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First-Year Seminars and Clusters

First-Year Seminars and Clusters

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First-Year Seminars and Clusters
First-Year Seminars and Clusters

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First-Year Connections

First-Year Seminars and Clusters
FALL 2012

Get connected!

Your first year of college is a time of exciting

changes and dramatic transitions. Hofstra’s first-year seminars and clusters are designed to get your college experience off to a great start. At the heart of the program are small classes taught by distinguished faculty in areas of interest ranging from art to writing. Not only will these courses introduce you to the intellectual and social life of the University, but — even if you are undecided about a major — nearly all of them will also help you satisfy the general education requirements for all majors. These are regular undergraduate courses, but they are reserved for first-year students only, so once you’ve looked over this brochure, please log in to the Hofstra portal (My.Hofstra.edu) and give us your preferences.

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first-year options:
seminars and clusters fall 2012
SEMINARS
Limited to 15 students, first-year seminars allow you to interact in a small setting and connect with a faculty member who may become your major advisor, depending on what major you choose. We’ve tried to design seminars to fit every interest, from jazz to film to legal studies to computing.

It’s All About New York City
When you look over the seminars and clusters, you’ll notice that many of them involve activities in New York City. We want all our students — especially our first-year students — to be comfortable getting in and out of the city. To that end, seminar and cluster faculty accompany their students on related events in New York City. Thus, students in music, dance and drama courses attend performances; science students visit museums and laboratories; and politics students attend lectures by expert speakers, visit government offices, etc. In essence, all these courses will help you navigate the city and make it your own.

CLUSTERS
First-year clusters are usually three courses grouped around a common theme. For example, cluster F1, “The Psychology of Everyday Life,” contains psychology, philosophy and English composition courses; F7, “Drama and the Visual Arts,” includes courses in drama, art history and English composition; and so on. By taking a few courses with the same group of students, you’ll make friends more quickly, form study groups, and come to feel at home on a large campus.

Why Enroll in a First-Year Seminar or Cluster?
First-year seminars and clusters help you move closer to graduation. The first-year seminars and clusters satisfy general education and liberal arts requirements which all Hofstra students must fulfill. For this reason, they are appropriate for you whether you have a major in mind or are undecided. In fact, even if you switch majors, these courses will still satisfy the same graduation requirements.

LIVING-LEARNING COMMUNITIES
Several of the first-year clusters and seminars are linked to “Living/Learning Communities” or LLC’s. Residential students enrolled in these clusters and seminars may choose to live together in an LLC in the Netherlands First-Year Complex. The LLC’s are devoted to particular themes. They allow students to live and study together with students having common interests. In this brochure the LLC’s are marked with icons like this , which stands for the Math/Science/Engineering LLC. When an LLC icon appears next to a seminar or cluster, it means that offering is linked with a Living Learning Community. Students who choose LLC’s are given some priority for Netherlands housing.

Time to Choose!
Please take some time to look over your first-year options in this brochure. Then, log in to the Hofstra portal (My.Hofstra.edu) and choose your preferences. Please express your top three choices in any order; for example, two clusters and a seminar, or two seminars and a cluster. We can’t always guarantee your first choice of seminar or cluster, but we can generally enroll you in one of the top three you indicate. Then, when you attend one of the summer orientation sessions, you’ll sit down with an advisor and complete the rest of your fall schedule. At that time you’re welcome to change to a different first-year seminar or cluster, or choose different courses altogether. If you have questions about fall courses now or at any time, simply call the Center for University Advisement at 516-463-7222 or 516-463-6770.

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Donna Karan, Prada, as well as their muses and fashion icons who both inspired and influenced them (e.g., Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Princess Diana, and Audrey Hepburn). Trips to New York City, the fashion capital of the world, will include visits to The Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), “window shopping” on Fifth Avenue, and the “Garment District.” This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 91187). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities.

