely politically correct, but it was interesting to hear nevertheless. Part of LaVey’s doctrine was that each person can be a divinity in his or her own right and without basic principles to follow in terms to what personal conduct is and isn’t ethical, a lot of racists and neo-Nazis might easily get into Satanic groups if black magic or LeVeyan doctrines ignite their fancy. Then again, just grouping all the things to which you object and naming them Satanism is just lazy and sloppy.

Satanism and Nazism - Part 2
By satanismnz

The Temple of Set was founded in 1975 by Michael Aquino along with breakaway members of the priesthood of the Church of Satan. In November 1990 Tim Maroney released an article entitled “The Nazi Trapezoid - Nazis and the Occult“. In this article Tim Maroney outlines allegations that the Temple of Set’s “Order of the Trapezoid” is dedicated to “Nazi Occultism”. In the article he states: “Aquino is known to have participated in black magical rituals at Wewelsburg Castle, set up as a place of occult working for the SS by Heinrich Himmler. Aquino counts Nazi occultism as one of his chief interests, and the heraldry and symbolism of the SS is one of his favorite topics of discussion.” Michael Aquino’s own outline on the background of the Order can be found in Order of the Trapezoid - Statement which was published by the Temple of Set in January 1, 1990. The current website for the Order of the Trapezoid contains a more up to date history. The webpage Order of the Trapezoid: Nazi? contains several indepth rebuttals of Tim Maroney’s claims. Perhaps the most basic statement is that: “It’s easy to believe that anyone employing the Germanic magikal techniques which the Nazis use is neo-Nazi in some secret contrivance.” This is logical, as an outsider (perhaps with a preconceived personal bias) could suggest a group or individual is neo-Nazi based simply the similarity or use of the same occult rituals, techniques and symbolism. A further article entitled “‘Nazi Trapezoid’” debunked” further explains the incorrect statements and assumptions made in Tim Maroney’s original article. Tags: neo-Nazism, Satanism, Temple of Set

This entry was posted on October 13, 2008 at 6:46 am and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Satanism and Nazism - Part 3
By satanismnz

The Order of Nine Angles promote a form of Satanism that is a highly individualized quest that aims to create self-excellence and wisdom, by undertaking challenges that allow a person to transcend his physical and mental limits. They are often listed a neoNazi or Fascist Satanism. This claim of Fascism or neo-Nazism immediately seems contradictory when they are also described as promoting a highly individualized form of Satanism. It is therefore useful to look further at their system to see what their connection with Nazism actually is. The document Aeonic Insight Roles suggests that an ONA adherent could “5) Join or form a National Socialist group or organization, and aid that organization, and especially aid and propagate “‘historical revisionism’”. Aims of the ONA states that: “The championing, by the ONA, of such things as National Socialism, is part of the Sinister Dialectic - a means, one causal form limited to a certain causal time, not the essence of the ONA. Those who cannot understand the difference have totally misunderstood the essence of the ONA, and genuine sinister magick itself.” ONA Strategy and Tactics details that “a Satanically inspired society could well be of a fascist/National Socialist type - i.e. this type of society would achieve or could achieve certain Satanic goals either directly or via the dialectic of change, and thus aid the ultimate goal: a New, Satanic, Aeon. Accordingly, such views and the organizations upholding them would be aided, mostly secretly. Esoterically, the creation of an Imperium by a charismatic individual (Vindex) would be aided both by magickal means, and more directly. Vindex would be a nexion for the dark forces. Essentially, NS type politics is considered as, at this moment of aeonic time, aiding the sinister dialectic, and an NS society as one of the first stages in changing evolution toward the sinister on a large scale. One of the primary goals of Imperium must be the conquest of Space.” In Novus Ordo Seclorum: An Interview with Anton Long there is the statement that “This is one esoteric reason why such forms as National-Socialism are used in the case of America and Europe: because NS is one of the things those who uphold the old order fear and dread. One of the greatest fears of the cabal behind such things as the tyrannical (and mis-named) New World Order is a Vindex-type figure. Thus, this fear can be used against them.” Perhaps the most important writing on the topic of neo-Nazism and Satanism by the Order of Nine Angles is given in Shadowscape: ONA Esoteric Notes XXI where they state the following: “The Knowing of Forms: As has been mentioned above, and elsewhere, many times: many non-Adepts, and even some Adepts, sometimes confuse a tactic, a form, for the essence. That is, they fail to appreciate what is being done,

and why it is being done. Sometimes, non-Adepts even mistake an Insight Role undertaken by an Initiate or even an Adept - for the ‘views’, or whatever, of that Initiate or Adept, and thus castigate that individual! Consider, also, the incitement to action, to disruption, to practical change, which occurs in many of the exoteric (3) ONA MSS, and which sometimes might take place in some Temple (Nexion) or some Sunedrion by such a thing as an individual giving an emotive speech. This individual may even be regarded, in the conventional sense, as ‘advanced’ (that is, beyond Adeptship) and thus may not be ‘expected’ (by non-Adepts) to still use such emotive rhetoric or such forms.” Tags: neo-Nazism, Order of Nine Angles, Satanism
This entry was posted on October 14, 2008 at 12:47 am and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
By satanismnz

Roel van Leeuwen’s statement regarding the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is particularly offensive to some of my friends (who were “raised Mormon” and happen to be Maori or Polynesian), so they urged me to comment on this as soon as possible to ensure the facts can be separated from the fabrications. Van Leeuwen writes: “While the LDS admitted blacks into the Church from the 1830s, it wasn’t until 1978, well after the period in which Bolton was associated with the Church, that black (and brown) skinned men could be admitted into the priesthood.” His reference is Alan Cherry and Jessie L. Embry, ‘Blacks’ in Encyclopedia of Mormonism, Daniel H. Ludlow(ed.),(New York: Macmillan, 1992), pp.125-127 There are two things that are very surprising about this comment. The first is that one of Roel van Leeuwen’s supervisors for his thesis was Margaret Coldham-Fussell from the Philosophy and Religious Studies department at the University of Waikato. Her profile lists her Undergraduate papers taught in 2008 as being RELS101 World Religions, RELS209 Ancient Mythologies, RELS213 Contemporary Spiritualities. As a supervisor of theses and a lecturer, it would seem that it is not necessary to have any understanding of mainstream religions in New Zealand, so perhaps she was unaware that van Leeuwen’s statements were misleading (to say the least). A quick search via Google turns up an articles from the Latter-day Saints website entitled “Maori Traditions and the Mormon Church” by R. Lanier Britsch It is clear from this article that Maori were enthusiastically encouraged into the LDS Church in New Zealand from relatively early colonial days. For example, this article states that “[b]y the end of 1884 the missionaries had firmly established the restored gospel among the Maori people. The next several years were very satisfying to most of the elders and sister missionaries (several couples were sent to New Zealand beginning in 1885). In August 1885, there were 16 Maori and 4 pakeha branches of the Church, and this number continued to grow steadily for the next 15 years. At the close of 1887, there were 2,573 Latter-day Saints, and by the turn of the century there

were nearly four thousand members of the Church in New Zealand. Most of the Maori tribes, including large numbers in the north, around Whangarei and the Bay of Islands, had been introduced to the gospel. In 1901 there were 79 branches. Clearly, since the early years in Hawaii, the Church had not enjoyed so much success with a Polynesian people.” The reason for acceptance of the Maori and Polynesian people is given in a later paragraph: “Although the relationship between the Polynesian peoples and the adventurer Hagoth (see Alma 63:5–8) is not clear—he being a Nephite and the Polynesians appearing to be Lamanites—Church leaders have time and time again referred to the Polynesians as children of Lehi. In the Book of Mormon, 2 Nephi 4, father Lehi blessed the offspring of his evil sons Laman and Lemuel and promised them that their posterity would one day have all the blessings promised to Abraham. The Latter-day Saints believe this refers specifically to the blessing of membership in the Lord’s church and of holding the priesthood. Latter-day Saint missionaries believed and taught that the Maoris were chosen sons and daughters of Abraham. The elders expected the Maoris to accept easily the restored gospel and to assume their rightful place as leaders in the Church. There was almost no racial prejudice on the part of the Mormons toward the Maoris.” I don’t currently have time to access Roel van Leeuwen’s claimed source of the quote regarding the exclusion of black (and brown) skinned men being admitted to the priesthood. However, the Wikipedia article “Blacks and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints” has background information and citations which are in line with what I understand of the history of the LDS Church. He is correct that in the United States black skinned people were prohibited from entering the priesthood, but only after the leadership of Joseph Smith. What relevance this has to Mr. Bolton seems quite contrived. Roel van Leeuwen writes, “It is tempting to speculate on what influence exposure to Mormonism in Bolton’s formative years may have had on his subsequent political, spiritual and racial views.” And it seems that temptation was too much to resist, demonstrating either a willful attempt at slandering “Mormonism”, lack of research (hard to believe given that information is plentiful on the internet, and van Leeuwen appears to primarily use internet resources for this citations), or a deliberate ignoring of the facts relating to the New Zealand history of the LDS Church. Kerry Bolton, on his expose of “Dreamers of the Dark”, writes: “The Naenae Ward I attended had many Polynesians and Maori with whom I associated on cordial and social terms. Leeuwen states that the Church only admitted ‘dark races’ in 1978, ‘well after my involvement in the Church’. Given that it was probably 1978 that I was in the Church for around three months, and that there were abundant Maori and Polynesians in the Church, none of this makes sense. In addition, if I was supposedly raised a Mormon, left well before the admission of ‘dark races in 1978’, and was born in 1956, even the basic arithmetic does not add up.” If there is more wild speculation and similar lack of research (or worse still, ignoring facts and fabricating “evidence”) such as this section on the LDS Church, what other wild speculation (and fantasy?) has Roel van Leeuwen provided as the basis for a Masters level thesis. Given than news reports state that Professor Bing claimed that “[t]he thesis was assessed by two senior academics from other New Zealand

universities” it would appear that there is no one in New Zealand capable of assessing a thesis on even mainstream religions, let alone one cobbled together from internet sources, speculation, fantasy, and personal bias claiming to show a synthesis of Satanism and neo-Nazism (yes, I have read it thoroughly - which is painfully slow going given that it is not very logically structured and jumps around between years, groups, and authors to try and prove points which seem tenuous). Tags: Kerry Bolton, Latter-day Saints, Mormonism, Roel van Leeuwen, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 14, 2008 at 8:10 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

About Roel van Leeuwen - Part 2
By satanismnz

Doing a little more research into the author I have made some interesting discoveries. According to the page “The Modern Middle Ages in NZ” Roel van Leeuwen went by the pseudonym Skali Vidfari (circa 1998), and was the Medfest Society secretary. With a name like Skali Vidfari it is tempting to speculate on the political orientation he may have held at this time. From Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis, footnote 66 quotes Spoonley, The Politics of Nostalgia, page 170 in saying “A developing convention among commentators and adherents describes neo-Nazi/Racist followers of the Norse gods as ‘Odinists’ while non-Racist followers of Norse neo-Paganism are often termed Asatrur.” Is/was Skali Vidfari an Odinist or Asatrur? It would also appear that Roel van Leeuwen was involved in Satanism. In a posting to alt.magick on Oct 9 1998 he writes: “many moons ago when I was young, … myself and my lady conducted a similar ritual. Now some years later after a lot of crap I think she is a deceptive, manipulating, nasty, grasping, self centred bitch. But I still see her regulary and sometimes we even fuck but every time we meet I come away thinking she is a deceptive, manipulating, nasty, grasping, self centred bitch. … However, like all things magical there is perfectly rational and mundane explanations to this event. …this is not to say I would pay cold hard cash for a good hexbuster. TECHNICAL NOTE: we didn’t do anything fancy like carve sigils or runes but rather just made simple slit with a razor on the palm of our hands. hmmmmm, come to think of it prehaps I should have taken more notice of the glazed look of rapture on her face when she cut my palm with what I thought was altogether too much enthuasim…” Additional evidence appears in the form of his chosen email address “mithras@wave.co.nz“. The Mythraic Mysteries are a militaristic mystery religion, that was divided into seven ranks. Compare this with the seven stages of the Order of Nine Angles tradition, the “Septenary System” which also contains seven divisions. Mithras was the theme of the song “Lord of Ages” by Michael Moynihan of the music group Blood Axis. Moynihan, along with his friend Boyd Rice have links to the Church of Satan and Right-wing political ideologies such as Fascism. Boyd Rice’s Abraxas Foundation promotes authoritarianism, totalitarianism, misanthropism, elitism, is antidemocratic.

Perhaps participation in Satanic Rituals and a possible involvement with Right-wing politics gave Roel van Leeuwen an insight into a Satanic/neo-Nazi synthesis? Maybe not, but it is tempting to speculate. Tags: Mithras, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism
This entry was posted on October 15, 2008 at 4:56 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Satanism and Nazism - Part 4
By satanismnz

It seems a very strange that an ideology associated with “evil” should have so many apologists and defenders trying to differentiate between the “evils” of Satanism and the evils of neo-Nazism, and claim that the Order of Nine Angles are somehow “wrong” (genuinely evil) in their advocacy of actual evil deeds and ideologies. However, even though the general focus on the Order of Nine Angles seems to be their links to racism and Fascism there is one important document that seems to be often overlooked. That is their teachings about Magick and Politics given in ONA and Anarchy I: Magick and Politics. Anton Long writes, “Of course, this analysis forms the core of ‘genuine anarchism’: but even this is a label, an ism - which has evolved into an ‘idea’ with all the dissent appropriate to an idea. Magick is a means away from all this - it is a practical system, devoid of dogma, and makes possible the next stage of our evolution as individuals. As such, it is direct opposition to all powerforms - governmental, religious or social - although this opposition is silent and will remain silent.” (footnote: “Silent as in ‘covert’ - at least in respect of the intention of the Initiate/Adept of the Sinister Tradition of the ONA. Understood magickally, politics, of whatever type, is one means, one form, used in a magickal way by an Initiate/Adept to bring about causal change in accord with the sinister intent of that Initiate/Adept, and in accord with intent of the Sinister Dialectic itself.”) Aeonic Insight Roles backs up these claims where it is suggested that an adherent could “(1) Join or form a covert insurrectionary political organization - either of the so-called ‘extreme Left’ or of the ‘extreme Right’ - whose avowed aim is to undermine by practical, revolutionary, means the current Western status quo.” or “(4) Join or form an active anarchist organization or group dedicated to fighting the capitalist System.” Now this leaves a situation where it is impossible to determine whether the ONA is ultimately fascist and simply trying to subvert Anarchist or Left-wing groups, or is it ultimately Anarchistic and tying to subvert neo-Nazi and Right-wing groups? Applying Occams Razor, the simplist solution is to accept that their teachings on using forms and insight roles are truthful, and that any -ism (essentially even “Satanism” itself) is only a step in a Left Hand Path approach to spiritual development. This may be difficult for many spiritually-minded people to accept, that learning through “evil deeds” and “diabolical tasks” could ever lead to enlightenment! But that is exactly what the Order of Nine Angles appear to be promoting - the

creation of a new, enlightened, and liberated individual, unrestrained by dogma and isms, whose destiny is to explore Space as a Galactic Civilisation. If we suggest that the ONA are dedicated Nazis who will infiltrate all non-Nazi groups and institutions it would be virtually impossible to prove or disprove whether someone or something was linked to the ONA. An Anarchist or Anarchist group would have to be suspected of potentially being a ploy by the ONA to use their Satanic tactics to spread disruption. Under this thinking even Roel van Leeuwen could be a member of the ONA taking on a role (no pun intended) of disruption and opposition, and essentially being an archetypal accuser by blaming other people of being neo-Nazis. However, this is unlikely, as I am sure there would be more highprofile individuals in New Zealand who would make more appropriate and worthwhile targets for these kind of tactics. Tags: neo-Nazism, Order of Nine Angles, Satanism
This entry was posted on October 15, 2008 at 6:58 am and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

A Disgruntled Customer?
By satanismnz

Here are some of my initial views on Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis, “Dreamers of the Dark”. A quick flick through finds pages 118 to page 152 (Appendix 3) to be what appears to be an almost verbatim copy of the Renaissance Press Catalogue, 2007. The accompanying footnote gives a link to http://www.freewebs.com/renaissancepress/thecatalogue.htm. The inclusion of this catalogue amounts to 34 pages (out of 182 or 18% of the document) of “filler”. If the Appendices etc are ignored 34 pages amounts to the equivalent of more than 34% of the actual bulk of thesis, given than it is 100 double spaced pages, and the Renaissance Press Catalogue is not double spaced. The catalogue only lists one book title mentioning “Satanism” and that is Mr Bolton’s Occult Origins of the New World Order. The context is relating to Marx and Bakunin Satanists, Satanic cult behind modern art, Carducci’s “Hymn to Satan”, Luciferic origins of New Age, and New Age/Luciferic origins of “New World Order”. One entry out out of the numerous titles on 34 pages hardly seems to support the thesis which claims to be showing a link between Satanism and neo-Nazism. The significance of the book catalogue don’t seem to be adequately explained, but it appears that Roel van Leeuwen may be a disgruntled customer of Renaissance Press. Five sentences prefacing Appendix 3 simply make claims about the profit margins of Mr Bolton’s enterprise: “Two representative examples of books sold by Bolton suggests that he makes a significant profit from his sales if material costs only are taken into account.” and “Other examples all show an approximately similar profit margin over production costs.” I have a vivid imagination but currently can’t come up with any suggestions as to the relevance of production costs and profit margins to a thesis which suggests a very sinister motive - which in this case would seem to be accusations of Capitalism and Free Market economics. No, maybe I can imagine something wildly speculative, that

Roel van Leeuwen is advocating price fixing of publications in some kind of fascist way, as a counter to Capitalism. There is another issue here though, and that is of copyright. There is no indication that permission was gained to include this catalogue in the thesis. Judging by Mr Bolton’s website set up to “expose” the thesis, it seems highly unlikely he would have given permission. Under New Zealand law, copying verbatim is a breach of copyright if no permission was given, and generally, in Academic institutions, this would amount to plagiarism. Perhaps the University of Waikato has no problem with copyright infringement when used in a thesis to illustrate a point which backs up a thesis. However, as said above, complaining about Capitalist profit-margins doesn’t seem to fit the thesis. Perhaps we will see books written by Roel van Leeuwen which are sold at-cost, or perhaps given away free so as to make the world a better place. A couple of sentences that stuck out in Appendix 3: “Banking Swindle. K Bolton. Succinct account of rise of international bankers, how usury banking system operates, its political power and how it was opposed by Catholic and Islamic social doctrines, Ezra Pound, Father Coughlin, Presidents Kennedy and Lincoln and American Revolutionaries” The above would seem to constitute an unbiased look at banking, including opponents who were Catholic and Islamic, as well as American Presidents (Kennedy and Lincoln). It hardly seems to support a claim of Satanism and neo-Nazism “Historical Revisionism: Note: Revisionism is stereotypically portrayed by vested interests as being motivated by anti-Semitism or neo-Nazism. In fact the founders of post World War II revisionism were the Left-wing scholars the American Prof. Harry Elmer Barnes, and the French resistance leader and concentration camp inmate Prof. Paul Rassinier. Revisionist scholars come from a wide variety of backgrounds, including both Left and Right, conservatives libertarians, and a significant number of Jews.” This note suggests that the founders of revisionism relating to World War 2 were actually Left-wing scholars, rather than Nazis or neo-Nazis, and that even some Jews (Satanic neo-Nazi Jews?) have questioned the holocaust. This again does seem to fit a thesis of Mr Bolton being a narrow-minded neo-Nazi working away at creating a synthesis of Satanism and neo-Nazism. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 16, 2008 at 12:07 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Tide is Changing?

By satanismnz

Waikato Times have carried a new story which shows the potential for change in the opinions of the media. The story is entitled ‘Varsity should explain itself‘ and while it is critical of the University of Waikato for their apparent acquiescence to a supposed “neo-Nazi” (remembering this is Roel van Leeuwen’s accusation - casting him in the role of Satan, the accuser - and spread via the viral marketing of the media) questions are beginning to be asked, and Roel, his supervisors, and leading academics within New Zealand may well begin to fear the answers which will come out. It looks as though the Waikato Times has begun to do their homework. To quote from the article, “Of course the publication should be rock solid with its facts, and perhaps it wasn’t, given the author has made some minor amendments in response to the complaints.” Contrast this to Roel van Leeuwen’s claim that his work was accurate and not defamatory in any way. If it was accurate and not defamatory, why was it edited? Mr van Leeuwen, New Zealand and the World await your answers. The Waikato Times editor has apparently accessed the thesis, as he writes “It is clearly a personal matter for him [Roel van Leeuwen]: the dedication reads: ‘To the memory of my father and oma, who lived through the nightmare that these people wanted to recreate’.” This apparently shows that even the blinkered media (who would rather put the blame on the thesis being removed from the internet and University library on the victim, rather than the author, whose research is questionable) can see that there is a personal bias that has come in to play during the writing of the thesis. Unfortunately the editor doesn’t appear to have critically appraised the thesis, and accepts that the facts are truthful and correct: “But academically he appears to have been on solid ground; the thesis apparently received a good mark and was externally moderated before being published.” This will be troubling for the University of Waikato, as at stake is the reputation of their University and all Universities in New Zealand (given that the external assessors are from other New Zealand Universities). In the coming weeks I will start to detail my findings, which are at odds with the thesis. I have found a number of places where the facts appear to be distorted, conclusions and accusations are not referenced, and the timelines do not make sense with what is publicly available on the internet sources used by Roel van Leeuwen. Tags: Roel van Leeuwen, Waikato University, Kerry Bolton, Satanism, neo-Nazism, Dreamers of the Dark, thesis, Waikato Times
This entry was posted on October 18, 2008 at 1:48 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Starting with Conclusions
By satanismnz

While researching the history of various Satanic organizations I came across a situation with some ominous parallels with Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis trying to prove a Satanic neo-Nazi synthesis relying mostly on documents from over a decade ago. It would seem that a former member of the Order of Nine Angles, who left to pursue painting and music was the subject of attention from someone intent on “exposing” him, and proving that he was still a Satanic neo-Nazi. It primarily differs in that it is not a thesis, or very extensive, but it starts with similar premises and draws similar conclusions - well, it starts with a conclusion which the “researcher” unswervingly sets about “proving”. A serious of postings entitled ‘Richard Moult/Christos Beest and Order of Nine Angles‘ appear on an internet forum. A person going by the name of “Charles Witton” starts out by stating “I am carrying out research into the Hitlerite/Occultist, Richard Moult (a.k.a. Christos Beest).” The conversations carries on with some supposed attempts at “researching” (which one would assume meant trying to discover facts and truth - but it seems whether academic or not, research these days means twisting of all information to fit a preconceived conclusion) but ultimately Mr Witton ends up stating, “I think you have told me enough to confirm that which I have been told by others- that Moult/Beest is still involved with both Occultists and Neo Nazis.” However, reading the conversation there is no actual proof here. There is of course circumstantial evidence (why would the Order of Nine Angles distance themselves from Richard Moult?) however it is also equally plausible that what the ONA write about Mr Moult’s leaving and involvement with Christianity is genuine. There certainly doesn’t appear to be any proof or evidence of Mr Moult’s continuing involvement in the occult or in anything political. Regardless, it is a big leap in faith to go from claiming to be researching a person, to revealing the “research” all just confirms your conclusion when in fact it is open to debate. There was no information revealed in the conversation that categorically proved that Mr. Moult still has involvements with ideologies he may have held a decade ago. The writings of the Order of Nine Angles clearly show that promotion of political ideologies don’t actually mean someone holds that beliefs, so even if it is correct that Mr Moult promoted neo-Nazi politics it does not mean he genuinely believed these things, but was doing so to learn something via adopting a particular ideology that is seen as unacceptable by mainstream society. The lesson may well include the fact that your past can hang around and haunt you. Additional information can be found on the following pages:
• •

Christos Beest and the ONA More About Moult and the ONA

Tags: neo-Nazism, Order of Nine Angles, Satanism
This entry was posted on October 18, 2008 at 7:29 am and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Satanism in New Zealand - Part 2
By satanismnz

Some recent research into the existence of Satanism in New Zealand has begun to turn up some interesting leads. A posting on an internet forum suggests that the Order of the Left Hand Path is still active in New Zealand, and that the Order of Nine Angles has a branch in New Zealand calling themselves “Meridianus Nexion”. Also, the Temple of Set and Church of Satan possibly have branches in New Zealand. The poster, going by the name of Flay, comments, “I do know however that there are a lot of professed Satanists in NZ; Paremoremo prison was reknowned for it in the early 90’s. All of the few persons I met physically into Satanism when I lived in Auckland were literal Devil Worshippers/Anti-Christians or students of the Gothic or COS variety.” A little more digging turned up the website Order of the Left Hand Path which provides a brief history of the Order and a membership application page. The history page concludes with the following statement: “The ODF withdrew from the public in late 1997. After 10 years of existence within the shadows, the wheel has gone full circle and a decision was made for the Order of the Left Hand Path to re-emerge. More will be posted as necessary.” There is an associated OLHP MySpace page, however it doesn’t appear to have been accessed since 2007. As of writing I have not received any response from an email I sent to the listed email address listed on the site. I will keep readers informed of any progress in my research here. The Meridianus Nexion page contains no contact details and only 3 brief articles. It is difficult to know if this is genuinely Order of Nine Angles material or members, as some of the articles appear to almost mock ideas promoted by the ONA. Maybe I am not clued up enough to understand and simply miss the point. I did note that both of these websites are hosted on the same webhost, which suggests to me that they may be set up by someone wishing to give the appearance of the groups still existing. If my above hunch is correct, then they may be set up either as a joke or by someone wishing to become notorious by association with already existing (or previously existing) groups. So far I’ve not found any direct evidence of the Temple of Set existing in New Zealand, although it is possible there will be members here. The official Temple of Set website has a section for Temple of Set Australia. However, the Temple of Set seem to no longer associate with Satanism per se. Don Webb, High Priest Emeritus, in his article Concerning Satanism, writes: “The Temple of Set has begun the process of distancing form the term “Satanism,” a cultural fad of the latter part of the Twentieth Century of the Common Era. The usefulness of this particular tool as a means to antinomianism is fading in our post-Christian society, just as it had no

meaning in the pre-Christian society where the first explorations of the Setian path occured.” To date, I have been unable to find any definitive information on the existence of an official branch of the Church of Satan in New Zealand. Tags: New Zealand, Satanism
This entry was posted on October 19, 2008 at 3:58 am and is filed under Satanism in New Zealand. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Satanism, The ONA, and Politics
By satanismnz

It would seem I am correct in my brief analysis on the Order of Nine Angles and their political motivations and activities. The Dark Imperium website has a recent article, entitled ‘Satanism, The ONA, and Politics‘ commenting on the posting of mine (Satanism and Nazism - Part 4). The author on Dark Imperium writes: “Reproduced below is the text of most of an article, written by an anonymous author, about the Order of Nine Angles, which was published some days ago on another blog. The anonymous author makes some interesting and perceptive remarks about the ONA and politics, challenging what has become the seemingly accepted and “majority view” - among both Occultists, and others, who know of the ONA - that the ONA is a fascist organization and/or promotes fascism and/or National Socialism.” I am guessing that by “interesting and perceptive remarks” the author is saying I am, at least partially, correct. I am somewhat surprised that the majority of authors, academics, and occultists make so many assumptions about the Order of Nine Angles, and get it wrong (at least partially) with regards to exactly what the ONA is, and promotes. Am I a genius? I don’t think so. I have only been researching this publicly available material for a couple of weeks, but it is fairly clear that the ONA is not inherently Nazi, Fascist or any other political orientation. Tags: Order of Nine Angles, Satanism
This entry was posted on October 19, 2008 at 4:11 am and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

A Brief Synopsis of Dreamers of the Dark
By satanismnz

Kerry Bolton has updated his website regarding the problems he has found with Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis. Towards the end of the page is a section entitled ‘A Brief Synopsis so even Journalists can Understand’ that details Mr Bolton’s findings. Some of his findings are quoted below, and will provide a good introduction to the flaws of the thesis before I provide my own analysis over the coming weeks:

About 80% of the thesis is flawed, based on wilful, dishonest misinterpretations, poor referencing, non-sequitor and straw man arguments, libel, and outright lies. Additionally, I am not alone in having made a formal complaint against the thesis, and at least one other complainant documents further flaws in the thesis. Flawed Bibliography which credits me with 48 works, 8 of which aren’t mine and some of which I haven’t heard of. Claims that I am “still a nazi” via my ‘leadership of the New Right”. I have never held any leadership in any such group. Claims that I was ‘raised a Mormon’ which contributed to my attitude to “unclean races” (sic). I attended a Mormon Church for 3 months ca. 1978. Many Maori and Polynesians were in the Church. Van Leeuwen claims that non-whites were not permitted into the Mormon church until after 1978; “well after I left” For a student of ‘alternative beliefs’ whose co-supervisor was the Religious Studies lecturer, this is pure nonsense as will be seen by five minutes research into Mormonism. A racist interpretation of an article on eugenics, claiming that I wrote that inter-racial marriage ‘dumbs down civilisation’. There was no such statement or insinuation. Unreferenced claims that I advocated separate racial homelands Interpretation of all essays from myself and others as somehow advocating “genocide” (sic). Equating the Right, Fascism, Nazism, and Nationalism in some kind of reductionist paradigm which says little for the level of scholarly sophstication from the Univesrity’s Political Science Dept. Unreferenced claims that I was a member of the NZ Nazi party at 14. Identification of msyelf as W Grimwald, head of the Black Order, on the basis of a reference in Goodrick-Clark’s book Black Sun, which makes no such identiifcation, similarity of writing styles (which VL reduces to farcical proportions in confusing me with at least 5 other individuals on that basis), and association with Renaissance Press. Claims that I mistreated someone with brain damage and that I raised my son in a ‘racist milieu’; slurs that VL subsequently deleted from the online thesis. Claims that I as supposed New Right ‘webmaster’ and NR ‘leader’ (another cocked up assumption), posted a rant against then National Front leader Sid Wilson in response to his having ‘expelled’ (sic) me from the NF and for having posted a rant at me that I am ‘deceptive’

