“Certain new theologians dispute original sin, which is the only part of Christian theology which can really

be proved.” G.K. Chesterton How is it proved? Look at the news. Some of the top news stories of 2009 include: Octomom, Balloon Boy, ACORN, (SC Gov. Mark Sanford, Letterman, Woods) Look at research. Josephson Institute Survey of Teens  30% admitted to stealing from a store in the past y ear.  80% lied to a parent about something significant in the past year.  64% cheated on a test in the past year Look at yourself. How often do we act against what we know is right and good? Switchfoot “Meant to Live”-- We were meant to live for so much more Have we lost ourselves? . . . Dreaming about Providence And whether mice or men have second tries Maybe we've been living with our eyes half open Maybe we're bent and broken, broken This is not how God made us in the beginning. This is not what we were meant to be. Our first parents disobeyed God, rejecting the gift of divine life. They are ashamed of their nakedness, they begin to fight with one another. Human nature itself is damaged. Intellect is clouded, and will is weakened. Appetites are not subject to reason. We tend towards selfishness. God starts again with a new Eve. The angel greets Mary as “full of grace.” She had a human nature that was whole, healthy, without flaw, because God dwelt in her from the moment of her conception. God saved her by the merits of her son. She could have still said no. But she cooperated with God’s plan, saying “Be it done to me according to thy will.” This gift that Mary received is meant for all of us. “God chose us in Christ, before the foundation of the world, to be holy and without blemish before him.” Switchfoot has it right. We were meant to live for so much more . . . Mary shows us that something more. We’re bent and broken, but God wants to straighten us out, fix us up. God calls us to be holy and without blemish. He offers us the gift of His very life which accomplishes the work of sanctification in us. Our part is to say yes.

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