(sic) etc. another classic VL blunder: The anti-Sid ‘retaliation’ was written by the NR webmaster. Sid Wilson’s diatribes were directed at NR leader Steve Larsen, (whom he considered to be an anti-Christ, satanic Jew) not myself, and I left the NF before Sid even assumed leadership. Sid subsequently tried unsucessfully to get me to rejoin the NF. Claims that I continued to write ‘manuals’ for esoteric Orders that I had either left or never belonged to and with which I had no contact with, to the point of even losing contact with some longtime friends in those orders. Again the claims are unreferenced. Interesting stuff. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 19, 2008 at 4:31 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Edited Thesis
By satanismnz

Tonight I found that by downloading the PDF versions (Roel Van Leeuwen Thesis Original and Roel Van Leeuwen Thesis Edited) of the thesis it is still possible to see the title and author. This is what was shown in the video on YouTube video entitled ‘Waikato University Removes Thesis‘. With the help of a friend I was able to produce an image of the properties display. For the original document (unedited) it is as follows:

Author and title of the original unedited thesis by Roel van Leeuwen For the edited thesis it is:

Author and title of the edited thesis by Roel van Leeuwen The original shows the title as ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ with the author ‘Van Leeuwen’. The edited version ‘Microsoft Word - Dreamers of the Dark Amended’ and the author as ‘Dignitas Regum’ (which I would guess is an occult pseudonym of Roel van Leeuwen). You can click on the above images to see the full size image. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 19, 2008 at 7:47 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Tide is Changing - Part 2
By satanismnz

The University World News carries an article entitled ‘NEW ZEALAND: University committed to academic freedom‘

Gone are the recitations of Roel van Leeuwen’s allegation of Mr Bolton as a Satanic neo-Nazi, or of threats of legal action. Instead the article describes Mr Bolton as “a former National Front secretary” and states that Mr Bolton “complained the thesis was poorly researched and ineptly supervised.” It will be interesting to see whether the University of Waikato actually have the academic skill necessary to analyze a subject which apparently caused Mr van Leeuwen so many problems in understanding. Given that his degree was conferred by the University of Waikato it will remain to be seen if they can provide an extensive and impartial investigation into their own Academic staff, processes, and postgraduate students. Tags: Roel van Leeuwen, Waikato University, Kerry Bolton, Satanism, neo-Nazism, Dreamers of the Dark, thesis, Waikato Times
This entry was posted on October 20, 2008 at 6:31 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Critical Analysis of Dreamers of the Dark
By satanismnz

To examine the thesis, albeit 100 pages, is actually a very time consuming task. Checking of references (sometimes difficult due to their absence) and making sense of some of the convoluted and erratic style of writing means that a full analysis could take some months. Where possible I will use internet based resources as primary references so that anyone wishing to confirm what I conclude can check the facts for themselves. Where I am unable to find material on the internet but am able to source it, I will endeavour to provide scanned copies of the original, or at least transcribe the relevant portion of a page to reveal whether Roel van Leeuwen was correct in his evaluation of the supposed Satanic neo-Nazi conspiracy theory. Page referencing for ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ (DotD) will be given in the form [page(s) x-x DotD]. Other page references will be for the indicated publication. I have been able to track down copies of ‘The Heretic’, some early issues of the ‘The Nexus’, and various other miscellaneous documents relating to the subject at hand so will be able to check references given to these publications. I will keep with Roel van Leeuwen’s usage of the words “the Order” to refer to the Order of the Left Hand Path (OLHP), Ordo Sinistra Vivendi (OSV), and Order of the Deorc Fyre (ODF) as it is well documented that this group changed its name over the course of its existence. However, unlike Mr van Leeuwen, I have so far been unable to establish that The Black Order (TBO) was inherently part of the same ‘entity’, and will keep references to this group separate from “the Order”. Roel van Leeuwen defined “the Order” as “A generic term encompassing the Order of the Left Hand Path and its successor organisations (Ordo Sinistra Vivendi and Order of the Deorc

Fyre) and, to a limited extent, The Black Order.” By “limited extent” I would speculate he means due to the use of the word “Order” in the name. It is difficult to tell where Roel van Leeuwen gained much of his information on The Black Order from. This problem will be dealt with in more detail in later postings, and a planned timeline (comparing Roel van Leeuwen’s timeline, based on his published thesis, with research based on available material). For now, consider Fig 1. on page 16 of Dreamers of the Dark which shows The Black Order as beginning in 1991 and ending in 1997. Compare this with the statements on page 34 where he writes: “The Black Order was founded in 1993 and initially acted as a ’superior degree’ of the OLHP/OSV into which like-minded people were invited before TBO started to directly recruit through the pages of The Heretic in 1994″ with footnote 114 stating “Advertisement, The Heretic 9″. Note, there is no reference to where he gained the knowledge that The Black Order was a “superior degree” of the OLHP/OSV. Heretic #9 was published in July 1994, with the advert for The Black Order appearing on page 4. However, looking at earlier issues, The Black Order is advertised on page 18 of The Heretic #7 (January 1994) and page 17 of The Heretic #8 (April 1994). Without reference to research material it remains to be seen how Roel van Leeuwen discovered his “facts” about the genesis of this group. It is tempting to speculate that this is merely self-serving to prove a point that “the Order” (combining an arbitrary number of groups relative Roel van Leeuwen’s current mood) was a Satanic neo-Nazi organization. If someone can provide some references to substantiate the claims of Roel van Leeuwen then I would appreciate it. In some of the footnotes and references for background material Roel van Leeuwen simply states “OSV Archive” [pages 26 - 29; 74 DotD] or “ODF Archive” [pages 15; 43; 69; 77-78; 82 DotD], however there doesn’t seem to be a reference or description of exactly what these archives are, or where they are located. Are they websites (if so, why not provide the links?) or are they physical repositories of material relating to the Order. It is tempting to speculate as to whether or not leaving out the location of these archives was a deliberate attempt to stop secondary research and cause difficulties for external assessors attempting to verify his claims. A quick web search doesn’t readily identify any official or unofficial OSV or ODF Archives, so it is doubtful that editors, supervisors, or assessors bothered to check any references at all. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 20, 2008 at 8:39 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Biblio-what?
By satanismnz

Mr Bolton’s website claims that Roel van Leeuwen misattributes various writings to him. The thesis “Dreamers of the Dark” contains the statement in the bibliography

that “Much of this thesis focuses on the role of Kerry Bolton as the chief ideologue of the Order and his efforts to dissemination a neo-Nazi message.” Further, “much of his personal writing was published in those journals as unattributed articles.” (no footnote, so I cannot confirm the validity of this statement). Roel van Leeuwen writes “I have credited Bolton with the authorship of most of those anonymous articles based on stylistic comparisons with known articles by Bolton.” This sounds like dangerous ground to enter in a thesis - or perhaps it is merely convenience to fit the facts to a preconceived conclusion? Additionally, Roel van Leeuwen declares that “Bolton states ’signed articles do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the author’ [sic]. I understand this to imply that the unsigned articles originate from Bolton.” Well, I understand this to imply that this thesis may well be filled with speculation about what something may or may not be implied, rather than research and fact backed up by credible references. Actually, according to an online copy of The Watcher #1 the disclaimer is actually: “Signed articles do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Editor.” I will work on the assumption that Roel van Leeuwen unintentionally transcribed the word ‘author’ instead of ‘editor’ and that this was not part of an intentional attempt to attribute all authorship with Mr. Bolton. It is tempting to speculate that this was a Freudian slip on Roel van Leeuwen’s part, which showed he was actually aware that there was a difference between what authors wrote, and what they genuinely believed. From a logical look at the statement of the editor we could reasonably get the following permutations: UA = unsigned article SA = signed Article O = editors opinion Either: UA ≠ O Or: UA = O It is a fair assumption that unsigned articles most likely reflect the opinions of the author. Therefore: SA = O or SA ≈ O There is no logical way to go from these assumptions to declaring that all unsigned articles are authored by the Editor. It is a logical step to say that if the Editor was willing to publish an article not bearing a signature he very likely agreed with the article in some way. However, there are some caveats. For example, according to the numerous footnotes a lot of articles were sourced from the internet. It is possible that transcription or transmission errors have occurred and that some articles may be either attributed to the incorrect author or the author may not be credited at all. This is backed up by the acknowledgment by Roel van Leeuwen on page 154 that “In the case of transcribed material, I often can not be sure whether mistakes in spelling, grammar or punctuation were present in the original or have crept in during the transcription process”.

It is also possible, even if unlikely, that the original publications misattributed an author or left out the credits for the author due to error rather than intent. Can speculation of authorship be considered an example of excellent research? According to Dov Bing, one of the thesis supervisors it would seem that this is the high standard of the University of Waikato. Roel van Leeuwen also claims there to be good research in here too. Mr van Leeuwen, please be clear between what is research and what is speculation. Mr Bolton lists examples of misattributed authorship as follows (square brackets show the claimed source stated by Roel van Leeuwen): Satanism and Race [Heretic #3, Heretic #6], Satanism, blasphemy and the black mass [Heretic #9], A sinister nobility [OSV essay], A master morality [OSV essay], Dark Forces [ODF essay], Political and social realities of Satanism [ODF essay], and Symphysis [ODF essay]. Satanism and Race: A quick search on the Intenet doesn’t find much, apart from a reference in a compendium of ONA articles where it is listed as part of another ONA publication entitled ‘NEXION - a Guide to Sinister Strategy’. However, in the body of the thesis Roel van Leeuwen attributes this article’s authorship as follows: “In issue 3 of The Watcher an article was published by the Order of Nine Angles, an English based Satanic group who had made earlier contributions to The Watcher and The Heretic, entitled ‘Satanism and Race’…” [page 23 DotD]. So, here we have an article listed as being in issue 3 of The Watcher, as well as issues 3 & 6 of the Heretic (in the bibliography). And who is the author, Kerry Bolton or someone from the Order of Nine Angles? Or, is this an attempt to Roel van Leeuwen to claim that this article was so important it was published 3 times, and that Kerry Bolton was a member of the Order of Nine Angles? The article in question appears on Page 9 of The Heretic #3. At the very top is a large graphic image and the words “O.N.A.”. The article is signed ONA. Using the logic from above, a signed article does not necessarily reflect the Editor’s opinion. However, it is also important about what the article actually says, so here is one brief quote: “The fundamental strategic (or ‘long-term’) aim of Satanism is to elevate the consciousness of all individuals* to at least what is now described by ‘Adept consciousness’. The footnote * reads “Regardless of race.”

Satanism And Race - The Heretic #3 - Page 9

Satanism And Race - The Heretic #3 - Page 10

Satanism And Race - The Heretic #3 - Page 11

Satanism And Race - The Heretic #3 - Page 12 This fits in with my research into the Order of Nine Angles writings of politics, that in essence there is no discrimination regarding race, gender, or ideologies. They are

promoting a very extreme method of spiritual development - perhaps appropriate of the label Satanism, and Left Hand Path. The Watcher #3 and Heretic #6 do not contain copies of this article. The essay ‘Satanism, Blasphemy And The Black Mass’ is contained in the aforementioned document and appears to have been written by someone within the Order of Nine Angles in 1974 - 16 years before the founding of the Order of the Left Hand Path. It is found on pages 25-27 of The Heretic #9 and signed “ONA 1974eh.” As of writing, I have been unable to find the essays entitled ‘A Sinister Nobility’ and ‘A Master Morality’, both attributed to the OSV period of the Order. The ODF essays can be found on a webpage called Alternative Thinking. Dark Forces, Political and social realities of Satanism, and Symphysis - The Left Hand Path And Right Hand Path Dichotomy. There is no author attribution, however the date is given as 1997. Accordingly to Roel van Leeuwen’s own statements “Even as Bolton started to withdraw from the Order, first resigning as Magister, or Grandmaster, of the Order in 1994 and then his membership in 1996, he maintained editorship of the journals and the journals, under his direction, still acted as the organ of the Order.” [pages 19-20 DotD]. This indicates that even van Leeuwen’s own research showed Mr Bolton had officially left the order by 1996. If the article dating is correct on the online ODF archive then these articles were published after Mr Bolton left the Order. Being “unsigned” and attributed to Order of the Deorc Fyre does not provide evidence either way as to who the author may be. Mr Bolton may have continued as ‘Editor’ of magazines, but it doesn’t prove he authored the articles, or agreed with them - they are signed “Order of the Deorc Fyre”, which would appear to indicate a “signed” article given that various Order of the Nine Angles articles are simple ’signed’ as ‘ONA’ or ‘Order of the Nine Angles’. Note, there is no reference here for evidence that the journal edited by Mr Bolton continued “as the organ of the Order”. This might seem “picky”, however quick research shows the existence of another journal entitle ‘Suspire’ which “was primarily a creative outlet for members of the OSV, as opposed to the broad-perspective open-forum provided by The Heretic (and The Watcher before it).” (Order of the Left Hand Path entry on Nation Master Encyclopedia). Page 20 of The Nexus #4 shows an advert for Suspire, advertised as “Journal of Ordo Sinistra Vivendi” with the address as Hesperos Press, PO Box 83, Paekakariki, Wellington - not Kerry Bolton’s Renaissance Press address.

Advert for Suspire Journal from The Nexus #4, May 1996 Roel van Leeuwen was well aware of the existence of Suspire as the Journal of Ordo Sinistra Vivendi, as he writes, “The aims and organisational structure of the OSV were published in Suspire: the Journal of the Ordo Sinistra Vivendi…” [page 32, DotD]. A final point regarding the Bibliography. The aforementioned ODF essays attributed to Bolton could easily have been placed in the section Order Publications and Essays Order of the Deorc Fyre, and left unattributed. Otherwise, the ‘Disablot’ essay (dated 1997) could likewise have been attributed to Mr Bolton. Why was this essay singled out as unattributable? Was it because it didn’t give enough support to “proving” a preconceived conclusion? Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 20, 2008 at 12:40 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Personal Bias
By satanismnz

“Dedication: To the memory of my father and oma, who lived through the nightmare that these people wanted to recreate.”

The dedication seems to suggest a personal bias attributed to family history, Roel van Leeuwen’s “father and oma” apparently having lived through a “nightmare” which assumedly refers to World War II, although it is unspecified. This is logical assumption (given the title of the thesis linking it to neo-Nazism). It sets up the premise that the thesis will portray some kind of “nightmare” scenario akin to World War II (the holocaust perhaps - but unspecified). The comment on “these people” is unspecific, but coming after the title could be read as suggesting the thesis will reveal that Kerry Bolton and the Order of the Left Hand Path were masterminding a Satanic neo-Nazi World War III from the formidable “superpower” New Zealand. Personal bias and preconceived beliefs are the enemies of genuine academic research. From the beginning of the thesis a cloud of suspicion arises in my mind as to whether Roel van Leeuwen will be able to distance himself from the personal and emotional themes he deals with in his thesis and provide a factual and accurate account what he claims to be a Satanic neo-Nazi synthesis. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 20, 2008 at 2:26 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Who To Blame?
By satanismnz

While my research is beginning to show that Roel van Leeuwen has made some unsubstaniated claims, it is worthwhile considering how much of the blame rests with him, and how much must be apportioned to his co-supervisors, Professor Dov Bing and Ms. Marg Coldham-Fussell. Looking through information on the University of Waikato website relating to Graduate Study and Supervision, the following is very insightful. Graduate Study: Supervision “Dissertations and theses are the students’ own research work, but are developed under the supervision of one or more academic staff. In many cases one staff member will be the sole supervisor; alternatively there may be a main supervisor, with others involved as secondary supervisors for their knowledge of a specialist area of the research, or for their experience in the supervision process. Another arrangement is for two or more staff to act as equal co-supervisors. As well as being assessed by a supervisor, Masters theses are sent out for external assessment by a scholar at another university. MPhil and DPhil theses are sent to two or more external assessors. The supervision begins with a discussion between student and potential supervisor(s) to agree on a topic and the form the research will take. These initial meetings should

be held before the end of teaching in the academic year preceding the year of enrolment for the research project, dissertation or thesis. The student may develop, under the lecturer’s guidance, a reading list or other tasks to prepare for the project over the summer before formal enrolment. Once the project is formally under way, there should be regular supervisory meetings to discuss progress (fortnightly is a common frequency for dissertation or thesis supervision meetings). Once writing up of the project begins, the supervisor provides feedback on written drafts of the work. The final draft of a thesis should be approved by the main supervisor before it is bound. Supervision involves balancing two priorities: students’ need to develop their own reading and research, and to express the results of this process in their own words; and supervisors’ responsibility to ensure that students are aware of the range of sources and publications in the topic area, and that students’ work meets current standards of research and scholarly debate in the subject. In practice this means that students need to read, write and plan for themselves in the lead-up to supervisory meetings, and then take seriously the criticisms and suggestions made by their supervisors - rejecting them only if they can meet the objection with arguments which persuade the supervisor around to the student’s point of view. In many cases the supervisory process takes the form of an ongoing collegial discussion, in which the supervisor may raise various objections. These points may anticipate the sort of objections which the supervisor suspects will be raised by external assessors and other workers in the field. Such criticisms invite students to develop further their methodology and arguments.” Facts: 1. The supervisor provides feedback on written drafts of the work. 2. The final draft of a thesis should be approved by the main supervisor before it is bound. 3. Supervisors’ responsibility [is] to ensure that students are aware of the range of sources and publications in the topic area, and that students’ work meets current standards of research and scholarly debate in the subject. 4. Students need to … take seriously the criticisms and suggestions made by their supervisors - rejecting them only if they can meet the objection with arguments which persuade the supervisor around to the student’s point of view. 5. These points may anticipate the sort of objections which the supervisor suspects will be raised by external assessors and other workers in the field. Let’s look at these facts. 1. Having already looked at anomalies in the Appendices, Bibliography and Introduction of the thesis, and having mentioned the numerous points raised by Kerry Bolton, it is worth asking what feedback was offered by Professor Dov Bing and Ms. Marg Coldham-Fussell? 2. With the glaring errors, and an apparent lack of scholarly research having been done, as well as some questionable claims, who was the “main supervisor” that

approved the thesis? Professor Dov Bing or Ms. Marg Coldham-Fussell, please raise your hand if it was you, or was it a joint effort? 3. Professor Dov Bing and Ms. Marg Coldham-Fussell, what checks were in place to ensure the student’s work meet current standards of research and scholarly debate in the subject? Or, are we to make the assumption that this work is indicative of the “current standards” held and endorsed by the University of Waikato, and other New Zealand Universities, whose Academic staff acted as external assessors and agreed with the supervisors that the work met “current standards of research and scholarly debate in the subject.” 4. This one will be particularly problematic for the University of Waikato. Did Roel van Leeuwen (perhaps using his neo-Pagan occult powers of persuasion) persuade Professor Dov Bing and Ms. Marg Coldham-Fussell around to his point of view? Or, were Professor Dov Bing and Ms. Marg Coldham-Fussell unable to provide an appropriate level of supervision to Roel van Leeuwen? Or perhaps one or both of the supervisors insisted the Mr van Leeuwen “tow the line” and produce a thesis with an oversimplified typology, lack of references for key points, and a muddled bibliography? 5. It must be assumed that by the “final proof” (fact 2) when the thesis was approved by one or both supervisors, either Roel van Leeuwen had persuaded his supervisors that his arguments were watertight (”look into my eyes, you are getting sleepy”) or the supervisors were at fault (before the external assessors were somehow persuaded that the thesis was of a sufficient standard to pass it). The supervisors had to either intentionally ignore the lack of referencing, lack of research, and general problematic themes raises in the thesis, or they did this unintentionally, either through lack of ability or personal bias due to the emotive theme of the thesis. This is only five points (a Diabolic Pentagonal Terms of Reference to use the pseudobabble that seems to be part of the Satanic culture) based on one section of one document from University of Waikato. It would be difficult to assess all the potential ethical problems without knowledge of processes the University of Waikato have in place for ensuring their published ethical codes are followed. Tags: Dov Bing, Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, Marg Coldham-Fussell, neoNazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 21, 2008 at 9:05 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Abstract and Introduction
By satanismnz

Initially I was going to postpone an analysis of the abstract and introduction of “Dreamers of the Dark”. The reason was that it only offers an overview of Thesis on a whole, and can reasonably be expected to lack detailed references as later chapters

will cover the points introduced in greater detail. However, on reviewing the introduction I found it sets the general tone and reliability of the thesis as a whole. Keep in mind that what is raised and suggested by the introduction should give an accurate overview of what will be covered later on, and in the absence of references at this point should be remedied later when the topics are covered. As you read the posts analyzing the thesis, keep in mind Roel van Leeuwen’s stated nature of his thesis: “This thesis examines the way in which the Order bought Satanic and neo-Nazi ideologies together and the resulting synthesis. It also looks at the transition from being a Satanic order led by a neo-Nazi to an openly neo-Nazi Order that uses Satanic philosophy to justify and popularise its conception of National Socialism.” We can therefore carry on in the knowledge that Mr van Leeuwen will provide sufficient research with appropriate references to back up these claims. Specifically he has stated that: 1. “The Order” began as a Satanic order lead by a neo-Nazi 2. “The Order” became openly neo-Nazi using Satanic philosophy to justify and popularise National Socialism. Page viii onwards of the Introduction needs specific addressing. Roel van Leeuwen states: “a reader unfamiliar with current pagan discourse needs to be aware of the necessary distinctions made between modern paganism and Satanism; and within Satanism, the distinction between normative and neo-Nazi expressions.” Van Leeuwen describes modern Pagans by stating: “neo-Pagans have reinterpreted the ancient and classical deities of Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean within a modern context as a form of personal religious expression, and in the process have, in many instances, co-opted elements of indigenous spirituality or from other religious systems such as Hinduism.” “Satanism,” contends van Leeuwen, “on the other hand focuses on one archetypal figure, that of Satan, and centralises the engagement with that figure.” He also notes that “although conceptions of the figure and nature of Satan are extremely varied.” Van Leeuwen goes on to detail that: “For the purposes of this thesis, Satanism itself can be divided into normative Satanism, which is largely Libertarian/Objectivist in nature, and neo-Nazi Satanism. Both understandings of Satanism start with broadly the same conceptual foundations, but the conclusions drawn are radically different. This thesis does not intend to imply that all Satanists (or Pagans) have neo-Nazi leanings but rather that neo-Nazi Satanism remains the province of a small, but vocal and articulate, minority.”

This appears to be the only typology offered by Roel van Leeuwen, that Satanism is either “normative” or “neo-Nazi”. On the surface this may not seem problematic, however it does seem a little basic for a Masters level thesis. It also seems convenient by creating two arbitrary groups which represent “for” or “against” neo-Nazi or Nationalistic philosophies. The biggest problem however is what basis is actually used for determining a “normative” type of Satanism. Van Leeuwen has listed the primary non-New Zealand Satanic organizations as Church of Satan, Order of Nine Angles, Temple of Set, and White Order of Thule. As has already been shown (and can continue being shown) it is possible to claim each of these groups has neo-Nazi leanings. A general introduction to this “synthesis” can be found in my earlier posting: Satanism and Nazism With regards to the Church of Satan, remember that In the Satanic Bible, Anton LaVey wrote: “From every set of principles (be it religious, political or philosophical), some good can be extracted. Amidst the madness of the Hitlerian concept, one point stands out as a shining example of this - ’strength through joy!’” My posting, ‘About Roel van Leeuwen - Part 2‘ shows the ease at which parallels with neo-Nazi philosophy can be drawn, and details members of the Church of Satan considered to have extreme Right-wing political beliefs. It is worth detailing the Church of Satan and “neo-Nazi” sympathies in a little more detail. According to Wikipedia, Boyd Rice “[in] the mid-1980s … became close friends with Anton LaVey, founder and High Priest of the Church of Satan, and was made a Priest, then later a Magister in the Council of Nine of the Church.” and founded “the Social Darwinist think tank called The Abraxas Foundation, named after the ancient Gnostic god Abraxas. The organization promotes authoritarianism, totalitarianism, misanthropism, elitism, is antidemocratic, and has some philosophical overlap with the Church of Satan.” Michael Moynihan, a former associate of Boyd Rice, was “frequently identified as a fascist or neo-fascist by some critics and fans.” He was formerly a member of the Church of Satan. He went on to become a member of the small Asatru collective, Wulfing Kindred, in 1994. In 2001 Moynihan edited an edition of ‘Introduction to Magic’, by Julius Evola and in 2002 edited the first English language translation of the 1953 book Men Among the Ruins, also by by Julius Evola. It needs to be remembered that the ‘Order of the Trapezoid’ started as a body within the Church of Satan: “The O.Tr. was founded as an informal Order within the Church of Satan by the authority of Anton Szandor LaVey as High Priest. Its existence was first announced in the December V/1970 ‘Cloven Hoof’” Lineage of the Order in ‘Order of the Trapezoid - Statement‘ by Michael Aquino. Whether the Church of Satan promote and accept National Socialism is irrelevant to the present argument, as clear parallels can be drawn with Mr Bolton’s publishing of

advertising and literature of the “far Right”. According to Unholy Aliance by Peter Levenda and Norman Mailer: “… James Mason’s Universal Order - which advertises in the satanic newsletter The Black Flame: International Forum of the Church of Satan - sports a ‘backward spinning’ swastika symbol … James Mason (who boasts he joined the American Nazi Party at the age of fourteen) retained that particular form of the swastika even as he extolled Manson as the next Hitler… The collected writings of Mason - as well as his thoughts on George Lincoln Rockwell and the National Sociality Liberation Front … - is entitled Siege. Advertising blurbs in The Black Flame hail it as the ‘Mein Kampf of the 90’s’” This does not establish the Church of Satan as a neo-Nazi outfit, or even particularly sympathetic to neo-Nazi ideologies. However, it does establish an ongoing theme of Satanic groups and periodicals allowing a wide range of heretical ideologies to be promoted, ideologies that the “normative” populace would likely find repugnant, evil, and Satanic. The allegations and refutations of the Temple of Set’s ‘Order of the Trapezoid’ being neo-Nazi or sympathetic to Nazism are commented on briefly in Satanism and Nazism - Part 2 The politic ideologies of the Order of Nine Angles (who openly promote National Socialism and Anarchism as “sinister strategies”) are covered in Satanism and Nazism - Part 3, Satanism and Nazism - Part 4, and Satanism, The ONA, and Politics. Ignoring the White Order of Thule for now, which splintered from The Black Order, it has to be asked: Of the “Big Three” Satanic groups, which can be considered normative and which can be considered neo-Nazi, and by what terms? Roel van Leeuwen has suggested “normative” Satanism is primarily Liberterian/Objectivist in nature. Wikipedia says of Libertarianism that it “is a term used by a broad spectrum of political philosophies which prioritize individual liberty and seek to minimize or even abolish the state. The word libertarian is an antonym of authoritarian.” The Wikipedia entry on Objectivism suggests: “holds that reality exists independent from consciousness; that individual persons are in contact with this reality through sensory perception; that human beings can gain objective knowledge from perception through the process of concept formation; that the proper moral purpose of one’s life is the pursuit of one’s own happiness or rational self-interest; that the only social system consistent with this morality is full respect for individual rights, embodied in pure, consensual laissez-faire capitalism; and that the role of art in human life is to transform humankind’s widest metaphysical ideas, by selective reproduction of reality, into a physical form—a work of art—that one can comprehend and respond to.” The Order of Nine Angle could be said to Libertarian as it seeks to abolish the state, and prioritizes individual liberty. This is particularly evident in ONA and Anarchy I: Magick and Politics. Likewise the quote from ‘Satanism and Race’ given in the previous post (’Biblio-what?‘) clearly states: “The fundamental strategic (or ‘long-

term’) aim of Satanism is to elevate the consciousness of all individuals (Regardless of race) to at least what is now described by ‘Adept consciousness’.” (although this quote is outside the framework of politics). The Order of Nine Angles are unlikely to fall into an Objectivist framework as the emphasis on individual development and anti-Capitalist nature of the Libertarian aspects of their philosophy would seem at odds with “consensual laissez-faire capitalism”. However, are Liberatarian and Objectivist philosophies close enough to state that “normative Satanism” is Libertarian/Objectivist? The Wikipedia article Libertarianism and Objectivism suggests that it is not a simple matter to ascertain whether the two philosophies are compatible or mutually exclusive. It will come down to prior definitions and beliefs as to what each of these philosophies are, and of course individual interpretation and preference. To me, the claim that “normative Satanism” is “Libertarian/Objectivist” offers no substance and suggests that picking a broad philosophical base to attack a narrow “neo-Nazi” base is a deliberate strategy akin to a “Straw man” argument. What about the ‘Satanic Reds‘ who promote a form of Communism (note, this is not necessarily the political variety - read their web site for details). Is Communism Libertarian/Objectivist under the dichotomy of “normative Libertarian/Objectivist” vs “neo-Nazi”? However, using the colour red and sporting a hammer and sickle, associated with political Communism almost certainly sets up a 3rd political avenue for Satanists. This really calls into question such a basic typology as promoted by Roel van Leeuwen. A basic understanding of fallacies may be useful for readers wishing to critically analyze Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis. The final problem here is that Roel van Leeuwen claims that “both understandings of Satanism start with broadly the same conceptual foundations, but the conclusions drawn are radically different.” This will be a difficult position for him to defend, and actually makes little sense when saying “normative Satanism” is basically Libertarian and therefore implying that “neo-Nazi Satanism” is authoritarian. The yin-yang symbol symbolizes that two opposites are part of a whole, and both contain the seeds of their opposite, but it is a little stretch of the academic imagination to say that Libertarian and Authoritarian philosophies could “start with broadly the same conceptual foundations, but the conclusions drawn are radically different.” On Page ix Roel van Leeuwen states: “The second phenomena that will be commented on, though somewhat briefly, is the rhetorical methodology used by the Order to inculcate a pro-Nazi weltanschuung among members and readers. Starting from a position that is within the realms of normative Satanic thought, the Order directs the reader down a path that leads to the Order’s version of National Socialist philosophy by a combination of ‘logical’ thought and flattery. In this way, conceptions of self identity were encouraged to be identified with Satanic identity and so the individual’s ‘will to power’, or the ability to succeed at life, was aligned exclusively with the Satanic paradigm as articulated by

the Order. The result was the inculcation of the idea that if you weren’t a Satanist, you weren’t anything, but if you were a Satanist you were everything- or, at least, among the awakened, enlightened and (spiritually) powerful few.” Hold on, there seems to be something amiss here, so let’s break it down. 1. The Order starts with normative Satanic thought (which according to van Leeuwen has “broadly the same conceptual foundations” as neo-Nazi Satanic thought). 2. The Order directs the reader down a path that leads to the Order’s version of National Socialist philosophy. 3. Conceptions of self identity were encouraged to be identified with Satanic identity 4. The individual’s ‘will to power’, or the ability to succeed at life, was aligned exclusively with the Satanic paradigm as articulated by the Order. 5. The result was the inculcation of the idea that if you weren’t a Satanist, you weren’t anything, but if you were a Satanist you were everything. Okay, so where did that emphasis on “the Order’s version of National Socialist philosophy” disappear to? It seems to disappear after step 2. Mr van Leeuwen appears to be suggesting that: 1. The Order promotes “normative Satanic thought” 2. The Order directs the reader to “National Socialist philosophy” 3. “self identity” was to be “identified with Satanic identity” 4. “will to power” or “the ability to succeed at life” were “aligned exclusively with the Satanic paradigm” of the Order (see 1. The Order promotes “normative Satanic thought”) 5. Not Satanist = Nothing, Satanist = Everything Perhaps during his late nights “ranting about the house at 3am as [he] struggled with researching and reporting [his] material” meant frequent lapses in focus and attention, and he perhaps meant to conclude that the neo-Nazi Satanic Order attempted to promote that if you aren’t a neo-Nazi Satanist, you aren’t anything, or more correctly (by Roel van Leeuwen’s claim that the Order become an “openly neoNazi Order that uses Satanic philosophy to justify and popularise its conception of National Socialism.”) that if you weren’t a neo-Nazi, you weren’t anything. Things aren’t making sense here. Page xi states: “Research for this study was primarily based on the analysis of material published by the Order, including its periodicals (The Watcher, The Heretic, The Nexus, Suspire etc), various internal publications (including various curriculums of study, internal essays, memos and so on), and pamphlets and broadsheets available through ‘Realist Publications’ and other publishing concerns run by Kerry Bolton, the Order’s chief ideologue.” Now, thinking back to the Bibliography, covered briefly in the previous posting ‘Biblio-what?‘ there are some concerns about what exactly was an wasn’t used, and who wrote what. One statement stands out that Roel van leeuwen claims to have used “various internal publications (including various curriculums of study, internal

essays, memos and so on)” A quick look through the bibliography fails to show any “internal” documents. Something isn’t right here, page ix also states, “While access to most of the Order’s periodicals between 1990 and 1998 and major curriculum items (schedules of lessons and essays) have been achieved, access to more informal or internal documents such as letters, memos and essay collections has been uneven. Nevertheless, while this thesis can not claim to represent an exhaustive survey of all possible literature, it does represent a broad review of material that is largely accessible to interested parties.” Firstly, where does Roel van Leeuwen provide evidence for having accessed “major curriculum items (schedules of lessons and essays)”. There is no list in the Bibliography to help a reader identify these things. I will return to this later in the analysis. Secondly, a search of the thesis for the word “internal” shows up on pages, ix, 23 (”internal European Imperialism”), 29 (jackpot!), 32 (jackpot!), 51 (Internal Adept), The “jackpot” on page 29 states: “The internal material of the order, in the form of essays, largely follow the lead of the lessons, expanding and developing on the ideas and adding a degree of sophistication to them.” - I will get to this in the coming weeks, however for now, consider the rest of the comments regarding “internal documents” and consider what access Mr van Leeuwen actually had to internal lessons and essays - or if these things actually existed. The “jackpot” on Page 32 makes the claim: “Internal to the Order, a collection of essays were published as Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism. Ethos functioned as the textbook of the OSV”. So if this was an internal publication, why does Roel van Leeuwen state on page 31 that “… the booklet Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism, … the author (Thorsten Moar) is described as a ‘Grandmaster of an established esoteric Order’” If the document was internal, surely it would say something more along the lines of “official” or “internal” document of the OSV, or identify the “Grandmaster” as being part of the OSV? Footnote 109 on page 32 states “‘The Prince of Darkness: A Heretical Typography’, ‘Satanism, Tradition and the Sinister Way’, both in Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism (Paekakariki: Hesperos Press, 1996).” Why was an internal document being published by Hesperos Press if it was intended for internal circulation? Hesperos Press being the same publisher of the publicly available Suspire Journal previously mentioned. This makes me suspicious. ‘Satanism, Tradition and the Sinister Way‘ is available at the “ODF Archive“. It doesn’t appear to be particularly secretive. I think it is fair to say that with a subtitle of ‘A Basic Introduction to Satanism’ the book ‘Ethos’ was likely an introductory set of essays for the general public that contained little secret information. As for the importance of ‘Ethos’ on Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis it only rates a mention under “Secondary Sources” on page 164 of “Dreamers of the Dark”.

I will get back to claims of knowledge of “internal” documents later in my analysis. The final paragraph of the Introduction could be said to undermine the entire premise of the thesis: “The significance of this bias towards literary study is that there needs to be an awareness of the difference between public and private, as well as official and informal, communications of the Order and between Order members. The importance of this distinction lies in acknowledging that, while the Order may articulate a distinct ideology, how that ideology was received and understood by its members is a separate phenomenon from what was intended by the publication of the said material. In short, how much of the ideology did the rank-and-file adopt, and how much did the hierarchy personally believe?” Ideally, this could have been the basis for an excellent thesis in its own right. “How much of the ideology did the rank-and-file adopt, and how much did the hierarchy personally believe?” According to my brief research, the Order of Nine Angles, who Roel van Leeuwen acknowledges as a major influence on the Order, don’t appear to genuinely “believe” (per se) what they preach. Moreso they advocate extreme experiences and involvements as a “left hand path” to spiritual development - but I have covered this enough already in previous postings. The final sentence of the paragraph appears to be particularly misleading. Van Leeuwen writes, “Within the scope of this study it is not possible to accurately gauge how many people believed in Aeonic theory; it is only possible to examine how the Order wished Aeonic theory to be understood.” The thesis was apparently “a Case-study of a Satanic/Neo-Nazi Synthesis” so the relevance to “how many people believed in Aeonic theory” seems to be a way of deliberately leading the unperceptive reader away from the real questions, like the accuracy of research, the truthful use of references, and an unbiased and academic study of an emotional charged subject. It could be suggested that this is a deliberate ploy to look “unbiased” by “giving the benefit of the doubt” but instead of negating suggestions of neo-Nazism van Leeuwen instead mentions “Aeonic theory” which he hasn’t even introduced yet. It would be equally fair to state, “Within the scope of this study it is not possible to accurately gauge how many people believed in Satanic/neo-Nazi theory; it is only possible to examine how the Order wished Satanic/neo-Nazi theory to be understood.” These things were not possible for Roel van Leeuwen to accurately gauage as “it has not been possible to obtain interviews from former members of the Order.” (page xi, DotD) The glaringly obvious question is, why was it not possible to interview former members of the Order? There is no mention that former members were unable to be contacted, or declined to be interviewed, or that Ethics approval was not given. So, Mr van Leeuwen, explain this, please? It seems you had no problem contacting Mr Bolton and offering to remove defamatory comments about him. The media had no problem interviewing him in response to your thesis being removed from the library

shelves and Internet by the University of Waikato. What responses did other former members give you? Could we guess that they said similar things to the Order of Nine Angles, with regard to insight roles, and experiences, and that this may have undermined the central plot of your thesis? Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 21, 2008 at 9:26 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Dreamers of the Dark Thesis Proposal
By satanismnz

A document alleged to be the thesis proposal for “Dreamers of the Dark” by Roel van Leeuwen has appeared on the Occult News Agency’s page on Scribd.com. I will certainly be analyzing this in due course and posting my thoughts about it here. Keep in mind, a thesis proposal is really the beginning of a conversation between a student and their supervisor(s) and is likely to change during the course of the initial research. However, it will give some idea of the genesis of the thesis, and may give clues as to what the rational for undertaking research on the thesis topic. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 21, 2008 at 2:13 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Nature of the Beast: Satanism
By satanismnz

“…Satanism becomes a kind of Rorschach Test of the individual, both of those who describe themselves as Satanist as well as those who come into contact with ‘Satanism’, allowing the viewer to reflect back to themselves their conscious and unconscious imaginings.” (page 2, DotD) This statement is particularly interesting in light of claims of defamation, intentional misidentification of authorship, and lack of scholarly research. It is clear that Roel van Leeuwen encountered problems and struggled with his research. Roel van Leeuwen is quoted in the media as saying, “… it’s hard not being critical when you’re writing about [neo-Nazi and satanic topics]. There is some good work in my thesis and I would like to see it back on the shelves.”

In “Dreamers of the Dark” van Leeuwen writes of “ranting about the house at 3am as I struggled with researching and reporting my material or vented my frustration at the folly of human nature…” and his dedication speaks of “the nightmare that these people wanted to recreate.” This gives a fairly good indication, based on the available published material by and about Roel van Leeuwen, that he was emotional affected by what he encountered in his research, and even struggled with the research and reporting. It could be suggested that what he saw in the “Rorschach Test” of Satanism reflected back to him his “conscious and unconscious imaginings”. This is another point against scholarly research. Not convinced? Contrast, “Satanism becomes a kind of Rorschach Test of the individual … [reflecting] back to themselves their conscious and unconscious imaginings” with his typology of normative and neo-Nazi Satanism. Points from Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis regarding Satanism effectively say that: 1. “[C]onceptions of the figure and nature of Satan are extremely varied.” (page viii, DotD) 2. “Satanism becomes a kind of Rorschach Test of the individual…” (page 2, DotD) Yet this extremely varied nature, and “Rorschach Test” reflection of “conscious and unconscious imaginings” are apparently boiled down to mere “normative” and “neoNazi”. Also, according to the media, Roel van Leeuwen stated that his thesis was accurate and not designed to attack Mr Bolton. Yet we have the dichotomy of claims that Roel van Leeuwen wrote to Kerry Bolton saying, “The passage you have objected to on page 30 has been deleted as you requested.” and yet stated to the media, “I unequivocally stand by my thesis. There is nothing at all in there that’s defamatory in any way to Bolton.” (It will be shown later that there are more deliberate distortions of fact by attributing things to Kerry Bolton when van Leeuwen’s own references don’t claim this at all.) “Aleister Crowley (1875-1947), the self-proclaimed ‘Great Beast 666’ … did not consider himself a Satanist in any real sense except as a public persona.” (pages 4-5, DotD) Okay, here a precedent is set that claims of being a certain ideology (e.g. Satanist) can be a “public persona.” This is an important point, as the Order of Nine Angles constantly point to forms and insight roles, which, not matter how extreme or repugnant are, at the end of the day, only forms and roles played out. If it was accepted that the head of the ONA is David Myatt (a claim denied by David Myatt himself) then the various ONA personalities are only “public personas” and it is difficult to get a genuine insight into who “the man” actually is. Remember van Leeuwen’s own introduction to this thesis, “How much of the ideology did the rankand-file adopt, and how much did the hierarchy personally believe?”

Additionally, in The Watcher #1 an article appeared entitled ‘Aleister Crowley: Satanist‘ by ‘Thelemite’ which quotes “Crowley’s literary executor and biographer, John Symonds”, who writes: “Crowley’s philosophy takes a bit from here and a bit from there… but… he was more a Satanist than anything else. ‘I serve my great Master Satan’, he wrote in one of his franker confessions, ‘and that august Council composed of Beelzebub, Lucifuge, Asmodeus, Belphegor, Baal, Adrammelech, Lilith and Nahema.’” (John Symonds, The Great Beast). Additionally in the article on Crowley as a Satanist: “In his ritual for the Attainment of Knowledge and Conversation of his Holy Guardian Angel, Crowley identifies himself as the servant of Satan, ‘the Devil, our Lord… whose number of magick is 666, the seal of his servant the Beast’ (Crowley). The occult author Kenneth Grant, a former student of Crowley’s and head of an English OTO lodge, comments that ‘this whole ritual is an invocation of Shaitan (Satan) or Set’, Crowley’s aim being union ‘with his Angel, Shaitan-Aiwaz.’” Not convinced? Where is the reference to evidence that Crowley “did not consider himself a Satanist in any real sense except as a public persona.” This is another example of unreferenced claims, which are not expressed as opinions of the author. Is this the academic standard of the University of Waikato? “The great gift of Crowley was, however, using blasphemy as a path of transcendence or liberation away from constraining, constricting and unthinking societally enforced habit patterns. This ethos of challenge and the seeking of intellectual and spiritual emancipation became the fundamental idea which inspired a new generation of Satanists. To such eyes, society forced on individuals behavioural patterns that were essentially conditioned, unnatural and unthinking, which stultified their reasoning and repressed their True Self. By challenging such culturally defined patterns of behaviour (especially the consequences of religious orthodoxy), one can free oneself from its ‘negative’ hold and become liberated into a whole new understanding of the human ciondition. Satanism had become therapy.” (page 5, DotD) Let’s look at the first statement, which is not referenced, so must assume to be personal opinion: “The great gift of Crowley was … using blasphemy as a path of transcendence or liberation away from constraining, constricting and unthinking societally enforced habit patterns.” What is wrong with this picture? Crowley’s use of blasphemy is a “great gift”, but the promotion of genuinely evil and blasphemous (in modern times) concepts such as Revisionism or Right-wing politics “as a path of transcendence or liberation away from constraining, constricting and unthinking societally enforced habit patterns” is bad? Look at the “great gift” of Crowley in his sacred text, “The Book of the Law” where he states: 49. I am in a secret fourfold word, the blasphemy against all gods of men. 50. Curse them! Curse them! Curse them! 51. With my Hawk’s head I peck at the eyes of Jesus as he hangs upon the cross. 52. I flap my wings in the face of Mohammed & blind him. 53. With my claws I tear out the flesh of the Indian and the Buddhist, Mongol and Din.

54. Bahlasti! Ompehda! I spit on your crapulous creeds. 55. Let Mary inviolate be torn upon wheels: for her sake let all chaste women be utterly despised among you! Now those words are quite offensive, and not only at Christians, Muslims, and Buddhists, but also Indians, Mongols and Dins (racial/ethnic groups?), not to mention “chaste women”. I would challenge Mr van Leeuwen to publically repeat these blasphemous “Great Gifts” if he believes them to be such, or explain how these are acceptable, but other forms of blasphemy within “Satanism” equate to lust for genocide, anti-semitism, and homicidal neo-Nazism (“the nightmare that these people wanted to recreate”). “As youth culture moved to the left, LaVey was moving to the right and flirting with the trappings of Nazism and the Ku Klux Klan(29).” (page 6, DotD) According to Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis proposal, “if it looks like a Nazi, and it smells like a Nazi then it must be a Nazi” - so here again I have to ask, where is the “normative” Satanism that LaVey was supposed to be promoting? “While LaVey did not acknowledge Rand’s influence in the Nine Satanic Statements in the Satanic Bible, he did express his debt to her elsewhere, describing the Church of Satan as being ‘just Ann Rand’s philosophy with ceremony and ritual added. (30)” (page 6, DotD) Footnote 30 directs us to Bill Ellis, Satanism, New Religions, and the Media, page 180 - which, if I am not mistaken from my access to the online version, apparently is referenced from Los Angles Times [17 July 1970]:1, 24-25. This would likely be a claim made about LaVey or by LaVey himself, who is a self-confessed liar: “I’m one helluva liar. Most of my adult life, I’ve been accused of being a charlatan, a phony, an impostor. I guess that makes me about as close to what the Devil’s supposed to be, as anyone. It’s true. I lie constantly, incessantly. Because I lie so often, I’d really be full of shit if I didn’t keep my mouth shut and my bowels open.” - Anton LaVey, Satan Speaks, page 101 On the same page of Ellis’ book LaVey is quoted as having claimed, “Yes, Weishaupt was indeed ‘a practicing Satanist,’ LaVey proudly confirmed, and the Illuminati were ‘quite a powerful force for evil.’”

Raising the Devil by Bill Ellis page 180 For the reliability of claims from Anton LaVey the humble reader may be well advised to read Anton LaVey: Legend and Reality - “compiled by his daughter Zeena and Nikolas Schreck - February 2, 1998″ It would seem that for a source be academically valid it would need to be third party, and not simply quoting LaVey (or a claim about LaVey). Yet there is no reference to critical analysis and comparison of Laveyan Satanism and Ayn Rand’s philosophy. There are undoubtedly similiarities and differences judging by the variety of information promoted by the Church of Satan over the years. The Satanic Bible includes Social Darwinist inspired material also, as recorded by Roel van Leeuwen, “Another unacknowledged work that LaVey cribbed to form the Book of Fire: The Infernal Diatribe (the prologue to the Satanic Bible) was Might is Right, a 1896 paean to survival of the fittest and strong-man politics…” Are we to assume that Social Darwinism is a form of Libertianism/Objectivism? To quote the research of Zeena LaVey and Nikolas Schreck: “REALITY: The Satanic Bible was conceived as a commercial vehicle by paperback publisher Avon Books. Avon approached ASL for some kind of Satanic work to cash in on the Satanism & witchcraft fad of the late 1960s. Pressed for material to meet Avon’s deadline, ASL resorted to plagiarism, assembling extracts from an obscure 1896 tract - Might is Right by Ragnar Redbeard into a ‘Book of Satan’ for the SB, and claiming its authorship by himself. [Ironically these MiR passages are the ones most frequently quoted by ASL disciples.] Another third of the SB consists of John Dee’s “Enochian Keys”, taken directly but again without attribution from Aleister Crowley’s Equinox. The SB’s ‘Nine Satanic Statements’, one of the Church of Satan’s central doctrines, is a paraphrase, again unacknowledged, of passages from Ayn

Rand’s Atlas Shrugged. The last words in the SB - ‘Yankee Rose’ - have been puzzled over for years by readers. ‘YR’ is actually the name of an old popular tune in ASL’s nightclub repertoire.” If these claims are true it hardly makes a ‘paraphrasing’ (and plagiarising) of an author’s work, in an attempt to meet deadlines, evidence that LaVey’s “philosophy” (or lack thereof) was anything remotely ressembling Ayn Rand’s “Libertarian/Objectivism”. And as for “normative Satanism”, if LaVey is shining example of the “nicer side” of Satanism, how about his daughter’s claims: “REALITY: ASL violently beat his wife Diane throughout their marriage. In 1984 a police report was made describing Diane being strangled into unconsciousness by ASL, who was in such a murderous rage that his daughter Karla had to pull him off Diane and drag her outside the house to save her life. ASL routinely physically beat and abused those of his female disciples with whom he had sex, forcing them into prostitution as part of his ‘Satanic counseling’ and collecting their earnings. In 1986 ASL was a passive witness to the sexual molestation of his own grandson by a longtime friend who was later convicted of sex crimes with minors. In 1990 ASL informed a mentally-ill stalker of his daughter Zeena of her whereabouts and the time & location of a public appearance she was scheduled to make, deliberately endangering her life. SOURCES: San Francisco Police records of ASL attack on Diane LaVey, Zeena LaVey, Diane LaVey, Stanton LaVey.” Yet, after exhaustive research, Roel van Leeuwen tells us that, “The Church of Satan is the reference point of almost all modern articulations of Satanism, which are either an adaptation of, or a reaction against, LaVey’s fundamental principles.” (page 6, DotD) Again note the lack of references to the claims that the Church of Satan is reference point. This is speculation, and would be better worded as, “I have chosen to use the Church of Satan as the reference point of almost all modern articulations of Satanism.” “Man’s individual will-to-power. Drawing heavily on the Nietzschian concept of the ubermensch as the idealized Satanist, LaVey taught that life is a struggle and that it is up to the individual to impose his or her own meaning onto the world.” (page 7, DotD) - Nietzsche is an example of Libertarian/Objectivism? According to the Wikipedia article on Nietzsche “Political dictators of the twentieth century, including Stalin, Hitler, and Mussolini read Nietzsche. The Nazis made use of Nietzsche’s philosophy, but did so selectively; this association with National Socialism caused Nietzsche’s reputation to suffer following the Second World War.” Additionally, the Wikipedia article on the Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche doesn’t appear to mention Libertarianism or Objectivism as philsophies that Nietzsche influenced.

Back to the original article on Nietzsche, the following schools of thought, interests, and notable ideas are listed: School/tradition: Weimar Classicism; precursor to Continental philosophy, existentialism, postmodernism, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis Main interests: aesthetics, ethics, ontology, philosophy of history, psychology, valuetheory Notable ideas: Apollonian and Dionysian, death of God, eternal recurrence, herdinstinct, master-slave morality, Übermensch, perspectivism, will to power, ressentiment Keep in mind the mention of “master-slave morality” as I will return to this later in the thesis. “Man, the Animal. … It was also an espousal of social Darwinism and, effectively, a caste and eugenic system.” (page 9, DotD) - Eugenics - yet the Church of Satan and Anton LaVey are Normative, not neo-Nazi? “… the conceptual background of the CoS owes [to] Rand’s caustic observation that ‘[normative] morality demands the sacrifice of your self interest and of your mind’.” (page 10, DotD) This comparison with Rand’s philosophy could be applied to the Order of Nine Angle’s teachings also however, so is not supporting evidence of a “normative Satanism” that is different “neo-Nazi Satanism” allegedly promoted by the Order of the Left Hand Path / Ordo Sinistra Vivendi / Order of the Deorc Fyre. “Normative Satanic understandings see Satanism as a path of individualism and is as much a psychological process as it is a religious one.” (page 11, DotD) Look once again at the writings of the Order of Nine Angles, such as my repeated quote from ‘Satanism and Race’ that states: “The fundamental strategic (or ‘longterm’) aim of Satanism is to elevate the consciousness of all individuals (Regardless of race) to at least what is now described by ‘Adept consciousness’.” The ONA are claimed to be an example of neo-Nazi Satanism, but the key to their philosophy is “a path of individualism” and “psychological process”. I am struggling to see the delineation of this dichotomy of normative versus neo-Nazi. Of course, Roel van Leeuwen has stated, “Both understandings of Satanism start with broadly the same conceptual foundations, but the conclusions drawn are radically different.” “The relationship between Satanic thought and Nazism is complex and conditional. It needs to be emphasised that most Satanists firmly reject the National Socialist ethos on both religious and moral grounds with only a vocal minority adopting a neoNazi/Nationalist reading of Satanic philosophy.” (page 12, DotD) Again, a reference to this statement is absent. Where was the research performed surveying those identified as “Satanists” and finding out their political leanings? Where would one begin in such a task? Would anyone claiming to be a “Satanist” be accepted and if

they then say they reject Nazism then they can be considered a “normative Satanist”, even if their actual understanding of Satanism (as promoted by which “normative” branch of Satanism?) is lacking? And would a researcher know that a rejection or acceptance of Nazism is genuine or for “shock” value, or other Satanic tactics (insight roles, anybody?). “[Walter] Grimwald was one of Bolton’s many pseudonyms (55).” Footnote 55 reads: “The conclusion that Grimwald is Bolton is based on a similarity of writing style, the Renaissance Press connection and that Grimwald was a ‘Former Grandmaster of the Black Order’, a Nazi occult order than was founded and run by Bolton. For the Grimwald/Black Order connection, see Goodrick-Clarke, The Black Sun, p.229″ (page 13, DotD) Here we go, “similarity of writing style”, a “Renaissance Press connection” and that Grimwald was a “Former Grandmaster of the Black Order”, based on page 229 of Goodrick-Clarke’s The Black Sun. The Black Sun page 229 actually reads: “Through his imprints Realist Publications and Renaissace Press, Bolton has published a variety of texts in furtherance of his ’sinister dialectic.’ The list includes Dietrich Eckart: Hitler’s Occult Mentor (1995), Lovecraft’s Fascism (1995) and Blood and Soil: A Heathen Manifesto (1996), all by Wulf Grimwald, a former Grand Master of the Black Order…”

The Black Sun by Goodrick-Clarke page 229 Nothing is actually written that backs up van Leeuwen’s claims as Goodrick-Clarke writes “Bolton has also issued a new edition of Savitri Devi’s The Lightning and the Sun … acts as the international distributor for David Myatt’s ONA and Thormynd Press’s National-Socialist series.” So the evidence from here that Bolton is Walter/Wulf Grimwald are circumstantial to say the least. Using this type of jump in logic, one could conclude that Kerry Bolton is David Myatt (or Savitri Devi) based on the “Renaissance Press connection”. If Roel van Leeuwen had done his research properly, and referenced his sources of information properly then maybe he could be

shown to be correct. This is irrelevant in that it is not very academic to guess at authorship based on “a similarity of writing style”. “In the context of the Satanic movement from the mid-1980s onward, there was certainly an increasing interest by a minority of Satanist in right-wing politics and political expression…” (page 14, DotD) Again, no reference as to how he arrived at the fact a “minority of Satanist” [sic] took interest “in right-wing politics and political expression”. Likewise, where is the reference to the mid-1980’s when it was established that as far back as the late 1960’s that “LaVey was moving to the right and flirting with the trappings of Nazism and the Ku Klux Klan.” (page 6, DotD) and there is established history of the “Order of the Trapezoid” existing from the early days of the Church of Satan through to the current Temple of Set. “The adoption of an Objectivist or Libertarian political philosophy represents one way in which a critique can be launched against not only the values, but also the mechanism of society itself. Neo-Nazism represented another, and it was the potential that Satanism had for disseminating neo-Nazism that attracted Kerry Bolton to the cause and in turn, inspired him to launch the Order of the Left Hand Path.” (page 14, DotD) Unreferenced claims. Where are the references for the claim that “it was the potential that Satanism had for disseminating neo-Nazism that attracted Kerry Bolton”? Making a statement like this needs to offer evidence, and these statements are made in the ‘Summary’ of Chapter 1. If this will be introduced in the next chapter, shouldn’t it be in the introduction rather than summary? This is not an exhaustive analysis of this chapter. There is plenty that could be said about the amount and types of reference material cited (often websites rather than peer reviewed academic literature) to substantiate claims on many more points. However, I believe the points I have made will be sufficient for the reader to get an understanding of the lack of references, and lack of substantiating claims of a “normative” and a “neo-Nazi” form of Satanism, aside from telling us “Satanism becomes a kind of Rorschach Test of the individual…”. Attempts to prove a claim that both “normative” and “neo-Nazi” forms of Satanism start from the same foundation but reach different conclusions are yet to be seen.
This entry was posted on October 22, 2008 at 7:08 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

LaVeyan Satanism
By satanismnz

On the question of whether Laveyan Satanism is Liberatarian/Objectivist or not I discovered that Wikipedia has a page dedicated to Laveyan Satanism. As it seems that Wikipedia has higher quality standards than the University of Waikato I thought it

would be interesting to see what Wikipedia states about the philosophy of Anton LaVey. On Ayn Rand “Current church teachings have laid claim to philosophical ideas such as individualism, self-indulgence, and ‘eye for an eye’ morality, and teachings from Friedrich Nietzsche and Ayn Rand.” On Libertarianism “There are progressive and libertarian elements here; diversity is encouraged, everyone is expected to discover their own sexuality, chart their own personality, and decide their own ambitions in life.” On Objectivism “Associated concepts: Left-Hand Path, Pentagonal Revisionism, Suitheism, Might is Right, Lex talionis, Objectivism, Antinomianism” Ok, perhaps I was wrong, Wikipedia’s standards aren’t higher than Waikato University, as there are no references for where these concepts are claimed to be associated with LaVeyan philosophy. However, could this be Roel van Leeuwen’s source for claims of Libertarian/Objectivism? Afterall, here there is no mention of Fascism or neo-Nazism. However, on the LaVeyan Satanism discussion page there are comments such as the following: “Carducci’s Satanism is more individualist, Laveys contains more dogma and makes Satanism at least having to be base don HIS own intrpretations of Obectivism, revenge, and the other dogmas in Laveys personal Satanism.” [sic] “I’m not certain that the comparison with Ayn Rand is deserved or welcome. Ayn Rand disapproved of violence in all forms, and would have despised Anton LaVey: she opposed mysticism and mystical practices, even in jest, and she would not have appreciated the idea of ‘ghettoising’ the country - no uninitated force. ‘Selfishness’, to an Objectivist, is more than material gain and physical enjoyment: it is creation, enlightenment, understanding, and contentedness with oneself. Additionally, Rand and Objectivists believe that all wealth should be earned: $100 tithings are out.” “Egoism and Objectivism are not synonymous - if there is a genuine link to or influence from Ayn Rand, I should like to hear the case. Otherwise I suggest that this reference is removed.” So it would seem that I am not alone in questioning whether “normative Satanism”, modeled after Anton LaVey’s philosophies and the Church of Satan, can be considered Objectivism, or even Libertarian when it would seem there are claims of LaVey being dogmatic. Of course, these counter claims are equally unreferenced, but they are calling for evidence of the claims that LaVey’s Satanism is Objectivism.

After re-reading my lengthy post on Chapter 1 of Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis I think the point needing to be made is that if Satanism is about freedom of choice then a person’s political stances and ideologies could be incredibly complex, and reducing the choices down to Libertarian/Objectivism or neo-Nazism is being very simplistic. It can only be seen to chosen to prove a preconceived conclusion that the Roel van Leeuwen or his supervisors wished to get across, as it certainly doesn’t appear to be validated by my research to date, and in the absence of academic sources from Roel van Leeuwen I have to assume it is merely his opinion, and he could have equally set up any other arbitrary dichotomy of normative =Anarchist versus Fascist / Democratic / Communist. The fact that LaVeyan Satanism contains elements of Libertarianism and Objectivism would surely make it “eclectic” rather than a pure type of thing. So the “neo-Nazi” variety is also somewhat eclectic from the writings of the Order of Nine Angles and the Order of the Left Hand Path. Bottom line: Academic theses’ require academic evidence to back up statements, or they need to be acknowledged that it is the author’s opinion, based on evidence pointing to this conclusion. When references are absent there is no way of being able to verify the accuracy of these claims and they must be assumed to be opinion alone. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 23, 2008 at 7:00 am and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Satanism in the New Zealand Police
By satanismnz

Given that there has been an increase in the number of people identifying as Satanists in New Zealand it wasn’t long before there would be claims of New Zealand police officers involved in Satanism. My research has shown that back in 2005 there was “headline news” (which I somehow missed…) about a New Zealand Police officer, Rigel Walshe, who is also a member of a Death Metal band, Dawn of Azazel. The band certainly appears to use Satanic imagery such as a pentagram and the goats head, and Rigel Walshe appears to have a tattoo of a trapezoid (such as popularised by the Temple of Set’s Order of the Trapezoid and later the Order of Nine Angles). An article by Kerre Woodham entitled ‘Don’t give up the day job‘ makes the comment that: “much has been made of his statement, lifted from the band’s website, that there should be an eradication of the weak. … Taken at face value, the comment has all sorts of National Socialist overtones and nasty images of skinheads knocking people off their crutches comes to mind.” Walshe is quoted as having stated on the band’s website, “I just wanted to create lyrics that accompany the feeling of the music, total unrestrained violence, but intelligent and thought out. I’m most f––ed off at people that are afraid to confront

their fears, who waste their potential and just follow like sheep, basically the weak and f–-ing mediocre that infest our world.” Walshe is also quotes as having stated: “Thankfully as a member of the armed forces I do not have to endure the red tape to use weapons of the type mentioned.” Inspector Keith Brady, the Counties Manukau police district’s professional standards manager, is quoted as having said: “It involves a police member’s personal life, and I’m not prepared to discuss that in the media. There has been no specific investigation in respect of his involvement in that band.” I have been unable to specifically find any comments on whether Rigel Walshe is a Satanist or whether the imagery used is part of a public persona (outside of police work). However, if he is a Satanist, and promotes non-Libertarian (ie. neo-Nazi) sentiments, then he will be classified as a neo-Nazi Satanist according to the definitions accepted by the University of Waikato and leading New Zealand academics who agreed that Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis on a Satanic neo-Nazi synthesis was well researched and deserving of class honors. This is the problem with a typology of only 2 types in an ideology claimed to have extremely varied views and essentially being a Rorshcach Test reflecting back one’s own unconscious and conscious imaginings. If we accept this typology then it could lead to the conclusion that the New Zealand police have no problems with neo-Nazi Satanism amongst its officers, remembering that Roel van Leeuwen claims that “if it looks like a Nazi, and it smells like a Nazi, then it must be a Nazi.” I am not sure what is more unsettling, reported Satanists in the New Zealand police force (not “normative Satanism” adherents either) or the academic standards being set by New Zealand universities such as the University of Waikato. Tags: Dawn of Azazel, neo-Nazism, New Zealand Police, Rigel Walshe, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 25, 2008 at 2:09 am and is filed under Satanism in New Zealand. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Ethos - A Basic Introduction to Satanism
By satanismnz

In the post entitled ‘Abstract and Introduction‘ I detailed that Roel van Leeuwen claimed that: “Internal to the Order, a collection of essays were published as Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism. Ethos functioned as the textbook of the OSV”. (page 32, DotD) Page 31 of ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ identifies that author as Thorsten Moar, who Roel van Leeuwen’s claims is Harri Baynes: “The belief that Thorsten Moar was Harri Baynes is based on the preface of the booklet Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism, which functioned as the primary textbook of the Order at the time. In it, the

author (Thorsten Moar) is described as a “Grandmaster of an established esoteric Order” at the same time Baynes was leading the OSV.” Page 39 Roel van Leeuwen is claiming that one essay in ‘Ethos’ is written by Kerry Bolton: “Kerry Bolton, ‘Some Questions Answered’, Ethos, 1996″ By page 76 Thorsten Moar has been relegated to the role of editor, “‘Some Questions Answered’ Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism Moar, Thorsten [Harri Baynes] (ed.) (Paekakariki: Hesperos Press, 1996)” and page 78 contains a similar citation, “‘Satanism, Tradition and the Sinister Way’, Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism Moar, Thorsten [Harri Baynes] (ed.) (Paekakariki: Hesperos Press, 1996)” Pages 82 includes another similar claim of Moar as simply an editor. The bibliography likewise has relegated the author (as per page 31, DotD) to simply being the editor: “Moar, Thorsten [Harri Baynes] (ed.) Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism (Paekakariki: Hesperos Press, 1996).” (page 163, DotD). From Roel van Leeuwen’s own statements he claims to have read at least the preface to the thesis, and claims that in the preface of Ethos the author is identified as Thorsten Moar, who he identifies as Harri Baynes. In later chapters Roel van Leeuwen claims that Thorsten Moar was only the editor, and attributes one section of the book as being written by Kerry Bolton. Was this a deliberate change in tactics to try and create the illusion that Kerry Bolton remained a leading member of the Order after he ceased involvement? With regards to the document being internal, I have discovered a review of it in The Nexus #2 which makes no mention of it being for members of the Ordo Sinistra Videndi only and attributes it to Thorsten Moar (giving no indication that Moar is only the editor). If this document was internal to the Order (and assumedly part of the “various internal publications (including various curriculums of study, internal essays, memos and so on)” that Roel van Leeuwen used why was it being offered for sale to the public for $5? Additionally, it is clearly from Hesperos Press, Box 83, Paekakariki, not Realist Publications or Renaissance Press.

The review of Ethos A Basic Introduction to Satanism from The Nexus #2 Where are the internal documents used as part of the primary research? Was Thorsten Moar the editor or author of Ethos? Roel van Leeuwen, Dov Bing, Marg ColdhamFussell, and the external assessors have some explaining to do. Tags: Dov Bing, Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, Marg Coldham-Fussell, neoNazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 25, 2008 at 3:07 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Academic Standards in New Zealand Universities
By satanismnz

It is becoming clear, through my research, that there are some serious questions relating to the academic standards, level of research, and truthfulness of statements made in Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis ‘Dreamers of the Dark: Kerry Bolton and the Order of the Left Hand Path, a Case-study of a Satanic/Neo-Nazi Synthesis’. So far I am not convinced that it is acceptable to created a typology of only two types for what what is a complex smörgåsbord of ideologies, beliefs, and practices grouped into a broad umbrella term of Satanism. The dichotomy proposed by Roel van Leeuwen is actually worthless for analysis of Satanism in any meaningful way. I am not convinced that it is valid academic practice to define Nazism (and neoNazism) by simply saying, “if it looks like a Nazi and it smells like a Nazi then is must be a Nazi.” (Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis proposal) Roel van Leeuwen’s claim about discrimination against “brown skinned” people doesn’t ring true when the Mormon Church history shows that Maori were early supporters of the Latter-day Saints Church in New Zealand and have never been denied access to the priesthood. It is becoming increasingly clear that Roel van Leeuwen has intentionally misattributed works to Kerry Bolton to bolster his claim that Mr Bolton is some kind of mastermind behind a Satanic/neo-Nazi synthesis - long after it is acknowledged that Bolton ceased involvements. If it was not intentional then there has been a lack of research by Roel van Leeuwen. Either way there has been a lack of supervision by Dov Bing and Marg Coldham-Fussell, and a lack of basic academic scrutiny by two academics from other New Zealand Universities. This casts a cloud of suspicion on the Academic Standards in New Zealand Universities and the University of Waikato in particular. The comments of Roel van Leeuwen and Dov Bing to the New Zealand media make the claim that the thesis is well researched and is indicative of the levels of Academic Standards promoted by the University of Waikato. I thought it would be useful to cover what the media reported from Dov Bing and Roel van Leeuwen: Monday, 06 October 2008 Thesis on Neo-Nazism pulled by university By NICOLA BRENNAN - Waikato Times Professor Bing told Nexus the thesis was a first-class piece of work, and was externally moderated by other universities before being published. The thesis was assessed by two senior academics from other New Zealand universities, Professor Bing said. They both deemed it to be a first-class piece of research.

Mr Van Leeuwen said he stood by his work. The thesis had received full-class honours and it was accurate. Tuesday, 07 October 2008 Controversial thesis taken off library shelves By BRITTON BROUN - The Dominion Post Mr van Leeuwen, 39, said his work, Dreamers of the Dark: Kerry Bolton and the Order of the Left Hand Path; a Case-study of a Satanic/Neo Nazi Synthesis, was accurate and not designed to attack Mr Bolton. “But it’s hard not being critical when you’re writing about [neo-Nazi and satanic topics]. There is some good work in my thesis and I would like to see it back on the shelves. “I understand the university has a responsibility to investigate a complaint … but as a general principle these kind of beliefs need to be discussed in New Zealand.” Mr van Leeuwen, a philosophy student specialising in alternative spiritual beliefs, said the thesis was a literature review that analysed what Mr Bolton had written, focusing on how neo-Nazi thought was repackaged for a younger generation. Former Waikato vice-chancellor Bryan Gould could understand the university’s caution from a legal point of view but hoped the thesis would be made public. “I hope they are not too quick to close something down just because someone objected to it. Exposing those ideas and subjecting them to the clear light of day is a perfectly good thing to do.” Media law specialist Steven Price said any work, including an academic one, could be defamatory and Waikato University could be held responsible for making it public. Waikato University removes thesis after complaint from neo-Nazi RadioLIVE / 3 News Thesis supervisor Professor Dov Bing thinks Mr Bolton’s threat to sue is hypocritical. He expects the book to be back on display before long. This last statement attributed to Dov Bing is comical, as nowhere has it been shown that Mr Bolton has threatened anyone with legal action. Mr Bolton has simply raised concerns about the lack of research and numerous mistakes in the thesis. The University of Waikato claims to be investigating the thesis. I have doubts about their ability to research, given the standard of supervision displayed by Dov Bing and Marg Coldham-Fussell, but I am curious what will come out. How will the University attempt to salvage their reputation? Tags: Dov Bing, Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, Marg Coldham-Fussell, neoNazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University

This entry was posted on October 25, 2008 at 7:28 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

There is Nothing Inherently Wrong with Fascism
By satanismnz

“There is nothing inherently wrong with fascism, given the nature and needs of the average citizen… Now it’s not so much a case of avoiding fascism, but of replacing a screwed up, disjointed, fragmented and stupefying kind of fascism with one that is more sensible and truly progressive.” - Anton LaVey I haven’t been able to find the original source for the above quote, however, if true it is again points to a hole in the theory that Anton LaVey and the Church of Satan are Libertarian/Objectivist in opposition to neo-Nazism (which I note is different than neo-Fascism, however as Roel van Leeuwen has reduced politics streams down to either neo-Nazism or Libertarian/Objectivist and stated “If it looks like a Nazi and it smells like a Nazi then it must be a Nazi” I will assume that he intends that Fascism = Nazism = Nationalism = any other kind of Right-wing -ism that one can imagine. Also, Kerry Bolton is associated with Fascism on Wikipedia rather than National Socialism, so as there is no discussion on how any paradoxes are worked around, or how Fascism and National Socialism differ I will accept Roel van Leeuwen’s pragmatic “if I say so” approach and lump Fascism with National Socialism - sorry if it offends any Academic sticklers out there). Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Fascism, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on October 25, 2008 at 10:06 pm and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Roel van Leeuwen’s Thesis Proposal Examined
By satanismnz

Overall the proposal actually suggests a promising thesis which would include am examination of “[Kerry] Bolton’s writings and construct from them a concise and critical understanding of what they are, what he stands for and the implications are both politically and within a larger neo-Pagan context.” Contrary to other parts of the proposal this suggests that capability of conducting unbiased research into the subject matter. I will focus on several points of the proposal which seem to be at odds with my own research, or which seem bizarre (to me) and have carried through to the actual thesis. It looks fairly certain that Roel van Leeuwen has willfully set about constructing a thesis around a belief that Kerry Bolton is a neo-Nazi and Satanist, perhaps with the support and encouragement of his supervisors Dov Bing and Marg Coldham-Fussell.

The the proposal clearly states that “Kerry Bolton is one of New Zealand’s most high profile neo-Nazis as well as being highly active in the equally underground Satanic and volkisch neo-Pagan movement.” The statement talks about Mr Bolton as though the thesis will explore present day activities, whereas Roel van Leeuwen’s own timeline in his thesis shows Bolton resigned from the Ordo Sinistra Vivendi circa 1996. One must wonder where he got his information on Kerry Bolton being a “high profile neo-Nazi” and “highly active in the … Satanic … movement.” Could this have been spoon-fed to him by Dennis Green, who Roel van Leeuwen credits with being the one who “planted the seed from which this thesis grew”? Or perhaps he hadn’t actually done any preliminary research, which is generally a prerequisite for a thesis proposal. Even the much maligned Wikipedia only refers to Kerry Bolton as “a far-right activist in New Zealand. He has been involved in many organisations and has written publications focused around politics and on his interest in metaphysics, religion, and the occult.” It would seem that the Wikipedia article actually tries to make Mr Bolton out to be a Fascist rather than a neo-Nazi (I’m sure most political science professors would have an opinion on whether Fascism is the same as National Socialism – Dov Bing, your thoughts?). Roel van Leeuwen wrote: “This thesis intends to examine the content of Bolton’s conception of neo-Paganism as an articulation of neo-Nazi philosophy.” This would also seem to confirm that Roel van Leeuwen had already decided that Kerry Bolton was articulating neo-Nazi philosophy. It would appear that the original title of the thesis was “Neo-Pagan Religious Inspirations in Far Right and Neo-Nazi Politics.” Nothing personal there about Kerry Bolton, or the claim of a Satanic neo-Nazi synthesis (perhaps the use “synthesis” was an academic euphemism for “conspiracy” - after all in the dedicatation of the thesis Roel van Leeuwen writes of a “nightmare” these people supposedly wished to recreate, which sounds quite conspiratorial. Roel van Leeuwen states that “[w]ithin the last 15 years or so there has been a marked rise in the numbers of neo-Pagans adhering to far right and neo-Nazi political views.” However, is this true? What prior research had Roel van Leeuwen undertaken to establish this fact. It appears to be an accepted fact (perhaps a “fact” given to him by Dennis Green, Dov Bing, or Marg Coldham-Fussell). However, as Roel van Leeuwen’s own thesis states, there has been a marked increase in the number of neo-Pagans, so it is worth raising the question as to whether the percentage of “Right-wing” neo-Pagans has increased, stayed the same, or decreased? It would be expected that this claim would be elaborated and demonstrated in the actual thesis. Roel van Leeuwen begins reducing political ideologies by stating: “While the far right and neo-Nazism are not the same thing when examined in detail, there is enough of a correlation in the primary units of belief upon which religious views impact (nationalism, racism, persecution, apocalytic/mellennial expectations) to group them together as one entity for purposes of this thesis.” While this is not overly problematic if they are grouped using an umbrella term (such a “far right”) specifically labelling them all as Nazi or neo-Nazi begins to take on a different focus

and from an academic position I don’t believe it is a good idea. Compare this with the stated way of deciding if something is neo-Nazi, where Roel van Leeuwen writes of a “pragmatic ‘if it looks like a Nazi and it smells like a Nazi then it must be a Nazi’.” What is intriguing is that Roel van Leeuwen actually proposed to interview two or three of the more active identities in the “local scene”. This sounds like good research, however it is notably absent from the final thesis. It has to be asked, was “ethic committee” approval denied, or was he advised against conducting such research by his supervisors? Either way, why was there no effort to conduct interviews? The thesis introduction also states that it was no possible to interview former members of “the Order” - why not? Generally speaking, in the production of a thesis proposal a certain amount of prior research would seem prudent. However Roel van Leeuwen writes of “the ‘Order of Nine Angles’[sic], one of the groups under study and present in New Zealand, advocates the ‘culling’ of undesirable elements of society (minorities, intellectually, physically and emotionally disabled etc) by means of human sacrifice to the gods of the Order.” This would indicate Roel had apparently done such research; However my research has failed to find reference to the Order of Nine Angles promoting culling of the listed groups of people, and I have to wonder if this “insider knowledge” the Roel van Leeuwen had from personal involvement in the Order of Nine Angles? Some quotes from Order of Nine Angles documents that exist in various collections on publicly available websites: Culling (A Guide To Sacrifice II) “As has been written - opfers are human culling in action. That is, Satanic sacrifice makes a contribution to improving the human stock: removing the worthless, the weak, the diseased (in terms of character).” “The choosing of specific opfers depends on three things: (1) Satanic judgement; (2) and insight into and knowledge of Aeonics and the sinister dialectic; (3) the means for undertaking the act without compromising the individuals involvled are available. Generally, it is the duty of a Master or Mistress to select opfers, althought any Satanist from novice upwards, can suggest suitable targets, in which case the Master or Mistress, after due consideration, will give judgement as to the suitability of the target.” “The suitability of the victim is decided by a Master or Mistress, and once confirmed, the victim or victims are subject to tests (qv. ‘Guidelines for the Testing of Opfers’ MS). Often, the Master or Mistress arranges to meet to victim or victims ‘accidentally’ and so can judge them on a personal level.” “Opfers are not chosen at random …” Examples of “suitable” sacrifices are given. None seem to be “minorities, intellectually, physically and emotionally disabled etc”

Baphoment & Opfer Details the sacrific of a willing individual, a man, who “was man an honourary Priest … and there was a joining between him and one or more women, as Priestesses. … At the ceremony itself, the head of the opfer was severed and displayed…” Sacrifice The description of elements of human sacrifice by someone claiming that they had tried a ritual of sacrifice “before [they] assumed [their] role as heir.” (possibly Anton Long or another Grand Master of the Order of Nine Angles?). It is concluded with “wars are the ultimate sacrificial rites, and it [is] no coincidence that sometimes the sinister dialectic has aided these, and occassionally brought them about.” Again, no claims of deliberate targetting of “minorities, intellectually, physically and emotionally disabled etc” Victims - A Sinister Exposé “It should be understood that all acts undertaken by a Satanic novice to gain experience are perpetrated/done against those (the victims) whose character has been revealed to be or shown to be, by their deeds, defective. This character is judged from a Satanic perspective” “… Satanic acts … which involve victims, are done against those who have revealed themselves to be of defective character.” A list of such defects in character include: “cowardice, treachery, sycophancy, fear, bullying, lack of self control …” While all these Satanic rules and regulations may be just as repugnant as targeting minorities and disabled people, it is still qualitatively different that Roel van Leeuwen’s claims. It would have to be concluded that Roel van Leeuwen is unlikely to have undertaken any substantial preliminary research before proposing the thesis. It can only be surmised as to whether Marg Coldham-Fussell (as the religious studies aspect of the supervisors) had sufficient ability, knowledge, and insight to supervise a thesis on Satanism. While the thesis proposal overall indicates that Roel van Leeuwen identified relevant and important areas for research, it would seem he dispensed with preliminary research before writing the proposal, and at some point increased his focus on a preconceived belief that Kerry Bolton is a neo-Nazi Satanist and went on to distort the facts and perhaps indulge in fantasy to create a tabloid quality piece worthy of the Weekly World News. Tags: Anton Long, Dennis Green, Dov Bing, Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, Marg Coldham-Fussell, neo-Nazism, Order of Nine Angles, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University

This entry was posted on October 29, 2008 at 4:53 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Ethos - A Basic Introduction to Satanism - Part 2
By satanismnz

I have tracked down a copy of Ethos - A Basic Introduction to Satanism. Unfortunately it is the second edition and not the first, so I cannot ascertain at present what changes (if any) were made between editions. The important thing though is that it confirms Roel van Leeuwen’s original statement that Thorsten Moar is the author of this book, not the editor. “The belief that Thorsten Moar was Harri Baynes is based on the preface of the booklet Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism, which functioned as the primary textbook of the Order at the time. In it, the author (Thorsten Moar) is described as a “Grandmaster of an established esoteric Order” at the same time Baynes was leading the OSV.” (Page 31, DotD) Before the preface, a title page has the following information: ETHOS A Basic Introduction to Satanism Second Edition Printed & Published by Hesperos Press (C) Copyright 1995 1996ev Thorsten Moar The copyright notice and the claim that “[t]he author is a founding member, and Grand Master, of an established esoteric Order” would seem to confirm that this is not a collection of essays by Kerry Bolton, edited by Thorsten Moar (whom Roel van Leeuwen identifies as Harri Baynes). However, as will be seen in later parts of the thesis, the claim that Kerry Bolton remained the primary ideologue for “the Order” is central to plot that “the Order” became an openly neo-Nazi organization at the direction of Kerry Bolton.

Cover - Ethos - A Basic Introduction To Satanism by Thorsten Moar

Title Page - Ethos - A Basic Introduction To Satanism by Thorsten Moar

Preface - Ethos - A Basic Introduction To Satanism by Thorsten Moar

Ordo Sinistra Vivendi - Scriptorum This final page (the back cover of the booklet ‘Ethos’) lists books sold by Ordo Sinistra Vivendi. There are several points to note here. The first point is that they are all publicly available works (it must be assumed, due to the general advertising of ‘Ethos’ in The Nexus magazine, and the lack of any statements suggesting otherwise. The entry for ‘Ethos’ itself simply says “A concise primer to the sinister philosophy of an esoteric Order of Satanists - revised and expanded. $8.” This doesn’t fit the state of Roel van Leeuwen where he claimed that “Internal to the Order, a collection of essays were published as Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism. Ethos functioned as the textbook of the OSV”. (page 32, DotD) While I note that the review of ‘Ethos’ in The Nexus #2 states that it “replaces

‘Sinistra Vivendi’ as the basic text of the OSV” this doesn’t make it an internal publication when it was clearly sold to anyone who wished a copy. The second point is the description of the book ‘Black Axis: Fascism and Satanism’ which states, “Essays expounding a particular political approach to Satanic strategy.” This gives an indication that, regardless of who was the ideologue behind these books (Kerry Bolton, Thorsten Moar, Walter/Wulf Grimwald, et al), Fascism (and using the “anything Right-wing is Nazism” approach of Roel van Leeuwen / Dov Bing I will assume that National Socialism also) was a “particular political approach to Satanic strategy” rather than the other way around where Satanism was a strategy used by neo-Nazis to spread their message. I believe I’ve covered this enough in previous posts to give good evidence for my argument that some Satanists (the so called “neoNazi Satanists”) use National Socialism, Fascism, Nationalism and even Anarchism as part of the deliberate strategy to further their Satanic ideals. There is little evidence (apart from claims and allegations) for any of the named “neo-Nazi Satanic” groups and Orders being genuinely aligned to Right-wing politics for the sake of that political form. Rather, the form is used as a subversive strategy to spread fear, panic, terror, disorder, and general ‘evil’ energy throughout the society they are in. Not particularly pleasant perhaps, but these guys are Satanists after all! Finally, Suspire is listed as the “official journal of Ordo Sinistra Vivendi” despite Roel van Leeuwen’s claims that Kerry Bolton’s magazines continued to be the main journal of the Order.
This entry was posted on November 1, 2008 at 1:04 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Satan in Cyberspace
By satanismnz

During my research on Satanism I came across an article entitled ‘Satan in Cyberspace: A Study of Satanism on the Internet in the 1990’s‘ by Roald E. Kristiansen, Ph.D. It is heavily referenced, although unfortunately some of the online references are no longer active. However, there is enough information contained herein to contrast with Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis ‘Dreamers of the Dark’. As this article was written by someone with a Ph.D. it may be argued that his understandings and insights will be at least as good as van Leeuwen’s, and in theory should actually be “better” given that he has had to produce a dissertation at Doctorate level, not a mere Masters. I recommend reading the article in it’s entirety, however here are a few snippets relevant to Roel van Leeuwen’s claims. The Handbook for Chaplains of the U.S. Army gives the historical roots of the Church of Satan as follows:

The Church of Satan is an eclectic body that traces its origin to many sources – classical voodoo, the Hell-Fire Club of eighteenth century England, the ritual magic of Aleister Crowley, and the Black Order of Germany in the 1920s and 1930s. It departs from its predecessors by (1) its organization into a church, and (2) the openness of its magical endeavors. Note the German connection with a “Black Order” - compare this with The Black Order in question in ‘Dreamers of the Dark’. Peter H. Gilmore who has been both a priest in the Church and its media representative, has created the Cyberspace material on the Church of Satan. Gilmore gives a very precise description of contemporary Satanism as follows: a brutal religion of elitism and social Darwinism that seeks to reestablish the reign of the able over the idiotic, of swift justice over injustice, and for a wholesale rejection of egalitarianism as a myth that has crippled the advancement of the human species for the last two thousand years. This doesn’t sound like a particularly Libertarian/Objectivist approach to Satanism. The description has religious, ethical, ideological and political connotations. Satanism is called a religion, which implies that it includes a certain belief system and a set of normative values. Its ethics emphasizes justice, but in the context of denying equal rights for all. Instead of accepting a detailed list of rules of behavior, satanists affirm the need to set up a political system of elitism, which shall promote social Darwinism as the normative ideology. Okay, so is the “normative Satanism” of Roel van Leeuwen one that is Libertarian/Objectivistic or one which is elitist and promotes Social Darwinism? International Satanic organizations recommended by The Church of Satan are The Order of the Left Hand Path (European and New Zealand), The Order of Nine Angels (England), and The Fraternity of Baelder (England). Ok, so this is one reference to the Fraternity of Balder being Satanic (but nothing to mention it being openly neo-Nazi). If this quote is true (the referenced website no longer exists) then the Church of Satan (supposedly “normative”) recommended three “neo-Nazi” Satanist groups, by Roel van Leeuwen’s typology). Again I ask, what is “Normative Satanism”? The whole point in most Satanists’ minds, are the rebellion against traditional religions, ideologies and morality. As stated in the New Zealand Satanist journal, The Watcher,

Satan and the Watchers are thus symbols of rebellion against tyrannical god and moral concepts, which stifle human ascent. We take our stand on the side of rebellion leading to liberation from slave religions, moralities and ideologies, the chief one being in the West at this time Judaeo-Christianity, with Marxism and the Puritan money ethic (ideological liberalism) being excrescences of this heritage. It is very easy to criticize Satanism for their lack of ethical norms, but the problem with such criticism is that it merely proves the point which Satanists want to make: that traditional morality is a remnant of the Judeo-Christian tradition that needs to be done away with. Ethics and morality is simply not a concern for Satanists of any “denomination,” and so to charge Satanists for their lack of moral standing is at best a waste of time. So if Satanism in general has a lack of “ethical norms” what exactly is “normative Satanism”? Note the usage of the quote from The Watcher. Nothing particularly “neoNazi” there, but one showing an oppositional approach - one of being an accuser, and in that sense a “Satanist”. With regard to the CoS, the “danger” becomes acute due to this group’s embrace of social-Darwinist ideals in which they envision a society that has rejected the principle of equality among persons, discarded all social security systems, and envisages the introduction of an elite police force to secure a strict enforcement of the Lex Talionis. If this is indicative of Libertarianism and Objectivism then I fail to see how it is much different that the common conception of Fascism and National Socialism. I am sure that Roel van Leeuwen would no doubt proclaim: “undoubtedly the degree was awarded ‘in recognition of life experience’ and in conjunction with the presentation of a single paper to a ‘prestigious, non-accredited university’.” Otherwise there is a big question of the presentation of Satanism as either “normative” (essentially Libertarian) or neo-Nazi. It is increasingly clear that while the Church of Satan may not be neo-Nazi or Fascist per se, they certainly presented political ideologies that are diametrically opposed to Liberterianism and Anarchism, and which many people would see as Nazi or Fascist through the elitism, Authoritarianism and Totalitarianism. Tags: Church of Satan, Dov Bing, Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, Marg Coldham-Fussell, neo-Nazism, Order of Nine Angles, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on November 1, 2008 at 4:19 am and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The University of Waikato
By satanismnz

“By adopting the trappings of academic rigour and the appearance of professionalism and dignity, such Institutes and their supporters try to deceive their way into the mainstream of society and propagate their propaganda under the guise of free-speech and intellectual rigour.” (Roel van Leeuwen, Page 96, DotD) Okay, so this isn’t actually talking about the University of Waikato, but ironically these words seem fitting for this “Institute” for the trappings of professionalism, dignity, guise of free-speech and intellectual rigour spoken of by van Leeuwen. I write this comment mainly due to the deafening silence from the University (as pointed out by the Editor of the Waikato Times newspaper). The University needs to be called to account on this one. Tags: Waikato University
This entry was posted on November 1, 2008 at 4:36 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - Part 2
By satanismnz

On page 18 of ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ Roel van Leeuwen writes: “While the LDS admitted blacks into the Church from the 1830s, it wasn’t until 1978, well after the period in which Bolton was associated with the Church, that black (and brown) skinned men could be admitted into the priesthood.” His reference is Alan Cherry and Jessie L. Embry, ‘Blacks’ in Encyclopedia of Mormonism, Daniel H. Ludlow(ed.),(New York: Macmillan, 1992), pp.125-127 While I did not have time to source the actual book to check the references I did discover the article on a website. Now, I cannot be 100% sure it is verbatim the same as the printed source, however it is very likely to be the same. What is important to note is that there is no mention of “brown skinned men”, Polynesians, or Maori being excluded from the Church in any way, shape, or form. Read for yourself at: http://www.lightplanet.com/mormons/daily/history/blacks/blacks_eom.htm So it would seem that the claim that “black (and brown) skinned men could be admitted into the priesthood.” is either a deliberate distortion of the facts to paint a dark picture of Kerry Bolton (ie. a deliberate slander) or it is ignorance and inability to conduct basic research and obtain the facts from what is discovered. If the first is the case, then Roel van Leeuwen could be accused of dishonest practice and may well find the University of Waikato revokes his degree. If the second is the case, then Roel van Leeuwen has essentially slandered the LDS Church purely to slander Kerry Bolton. And on these groups, I am certain the University of Waikato would have little choice but to revoke his degree.

No matter which case is correct, it would still seem prudent that Dov Bing and Marg Coldham-Fussell are called to account for their supervision of a thesis which seemingly has more holes than a sieve. This is not to mention the external assessors, who I am sure will be worried if their names should ever come to light. “I’m sorry, I slept through the reading of the thesis” isn’t really going to be an excuse for recommending the thesis be accepted as true, accurate, and worthy of class honors. I am sure the Church of the Latter-day Saints will be concerned that the University of Waikato may well whitewash the situation, accept the thesis as true and accurate, and effectively begin the rewrite of the history of LDS in New Zealand (revisionism anyone?). A thesis of this nature surviving the rigors of academic scrutiny before being passed, and potentially surviving an investigation into its accuracy, would provide highly valid evidence for anyone in the future wishing to claim that LDS discriminated against Maori and Polynesian people in New Zealand. Don’t trust my source? How about an exposé of what is claimed tobe the attitudes of LDS by former members? See Blacks and the Priesthood in the Mormon Church. Homework: Count the number of occurrences for the words “brown,” “Polynesian,” and “Maori” appear in the text. Tags: Roel van Leeuwen, Waikato University, Kerry Bolton, Mormonism, Latter-day Saints, Revisionism
This entry was posted on November 2, 2008 at 12:10 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Foot Soldiers of a New Imperium - Part 1
By satanismnz

Due to the length of Chapter Two - Foot Soldiers of a New Imperium: A Historical and Organisational Survey of the Order of the Left Hand Path, I have decided to split my analysis into separate parts. “Satanism…is a product of Western culture, of the collective psyche, and is a manifestation of the West’s will-to-power(58).” (page 15, DotD) Footnote 58 attributes this quote as being from “Kerry Bolton, ‘The Political and Social Realities of Satanism’, ODF Archive”. As previously established, no reference is given for what is or where is the ODF Archive. A copy of this article is available online at “The Political and Social Realities of Satanism“ The full sentence reads: “Satanism, like the present Plutocratic Imperium, is a product of Western culture, of the collective psyche, and is a manifestation of the West’s will to power.” This could be interpreted as setting up a contrast between Satanism and “the present Plutocratic Imperium” rather than simply speaking of Satanism as an artifact of “Western culture”.

As to authorship, the article is only credited as “Order of the Deorc Fyre 1997″. Accordingly, and owing to the lack of access to a claimed “ODF Archive”, it must be assumed that the attribution of authorship is based purely on stylistic comparisons to Bolton’s other writings. There is, however, some evidence to dispute the author being Kerry Bolton, primarily that this article is apparently written in 1997, and according to the timeline inherent in ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ Bolton resigned from the O.S.V. (or O.D.F.) in 1996. At very least I would have to say this attribution is currently unproven. Without access to the ODF Archive, many things written in the thesis cannot be substantiated. “…a footer-quote from the Russian anarchist philosopher, Mikhail Bakunin: ‘Satan is the first free-thinker and Saviour of the world. He frees Adam and impresses the seal of humanity and liberty on his forehead by making him disobedient’(61).” (page 15, DotD) Here Roel van Leeuwen quotes from The Watcher Issue 1 and attributes the article in question to Kerry Bolton (Footnote 61. Ibid. [Kerry Bolton, ‘Our Aim’ The Watcher 1, 1990]). Roel van Leeuwen states that this was an “unsigned article”, and states on page 154 of ‘Dreamers of the Dark’: “I have credited Bolton with the authorship of most of those anonymous articles based on stylistic comparisons with known articles by Bolton, as well as a caveat found in The Watcher 1 in which Bolton states ’signed articles do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the author’. I understand this to imply that the unsigned articles originate from Bolton.” [sic] This is likely a fair enough assumption for this article, given that it reads like an introduction to the magazine from an editor. However, it isn’t conclusive proof for it being Bolton. If we do accept it is authored by Kerry Bolton, then why is a supposed neo-Nazi quoting an anarchist philosopher? Could it be that Bolton identified with Satan as “the first free-thrinker and Saviour of the world” (hence choosing to become involved in Satanism) rather than his involvement in Satanism being a nefarious plot to spread the evils of National Socialism? Speculation perhaps, but worth mentioning when this quote seems at odds with the assertion of neo-Nazism. “From the first page The Watcher set itself up as an instrument of counter-cultural critique of conventional society, using Satanic rebellion as a leitmotif and applying the trappings of intellectualism and revolutionary discourse.” (page 16, DotD) Here we have some good, relatively unbiased, appraisal of the material at hand. It is worth keeping in mind that the magzine published by Kerry Bolton does indeed sound like “an instrument of counter-cultural critique of conventional society” which could include promotion of Anarchism (e.g. the already cited Mikhail Bakunin), Fascism, National Socialism, or any other manner of counter-cultural ideologies. “As The Watcher changed into The Heretic in 1992 and The Nexus in 1995, it started to articulate an increasingly political agenda which focussed on National Socialism, Nationalism and Third Way politics.” (page 16, DotD)

This “increasingly political agenda” would seem to coincide with Bolton’s distancing himself for Satanism (leaving the Ordo Sinistra Vivendi) and perhaps again immersing himself in political thought, which seems to be more important to him that occultism (given that it looks like Bolton ‘flirted’ with Satanism for perhaps 6 years, given that Roel van Leeuwen states in his thesis that Bolton left the Order in 1996). If you are not a professor of political studies then you could be forgiven for making the assumption that “National Socialism, Nationalism and Third Way politics” fit in nicely in one little pile. However, check out the Wikipedia entry for Third Way (admittedly a disputed article - undoubtedly sabotaged by the neo-Nazi/Satanic apologists to discredit Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis). The entry states: “The Third Way is a term that has been used to describe a variety of political philosophies of governance that embrace a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. Third Way approaches are commonly viewed as representing a centrist compromise between capitalism and socialism, or between market liberalism and democratic socialism. However, proponents of third way philosophies often claim that the third way represents a synthesis of these competing viewpoints, distinct from and superior to both of its sources, rather than simply a compromise or mixture. This claim is embodied in the alternative description of the Third Way as the Radical center.” A photo of Bill Clinton and Tony Blair together states that they are apparently “adherents of the ‘Third Way’.” So, here we must assume that the political spectrum of Waikato University, as taught by Dov Bing, means that Kerry Bolton, Bill Clinton, and Tony Blair are all neo-Nazis. If Wikipedia isn’t good enough for you (and no, it should not be a substitute for further research, unless you are trying to get class honors at Waikato!) then try these on for size: UK Politics: What is the Third Way? (BBC News) About The Third Way (Progressive Policy Institute) Tomorrow’s Politics By Ian Christie and Ian Hargreaves Before you say, “this doesn’t prove that Bolton’s conception of Third Way politics was anything like Bill Clinton and Tony Blair” check out the references in Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis for Bolton’s description, and marvel at the lack of them. “As part of its ongoing programme, The Watcher also announced that it was ‘published quarterly by the Order of the Left Hand Path’…” (page 16, DotD) This must be some of the “good research” that earned Roel van Leeuwen “class honours” for his thesis. “and the journal and the Order, both acting under various names at various times, shared a symbiotic relationship with the journal acting as the public face of the Order

and a tool for recruitment (fig.1). Thus any examination of one must include an examination of the other(63).” (page 16, DotD) The footnote here is #63 “Subscription and Caveat, The Watcher 1, 1990″. The choice of placement is confusing, as it would lead one to read it that it relates to the sentence it is noted in. However, the listed footnote contains nothing specifically relating to a symbiotic relationship between “the journal” and “the Order”. The reason being the journal was clearly an open forum. The Order of the Left Hand Path was the publisher, and presumably Bolton was the editor. The subscription and caveat simply reads: “The Watcher is published quarterly by the Order of the Left-Hand Path. Articles, letter and advertisements welcome. Signed articles do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Editor.” (The Watcher Issue 1) I agree that it would certainly seem wise to examine the contents of the journal for what philosophies and ideologies were promoted, which seems fairly diverse. A list of Satanic organizations and magazines is given that includes: Church of Satan, The Black Flame, Church of S.A.T.A.N., The Raven School/Church of the Raven, Order of the Nine Angles, and The 88 Temple Ov Deities. The last one should not be confused with the Order of Nine Angles’ Temple 88, as this one apparently combined Satanism and Qabalistic ritual (Jewish Nazi Satanists?). Remember the stated aim of the journal: “The aim of The Watcher is to serve as a forum for a broad spectrum of opinion within the range of the Left-Hand Path.” So it seems a bit hasty to say it was symbiotic with the development of the Order, and as noted the official journal of the Ordo Sinistra Vivendi (after Bolton resigned as Magister) was ‘Suspire’. However, Fig 1. of Dreamers of the Dark, on page 16, makes no mention of ‘Suspire’ and would seem to indicate the author’s opinion that “the journal” continued to maintain a symbiotic relationship, even though published accounts would seem to indicate otherwise. Fig1. Timeline of the Order and it’s Journals [sic]

Fig 1. Timeline of the Order and its journals from 'Dreamers of the Dark' by W.R. van Leeuwen (Roel van Leeuwen) - proudly supervised by Dov Bing & Marg ColdhamFussell.

This diagram is somewhat confusing and doesn’t appear to be particularly well explained anywhere in the thesis. It appears that it is primarily included to “prove” that the journal edited by Bolton maintained a symbiotic relation with the Order, including The Black Order, and the White Order of Thule. Later, this will be shown to be incorrect, as The Black Order had its own journal, ‘The Flaming Sword’, conspicuously absent from Roel van Leeuwen’s bibliography and timeline. Is this sloppy research, or is it willful distortion of the facts? If it was the only such error in the thesis it could be put down to accidental oversight, but with the increasing number of holes and distortions I am finding I have to conclude it was very likely a genuine intent to mislead the supervisors and assessors. However, as previously detailed, the thesis is supposed to be critically (but fairly) examined by the supervisor(s) and should be able to withstand secondary analysis by other academics. Next time I will reveal how Roel van Leeuwen has carefully encoded the recipe for Kentucky Fried Chicken into his thesis using an ancient masonic cipher. Stay tuned… Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe, Kerry Bolton, neoNazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on November 4, 2008 at 8:34 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Foot Soldiers of a New Imperium - Part 2
By satanismnz

“Bolton was born in 1956 and raised a Mormon in Lower Hutt, New Zealand(64).” Footnote 64 comes from “Biographical notes from Barrie Sargeant, ‘Kerry Bolton – A Nut or Just a Misunderstood Mormon/Satanist/Nazi?’, 2 December 2004, at Fight Dem Back http://www.fightdemback.org/2004/12/02/kerry-bolton/ (accessed 10/9/7)” According to their website: “Fight dem back! is a trans-Tasman campaign against racial hatred, xenophobia and fascism.” The article itself lists no references to sources of information and judging by the title and judging by the section “Kerry Bolton Trivia - Impress your Friends! Delight your Party Guests!” it would seem to mock Bolton. Even the title of this reference makes it suspect, which leads the reader to conclude Bolton is either “a nut” or is “misunderstood”. By the tone of the website in general (and labelling being as Nutzis) it would appear the articles author likely thinks Kerry Bolton is simply “a nut”. Writing a thesis on someone who is either “a nut” or “misunderstood” seems a little irrelevant, and would seem to make Bolton appear rather unimportant in the greater scheme of things. Quoting a source of biographical information from an anti-Fascist website of dubious pedigree really puts it on par with quoting from Wikipedia, which is generally seem in the Academic community as a cardinal sin. “He was listed as a member of the New Zealand National Socialist Party at age 14 and after participating in the New Zealand Democratic Nationalist Party and the New

Zealand National Front he founded New Force in 1981. By 1980 Bolton had moved to Christchurch and with David Crawford, the former leader of the National Front, cofounded the New Zealand branch of the Church of Odin(65). Paul Spoonley quotes Crawford as saying that the Church of Odin was exclusively for whites, and specifically whites “of non-Jewish descent” and that “the main Odinic law requires loyalty to race”(66). The Church of Odin itself was originally founded in Melbourne in the mid 1930s by Australian lawyer Alexander Rud Mills, after a visit to Nazi Germany and a meeting with Hitler. After the Second World War the Church of Odin died out but it was re-founded after Mill’s death as the neo-Nazi Odinist Fellowship by Danish-Canadian ex-patriot Else Christensen in the 1960s(67). Along with the virulently anti-Semitic and pro-Nazi Church of Odin, Mills also edited the ‘National Socialist’ newspaper and was briefly interned as a possible subversive element by the Australian Government in 1942(68). Despite the racial criteria and National Socialist heritage of the Church of Odin, by 1983 Bolton had left the Church because “it became obvious that the Odinists…” Footnotes 64, 65, and 66 all reference ‘The Politics of Nostalgia‘ by Paul Spoonley. Unfortunately the online version only gives tiny glimpses. However the printed version gives a very different impression of Bolton’s politically formative years. To be fair, a complete copy of the pages cited would need to be put online, but this would violate copyright law (as has been noted, this didn’t stop Roel van Leeuwen using the entire Renaissance Press catalog without permission as an Appendix). However, interested parties wishing to confirm that quotes that I put in here (typographical errors being most likely my own) will have to source their own copy through a library. The following are all quotes from ‘The Politics of Nostalgia‘ by Paul Spoonley: “In Palmerston North … a group of ‘boot boys’ made their presence felt during 1983 and 1984. … Organisationally, they were linked to King-Ansell’s Auckland-based National Socialists in preference to other groups such as New Force.” (page 153) Keep the above quote in mind, as it is quite relevant. “Kerry Bolton was secretary of the New Zealand Democratic Nationalist Party which was formed in 1975…” (page 158) “Crawford and Bolton went on to establish the Church of Odin and New Force.” (page 160) “New Force was founded on 1 March 1981 from the New Zealand Democratic Nationalist Party, and from the activisits who had formed the core of the National Front.” (page 160) “In mid-1983, New Force underwent a change of name. It became the Nationalist Workers Party, and a number of ‘elements’ were ejected from membership. The ’subversive factions’ included a ‘juvenile Nazi element’ with a fetish for German militaria and’free market capitalists (Press Release, 13/6/83). Apparently, the former were youths from the New Zealand National Socialist Party who were giving New Force ‘a bad name’ (Herald, 20/6/83).” (page 161)

“[New Force] reject the presence of skinheads who are explicitly National Socialist, on the grounds that their support would engender public opposition.” (page 162) “Bolton and the others firmly rejected [traditional German-influenced National Socialism] in favour of [a more contemporary nationalism which is British-oriented], and hence the dismissal of the skinheads.” (Page 162) “New Force … sought to avoid their classification as a reactionary or right-wing group.” (page 165) “Bolton used the opportunity to reiterate the anti-capitalist rhetoric of their ideology (the ‘real enemy was the ’stinking face of capitalism’ …)” (page 166) “KERRY BOLTON: A PROFILE … Bolton is one of the young activists born in the 1950s who has a strong commitment to neo-fascist views.” (page 167) According to Roel van Leeuwen’s primary biographical sources Bolton is repeatedly identified as promoting Fascist or neo-Fascist politics. Perhaps in Dov Bing’s political typography there is only “normative Politics” (which is Libertarian/Objectivist) and there is “neo-Nazi Politics” (which is anything else). This could account for the confusion of experienced by Roel van Leeuwen in determining what does and doesn’t look and smell like a Nazi - or perhaps it is the lack of confusion, as if it isn’t clearly Libertarian, then it is Nazi. “He was 14 … his name appears on the membership list of the National Socialist Party in this period.” (page 167) Damning? Proof that Kerry Bolton is a Nazi? Read carefully, around the time that Bolton was 14 his name *allegedly* appeared on the membership list of the National Socialist Party. This is not referenced and no copy of the list is given. But, even if it is accepted that Bolton was a member and buddying Nazi at the wise old age of 14 the previous set of quotes from the book quite clearly detail Bolton’s affiliation with groups distancing themselves from the National Socialist Party, Nazism, and skinheads, and in fact attempting to move outside of the politics of the right wing. Whether they achieved that or failed, it doesn’t make them neo-Nazis, except in Dov Bing’s Political Studies & Knitting Circle. Or do we accept that Roel van Leeuwen managed to slip these things past his “supervisor”. “He left school at 17 and his next political association was with the New Zealand Democratic Nationalist Party in Lower Hutt, a group that he describes as a radical Social Credit group.” (page 167) “Well, New Force policy is that we’re not anti-Jew any more than we are against anyone on account of their race, or religion. You know you have had certain aspects of political Zionism combining together against the interests of the West (Kerry Bolton, Personal Interview, 18/12/81).” (page 168) Two points to note here: 1) New Force Policy is not against Jews or any other race or religion; 2) Spoonley at least went to the trouble of interviewing Mr. Bolton, something Roel van Leeuwen was apparently unable to do, for an unspecified reason.

Presumably he feared Bolton may have contradicted the central premise of the thesis of Bolton being an active neo-Nazi Satanist. “After NZNF, Bolton went on to form New Force with David Crawford. The name of the group is symbolically meant to refer to the opposition to both capitalism and communism, to left and right, hence a ‘new force’.” (page 169) “The only way I can explaint it really is that every time the public saw the term New Force, they also saw the word fascist. … [the media] could have done a lot worse and come out with real smears trying to associate us with Nazism deliberately (Kerry Bolton, Personal Interview, 18/12/81).” (page 169) Again it appears obvious that Bolton did not identify as either a Fascist or a Nazi/neoNazi. His politics seemed to be a synthesis of left and right, perhaps a predecessor of the ‘Third Way politics’ he apparently advocated later. It is likewise interesting to note that Kerry Bolton considered a “real smear” by the media would have been to associate himself and New Force deliberately with Nazism. Presumably Roel van Leeuwen actually read this chapter fully, and critically, and then decided that the smear of “Nazism” should come from Academia rather than the media. This is a very quick overview, and leaves out the claims of racism and various political commentary which is unreferenced and impossible to tell from such preliminary research as to whether some of the things originated from Bolton or other members of the political parties. If Bolton was racist, which Spoonley claims, it contradicts the primary (first) source of information, Fight Dem Back, which claims Bolton has a son who is part-Maori. This apparent contradiction is simply ignored by Roel van Leeuwen, and to me would be evidence that instead of erring on the side of caution he deliberately chooses sources which appear (on the surface) to back up his claims, even if the source calls Bolton a neo-Fascist, who opposed Skinheads and the NZ National Sociality Party. Assuming Spoonley is correct about Bolton having been involved with National Sociality Party at around 14 years of age, there is distinct evidence of a change in attitudes for Bolton in later years. Firstly, Spoonley states that the parties Bolton was involved with opposed Skinheads, and by the ‘New Force’ days were essentially attempting to go beyond the left and the right with a kind of “Third Way” politics. Secondly, even if Bolton was a budding racist in his late teens and early-mid 20’s, as is evidenced by Fight Dem Back, Bolton had a son who is part-Maori, which would mean his “racism” was either public persona, something he never held or recanted later. The only other solution is to attempt to explain why a racist who advocated separation of races (such as Europeans and Maori) would end up in a relationship with someone who was part-Maori, and in turn get them pregnant. Something doesn’t seem right here in Roel van Leeuwen’s research, and I suggest the only intelligent way of overcoming this question would have been to interview Kerry Bolton. Back to the thesis. “This desire to have a politically active neo-Pagan ‘church’ was to bloom strange fruit in the formation of the OLHP seven years later(69).” (page 17-18, DotD)

Footnote 69 references “Bolton, letter to the editor, Herald (26/6/83), cited in Spoonley, p. 170.” which reads: “it became obvious that the Odinists were merely going to be a cult without any relevance to New Zealand politics. (letter to the editor, Herald, 26/6/1983)” Now this may appear picky, but in light of the growing number of anomalies in Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis, I feel it necessary to point out that this footnote is actually more relevant to the previous sentence, which is the direct quote from Spoonley’s book. From my reading, and re-reading, of ‘Dreamers of the Dark‘ it appears to me that these slight ‘errors’ in referencing may be deliberate to make certain statements appear to be referenced. The choice of putting the footnote at the end of the sentence gives the impression that Spoonley, a published and supposedly academically acceptable source, commented on Kerry Bolton’s desire to have a politically active neo-Pagan ‘church’ and mentioned the creation of the OLHP seven years later. This is obviously absurd, as ‘The Politics of Nostalgia’ was published in 1987. The choice of suggesting the OLHP was the neo-Pagan ‘church’ is odd, given that The Black Order is more obviously European-focused paganism that appears to have explored the occult influences of National Socialism in pre-World War 2 Germany, and apparently attracted various members and article writers who expressed National Socialist ideologies (e.g. the writings of David Myatt on National Socialism) it seems confusing that the OLHP is singled out, especially as is stated below the early incarnations at least were essentially “normative” LaVeyan Satanism. Pages 18 and 19 of ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ are primarily the speculation about Mormonism and its influence on Kerry Bolton, and the doctrines of the Order of the Left Hand Path, which has been covered in the postings ‘Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints‘ and ‘Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - Part 2‘ “These three themes; that of elect and unclean races, a secretive and hidden brotherhood of the chosen few, and a vision of history which is firmly entrenched in the realm of faith rather than sound scholarship, would later surface in the teaching of the Order. The primary vehicles by which these themes, and others, were disseminated were the periodicals The Watcher, The Heretic and The Nexus. While the periodicals had numerous contributors, Bolton wrote the majority of articles and certainly the published articles reflected Bolton’s editorial leadership. Even as Bolton started to withdraw from the Order, first resigning as Magister, or Grandmaster, of the Order in 1994 and then his membership in 1996, he maintained editorship of the journals and the journals, under his direction, still acted as the organ of the Order.” Here we have the unreferenced claim being repeated that the journals edited by Kerry Bolton “still acted as the organ of the Order.” Also, claimed is that the majority of articles were written by Bolton (again, no evidence given for this - couldn’t Roel van Leeuwen count the articles credited directly to Bolton, and add this to the articles which were unsigned, or arbitrarily attributed to Bolton?). The claim that “published articles reflected Bolton’s editorial leadership”, while being unreferenced, is also misleading. For example it could be equally said that articles submitted to the magazine (and were signed, and therefore didn’t necessarily reflect the editors views)

reflected the vocal section of the readership of the ever evolving “journal”. Where is the evidence that Bolton refused to publish articles outside his apparently neo-Nazi political spectrum? “The Watcher was the first journal launched in support of the Order and was published quarterly for 11 issues between Jan 1990 till April 1992. It was a photocopied A5 sized magazine, initially eight pages long, but eventually growing to an average of 30 or so pages by the time it had transformed into The Nexus. The Watcher stuck to Satanic themes and articles, primarily publishing anti-Christian articles or articles articulating a Satanic perspective on morality, ethics, government, and social relations, and largely following the lead of LaVeyian [sic] Satanism (even if it was critical of La Vey and the Church of Satan itself).” (Page 20, DotD) Okay, so here we have a supposed neo-Nazi who intended to “subvert” Satanism (and somehow “corrupt” it with evil neo-Nazi philosophies??) using LaVeyan Satanism which is Libertarian/Objectivist and the basis for the definition of “normative Satanism”. Given that this could be a deliberate and diabolically sinister strategy (note the irony of an attempt to corrupt or pervert Satanism in some way!) to slowly introduce ideas which were actually the opposite (and perhaps heretical) of “normative Satanism” it will be interesting to see just what evidence Roel van Leeuwen manages to rustle up through his wordly wizardry. “Christianity, Bolton wrote, was a ‘foul creed’ and subsequent issues of The Watcher all ran articles critical of Christianity, often condensed newspaper report of accusations of paedophilia against priests(75). Such articles noticeably increased in frequency and vituperatude in the wake of the Christchurch Civic Crèche child abuse case during the early 1990s and the subsequent ‘Satanic Panic’ in which the media sensationalised claims by some child therapists of Satanic abuse of some of the children at the crèche. For approximately two years after the breaking of the Civic Creache story, New Zealand newspapers regularly carried stories of alleged Satanic abuse, including organised paedophilia rings run by Satanists, and the Order was (falsely) identified as being involved in such illegal activity by a Sunday News reporter, Les Wilson(76). Bolton appealed to the New Zealand Press Council and won his appeal(77).” (Page 20, DotD) All this leg-work by Bolton to make Satanism “respectable” before making it “disreputable” by introducing neo-Nazi ideologies. Satan’s Excellent Adventure in the Antipodes (New Zealand) by Michael Hill, Professor of Sociology, Victoria University of Wellington covers the background to the ‘Satanic Panic’ of the 1990s. I wonder when we will get the next wave, of supposed neo-Nazi Satanists conspiring to attack academic freedom and question academic standards? “The Satanism that was described in The Watcher was strongly influenced by quasiNietzscherian idealism and stressed that the Satanism of the Order owed nothing to a Satanism that is ‘a spurious Christian concoction’ formulated by Christians and grounded in the fear of ‘alcohol, drugs, death and heavy metal’(78). Satanism, wrote Bolton in ‘Satanic Morality’, is explicitly linked to Nietzsche’s ‘Higher Man’, and Bolton quotes Anton LaVey’s Satanic ritual, Das Tierdrama, “Man is God/God is

Man”(79). This, in itself “implies a strong moral outlook”, which Bolton illustrates with reference to LaVey’s ‘Nine Satanic Statements’ as positive affirmation of the need for ‘pride, strength, ‘splendour’, Will-power, self discipline,” which are necessary to develop the ‘three basics upon which ‘Satanic morality’ can be constructed’(80):” (Page 21, DotD) To read the original article see: The Watcher Issue 2 It is again curious that the journal, symbiotic to the Order of the Left Hand which was “a Satanic order led by a neo-Nazi” (page i, DotD), is promoting philosophy that is “normative” according to the typology already set up in the introduction. “There is little in The Watcher to foreshadow the neo-Nazism that would be increasing evident in The Heretic and The Nexus, beyond the occasional condemnation of ’sickly humanism, whether it be called Christianity or liberalism’ or other potentially anti-Democratic statements(81). In The Watcher there are the two articles which touch on the subject of Judaism, ‘Zealots Pushing For Armageddon’ in The Watcher 5 and ‘Religious Zealots Aiming At World Rule’ in The Watcher 6 but, taken in (apparent) context, they parallel anti-Christian and anti-Islamic rhetoric expressed elsewhere in The Watcher.” (Page 21, DotD) Now, if I was going to produce a thesis with so many distortions of fact, leaps in logic, and outright lies, I would have capitalised on the already documented accusations of Nazism against the ‘Order of the Trapezoid’ run by the Temple of Set, and the promotion of neo-Nazi literature and group in the Church of Satan’s ‘Black Flame’ magazine to prove that Bolton was a neo-Nazi, attracted to Satanism by the already scandalous claims of connections with Nazism, whitepower and totalitarian individuals. Of course, Roel van Leeuwen wasn’t able to do this as he had claimed most Satanism is Libertarian/Objectivist in nature and needed to create a mere polarity out of a complex set of ideologies under the umbrella term of ‘Satanism. In The Watcher Issue 3 there is a letter from Michael A. Aquino, then leader of the Temple of Set, which addressed Bolton as ‘Setian Bolton’ showing that Bolton was in all likelihood a member of the Temple of Set. So it could have been capitalized on that Bolton was already associated with a group with alleged admiration of Nazism, even if they claim it was purely to explore the magic and occult knowledge of individuals and groups in pre-World War Two Germany (The Black Order). Of course, there is still the ‘problem’ of Spoonley’s statements and quotes from Bolton which make it fairly evident that Bolton rejected the label of Nazism, and was not a supporter of either skinheads or the National Socialist Party. As the Nazis apparently used some of the philosophies of Nietzsche, or perhaps “quasi-Nietzscherian idealism” (to borrow from Roel van Leeuwen’s extensive vocabulary of quasi-academic verbage), and van Leeuwen clearly identifies Nietzsche as a source of inspiration for Bolton’s writings at this period of time, couldn’t this have foreshadowed the exploration of a heretic, and genuinely evil political ideology, or are us humble readers, lacking letters after our names, expected to believe that Satanists are really the ‘nice guys’ out there?

Okay, so we will see later how Roel van Leeuwen develops his arguments that neoNazi Bolton, a neo-Fascist ex-Mormon, created a neo-Pagan ‘church’ based on the teachings of Mormonism that expressed increasingly neo-Nazi politics. “While comments referring to ‘an Israeli Reich’ (‘Zealots Pushing For Armageddon’) are deeply offensive, set next to other comments concerning Christianity it becomes part of the offensive against normative values and beliefs. However, there are some scattered hints of Nazi sympathies in some of Bolton’s articles during this early period. In ‘Iraq and the New World Order’, Bolton writes ‘The Axis and Iraq were very definitely genuine dangers to the New World Order’ and thereby linked Saddam Hussein and Adolf Hitler as fighters against the forces of International Capitalism(82).” (Page 21, DotD) Now there is a some distortion by omission in the quotes here. Firstly, while Roel van Leeuwen quotes the included articles, and lists the issue of The Watcher that they appeared in, it fails to identify the author of one of them, and doesn’t offer evidence two of the articles being written by Bolton (aside from the caveat that essentially any article Roel van Leeuwen wants to attribute to Bolton will be thus attributed, thus spake van Leeuwen). ‘Zealots Pushing For Armageddon’, by Elisha ben Azazel - The Watcher Issue 5 ‘Religious Zealots Aiming At World Rule’, uncredited - The Watcher Issue 6 Footnote 82 does however state that it is quoting “Kerry Bolton, ‘Iraq and the New World Order’ The Watcher 7, 1991″ based on Roel van Leeuwen’s honesty and integrity, not to mention great skill at accurately identifying authorship based on writer style and editorial caveats. Perhaps by this stage in the thesis van Leeuwen figured that he had already established most articles could safely be claimed to be written by Bolton, and therefore didn’t need to state that ‘Zealots Pushing For Armageddon’, containing the “an Israeli Reich” comment, was a signed article, and didn’t necessarily reflect the views of the Editor. Roel van Leeuwen shows here also that he likely conducted rather superficial “literary review” for the thesis as he missed the prime opportunity to add another ’sinister’ step in the apparently progress towards full neo-Nazi status, which he awards the Order. The Watcher Issue 6 contains an article by R. Parker, Editor, “Exeat”, England, entitled ‘The Heresy of the Left Hand Path’. This article is significant for several reasons in this critical analysis of ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ both by its absence in this section of the thesis, and by a later inclusion of it in a distorted manner. As far as I can tell, ‘Exeat’ was first advertised in The Watcher Issue 5: “Exeat, a forum to explore the forbidden. Sub. 10 Pounds; Overseas air, $US35. Thormynd Press, Box 4, Church Streeton, Shropshire, England.” A quick search for ‘Thormynd Press‘ on that interweb thing (apparently a complex task for University of Waikato students and supervisors) shows connections to the Order of Nine Angles and David Myatt’s National Socialism books.

Examples for external assessors and supervisors too lazy to check these small and irrelevant details: Bibliography of SATANISM - An Examination of Satanic Black Magic Beest, Christos. Caelethi. The Black Book of Satan II Thormynd Press: Shrewsbury, Year of Fire 103. Brown, Stephen. The Satanic Letters of Stephen Brown Thormynd Press: Shrewsbury, No publishing date given. Long, Anton. Hostia. Secret Teachings of the O.N.A. Volume III Thormynd Press: Shrewsbury, 1992. Long, Anton & O.N.A. Hysteron Proteron. Inner Teachings of the O.N.A. Thormynd Press: Shrewsbury, 1992. Long, Anton. Satanism: An Introduction For Occultists. Thormynd Press: Shrewsbury, 1992. Order of Nine Angles. Hostia. Secret Teachings of the O.N.A. Volume I Thormynd Press: Shrewsbury, 1992. Order of Nine Angles. Hostia. Secret Teachings of the O.N.A. Volume II. Thormynd Press: Shrewsbury, 1992. SOPHOCLES - OEDIPUS THE KING: A Translation by D.W. Myatt, based on Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus; A Translation, Interpretation and Commentary (Thormynd Press, 1991) National-Socialism, Order and the Triumph of Individual Will by David Myatt Footnotes: 1. The civilized nature of National-Socialism is explained in Vision of a Future Golden Age - National-Socialism and the Importance of Honour and in The Nobility of National-Socialism. See also the others works in the fourteen volume Thormynd Press National-Socialist Series. 2. See, for example, ‘The Spiritual Importance of Race’ in The Religion of NationalSocialism (Volume IX of the Thormynd Press National-Socialist Series). 15. Further details concerning this future National-Socialist society are given in: (1) ‘The Harmony of National-Socialism’ in The Numinosity of National-Socialism; (2) ‘The Thousand Year Reich’ in The Enlightenment of National-Socialism; (3) ‘Eugenics and Racial Socialism’ in National-Socialism, Morality and Justice; and (4) ‘National-Socialism and the Fight Against Decadence’ in National-Socialism, Morality and Justice. These works form part of the fourteen volume Thormynd Press National-Socialist Series. 16. This duty is outlined in ‘The Numinous Significance of Adolf Hitler’ in The Enlightenment of National-Socialism; in ‘The Spiritual Importance of Race’ in The Religion of National-Socialism and in ‘The Philosophical Foundations of NationalSocialism’ in The Numinosity of National-Socialism. These works form part of the fourteen volume Thormynd Press National-Socialist Series.

Okay, so nothing here from a simple search of internet based material is academically conclusive, but it provides evidence that Roel van Leeuwen wasn’t doing much research to build a case. Okay, the next piece in the puzzle of distortions of fact that comprise Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis requires turning to pages 74-75 of ‘Dreamers of the Dark’. Here we find: “Bolton and the Order rejected democratic forms of government completely as ‘all great endeavours are founded on might and conquest, upon hierarchy and inequality, upon the recognition of the primacy of the noble and warrior classes, and the recognition of their mastership by the lower classes’(225). In a modern context, liberal democracies were believed to be tools of international capitalism and a pawn of the plutocracy and that ‘…capitalism, [along with Marxism and Christianity are] … expressions of the Judaic attack against the European soul’(226). Democracy is a ’sham’, a ‘pallid myth’ whose symbiotic relationship with capitalist economics ‘keeps a society in a state of perpetual stagnation’(227).” (pages 74-75, DotD) The accompanying footnotes: 224 Wulf Grimwald [Kerry Bolton], ‘Social Darwinism, National Socialism and the Folkish Community’, WOT 225 Kerry Bolton, ‘Law of the Strong’, The Watcher 8, 1991 226 Kerry Bolton, ‘The Numinous Nature of Family and Property’ OSV archive 227 R. Parker, ‘The Heresy of the Left Hand Path’, The Watcher 6, 1991; Thorsten Moar [Harri Baynes], ‘Nationalism, Nature’s Decree’ Suspire I/IV 1996; The Red Priest, ‘Strategies towards Adversity’ ODF Okay, aside from the insistance without reference that Kerry Bolton = Walter/Wulf Grimwald what is dishonest about this? These things are referenced, right? Correct. But, the clever construction of the paragraph makes is look as though all the sources are part of ‘the Order’. There is a mishmash of timelines, a mixture of Order of the Left Hand Path (Libertarian/Objectivist) writings, The Black Order (or White Order of Thule - WOT) writings, and writings from the Order of the Deorc Fyre, after Bolton ceased even being a member. But wait, there is more. R. Parker. The sleepy academics (Dov Bing, Marg Coldham-Fussell, and external assessors) - either bored stiff by the quasi-Bingerian crypto-academicism, or gloating at the beat-up job of a neo-Fascist neo-Nazi exMormon neo-Pagan turned Christian (about to be memorialised in a thesis at a ‘Slightly Better than Life Experience Degree’ University) simply accepted Roel van Leeuwen’s statements that R. Parker was part of “the Order” (perhaps we can say any group with “Order” in the title can be included in “the Order” and that individuals identified as involved are all pseudonyms of Kerry Bolton - so add into this blend: The Order of Saint Benedict, Order of the Table Round [of which van Leeuwen himself is apparently a member], Order of the Garter, Order of Canada and for good measure Order of Magnitude).

But look above (or below, inside or outside, or at least at The Watcher Issue 6) and we see that the article in question, ‘The Heresy of the Left Hand Path’, clearly lists the author as R. Parker, Editor, “Exeat”, England. Wikipedia editors and Fight Dem Back authors please take note: Kerry Bolton can now safely be listed as the editor of “Exeat”, and lived in England in 1991. Further, this is highly quality academic evidence that Kerry Bolton is David Myatt. The current photos circulating on the internet claiming to show David Myatt should immediately be replaced with photos of Kerry Bolton. Note: Issues of The Watcher will soon be posted on this web site. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
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Re: Was Crowley a Satanist?
By satanismnz

The following is taken from a posting on the Yahoo Chat Group ‘Lectisternium’ and is written by Roel van Leeuwen: Re: Was Crowley a Satanist?

Hi all, To add my two cents to the threadI am the author of that thesis mentioned below, which looked at the Order of the Left Hand Path, an organisation started by Kerry Bolton in Wellington, NZ, during the 1990s and which synthesised Satanism with neo-Nazism. As such I watched the thread with some interest. One of the unfortunate things about the thesis is that I did not have space to fully discuss a number of topics that were somewhat tangential to the main thrust of my research- and it would appear that “Crowley the not-Satanist” was one of those. The short reason why I take that position is simply because I do not believe that Crowley did not consider himself a Satanist, nor a worshipper or follower of Satan- his gleeful adoption of ‘To Mega Therion 666′ notwithstanding. While he undoubtedly adopted a Satanic persona from time to time, I believe that it was for public consumption and than anyone halfway familiar with the bulk of his writings as a whole would see that facade for what it was- a facade.

The fact that there is a difference of opinion on this list indicates the multiple perspectives one can have on Crowley, though I do note that the consensus opinion seems to support my original statement, that Crowley should not be considered a Satanist. I would also like to add that the website mentioned below, Satanismnz, is bunk and an example of what neo-Nazis and holocaust deniers do best, twist and distort the written record in order to make it conform to their preconceived and politically motivated ideas. Bolton’s ‘plight’ has received much support from messageboards such as the overtly neo-Nazi and racist Stormfront messageboard and similar sites and individuals but little from elsewhere. At heart, I believe the issue is that Bolton himself is embarrassed that his undeniable Satanic associations has become public knowledge now that he has repositioned himself as a Christian (even if his politics have not shifted much). He has, in the past, tried to brush off his involvement with Satanism as being little more than essentially a publicity officer for the group and that it was, for him, a quaint political experiment. My thesis disproves that rather clearly. Furthermore, Bolton is trying to make out that the thesis was a personal attack on him. It is not, it is an examination of the ideological position of the OLHP and what it advocated- including statements such as National Socialism represents the soul of Western culture. Roel. Yay, the Master Speaks! (or should that be the Master Squeaks). The ‘Master of neo-Bingian jargon’ has the following to say about my outstanding piece of scholarship: “I would also like to add that the website mentioned below, Satanismnz, is bunk and an example of what neo-Nazis and holocaust deniers do best, twist and distort the written record in order to make it conform to their preconceived and politically motivated ideas.” Here we have it from the horses mouth, whoever disagrees with Roel van Leeuwen is a neo-Nazi and a holocaust denier. However, if we reverse his logic, that “neo-Nazis and holocaust deniers do best, twist and distort the written record in order to make it conform to their preconceived and politically motivated ideas.” then this makes Roel van Leeuwen a neo-Nazi and a holocaust denier. Why? He distorts the written record, which is what neo-Nazis and holocaust deniers do best. This aside, why am I suddenly a neo-Nazi and a holocaust denier? I challenge any reader to identify any pro-neo-Nazi or holocaust denial by myself on this blog or any other written or recorded source. Should I say that “liars” will always make false accusations against those who show the liar to be a liar? Liar, liar, your pants are on

fire. Roel, come into public and defend your thesis here! You are welcome to post here and repeat your allegations about me being a neo-Nazi and a holocaust denier. I am neither and if you have evidence that I am, please show us. Otherwise, this is another example of your lies and accusations. “The fact that there is a difference of opinion on this list indicates the multiple perspectives one can have on Crowley, though I do note that the consensus opinion seems to support my original statement, that Crowley should not be considered a Satanist.” Congratulations Roel, you have the support of a bunch of non-academics over actual published sources who would presumably be more academically acceptable? Ok, so if I concede that Crowley only was a Satanist as a public persona (even though you state no reference for this) will you please fill in the blanks with the points I raise in these postings? I dare you. In fact, I double dare you. I am glad that the best you can do to describe this website is to say it is “bunk”. I am flattered, and assume this is an academic term from University of Waikato and is just as fitting as describing Realpolitik as “no bullshit” and “hardcore”, or calling Kulturkampf a Nazi aesthetic. Perhaps you ran out of space to in your thesis to do any more than the describe terms in more than a few syllables. This is on par with the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy describing Earth as ‘harmless’ or ‘mostly harmless’. Good job! With you crusading against the neo-Nazis and Satanists with your kids in tow, I will sleep easy, even if I am accused of being a neo-Nazi holocaust denier. Why not add ‘Satanist’ to the mix? Front up to this website Roel, and answer the questions about your thesis. I will promise you an open forum to comment on all allegations in this page and explain yourself to the world. You want to make a name for yourself, do it here. Front up. Face your ‘accuser’. Have your say - or are you afraid of something? Tags: Roel van Leeuwen, Waikato University, Kerry Bolton, Satanism, neo-Nazism, Dreamers of the Dark, thesis, Aleister Crowley
This entry was posted on November 6, 2008 at 7:52 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

being truthful is not the same as being honest
By satanismnz

“Yep, but in fairness, you may well need to be reminded that being truthful is not the same as being honest.” - Journeyman1717 Tags: Roel van Leeuwen
This entry was posted on November 6, 2008 at 9:14 am and is filed under Roel van Leeuwen. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Heresy of The Left Hand Path
By satanismnz

For those wondering if it is correct that R. Parker was linked with the ONA rather than the OLHP/OSV/ODF (as intimated by Roel van Leeuwen) I noticed that Dark Imperium has posted the article with the additional information as to its source: “This article first appeared in Azoth, a private Order of Nine Angles journal, in late 1990 ev, and was reprinted (with some minor typos) in issue #6 of The Watcher, dated February 1991CE.” - The Heresy of The Left Hand Path Nice and convenient timing by Dark Imperium. Thank you. HBKB Tags: Order of Nine Angles, Satanism
This entry was posted on November 19, 2008 at 8:47 pm and is filed under Satanism. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Great Gift of Blasphemy
By satanismnz

It is clear that Roel van Leeuwen has no problem is essentially championing the blasphemy of Aleister Crowley: “The great gift of Crowley was, however, using blasphemy as a path of transcendence or liberation away from constraining, constricting and unthinking societally enforced habit patterns. This ethos of challenge and the seeking of intellectual and spiritual emancipation became the fundamental idea which inspired a new generation of Satanists. To such eyes, society forced on individuals behavioural patterns that were essentially conditioned, unnatural and unthinking, which stultified their reasoning and repressed their True Self. By challenging such culturally defined patterns of behaviour (especially the consequences of religious orthodoxy), one can free oneself from its ‘negative’ hold and become liberated into a whole new understanding of the human ciondition. Satanism had become therapy.” (page 5, DOTD) Recall what Crowley’s blasphemy entailed (source: “The Book of the Law“) 49. I am in a secret fourfold word, the blasphemy against all gods of men. 50. Curse them! Curse them! Curse them! 51. With my Hawk’s head I peck at the eyes of Jesus as he hangs upon the cross. 52. I flap my wings in the face of Mohammed & blind him. 53. With my claws I tear out the flesh of the Indian and the Buddhist, Mongol and Din. 54. Bahlasti! Ompehda! I spit on your crapulous creeds.

55. Let Mary inviolate be torn upon wheels: for her sake let all chaste women be utterly despised among you! This is acceptible blasphemy (it must be acceptible if it is a “great gift”) according to Roel van Leeuwen and his publishers, the University of Waikato. However, for the Order to practice blasphemy, as claimed here: “To the Order, the role of a Black Mass is to provide the initiate with a ritual environment in which various genuinely blasphemous rites are performed in order to produce a ’shock and a reaction to [normative] values, which though accepted, are unconsciously accepted’[161]. In other words, the blasphemy of the Black Mass is specifically intended to confront the initiate’s unconscious programming and thereby overcome it, allowing the initiate to take another step on the path of liberation.” (pages 51-52, DOTD) Roel van Leeuwen equates the performance of a Satanic rite celebrating Adolf Hitler with the “ritual adoration of Hitler” and does not accept it as equally “liberating” as Crowley’s blasphemy. Why not? “The ritual adoration of Hitler is presented in the guise of an iconoclastic psychospiritual liberation. However, repeated exposure to such experiences also had the effect of normalising, desensitising, and acclimatising the initiate to a pro-Nazi Satanic framework while at the same time associating ‘Hitler’ with positive emotional responses (‘liberation’ and the cathartic satisfaction derived from participation in an emotionally intense ritual).” (page 53, DOTD) But wait, before you decide that it is “correct” to differentiate between one lot of foul mouthed blasphemy and another, have a quick look at Roel van Leeuwen’s sources again. His footnote 161 claims the source to be “‘Satanism, Blasphemy and the Black Mass’, The Heretic 9″. Let’s look that up in the “Heretic archive” shall we? Oh wait… there I go mocking Roel’s secret hidden stash of neo-Nazi Satanic literature. As has already been established in previous postings, ‘Satanism, Blasphemy and the Black Mass’ is an ONA article. The Heretic #9 clearly states ONA 1974 as the source. See also Biblio-what? where it is mention as being in a compendium of ONA articles http://www.satanism-today.com/ONA_VariousManuscripts.pdf (also clearly labeled ONA 197eh). I am forming the opinion that van Leeuwen consulted sauces rather than sources… or is that spirits instead of spirit. Note: I have opted for the pragmatic Leeuwenerian approach to classifying blasphemy: “If it looks like blasphemy, and it smells like blasphemy, then it must be blasphemy.” Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University

This entry was posted on November 19, 2008 at 8:55 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Order of the Deorc Fyre Neo-Nazi?
By satanismnz

In ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ Roel van Leeuwen alleges that “the Order” became an openly neo-Nazi group. However, an interview with a member at around the time of the change from OSV to ODF offers other evidence, and inclusive shows a complete break away from Kerry Bolton, showing he was not the chief ideologue as accused by his accuser. See the document: ODF - Order of the Deorc Fyre You be the judge. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on November 19, 2008 at 9:01 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

The Supervisors - Part 1
By satanismnz

“To my supervisors, Professor Dov Bing and Ms. Marg Coldham-Fussell, I am in your debt.” (page ii, DotD)

Dov Bing
As Dov Bing is named first, we shall begin with him.

Dov Bing - University of Waikato Dov Bing’s staff profile states that “Professor Dov Bing gained his BSocSc from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem and his MA and PhD from the University of Auckland. His research and teaching interests are in international relations, comparative government, and public policy. In area studies his particular interests are China, the Middle East, and the European Union.” The profile gives areas of Dov Bing’s expertise that include: • Political dimensions of race and ethnic relations in New Zealand • Holocaust Denial • The Extreme Right This makes Dov Bing well versed in the areas of politics necessary for the supervision of a thesis claiming to show a synthesis of neo-Nazism (”Extreme Right”) and Satanism. According to the article ‘Death threats and breakdowns - the Holocaust thesis destroyed my life‘ Dov Bing is the man who first alerted the world to Joel Hayward’s thesis which was claimed to be Holocaust denial.

Joel Hayard’s article ‘My overview of “The Canterbury Affair”‘ speaks of harassment: “Most of the garbage I received was unimaginative and only semiliterate, and phrases like “hope you die,” “you’ll get yours,” “die scum!,” “rot in hell,” and “we’ll be waiting for you outside your work” seemed so common that, had the calls and mail not come from different parts of New Zealand or been sent from many different email addresses, I probably would have concluded that they came from one small group of hate-filled people. … Some of this mail even came from a senior academic at another New Zealand university, and, with full specifics, I reported that academic’s behaviour and mail to the Working Party.” Page 29 of the University of Canterbury Report by the Joel Hayward Working Party, December 2000, states: “2.47 On 2 October 1999, Dr Hayward received what he describes as the first of many e-mails from Professor Dov Bing, Professor of Political Studies at the University of Waikato. … Dr Hayward claimed that he had received several nasty e-mails from anonymous persons and was concerned at what action might be taken by Professor Bing and NZJC.” (As a side note the same page of the report states: “The University did not consider that the thesis should be withdrawn from the Library, but accepted the Addendum, which is Appendix B.” (The Addendum essentially being a retraction of his views). Could this be karma for Dov Bing, that after he leaked Joel Hayward’s thesis (which lead to a lot of stress for Hayward) that now a student of him as “done him proud” and produced a thesis which has been removed from the University of Waikato library? (As a side note - Kerry Bolton has taken down his website exposing ‘Dreamers of the Dark‘ and states: “Apparently I am not supposed to have the right to defend myself against a hundred pages of defamation, etc in ref. to the thesis Dreamers of the Dark without incurring the threat of vexatious litigation against me for the sum of ‘at least $300,000′, with even the family home being threatened.” No explanation is given as to who is threatening him, but it is likely someone connected with the thesis, or the University of Waikato itself. Perhaps I will be next being threatened or intimated? Oh wait, if I am Kerry Bolton, then it means I already have been threatened…) Getting by to Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis, let us see some of the political ideology and terminology Dov Bing assisted him with: “…invoking not only a National Socialist aesthetic by utilising the word kulturkampf, but associating it with the ‘hardcore’ and ‘no bullshit’ implications of the words ‘realpolitik’ and ‘esoterrorism’.” (Pages 23-24, DotD) This is my personal favorite. Kulturkampf is a National Socialist aesthetic, and better still realpolitik is “hardcore” and “no bullshit”. “…it started to articulate an increasingly political agenda which focussed on National Socialism, Nationalism and Third Way politics.” (Page 16, DotD)

“In every edition after The Heretic 8, articles were published promoting neo-Nazi, ‘Folkish Nationalist’ or Third Way political ideologies.” (Page 24, DotD) Who am I to question a Professor, but Third Way politics doesn’t seem to fit with the other… “one of these things is not like the others, one of these this is not quite the same…” It would be suggested that Dov Bing is also somewhat knowledgeable about Satanism, as he was after all supervising a thesis which claims to look “at the transition from being a Satanic order led by a neo-Nazi to an openly neo-Nazi Order that uses Satanic philosophy to justify and popularise its conception of National Socialism.” This would suggest that Dov Bing new a lot about the Order of the Deorc Fyre, which was the ‘final’ transition of “the Order” and allegedly an “openly neo-Nazi Order” that only used “Satanic philosophy to justify and popularise its conception of National Socialism.” However, we must keep in mind Roel van Leeuwen’s words of wisdom that “Arguably, membership in one or a number of … organizations would be a necessary pre-requisite before embarking on a work of this nature as fraternal societies are, in most instances, a society apart and thus have their own idiosyncrasies in terminology and approach to matters.” This begs the question of how supervisors can claim to be able to embark on supervising theses dealing with Satanism and neo-Nazism without having been former members… (Absurd I know) Looking at what we can know of the Order of the Deorc Fyre, based on an interview with a member (interviews being lacking from Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis), to see what things are likely to evidence an openly neo-Nazi group: The Grandmaster of the ODF is claimed to have given the reason for changing to the Order of the Deorc Fyre: “”t is felt that this more aptly describes the Order’s philosophy. When we talk of Fyre we are talking of a metaphysical Fire which is realised through Physis or the ‘unfolding’ of those qualities one would consider Satanic. This Fyre, which we term Fyre Weges or Fire of the Way, is an expression of the Western psyche: that is to say, it has specific relevance to those who are part of the Western, or European, culture. However, this is more a matter of practicalities rather than a matter of race.” Ok, so it is claimed to be of relevance to Western or European culture. But, seemingly about practicalities rather than race. “The current Grandmaster is Thorsten Moar, and it has been he who has been chiefly instrumental in the continued development and unfolding of the Order. He was voted into the leadership, upon the resignation of the former magister, by the collective Priesthood and Council of the time.”

So here we have an authoritarian (Fascist / neo-Nazi) group which has some form of ‘democratic’ core. “All members of the ODF are expected to conduct themselves in a manner befitting what we call ‘Satanic honour’. We have no actual ‘rules’ in the Order, and don’t believe we need them -rules are antithecal to Satanism at any rate.” Ok, so here we have an “openly neo-Nazi” group which has “no actual ‘rules’”. This is apparently neo-Nazism. According to Roel van Leeuwen, and his supervisor Dov Bing. I know I would be extremely interested to hear Dov Bing lecturing on politics. I am sure it would be a laugh a minute! What really makes me curious is how does one become a Professor of Political Science, and seem unable to recognise the difference between “normative Politics” (which are primarily Libertarian / Objectivist) and “neoNazi Politics”? Tags: Dov Bing, Dreamers of the Dark, Joel Hayward, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on November 20, 2008 at 8:10 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Foot Soldiers of a New Imperium - Part 3
By satanismnz

“However, a new direction was signalled with the publication of The Heretic 1 in July, 1992. The masthead had changed to ‘Incorporating The Watcher and The Realist’, The Realist being a more politically focused journal published by Bolton’s Realist Publications. The manifesto of The Heretic reads in part ‘The Heretic’ undertakes to publish views of a non-conformist nature, which confront the status quo and slay its sacred cows. We therefore oppose all creeds, ideologies and religions which seek to impose global uniformity on humanity, whether it be in the guise of capitalism, socialism, pacifism, egalitarianism or humanitarianism, or in the name of Christ, Allah or Jehovah(83). The Heretic’s manifesto thus prepares the ground for such ‘non-conformist’ views such sympathetic articles on National Socialism, Nationalism, and race. While the first edition of The Heretic did not contain any blatant examples of neo-Nazi thought or sympathy, it carried advertisements for Stephen Cox’s Pan-European Brotherhood/Brotherhood of Baldur, an English neo-Nazi Nordic/Satanic group, and Might is Right by the pseudonymous Ragnar Redbeard, whom Bolton identifies as New Zealander Arthur Desmond(84). Bolton describes Might as Right as standing alongside Nietzsche and among ‘the most heretical works of the last one hundred years” because it demolished the sacred cows of “christianity, humanitarianism, pacifism, egalitarianism” and, furthermore, ‘Realist Publications dedicated this edition of ‘Might is Right’ to this emerging generation of ‘Iron Youth’, that they may grasp the opportunity to take the future’(85).” (pages 2223, DotD)

Okay, so if The Watcher’s (The aim of which was “to serve as a forum for a broad spectrum of opinion within the range of the Left-Hand Path”) promoting various forms of Satanism wasn’t ‘non-conformist’ enough, Roel van Leeuwen now enlightens us that The Heretic’s manifesto is “preparing the ground” for articles sympathetic to National Socialism, Nationalism, and race. It will become self-evident whether or not increasing numbers of “National Socialist” sympathetic material appeared, however, it will be interesting to see how Roel van Leeuwen proves this to be a deliberate stategy of “repackaging” neo-Nazi thought for a younger generation, purpertated by a neo-Fascist. While there may be no blatant examples of neo-Nazi thought or sympathy in The Heretic Issue 1, Roel van Leeuwen chose some odd examples of adverts that supposedly support his central theme that Bolton was conspiring to create an Satanic / neo-Nazi synthesis. I will get to these in a moment, but it is worth pointing out that this casual research, presented as a Masters level thesis, missed capitalizing on the reviews in Heretic Issue 1: The Fifth Path #3, Editor R. Ward. 66 pages. …Issue #3 carries reviews of music and literature. Featured is Boyd Rice, socialDarwinist musician/composer, priest in the Church of Satan, and founder of the ‘occult-fascist think-tank’, the Abraxas Foundation. Wake #1, Editor Boyd Rice. …”Natures Eternal Fascism” is an attack on the dogma of equality. As the Dov Bing School of Political Correctness, as conveyed by his disciple, Roel van Leeuwen, teaches us, Facism and Nazism are the same thing (hence Bolton, identified in most of van Leeuwen’s sources as a Fascist or neo-Fascist, can also be called a neo-Nazi). The Wikipedia entry on Fascism will show how problematic defining Fascism can be, so taking the “pragamatic” approach of calling whatever you want a Fascist/neo-Nazi/Nationalist/etc allows for crafting a thesis from a preconceived idea. As to the validity of combining National Socialism (or neoNazism) into the umbrella of Fascism, it is worthwhile looking at a leading international authority on Fascism: Zeev Sternhell. He is credited as a leading authority on Fascism and has written several books. This is without mentioning that The Heretic Issue 1 also contains an article by the dreaded David Myatt. Footnote 84 is of particular interest here. It tells us that the source of some the information relating to Balder. What intrigues me the most is van Leeuwen’s choice of title for Cox’s group. Van Leeuwen’s own reference (Goodrick-Clarke The Black Sun, pp.224-226) identifies the group as the Order of the Jarls of Bælder or OJB for short. However, in an what appears to be an effort to obscure the source of the information, and make it sound more “neo-Nazi”, Roel van Leeuwen calls them Stephen Cox’s Pan-European Brotherhood/Brotherhood of Baldur. A google websearch for “Brotherhood of Baldur” turns up very little, and nothing relating to Stephen Cox. The use of the title “Pan-European Brotherhood” could well be an attempt to link them to the Aryan Brotherhood), a white supremacist gang.

On page 225 Goodrick-Clarke suggests that the OJB library has rituals of other “Nazisatanic orders” which includes the Ordo Temple Baphemetis, which is described as “homosexual”. I am surprised that Roel van Leeuwen didn’t leap at the chance to start a conspiracy theory around homosexual neo-Nazi Satanists seeking a holocaust for hetrosexuals, based on such scholarly claims as this single source of mostly unreferenced statements. According to Goodrick-Clarke, “Cox’s political interests are evident from his own publications. Freyr’s Oceanic Western Kingdom (1995) and The Aryan Arctic Atlantis (1995) offer a mystical reappraisal of the Nordic origins of the European peoples…” It goes on to detail Cox’s book The Occult Cycle of the Third Reich (1997) and states that it “presents ‘Nazi Mysteries’ as a ‘creative surge of folk archetype of immense innovation and vision’: the familiar topics include Vril Power, Black Sun, UFOs, the “aeonic insights” of Hitler and Himmler, Darrés blood and soil ecology”. Okay, so here there is the intimation that Cox is a neo-Nazi Satanist based on a few statements from his book. A label for Cox that he deserves? Perhaps, according to Left-wing journalists. But what about Cox and OJB, and later the Arktion Federation? Before I get to that, lets look briefly at page 225 of Goodrick-Clarke’s ‘The Black Sun’ where he writes “Since 1990 the OJB has allegedly grown swiftly…” Yes, that is correct, after all this research into Cox, and his neo-Nazi Satanic Order, all Goodrick-Clarke can claim is that growth was “allegedly” swift. Can this truly be trusted? Footnotes are sparse, and access to primary documents to verify his claims is unlikely to be easy. Further, Goodrick-Clarke claims that “As in the ONA, FL missions involve personal risk and danger and may even overlap with the violent activities of Combat 18.” This is referenced (endnote 35) which simply states the source as “Western Magick and the Way of the Warrior: An Introduction to The Fraternity of the Jarls of Baelder (Reading, U.K.: Fraternity of Baelder, 1991, 1993). Let us take a quick look at how the OJB was marketed, to get a sense of whether or not it aimed to be a) Satanic; b) neo-Nazi. The Watcher #6 contains a brief introduction to Balder: Balder, the name of both a society and a journal, is open to males of at least 18 years. (plans are afoot to set up a Sisterhood section, invoking the Earth/Maternal element.). Fees: 30 Pounds yearly, or 35 Pounds in any other currency. The journal Balder is published monthly and is free to members. “Articles by leading Brothers from all over Europe on magick, mythology, folklore, history, aeonics, Physis Training, and contributions from various secret societies”, are included in the jjournal. Members also receive a parchment membership scroll, 20% discount off the Albion Pilgrimage (a tour of England’s mystical and historic sites), minimum 25% discount off all books and other items produced by the society, participation in quarterly celebrations, future provision for participating in workshops (those far away can do this via correspondence), contacts, and studies in various subjects leading to Grades. Adds Stephen Cox: “Above all is the dynamic of the pan-European potential. Members

now come from 9 countries and their combined knowledge, experience, comments, and communication serve to stimulate all of us. Promote awareness of the individuality of each nation/tribe and rediscovery of the identity of each, and yet an appreciation of the ‘folk’ mission of the tribes combined. A tall order - but in even a little way we play our part!” Balder may be contacted c/- Stephen B Cox, The Studio, Chalkpit Farm, Englefield, Berkshire RG7 5EE, England. Can this be interpreted as Satanic? Maybe, but at a stretch. It is certainly proEuropean Paganism. Can it be interpreted as neo-Nazi? Maybe, as it mentions ‘folk’. But from my, albeit limited, knowledge of paganism the terms family, kith and kin appears to fit in well with Paganism, and Heathenry. A quick introduction can be found on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanic_neopaganism . Use this as a starting point for research, rather than gospel. Some interesting points are made, for example the comment regarding the “Nazi period of World War II” which states: “Point 24 of the National Socialist Party program, stated that the party endorsed ‘Positive Christianity.’” Likewise, “Some Germanic mysticists were victimized by the Nazis: Friedrich Bernhard Marby spent 99 months in KZ Dachau, and Siegfried Adolf Kummer’s fate is unknown. The founder of the original pre-Nazi Deutsches Ahnerbe, Herman Wirth was exiled and prohibited from writing or lecturing because his views of traditional Germanic religion were perceived as incompatible with the goals of the state. Another pioneer of the revival, Ludwig Fahrenkrog, founder of the Germanic Glaubens-Gemeinschaft was prohibited from public speaking or holding religious rituals because he refused to end his public lectures and personal correspondences with the obligatory ‘Heil Hitler’.” It would be interesting to know whether a study of Kummer’s, Wirth’s, or Fahrenkrog’s teachings would earn one the label of neo-Nazi, anti-semite, and Holocaust denier? The old Arktion Federation website is gone, however it isn’t too difficult to find the archived version at: http://web.archive.org/web/20051227154154/www.arktion.org/main.php The Arktion Federation is the later group incorporating the Jarls of Baelder. On the main page we find: The Arktion Federation The Grail of European Spiritual Heritage Welcome to Arktion, the pan-European heritage path of all spiritual worlds. Arktion (The European Heritage Trust) is a unique resource in the world today for cultural and spiritual self-renewal and education. We are a voluntary and non-profit Foundation and strictly non-political. No matter what your path, age, race, religion may be we heartily invite you to explore the vast range of facilities we have generated for your self-evolution in this lifetime. Scroll down to the end of this page and we find:

IMPORTANT NOTICE- Please note these facts: that Arktion refuses to submit to or be bullied or bound by or affiliated with any political creed or religious dogma; neither does it accept, recognise or align itself with politics of any kind no matter of left or right. Neither do we accept that any Church, Religion, or Pagan group has all the answers or the right to absolute authority or representation. The Eternal Divine Oneness beyond human knowing has created many paths to understanding. There should be no conflict, for this is a messianic negation of sentience and spirituality. Although our work is concerned solely with European spirituality and heritage, with regards to membership, ethos, facilities and outlook Arktion does not discriminate on the grounds of race, religion, language, colour, gender or species. Racism & intolerance has no part of our organisation. We joyously celebrate the diversity of Starship Earth and all Her human races, religions, cultures, languages, as well as other species, kingdoms, realms/planes, flora/fauna and landscapes. We hold this wondrous diversity of Holy Mother Earth to be sacred! May your Gods/Goddesses and Ancestors be with you. Blessed be! If you read or hear of anything by an individual or group contradicting these facts please do not worry: it is merely an infantile and malicious lie by sad and sick minds. We pray they may recover from their illness and see the light of truth and human fellowship. Public face or a Satanic neo-Nazi? Or statement of fact? In a criminal court of law the burden of proof is on those making the accusations (the prosecution). It would seem that in academic circles the burden of proof is on the individual or group accused of committing a thought crime or behaving in a certain way. As far as the activities of Stephen Cox go, he was an active Freemason. His masonic biographical material can be found at: http://espah.tripod.com/europeanlibrary/id30.html under the section ‘Our Masonic Librarian’. Remembering that Roel van Leeuwen is also a Freemason (a member of Lodge Te Papa No 316 (Tauranga), Hawke’s Bay Research Lodge No 305 and Waikato Lodge of Research No 445 according to the lecture on http://www.mastermason.com/hbresearch/pages/lecture03.htm) it could be alleged that neo-Nazi Satanists and Freemasons are interlinked. Of course, I would require evidence of such a suggestion beyond the (alleged) membership of Cox in Freemasonry, and the the fact that it is only a claim that Cox is a neo-Nazi Satanist, when his group’s promotional material would suggest otherwise. Note 37 for Chapter 11 of Goodrick-Clarke’s ‘The Black Sun’ cites “The European Library: A Complete Inventory and Guidance Notes,” No. 6 Autumn Equinox 1994. However, this doesn’t give a complete picture of the scope for the European Library. The European Library Subjects & Faculties lists amongst other things, “MASONIC/Hermetic”, “D=HISTORY: … 3a=WW2; 3a2=Korea;3 c= 3rd. Reich; 3b=Fascism/Nat; 3b2-Nationalism; 3b3-StateCommunism.; 3b4-Ethnoseparatism. 4=Prehistoric; 5=Medieval; 6=E.U.; 7= England 7b=Scotland;7c=Ireland; 8Vólkish; 9=USA; 10=Biographies.;11=France;

11b:Carolingians; 12=WW1;”, “G2= GARDENING; G3=Pagan Cookery; G4a=Norse board games; G4b=Norse crafts; G5=Herbs; G6a=Celtic crafts; G7= Crafts;”, “J=MAGICK: … J1= GD/Crowley; J2= Kabala; J3=Enochian; J4= Vampyric; … J7= Shamananic. J8= Faery; J9= Tantric; J10= Gaia/Moon; J11= Wicca; J11b= Gardnerian; J12= Astrology; J13= Skills; J14= Chaos; J15= History; J16= Sex; … J20= Egyptian;” Looks like the plans for a well stocked, and well rounded library, complete with a section for Communism, proving a link between Nazism and Communism perhaps? Look at the page ‘Stephen Cox: Spiritual Lectures‘ where it states: “Please note that lectures will not be given to any political groups.” So, the alleged neo-Nazi Cox won’t lecture to political groups? Hmmmm…. I have been unable to contact Stephen Cox for his comments (I am told he does not discuss matters such as these, perhaps lucky for Roel van Leeuwen). You can read an interview from 1998 to get an understanding of the man and decide for yourself whether accepting Goodrick-Clarke is academic quality or not: An interview with Stephen Cox Further bibliographic nformation on Cox can be found in the article “Our Founder” on the Arktion Federation website. Unfortunately it would seem that someone willing to openly talk about European focused Paganism is setting themselves up for the label of Nazi. I, as the author of this website investigating Roel van Leeuwen’s claims, am now labelled a neo-Nazi Holocaust denier, even if I cannot find any reference to my support of Nazism or denial of the Holocaust. And remember, I am also “likely” to be Kerry Bolton! Even more telling though is Roel van Leeuwen’s recent admission that he didn’t know Cox was a Freemason, but continued insistance that this doesn’t change the fact that Cox is still a neo-Nazi Satanist, and apparently his Masonic brethren were simply unaware of this fact. At very least this shows that van Leeuwen undertook little research of his own, and simply accepted the claims of Goodrick-Clarke. “In issue 3 of The Watcher an article was published by the Order of Nine Angles, an English based Satanic group who had made earlier contributions to The Watcher and The Heretic, entitled ‘Satanism and Race’, which advocated an internal European Imperialism, a Europe for Europeans by which ‘racism- whether White, Black or whatever- is a means, a tactic used by Satanists to achieve … a European Imperium’(86). The Order of Nine Angles, like Cox’s Pan-European Brotherhood, was an openly neo-Nazi group- not that readers of The Watcher or The Heretic would have initially had any prior cause for guessing this was the case as such political affiliations were nowhere in evidence at the time.” (page 23, DotD) See the articles I have already written on the Order of Nine Angles and politics. Note here that Roel van Leeuwen has dispensed with the formal and proper title of Cox’s group, the Order of the Jarls of Balder, and simply gone for “Pan-European Brotherhood”, as if it offers evidence that they are automatically openly neo-Nazi. In fact, re-reading The Black Sun, Goodricke-Clarke doesn’t actually state that they

were “openly Nazi”, only that they were implicated as they archive documents of other “Nazi-satanic orders” (which, by proxy, makes them a Nazi-satanic Order). It doesn’t actually state whether this was overt or covert Nazism. Keep in mind also that Issue 3 of The Watcher contains no such article, and that Roel van Leeuwen’s biography credits multiple issues of The Heretic with running this article. If basic facts can’t be established, what other mistakes are in this thesis? Likewise, which of his two supervisors (Dov Bing and Marg Coldham-Fussell) checked any references, and which of the two anonymous assessors checked anything? “However, issue 3 also ran articles entitled ‘Germany Awake!’, a slogan which was carried on the banner poles of the National Socialist Party during rallies, and ‘Victory for Holocaust Heretic”, in which “German-Canadian civil rights activist” Ernst Zundel was congratulated for having a conviction for Holocaust denial overturned. Bolton, in commenting that “the Holocaust legend has been elevated into Holy Writ in much of the world”, and that to challenge the legend is to “bring down the wrath of the contemporary inquisitors”, deftly utilises language that resonates with Satanic identity. The “Holy Writ”, defended by the “inquisitors”, evokes images of Christian oppression and torture, and so the heretic is thus obliged to oppose this “legend” (i.e. ‘non-fact’) on a matter of principle and in this way the reader is encouraged to identify with Zundel himself, another Satanic/Luciferian rebel fighting against the orthodoxy and oppression of Jehovah/‘the State’.” This is certainly one way of interpreting it. However, with reference to The Heretic’s stated aims, this certainly champions “non-conformist” thought and confronts the status quo. Assumedly, a “Satanist”, being a champion of “free thought”, would choose whether to identify with this or not based on their own beliefs, ideologies, and strategies. I am sure this kind of article provided all manner of debates at the little Satanist tea parties. “In issue 8, the masthead changed yet again, reading “A Journal of the Kulturkampf * Realpolitik * Esoterrorism”, invoking not only a National Socialist aesthetic by utilising the word kulturkampf, but associating it with the ‘hardcore’ and ‘no bullshit’ implications of the words ‘realpolitik’ and ‘esoterrorism’.” Yes, just, when you thought it didn’t get any better than this we have “Kulturkampf” associated with “a National Socialist aesthetic” and “realpolitik” being described as “hardcore” and “no bullshit”. What does this say about the scholarly standards of the University of Waikato and the supervisory skills of Dov Bing, Chief of Political Correctedness. Perhaps the University of Waikato can use some of this in their next advertising campaign, “Waikato University - The ‘No Bullshit’ University”. I won’t pretend to understand the term “esoterrorism” which would seem likely to be a combination of esoteric and terrorism. The usage could mean anything. A quick Google search turns up Genesis P-Orridge - ESOTERRORIST - selected essays 19801988; a posting on Metamagical Grafitti; a roleplaying game by Robin Laws. Suffice it to say, if you attend the University of Waikato you only need to know that it means “hardcore” and “no bullshit”. For sure, for sure! “Issue 8 also saw the introduction of biographic articles, often as the lead article. These biographic pieces were on people or movements of interest to Bolton’s

readership, such as Laibach, musical representatives of the far right ‘New Slovene Art’ collective (The Heretic 8), the Japanese neo-fascist poet Mishima (The Heretic 9), influential American avant-garde musician and crypto-fascist Michael Moynihan (The Heretic 10), ‘Marinetti and Futurism’ in The Nexus 5, Christian Bouchet, founder of Nouvelle Résistance, (The Nexus 6) and poet Ezra Pound (The Nexus 11).” Again note that the “crypto-fascist”, Michael Moynihan, is/was involved in both the Church of Satan (making him paradoxically a “normative Satanist”) and the Asatru movement. “Similarly, a survey of articles reveals an increasing politicisation of The Heretic and The Nexus.” Stop the press! Above we were already informed: “The masthead [of The Heretic] had changed to ‘Incorporating The Watcher and The Realist’, The Realist being a more politically focused journal published by Bolton’s Realist Publications.” Could it have been expedient to combine the two journals into one, without it being a conspiracy? Of course, I am Kerry Bolton (according to Roel van Leeuwen), so I could actually just state, “the fact is, Roel van Leeuwen is wrong.” and leave it at that… (and yes, I am joking - I am not Kerry Bolton, and do not aspire to be). “In every edition after The Heretic 8, articles were published promoting neo-Nazi, ‘Folkish Nationalist’ or Third Way political ideologies.” Here we are conviently being lead along the slippery path of linking neo-Nazi, Folkish Nationalist and Third Way political ideologies. Do you see a similarity of thought going on? Bolton (allegedly) slowly introduced neo-Nazi ideologies as being normal Satanic lines of thought. Van Leeuwen (actually) slowly introduced ideas such as Third Way political ideologies are connected to neo-Nazism, or that Kulturkampf is a Nazi aesthetic. Doing a comparison of writing styles I think I am drawing to the conclusion that Roel van Leeuwen is actually a pseudonym of Kerry Bolton (or vice versa). Roel van Leeuwen = Kerry Bolton. “In ‘An Interview with Christos Beest’, one of the grandmasters of the Order of Nine Angles, Beest describes National Socialism as “a fundamental expression of the Wyrd [fate] of the Western Soul” (The Heretic while a review of another Satanic periodical The Scapegoat in The Heretic 11 lambastes The Scapegoat’s editor and asks if “this…journal is going to become a platform for Whig Liberalism” because the editor had decided to refuse to publish racially themed articles.” (page 24, DotD) Ahh political spats between people of the same ilk… now why can’t all Satanists agree, accept everyone for who they are, and just get on with sacrificing virgins? “The Moynihan interview in The Nexus 10 and articles on American neo-Nazi James Madole, (The Nexus 2), ‘Nationalism: Nature’s Decree’ (The Nexus 5), ‘Fascism As A Civic Religion’ (The Nexus 7) and articles by the then Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamah (‘Defying the Usurers’) and the Southland Division of the New Zealand Fascist Union (‘Fascism as Dialectics’) in issue 14 are a few representative examples of the continuation of the theme that anti-liberalism and National Socialism

were intimately associated with the European soul and the destiny of Europe.” (page 24, DotD) Interesting, again van Leeuwen links anti-liberalism with National Socialism. The article by Malaysian (former) Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamah would be obviously “intimately associated with the European soul and the destiny of Europe”, right? “Viewed as continuity and as a whole, the direction and approach of Bolton’s editorship of these three journals reveals a calculated programme of desensitising and indoctrination, which was most prominent during the transition from The Watcher to The Heretic. The Watcher exclusively published articles of Satanic interest with only a barest hint of the political framework for which Bolton was preparing the ground.” (page 24, DotD) Again, it is taken as a fact (but unreferenced) that this was a deliberate strategy of Bolton. It would seem that the moral highground has been taken, so there is little point in suggesting that the transition was perhaps expedient, perhaps as the readership overlapped, or (shock horror) perhaps the readership of both “‘zines” was rather minimal. But who would write a thesis about something minimal and not particularly noteworthy? “Such hints as the description of liberal democratic values as “sickly humanism” only become ominous in retrospect and was no doubt interpreted by contemporary readers as an indication of a ‘hardcore’ Satanic outlook(87).” (pages 24-25, DotD) And why could this not be the case with Boyd Rice and Michael Moynihan, being both “Fascist” and members of the Church of Satan, and most Satanism it would seem championing the strong? Look at the actual article being referenced (Kerry Bolton, ‘Law of the Strong’, The Watcher and two things are clear: 1. The article is unsigned. Therefore there is no direct evidence that this is Bolton, aside from Roel van Leeuwen’s insistance that all unsigned articles are automatically written by Kerry Bolton. As was shown, this is not necessarily the case. 2. The author, Bolton or otherwise, quotes Aleister Crowley (”The law of the strong: this is our law, and the joy of the world”. Aleister Crowley, Liber AL) who by Roel van Leeuwen’s previous claims was only a Satanist as a persona, and goes on to talk about a Nietzschean (or quasi-Nietzscherian idealism for an acceptable Univeristy of Waikato term) philosophy and (shock horror) normative-Satanism of the Anton Laveyerian variety (from inclusion of Ragnar Redbeard’s “Might is Right” in the Satanic Bible). The conclusion of the article states: “A return to the laws of the cosmos - to the law of the strong, to the mastery of the world by the Masters, a ‘Satanic empire’ of unlimited aspiration and potential which shall Will into Being that Satanically-spawned ‘mighty and renown’ race of “giants” written of in the Hebraic scriptures (Gen. 6:5) with fear and dread.”

Assuming the author is Bolton, the so-called anti-Semite with neo-Nazi agenda, why is he suggesting a race of “giants” written of in Jewish (Hebraic) scriptures? The actual quote is from Genesis 6:4 (maybe a transcription error by the author, or when it was put on the internet): “There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown.” (Genesis 6:4 King James Version) This seems to be a stretch of the imagination to suggest that in “retrospect” there was something “ominous” about an article which draws together streams of thought of Crowley, Nietzsche, Redbeard and the author of the Old Testament book of Genesis. I suggest that this is a bizarre and fanciful claim which is unsubstaniated, as are many other claims made in the thesis. “Similarly, The Watcher contained a number of articles by the Order of Nine Angles, whose ideology would have a profound effect on the OSV. On the whole, the ONA articles are well written, well argued and presented a sophisticated, no-nonsense approach to Satanism and were therefore attractive to the readership of The Watcher. The literary fluency of both ONA writings and Bolton helped to inculcating receptivity to ONA/OSV ideas in the reader. Having worked to established a rapport with the reader, more controversial ideas could then be introduced and the seeds of the Nazi aesthetic would fall on prepared ground.” (page 25, DOTD) “This programme of gradual and progressive indoctrination is also reflected in the lessons that were offered to aspiring members of the Order. The Watcher 2 carried an advertisement for a ‘Correspondence Course in Satanism’, in which was offered a “complete course in the fundamentals of Satanism, as expounded by the OLHP” at the cost of $30 and in which “there are no refunds for failure to complete or pass the course”[88]. The course was administered through the Collegium Satanas and after the successful completion of the course (and the signing of an affirmation of Satanic allegiance) the aspirant was awarded a “certificate of ordination into the Satanic priesthood”[89]. The OLHP correspondence course not been obtainable, but the course that was offered by the OLHP’s successor organisation, the Ordo Sinistra Vivendi (OSV), appear to be similar to the OLHP course of lessons.” (page 25, DOTD) The footnotes 88 and 89 state the source as being “‘Order of the Left Hand Path: Degrees’, OLHP archive”. Here we have a lack of reference to where or what exactly is the “OLHP archive”. What is most bizarre though is the claim that “[t]he OLHP correspondence course not been obtainable, but the course that was offered by the OLHP’s successor organisation, the Ordo Sinistra Vivendi (OSV), appear to be similar to the OLHP course of lessons.” Now this begs the question, if Roel van Leeuwen was unable to view the OLHP course, how can it “appear” similar to the OSV course? According to the information I can find online about the Order of the Left Hand Path degrees: “12. There are three degrees within the OLHP, which are attained by

completing the prescribed examinations, as determined by the Magister: Neophyte I°, Adept II°, Priest/ess III°. 13. The Degrees may only be undertaken by those of at least 18 years of age. 14. Upon Recognition, a Neophyte has one year to apply for the examination of Adept. 15. Examination for the Priesthood is undertaken by Adepts at the invitation of the Magister.” This doesn’t give the impression that simply completing the correspondence course earned a “certificate of ordination into the Satanic priesthood”. Of course, I cannot check the OLHP archive which is the source claimed by Roel van Leeuwen. ‘Dreamers of the Dark’ pages 25-29 detail the correspondence course offered by the Ordo Sinistra Vivendi. Judging by the usage of ‘Sinistra Vivendi’ as the main text and the lessons outlined corresponding exactly to what is online, I conclude that the Order of the Left Hand Path Entrance Examination page http://olhp.50webs.com/olhpmembership.html is likely the same as the OSV course detailed by Roel van Leeuwen as being located at the mysterious “OSV archive”. What appears to be a complete copy of the text ‘Sinistra Vivendi’ can be found here: http://www.scribd.com/doc/7530004/OSV-Ordo-Sinistra-Vivendi The highlights of Roel van Leeuwen’s deliberate distortion of the written word include such unreferenced claims as “Lesson One concludes that humankind is fundamentally an animal and thus is not only holistically part of nature (which contrasts with the ‘anti-nature dogmas such as Judaeo-Christianity’), but ‘whose motivations are genetically based as are all animals’. This concept would be developed by the Order into the rational for such programmes as eugenics, nationalism and racism.” This is a stretch of the imagination, and something Roel van Leeuwen fails to provide credible evidence for from the survey of literature attributed to “the Order” or Kerry Bolton. For example: “The Third Lesson taught ‘The Coming God Race’ and advocated a eugenic programme lest the current social norms of racial and social equality and interracial marriages leads to a universal ‘dumbing down’ of civilisation. The lesson quotes ‘demographic expert Dr Elmer Pendell’, who wrote in Why Civilisations Self Destruct that civilisations collapse when genetic selection is no longer operative: ‘“Men no longer need brains and character to stay alive. The weeding out process has ceased. The birth rate of the mentally slow is higher than the birth rate of the mentally active’[93]. The lesson goes on to say that ‘applied eugenics would require none of the excesses the Hitler regime has been accused of in its implementation’ and suggests financial incentives and disincentives through tax breaks and subsidies would be adequate to the task, though it implies the creation of eugenically based laws and boards could also be a desirable possibility. The desired result of the eugenics programme was ‘the path to godhood…to a new form of humanity which can play among the stars- Homo Galactica’[94].” (page 27, DOTD) The article in question, ‘The Coming God Race‘ contains no references to interracial marriages. Further, it contains quotes from Anton LaVey (normative Satanism): “Now it is the higher man’s role to produce the children of the future. Quality is now more important than quantity. One cherished child who can create will be more

important than ten who can produce - or fifty who can believe! The existence of the man-god will be apparent to even the simplest, who will see the miracle of his creativity.” - Anton LaVey, High Priest, Church of Satan, The Satanic Rituals, page 12. Avon Books, NY, 1972. And Aleister Crowley (apparently not a Satanist): “What has been the result of our fine Christian phrases? In the good old days there was some sort of natural selection; brains and stamina were necessary to survival. The race, as such, consequently improved. But we thought we knew, oh! so much better, and we had Christ’s law and other slush. So the unfit crowded and contaminated the fit. Should we rather not breed humanity for quality?” Aleister Crowley, The Law is For All, page 274. Roel van Leeuwen can’t simply have it all ways and claim that Crowley was not a Satanist, LaVey promoted “normative Satanism” and then claim that a work drawing on these sources is inherently neo-Nazi and racist. The context of the quote from Crowley is clearly one of race = human race. If anything, it would champion nonEuropean races who still live “primitive” lifestyles where brains and stamina are neccessary to survival. The suggestion of racism in this article is false. This research and twisting of words, and assertions of lines of thought not inherent in writings can only be suggested to be willfully dishonest. “The internal material of the order, in the form of essays, largely follow the lead of the lessons, expanding and developing on the ideas and adding a degree of sophistication to them.” (page 29, DOTD) What internal material? This claim echoes the early claim of access to “various internal publications (including various curriculums of study, internal essays, memos and so on)” (page xi, DOTD) which mysterious go uncredited in footnotes or the biblography. It would seemingly be highly relevant to the production of this thesis to detail in what respects this supposed internal material of the Order corresponded with the claimed neo-Nazi agenda of the Order. Instead it is glossed over with the statement that such essays “largely follow the lead of the lessons” although it claims (without evidence) that these internal essays work on “expanding and developing on the ideas and adding a degree of sophistication to them.” Yes Roel, we trust you, thousands wouldn’t. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on November 24, 2008 at 8:09 am and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Who Watches The Watchers
By satanismnz

I recently received an email listing a large number of problems found in Roel van Leeuwen’s thesis, ‘Dreamers of the Dark’. The author(s) of the document thanked me, and said some of the points covered on this blog have been included. It was simply signed “R.G.B., R.N.B., R.H.A.B.”. I have no idea if that is people’s initials, or some creepy occult cryptogram.

Dreamers of the Dark
This document is broken down into sections dealing with the various types of problems encountered in W. R. van Leeuwen’s thesis. Simple facts to keep in mind: 1. Kerry Bolton was never a member of the Order of the Deorc Fyre (ODF). Sources: http://www.scribd.com/doc/7529945/ODF-Order-of-the-Deorc-Fyre (contains an interview circa 1996/1997 which states the basic reasons for Bolton’s leaving the Order.); Former and current members of the ODF. 2. The Order of the Deorc Fyre was fronted by an anarchist, and was never an openly neo-Nazi group as claimed. Source: Former and current members of the ODF. 3. Satanism is a recognized religion. In New Zealand it has its own subcategory in the census records. The New Zealand Police have stated that there is no incompatibility between being a Satanist and a Police Officer (cf. the case of Rigel Walshe).

Abbreviations as per ‘Dreamers of the Dark’
New Zealand Satanic Organisations The Order - A generic term encompassing the Order of the Left Hand Path and its successor organisations (Ordo Sinistra Vivendi and Order of the Deorc Fyre). Unlike the thesis The Black Order, is a separate entity. OLHP - Order of the Left Hand Path OSV - Ordo Sinistra Vivendi ODF - Order of the Deorc Fyre TBO - The Black Order Overseas Satanic Organisations CoS - Church of Satan ONA - Order of Nine Angles ToS - Temple of Set

WOT - White Order of Thule (Note: Not strictly ‘Satanic’)

‘Dreamers of the Dark’ as merely a literature review
The following is from the Letters to the Editor, Waikato Times, October 22. http://www.stuff.co.nz/waikatotimes/4735910a15496.html (emphasis added) Academic freedom In response to the Waikato Times editorial on October 16 I can assure you that Waikato University commits to academic freedom - “freedom for academic staff and students, within the law, to question and test received wisdom, and to put forward new ideas and to state controversial or unpopular opinions” (Education Act 1989). We also have a duty to ensure that our academic standards and processes are robust, and that complaints are dealt with in a professional manner. This is a thesis about a living person and the complaint is from the subject of the thesis. This matter is more than a mere disagreement over academic matters and these facts must be kept in mind. On that basis, I have absolutely no doubts that temporarily removing a thesis while the complaints from the subject of the work are investigated was the appropriate and best course. The university believed that prior to the withdrawal of the thesis, we had communicated with the student involved and his supervisor. It would appear we didn’t, and I agree this was an oversight and one we regret. We have subsequently ensured that we keep the student and supervisor well informed during the period that the matter is being investigated. The Times’ editorial writer should also consider that the subject of the thesis deserves the same confidence in our academic robustness as anyone, regardless of the unpopular nature of his alleged position. Academic rigour, free exchange of views and the spirit of inquiry are indeed nurtured at Waikato University, and both the quality of our graduates, and the pure and applied research produced here, supports this. The fact that we have the courage to investigate challenges to our academic integrity and processes, and face public criticism while we are doing so, should reinforce public confidence in our commitment to academic freedom. ROY CRAWFORD Vice-Chancellor Waikato University

Acknowledged speculation
Page 31: “It is tempting to speculate on what influence exposure to Mormonism in Bolton’s formative years may have had on his subsequent political, spiritual and racial views.” The next several pages are speculation on how Mormonism influenced Bolton and the Order. This has no independent verification, and is mostly unreferenced. It starts from

a premise which is unreferenced that Bolton was “raised a Mormon”. If this was shown to be incorrect (which Bolton was claiming on his website) then large chunks of the thesis pertaining to this supposed influence are invalidated.

Bizarre claims
Page 1: “As the source of religious anxiety the world over, Satan would appear to have an active schedule[12].” [12] Which is not surprising as there is allegedly no rest for the wicked What relevance is this to an academic thesis? Is this all “a bit of a joke?” Or is this a strategy at increasing word count? Page 5: “The great gift of Crowley was, however, using blasphemy as a path of transcendence or liberation away from constraining, constricting and unthinking societally enforced habit patterns.” It seems unusual for a thesis to contain praise for blasphemy as it repudiates blasphemy which the author finds personally distasteful. Page 31: (Part of footnote 108) “‘Thorsten Moar’ is not so easy to unravel, but it can be speculatively suggested that it is based on the etymology of Thorsten as a traditional Scandinavian name meaning “Hammer of Thor” and Moar being a contraction of ‘more’ and ‘roar’ and used on the internet as an expression of frenzy and passion108 (c.f. Urban Dictionary, ‘MOAR’(3) at http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=moar (accessed 10/10/2007)” The definition appears to be an arbitrary choice from a long list of non-academic sources. Other options included “Mother of All Retards”, another word for “More”, “a cry of lust intended to elicit more of whatever” and “A type of hot sex”.

Disputed claim
Page 10: “As the CoS grew in popularity, helped along by tabloid sensationalism, shameless self-promotion and a celebrity membership (including Sammy Davis Jr. and Jayne Mansfield), as much as by its philosophic and religious merits, an inevitable re-interpretation and critique of CoS doctrine was made by other Satanists.” From: http://www.churchofsatan.org/aslv.html - “REALITY: Publicity agent Tony Kent, an associate of Ed Webber, arranged the meeting between Mansfield and ASL as a publicity stunt.” This is also indicative of lack of research.

Incorrect referencing
Page 23: “In issue 3 of The Watcher an article was published by the Order of Nine Angles, an English based Satanic group who had made earlier contributions to The Watcher and The Heretic, entitled ‘Satanism and Race’…” The article actually appears on Page 9, Heretic #3.

Internet only source
Page 30: “In Jantsang’s own words, she “started a shitfight with Bolton” over three issues that she found “intolerable and loathsome”(104). The first was Bolton’s generally dogmatic attitude to Satanism, in which he “used the Dark Doctrines to club people over the head”. The second was Bolton’s ill-treatment of a brain damaged friend of Jantsang and the third was Bolton’s racism and in particular the psychological damage growing up in a white racist milieu would do to his part Jewish, part Maori son(105).” Source: Tani Jantsang, ‘What I Think’ at http://www.apodion.com/vad/article.php?id=29&aid=207 (accessed 10 Aug, 2007). Also an example of a selective use of material. Also a distortion of what is written. It would take an entire article to point out all the mistakes in the cited article (e.g. OLHP started as part of the TOS). An example to show that Jantsang’s writings were often refuted and ridiculed by other occultists: http://groups.google.com/group/alt.magick.tyagi/browse_thread/thread/b9b406d7a5d 55a06/cf1cbada3396892b re: Anna of the Nine Angles

Lack of corroborative research
Page 19: “These three themes; that of elect and unclean races, a secretive and hidden brotherhood of the chosen few, and a vision of history which is firmly entrenched in the realm of faith rather than sound scholarship, would later surface in the teaching of the Order.” “The Order” has never had policies on elect and unclean races, was originally very open (not secretive or a hidden brotherhood). This is established by RvL who mentions radio and TV interviews. It has never had a particularly have a faith based “history”. Even if it had, that is little different than most mainstream occult groups who are often more secretive and selective about members. As RvL states he never interviewed former members it has to be asked where he supposedly got his insights into what members believed or understood. Page 22: “While the first edition of The Heretic did not contain any blatant examples of neo-Nazi thought or sympathy, it carried advertisements for Stephen Cox’s Pan-European Brotherhood/Brotherhood of Baldur, an English neo-Nazi Nordic/Satanic group, and Might is Right by the pseudonymous Ragnar Redbeard, whom Bolton identifies as New Zealander Arthur Desmond[84].” It is disputed that Cox’s Order of the Jarls of Baelder was neo-Nazi, Nordic or Satanic. It was certainly Euro-centric paganism, but never appeared to promote specific political (or even pagan) ideologies. Even the choice of title and spelling of Cox’s group seems structured towards deception, when the official title (and that generally used by researchers) is Order of the Jarls of Baelder (OJB). It seems that the chosen emphasis is on “Pan-European Brotherhood”, perhaps to link it with groups such as the Aryan Brotherhood.

Page 24: “Viewed as continuity and as a whole, the direction and approach of Bolton’s editorship of these three journals reveals a calculated programme of desensitising and indoctrination, which was most prominent during the transition from The Watcher to The Heretic.” Where is the evidence for a “calculated programme”? This is a claim without comparison or reference. Journals exploring “forbidden topics” could be expected to explore neo-Nazi and Fascist ideologies. Page 33: “During its brief existence, the ODF entered into an alliance with the Order of Nine Angles and the Black Order, collectively calling itself ‘the Black Axis’ and having the primary purpose of articulating a neo-Nazi and Nationalist ‘hardcore’ Satanism, in contrast to the more popular libertarian conceptions of Satanism that was associated with the American Satanic scene[113].” No such alliance as ‘the Black Axis’ ever existed. cf. ONA_VariousManuscripts.pdf “An Infernal Alliance”. While there is no reference to this claim, this is also shoddy research. The loose “Infernal Alliance” was based on groups supporting “Traditional Satanism”, as opposed to those claiming modern (primarily LaVeyan) perspectives. Page 55: “[55] The conclusion that Grimwald is Bolton is based on a similarity of writing style, the Renaissance Press connection and that Grimwald was a ‘Former Grandmaster of the Black Order’, a Nazi occult order than was founded and run by Bolton. For the Grimwald/Black Order connection, see Goodrick-Clarke, The Black Sun, p.229″ Bolton’s publishing enterprise is known to have printed Key of Alocer, and the Key of Alocer Editor was also a former GM of TBO. No evidence is given as to RvL’s qualification to analyse writing style.

Lack of research
Page 21: “There is little in The Watcher to foreshadow the neo-Nazism that would be increasing evident in The Heretic and The Nexus, beyond the occasional condemnation of “sickly humanism, whether it be called Christianity or liberalism” or other potentially anti-Democratic statements[81].” Aside from Bolton being involved with TOS and COS and allegations of Nazism made against both these groups, advertisements for ‘The Black Flame’ (the magazine that is known to have advertised “neo-Nazi” James Mason’s book), The Watcher Issue 6 article by R. Parker, Editor, “Exeat”, England, entitled ‘The Heresy of the Left Hand Path’ (Exeat was published by Thormynd Press, publisher of both ONA and David Myatt’s National Socialist series). Where is the research?

Misattributed articles
Page 15: “[58] Kerry Bolton, ‘The Political and Social Realities of Satanism’, ODF Archive”

Kerry Bolton was never a member of the ODF. This is confirmed by the ODF interview published circa 1996/1997. http://www.scribd.com/doc/7529945/ODFOrder-of-the-Deorc-Fyre Page 155: Bolton, Kerry. ‘Satanism and Race’ The Heretic 3 Author: ONA (unsigned) Page 9, Heretic #3 Page 156: Bolton, Kerry. ‘A Master Morality’, OSV essay. OSV unsigned. Suspire Volume 1: Part Two, Summer 1995; Moar, Thorsten. ‘Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism’, 1995 Page 156: Bolton, Kerry. ‘A Sinister Nobility’, OSV essay. Moar, Thorsten. ‘Ethos: A Basic Introduction to Satanism’, 1995 Page 156: Bolton, Kerry. ‘Dark Forces’, ODF essay. Order of the Deorc Fyre 1997 (unsigned) http://www.rainbowholt.askhagatha.com/articles/darkforce.html Page 156: Bolton, Kerry. ‘Symphysis: The Left Hand Path and the Right Hand Path Dichotomy’, ODF essay. Order of the Deorc Fyre 1997 (unsigned) http://www.rainbowholt.askhagatha.com/articles/symphysis.html Page 156: Bolton, Kerry. ‘Satanism and Race’ The Heretic 6 Author: ONA (unsigned) Page 9, Heretic #3 Page 156: Bolton, Kerry. ‘Satanism, Blasphemy and the Black Mass’, The Heretic 9, 1994. Author: ONA 1974 (unsigned) Page 25, Heretic #9 Page: 156: Bolton, Kerry. ‘The Political and Social Realities of Satanism’, ODF essay. Order of the Deorc Fyre 1997 (anonymous) http://www.rainbowholt.askhagatha.com/articles/polsat.html

Misleading references
Page 18: “While the LDS admitted blacks into the Church from the 1830s, it wasn’t until 1978, well after the period in which Bolton was associated with the Church, that black (and brown) skinned men could be admitted into the priesthood(72).” Source: Alan Cherry and Jessie L. Embry, ‘Blacks’ in

Encyclopedia of Mormonism, Daniel H. Ludlow (ed.),(New York: Macmillan, 1992), pp.125-127 No mention of “brown skinned” people. http://www.lightplanet.com/mormons/daily/history/blacks/blacks_eom.htm Page 34: “118 The Black Order The Book of Wyrd (Wellington: Realist Publication, 1993), p.36)” RvL fails to mention that the article on page 36 is an ONA document. While it could be argued that TBO likely agreed with these strategies it would seem prudent to point out the source. RvL claims ONA influenced the OSV/ODF, and could have easily shown the influence the ONA had on the TBO also. Page 51: “To the Order, the role of a Black Mass is to provide the initiate with a ritual environment in which various genuinely blasphemous rites are performed in order to produce a “shock and a reaction to [normative] values, which though accepted, are unconsciously accepted”[161].” 161 ‘Satanism, Blasphemy and the Black Mass’, The Heretic 9 These pages suggests the essay in question is by “the Order” which equates to OLHP/OSV/ODF/TBO (according to RvL). The essay in question is written by the ONA, and hence this section invalidates RvL’s central premise of the introduction of neo-Nazi ideas to the OSV/ODF. Page 60: “While it is the “destiny of humanity to live among the stars and make their home on strange new worlds”, having been led by “the West’s star-bound destiny of conquest of the outer limits of existence”, the Order had serious reservations as to whether the Western wyrd was going to be fulfilled[181]. The current Aeon “has suffered a distortion of its ethos or Destiny. In the simple sense, the civilisation has become ill and a consequence of this is that’s its Imperium is unlikely”[182].” Footnote 181 is for an ODF document, Footnote 182 is for an ONA document. ONA and ODF are two separate groups. ODF ‘dissolved’ in circa 1997 (according to RvL’s research) – but actually went into a period of occlusion, that is withdrawal of public profile. The ONA is still operative as of 2008 e.g. http://nineangles.wordpress.com/ & http://www.nineangles.info

Misleading reference
Page 74: “Bolton and the Order rejected democratic forms of government completely as “all great endeavours are founded on might and conquest, upon hierarchy and inequality, upon the recognition of the primacy of the noble and warrior classes, and the recognition of their mastership by the lower classes”[225]. In a modern context, liberal democracies were believed to be tools of international capitalism and a pawn of the plutocracy and that “…capitalism, [along with Marxism and Christianity are]…expressions of the Judaic attack against the European soul”[226]. Democracy is a “sham”, a “pallid myth” whose

symbiotic relationship with capitalist economics “keeps a society in a state of perpetual stagnation”[227].” Footnote 227 includes reference to R. Parker (clearly identified in source material ‘The Watcher 6′ as editor of Exeat magazine, England). There is no evidence for R. Parker being connected to the Order. See also http://darkimperium.wordpress.com/2008/11/14/the-heresy-of-the-left-hand-path/ which claims “This article first appeared in Azoth, a private Order of Nine Angles journal, in late 1990 ev, and was reprinted (with some minor typos) in issue #6 of The Watcher, dated February 1991CE.”

Misleading statements
Page 16: “As The Watcher changed into The Heretic in 1992 and The Nexus in 1995, it started to articulate an increasingly political agenda which focussed on National Socialism, Nationalism and Third Way politics.” Gives the impression that Third Way politics is linked to National Socialism or Nationalism. Page 22: “While the first edition of The Heretic did not contain any blatant examples of neo-Nazi thought or sympathy, it carried advertisements for Stephen Cox’s Pan-European Brotherhood/Brotherhood of Baldur, an English neo-Nazi Nordic/Satanic group, and Might is Right by the pseudonymous Ragnar Redbeard, whom Bolton identifies as New Zealander Arthur Desmond[84].” This appears to suggest the link with Redbeard’s work was somehow sympathetic to neo-Nazi thought, which would mean that the Chuch of Satan (COS) can’t be “normative” as part of ‘Might is Right’ was used almost verbatim in ‘The Satanic Bible’ by Anton LaVey (founder of the COS). Page 24: “In every edition after The Heretic 8, articles were published promoting neo-Nazi, ‘Folkish Nationalist’ or Third Way political ideologies.” Gives the impression that Third Way politics is similar in nature to neo-Nazi or ‘Folkish Nationalist’ ideologies. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Way_(centrism) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascism - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeev_Sternhell

Missing material
Page xi: “Research for this study was primarily based on the analysis of material published by the Order, including its periodicals (The Watcher, The Heretic, The Nexus, Suspire etc), various internal publications (including various curriculums of study, internal essays, memos and so on), and pamphlets and broadsheets available through ‘Realist Publications’ and other publishing concerns run by Kerry Bolton, the Order’s chief ideologue.”

No genuine evidence of access to “internal publications” such as “curriculums of study” [plural] internal essays, memos etc, is given. These things are not mentioned in footnotes or the bibliography. Page xi: “While access to most of the Order’s periodicals between 1990 and 1998 and major curriculum items (schedules of lessons and essays) have been achieved, access to more informal or internal documents such as letters, memos and essay collections has been uneven.” Again, no evidence of “schedules of lessons” or “more informal” and “internal” documents such as “letters, memos and essays collections” is given.

Missing references
Page 57: “”magickal form through which [Aeonic] forces manifest themselves on the causal…plane”" Apparently quoting from an Order document.

Non sequitur logic problems
Page 154: “”Bolton states ’signed articles do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the author’ [sic]. I understand this to imply that the unsigned articles originate from Bolton.”" Notwithstanding the fact that this is sloppy quotation (correct quote is “signed articles do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editor”, it does not follow that unsigned articles are written by Bolton, only that they are likely to reflect his opinions. Page ix: “The second phenomena that will be commented on, though somewhat briefly, is the rhetorical methodology used by the Order to inculcate a pro-Nazi weltanschuung among members and readers. Starting from a position that is within the realms of normative Satanic thought, the Order directs the reader down a path that leads to the Order’s version of National Socialist philosophy by a combination of ‘logical’ thought and flattery. In this way, conceptions of self identity were encouraged to be identified with Satanic identity and so the individual’s ‘will to power’, or the ability to succeed at life, was aligned exclusively with the Satanic paradigm as articulated by the Order. The result was the inculcation of the idea that if you weren’t a Satanist, you weren’t anything, but if you were a Satanist you were everything- or, at least, among the awakened, enlightened and (spiritually) powerful few.” Starts off claiming something about “Nazi weltanschuung” but ends up stating the result was purely “if you’re weren’t a Satanist, you weren’t anything.” Page xi: “In short, how much of the ideology did the rank-and-file adopt, and how much did the hierarchy personally believe? Within the scope of this study it is not possible to accurately gauge how many people believed in Aeonic theory; it

is only possible to examine how the Order wished Aeonic theory to be understood.” While the statements in this paragraph essentially say “I don’t really know what people believed, so my entire thesis is speculation” the second sentence comments on “Aeonic theory”, when the thrust of the thesis is supposedly Satanism/neo-Nazism. Wouldn’t it be more prudent to ask how many genuinely adhered to National Socialism? But of course, the entire thesis is speculation given the lack of interviews, and statement in the first sentence.

Personal Attacks
Page 96: “Bolton now is claiming a Doctorate, and thereby adding weight, respectability and credibility to his name, though undoubtedly the degree was awarded “in recognition of life experience” and in conjunction with the presentation of a single paper to a “prestigious, non-accredited university”.” Speculation on the credibility of Bolton’s degree. Whether true or not, this is an unreferenced claim and comes across as a personal attack. This has no relevance to the thesis. Page 118: “Two representative examples of books sold by Bolton suggests that he makes a significant profit from his sales if material costs only are taken into account.” What relevance does this comment, or inclusion of Bolton’s book catalogue have to the thesis?

Timeline Problems
Page 16: Fig 1. shows The Black Order as beginning in 1991 and ending in 1997. This contradicts other references for starting dates and ending dates given in the thesis or in quick internet researching. Figure 1 is not particularly well explained. Page 18: “While the LDS admitted blacks into the Church from the 1830s, it wasn’t until 1978, well after the period in which Bolton was associated with the Church, that black (and brown) skinned men could be admitted into the priesthood(72).” Source: Alan Cherry and Jessie L. Embry, ‘Blacks’ in Encyclopedia of Mormonism, Daniel H. Ludlow (ed.),(New York: Macmillan, 1992), pp.125-127 According to RvL: Bolton was born in 1956. This makes him 22 in 1978. LDS accepted ‘blacks’ “well after” the period in which Bolton was involved. This makes Bolton anywhere between 1 and 21. Page 34: “The Black Order was founded in 1993 and initially acted as a ’superior degree’ of the OLHP/OSV into which like-minded people were invited before TBO started to directly recruit through the pages of The Heretic in 1994″ footnote 114 stating “Advertisement, The Heretic 9

Compare with fig 1. diagram on page 16 which appears to show that TBO existed in 1991.

Unexplained situation
Page xi: “In a similar vein, research has been focussed on textual analysis and it has not been possible to obtain interviews from former members of the Order.” Why was this not possible? Ethics? Inability to contact anyone?

Unreferenced but named sources
Pages 15, 43, 69, 77, 78, 82: ODF Archive Pages 26, 27, 28, 29, 74: OSV Archive Pages 64, 70, 71, 79, 82: TBO Archive Pages 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 79, 84, 86: WOT Archive What exactly are these archives? No indication is given as to the supposed source, whether they are physical libraries, or collections at a physical library, or if they exist on the internet somewhere. Even if they were for a website that has since gone offline they should be referenced as such with at least an approximate date they were accessed. How can anyone conduct secondary research on such material claimed to be in these archives?

Unreferenced claims
Page 4: “Crowley was a complex and multifaceted figure and while he identified with the Great Beast of Revelations, once sacrificed a toad to Satan, and called for the destruction of Christianity, Crowley did not consider himself a Satanist in any real sense except as a public persona.” At least two published sources claim Crowley was a Satanist: Kenneth Grant and John Symonds. RvL would have known this from his access to The Watcher #1 which contains an article claiming Crowley was clearly a Satanist and offering the aforementioned authorities as sources, as well as numerous claims of Crowley. While the ONA are very vocal at claiming Crowley was not a Satanist, some ODF members certainly consider he was. The point is, a claim that ‘Satanist’ was only a “public persona” needs to be referenced or the conclusion explained. Page 5: “In 1964, Anton Szandor LaVey became the next great influential figure in Satanism, effectively becoming the ‘founder’ of modern Satanism and responsible for its development as a sophisticated and comparatively public religio-philosophic system.”

It is disputed if he is “effectively” the “founder” when other sources claim to pre-date him in modern times. He is undoubtedly the most well known, for his obvious showmanship. Of course, the claim is unreferenced. Page 10: “As a unified system, the CoS was envisioned as a kind of liberation therapy, encouraging its adherents to break away from stultifying social moral, ethical, behavioural (though, ultimately, self imposed) constructs.” Unknown claim. It is speculation LaVey founded the COS with a vision of offering a “liberation therapy”. RvL’s only reference is LaVey’s claim that Satanism “fills the void between religion and psychotherapy”. LaVey was a known liar and showman who claimed many things over time, and isn’t a reliable or academic source. Page 14: “Neo-Nazism represented another, and it was the potential that Satanism had for disseminating neo-Nazism that attracted Kerry Bolton to the cause and in turn, inspired him to launch the Order of the Left Hand Path.” No reference is given as to how RvL knew this is what attracted Bolton to Satanism. It is speculation. Page 18: “While the LDS admitted blacks into the Church from the 1830s, it wasn’t until 1978, well after the period in which Bolton was associated with the Church, that black (and brown) skinned men could be admitted into the priesthood(72).” Source: Alan Cherry and Jessie L. Embry, ‘Blacks’ in Encyclopedia of Mormonism, Daniel H. Ludlow (ed.),(New York: Macmillan, 1992), pp.125-127 No reference given for how RvL knows when Bolton left LDS, and only vague time given. Could be anything for 1-21 years. Leads to Timeline error. Page 19: “Even as Bolton started to withdraw from the Order, first resigning as Magister, or Grandmaster, of the Order in 1994 and then his membership in 1996, he maintained editorship of the journals and the journals, under his direction, still acted as the organ of the Order.” Page 20 of The Nexus #4 shows an advert for Suspire, advertised as “Journal of Ordo Sinistra Vivendi” - not Bolton’s journal(s). No evidence is offered as to how RvL knows that Bolton’s Journal remained the official ‘organ’ of the Order. RvL was well aware of Suspire as it is mentioned throughout the thesis in the bibliography (pages xi, 32, 42, 46, 47, 50, 51, 53, 56, 68, 75, 82, + Bibliography). Page 22: “The Realist being a more politically focused journal published by Bolton’s Realist Publications.” The Realist, in 1992, was billed as The Journal of the Faustian Society and carried similar content to The Watcher. Page 24: “Viewed as continuity and as a whole, the direction and approach of Bolton’s editorship of these three journals reveals a calculated programme of

desensitising and indoctrination, which was most prominent during the transition from The Watcher to The Heretic.” No evidence is offered for this being a “calculated programme” Page 29: “The internal material of the order, in the form of essays, largely follow the lead of the lessons, expanding and developing on the ideas and adding a degree of sophistication to them.” This is simply glossed over, and we are expected to believe RvL had access to these documents. It could be said that this is blatant deception. The claimed “internal material” is not in the footnotes or bibliography. Page 31: (Part of footnote 108) “Bolton also contributed to CircleCaster, a Wellington based occult periodical, using the pseudonym ‘Scorpio’.” Which article did Bolton contribute under the name ‘Scorpio’, which issue, and how is it know to have been Bolton? Is this another example of comparison of writing styles? Page 34: “The Black Order was founded in 1993 and initially acted as a ’superior degree’ of the OLHP/OSV into which like-minded people were invited before TBO started to directly recruit through the pages of The Heretic in 1994″ footnote 114 stating “Advertisement, The Heretic 9″. No reference is given for TBO being a “superior degree”. This is a blatant fabrication. Page 60: “There are a number of minor differences between the ONA conception of Aeonic civilisations and the Order’s conception, perhaps the most noticeable being the name of the current Aeon. The Order reinterpreted the current Aeon, renaming it the Faustian Aeon, in keeping with Bolton’s embracing of the Faust myth as being indicative of “infinite aspiration” and reaching for the stars as being the primal drive of Western civilisation.” Where is the reference for “The Order” calling the “current Aeon” the “Faustian Aeon”? Page 60: “While the Order certainly took a cue from the ONA, the Order itself developed a larger and more sophisticated discourse around the meaning of recent historic events and placed a greater emphasis on the social, political and technological functioning of the current age in terms of the Aeonic paradigm. The ONA, on the other hand, invested greater energy in propagating a more occult-orientated mechanism for explaining the processes involved.” No evidence is offered to show that the Order developed more sophisticated discourse around “recent historic events” (what is being alluded to these words?). Page 62: “At its most benign, the adoption of Nazi dress and terminology was but one part of a wider project of ‘personal liberation’ by which normative values

are confronted and evaluated by the individual as a kind of DIY encounter group.” This is unreferenced and bizarre claims. It makes it sound as though “the Order” was some leather Nazi fetishist group. No evidence is shown that members wore “Nazi dress” or that “Nazi terminology” was used. This isn’t evident from published sources. It is perhaps alluding to the terms ‘Kulturkampf’ and ‘Realpolitik’ which being German would apparently instantly class them as Nazi. (See ‘Unusual definitions’ section of this document) Page 96: “Bolton now is claiming a Doctorate, and thereby adding weight, respectability and credibility to his name, though undoubtedly the degree was awarded “in recognition of life experience” and in conjunction with the presentation of a single paper to a “prestigious, non-accredited university”.” RvL shows no reference for how he knows Bolton’s degree is for “life experience”. Personal Attack. Page 97: “In analysing the rhetoric of the Order, two features are readily apparent. The first is that, stripped of its overt political and religious trappings, the Order relied on building up around itself a romantic mythology that resonated with its members. The Order invoked a mythology of the Aryan Satanist being an heir to a warrior culture that has fallen from glory and, like a princess in a fairy tale, Aryanism needs to be rescued and championed by stalwart knights. It also tells the story of secret and hidden knowledge that only the adepts of the Order are privy to; as well as knights errant, the members were also elect priests. A third story is told of a father standing on his homestead’s porch, hefting a sword to protect their child from harm as he looks out over the countryside and sees the possible death of their children’s future, swamped under the unnatural tides of race mixing bought on by the evil forces of Capitalism, Zionism, and political correctness.” Unreferenced speculation. Point 2 in particular, about “secret and hidden knowledge” is fairly common in “occult” groups anyway, but there is no evidence offered that the Order claimed monopoly on knowledge. This is not research, but speculation (or fantasy). Page 97: “While no ethnographic information on the Order’s membership is available, evidence drawn from anecdotal observation of mainstream Pagan and fantasy roleplaying (’Dungeons and Dragons’) communities suggests that there is a similarity between the Order’s members and the members of those communities.” No reference is given as to what RvL knew about the membership, or how RVL was able to compare said membership with members of roleplaying communities. Page 98: “The second feature is that while the Order drew on comparatively normative Satanic philosophy to construct a reasonably self-consistent, if contested, ideological foundation, it relied on non-normative and ahistorical understandings of National Socialism. Although regular reference was made to

the historic Nazi state, such references were on the whole vague and mythologised and Nazi Germany was transmogrified into an ideal of almost Platonic proportions. Despite any claims to the contrary, the Order’s NS Imperium was never a meaningful blueprint for a future society and was more of an ideological Shambhala, a chimerical realm which acted as a mirror onto which fantasies are projected and then reflected back. In short, the Order’s conception of National Socialism was simply another facet of the propensity for mythmaking in the Order.” While full of unreferenced claims, it can be asked, if the Order was simply ‘mythmaking’ then was it genuinely a neo-Nazi group? This “propensity for mythmaking” may well fit with the claim that promotion of forbidden and unpopular ideologies was a modern form of blasphemy. Page 154: “much of his personal writing was published in those journals as unattributed articles.” Talking about Bolton’s writings. This is alleged, but not shown how Roel was able to automagically determine which unattributed articles belonged to which person. Page ix: “For the purposes of this thesis, Satanism itself can be divided into normative Satanism, which is largely Libertarian/Objectivist in nature, and neoNazi Satanism.” Where is the evidence that “normative” Satanism is Libertarian/Objectivist? If there is a “democratic” Satanism, this would be lumped under neo-Nazi by this typology. “For the purposes of this thesis…” really says, “for convenience”.

Unusual definitions
Page 23: “associating it with the ‘hardcore’ and ‘no bullshit’ implications of the words ‘realpolitik’ and ‘esoterrorism’.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realpolitik Page 23: “invoking not only a National Socialist aesthetic by utilising the word kulturkampf…” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulturkampf

Unvalidated claims
Page 24: “Such hints as the description of liberal democratic values as “sickly humanism” only become ominous in retrospect and was no doubt interpreted by contemporary readers as an indication of a ‘hardcore’ Satanic outlook[87].” By usage of “ominous”, what exactly did this foreshadow?

Page i: “It also looks at the transition from being a Satanic order led by a neoNazi to an openly neo-Nazi Order that uses Satanic philosophy to justify and popularise its conception of National Socialism.” See ODF interview with Devil’s Advocate in document at: http://www.scribd.com/doc/7529945/ODF-Order-of-the-Deorc-Fyre No evidence is offered as to how “the Order” is apparently “openly neo-Nazi” and only uses “Satanic philosophy” to justify it’s conception of National Socialism. Tags: Dreamers of the Dark, Kerry Bolton, neo-Nazism, Roel van Leeuwen, Satanism, thesis, Waikato University
This entry was posted on November 24, 2008 at 2:08 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

I unequivocally stand behind my Masters thesis
By satanismnz

Date: Thu Nov 6, 2008 11:07 pm From: journeyman1717 (Roel van Leeuwen) Re: Was Crowley a Satanist? Hi there — In Lectisternium@…, “blacksunnz” <blacksunnz@…> wrote: > > Hi Roel, > > Perhaps you would be willing to answer some of the allegations made in > that ‘bunk’ website? The University is still undertaking its review of my thesis so it is not proper that I make a full comment regarding it at the moment, but to answer in brief some of your questions > 1. Do you still stand 100% behind your research? I unequivocally stand behind my Masters thesis > 2. Do you still claim there is nothing defamatory in your thesis? There is nothing defamatory in my thesis: - Bolton founded/headed the OLHP - The OLHP was a Satanic organisation - The OLHP had a neo-Nazi agenda

- Bolton was the central figure and chief ideologue of the OLHP. - Bolton remains an anti-Semite and Holocaust denier. > 3. If so, why did you edit your thesis (or is this claim ‘bunk’?) > isn’t think an unusual practice for a University? I edited it under advice and because it mentioned Bolton’s son, and I am sure he has a big enough cross to bear as it is. It is an unusual practice, and part of the review will no doubt examine that dimension and make recommendation to the University regarding such matters. I can’t comment further until the review committee delivers its findings. > 4. If the website you mention is merely ‘bunk’ why is the University > investigating your thesis for some very serious allegations rather > than backing your academic freedom? Could it perhaps be the the Vice > Chancellor looked at a few of Bolton’s points and alarm bells started sounding? I can’t comment on whether the VC himself read the thesis as I don’t know, but I would be highly surprised if he did. He is the CEO of a large institution and I doubt he would have had the time to do soespecially as it is well outside his field and being neither a lawyer nor a New Zealander, he is not qualified to know what constitutes libel under NZ law. The University is investigating an allegation of libel, which it has a duty to investigate and rightfully so. I certainly don’t have a problem with that. More than that, I can not comment on just yet. > 5. Can you please explain how you know the website you mention is run > by a neo-Nazi and holocaust denier. Please point to one thing on the > site where the author denies the holocaust or promotes neo-Nazism, or > any other ideologies you choose to lump into this one term. The website in question is obviously instigated by Bolton or one/some of his associates. ‘Nuff said. > 6. What are your sources for accusing a fellow freemason (assuming you > are still a freemason), Stephen Cox, of running an openly neo-Nazi > organisation, the Fraternity of Balder. I assume it was accidental > that you missed referencing this? The fact that Cox is a Freemason is neither here nor there, and furthermore it was something I was unaware of. Had I known he was a Freemason I certainly would have mentioned it as I appreciate the irony of it. Obviously, the source of that information knows Cox well and that speaks for itself. The source of the Cox information was Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke’s ‘The Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity”pp225-26 for a start.

Yes, I am still a Freemason and likely to remain one for a very long time to come. Obviously the brethren in the Lodge he joined were ignorant of his political leanings or he never would have gotten in, and rightly so. Any idea which lodge he was a member of? Any idea of the source of that information? > 7. Where is your reference that the Order of Nine Angles is openly > “neo-Nazi”? Are readers of your thesis expected to trust you all the > way through? Apart from reading their material (have you actually read the stuff? That you ask that question suggests not or suggests trolling…), which is obvious enough, I would also refer back to ‘the Black Sun’ as well as Mattias Gardell’s ‘Gods of the Blood’. > 8. In Figure 1 of your thesis you appear to show the Black Order > beginning in 1991. How do you explain this? Based on the information I had at hand > 9. In your attack on the Mormon Church, where you state: “While the > LDS admitted blacks into the Church from the 1830s, it wasn’t until > 1978, well after the period in which Bolton was associated with the > Church, that black (and brown) skinned men could be admitted into the > priesthood.” Where is your evidence of the discrimination against > “brown skinned men”? The article you reference doesn’t mention this. I > bet you are hoping LDS don’t complain about your slur… might carry a > bit more weight than a neo-Nazi Satanist. I am not sure I did attack the Mormon church. Are you saying that the facts as I quoted them are wrong or are you using the question to imply that I am slighting the LDS? As for source, in the first instance I refer you to the Encyclopaedia of Mormonism, the entry on ‘Blacks’ > 10. What does a Nazi smell like, and what part of a person is one > expected to sniff? I am so tempted to answer this. > 11. In your thesis you originally claim the book ‘Ethos’ was authored > by Thorsten Moar. Latter you claim he was the editor, and attribute > articles to Kerry Bolton. Why the change? If you were to provide me with the references in my thesis, I could answer this more fully. > 12. You seem to claim that R. Parker, an editor of ‘Exeat’ magazine, > published by Thormynd Press (David Myatt’s publisher and publisher of > ONA material) was a member of “the Order”. How do you know this?

Where/how did I seem to make this claim? > 13. You claim that The Black Order was originally a higher degree of > the OLHP/OSV. Where is your information from? Interpretation of material and intimations from an unnamed source. Now let me ask you some questions: 1) Are you saying that Kerry Bolton was not the head of the OLHP? 2) Are you saying that the OLHP did not promulgate neo-Nazi material and ideas along with Satanism? 3) Are you saying that Bolton was not the main figure responsible for the dispersal of this material? 4) Do you really take seriously a man who claims that my thesis was the result of a Zionist conspiracy? I look forward to your answers. > Why not comment on the satanismnz website an prove it to be ‘bunk’. I > am sure all the members of this forum will support you in this and > back you up if the author of the forum refuses to accept your comments. The reason being is that the page Satanismnz was created specifically as a page to slight my thesis, to defend Bolton’s reputation and give him a mouthpiece to promote himself and his career as an oppressed ‘free-thinker’ and political figure. Furthermore, I am sure that this post (or an edited version of this post) will end up on that page despite the fact that I have not given permission to do so. Of course, I have no legal recourse if it does turn up there but I don’t want it to. The simple fact is Bolton was, during the time that my thesis concerns itself with, was anti-Semetic, a Holocaust denier and a neo-Nazi. If he finds that libellous and feels he can prove that in a court of law, he has my e-mail address. The simple fact that he has not filed a writ against the University (or me) is indicative that he knows that my findings will be upheld. > How about uploading a copy of your thesis (preferably the unedited > version) to this group’s file section so that members can see the > proper version, and not have to rely on ones which have appeared on > the internet. As it is currently under review, I can not. Roel

Tags: Roel van Leeuwen, Waikato University, Kerry Bolton, Satanism, neo-Nazism, Dreamers of the Dark, thesis
This entry was posted on November 28, 2008 at 9:59 pm and is filed under Dreamers of the Dark. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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