SEMINARS
Seminars are small classes – limited to 15 students – that fulfill general education requirements. Many of the seminars involve activities in New York City. Seminars are an excellent way to connect with peers and faculty in a relaxed and friendly setting. ANTHROPOLOGY
1. ANTH 14F, sec. 01: Why Chimps Don’t Drive Ferraris (BH), CRN: 94158 (5 s.h.) T/TH, 10:05 a.m.-Noon, Anna Feuerbach

ASTRONOMY
4. ASTR 14F, sec. 01 and 01L: Our Solar System: From the Ancient Greeks to Interstellar Life (NS), CRNs: 94379 and 94380 (3 s.h.) Lecture, TH 2:20-4:10 p.m.; Lab, T, 2:20-4:10 p.m.; Brett Bochner

Society is defined by the relationship between people and products, whether it’s a supercomputer or stone tool. This seminar explores how different cultures, past and present, perceive the world and how this perception influences decisions. Technology and material culture originate from, propagate through, and reflect and reinforce the beliefs and behaviors of people. Not only do they provide people with resources to control their environment, but they also help people understand and explain the world in which they live. The past decisions of individuals shaped the world as it is today, just as the future will be built on today’s choices. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92198). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 2. ANTH 14F, sec. 02: New York and Slavery: Time to Tell the Truth (BH), CRN: 94159 (5 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Alan Singer

In this survey of our solar system, we discuss the evolution of ideas about the nature of our world, and the structure of our cosmos — from visions of an Earth-centered universe to the modern view of Earth as a small, blue dot in the vast Milky Way galaxy. This seminar covers the sun, the planets and their moons, and the small, wandering asteroids and plutoids orbiting in the empty places of the solar system. We also learn about planets orbiting other stars in other solar systems, and consider the possibility of extraterrestrial life in all these places, far beyond the boundaries of our home on Earth. The class includes lectures, participatory labs, and astronomical observations at the Hofstra Observatory. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
5. CLL 14F, sec. 01: Myth and the Modern World (LT), CRN: 92771 (5 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Maureen Murphy

This course examines the history of New York City before the Civil War, through the struggle to end slavery. We cannot understand the history of the United States unless we understand the role of race and slavery. This class is part of the campus-wide commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation issued in preliminary form in fall 1862. The class will visit the African Burial Ground, Underground Railroad sites, and current archaeological digs in New York City and Long Island, and students will take the Lower Manhattan New York and Slavery Walking Tour. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 93012). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

This seminar examines myth as a narrative form and explores its functions and its influence on the arts (visual arts, film, literature, music theater), culture and community. Tracing the continuity and change in myth over time, we consider the role of the hero, concepts of good and evil, the matter of faith, and the cycle of birth, life and death. Our study of myth embraces Eastern as well as Western visual and narrative traditions. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92619). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities.

ART HISTORY
3. AH 14F, sec. 01: Great Fashion Designers: Inspiration and Influences (AA), CRN: 91463 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Claire Lindgren

COMPUTER SCIENCE
6. CSC 14F, sec. 01: The Million-Dollar Problem (MC), CRN: 92430 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Gretchen Ostheimer

In 1858, Charles Frederick Worth opened a “fashion house” in Paris and high fashion or “haute couture” was born. Today, most people are more familiar with the names of fashion designers than those of other artists. This course will study great designers, such as Chanel, Dior, Versace, Ralph Lauren, Michael Kors, Vera Wang,

Here is your challenge. You are given a map marked with locations that you must visit. How would you plan a route that visits each of the locations exactly once and minimizes the distance traveled? It turns out there are important applications of this problem. One such application is the design of computer chips.

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The problem of quickly finding the optimal route using a map, known as the Traveling Salesman Problem, is one of the most famous unsolved problems in computer science and mathematics. The person who solves it will be awarded the “Millennium Prize,” which carries a $1,000,000 award! The class will explore the Traveling Salesman Problem using computers, mathematics, writing and that incredible problem-solving engine you carry with you every day — your brain. Please note: The course is open to all students without prerequisite requirements and satisfies a University graduation requirement in Mathematics/Computer Science. Although it does not count toward requirements for computer science and computer engineering majors, students in these majors are encouraged to take this seminar as an elective.

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ECONOMICS
9. ECO 14F, sec. 01: Macro Freakonomics (BH), CRN: 92349 (4 s.h.) M/W/F, 9:50-11:05 a.m., Massoud Fazeli

What caused the financial crash of 2008 and the subsequent Great Recession? How can there be a “jobless recovery”? What are the real threats – if any – of globalization? Why is there so much protest and even rioting at World Bank meetings? This course goes behind the headlines and examines the underlying trends of the economy in order to understand the current crisis and the future of capitalism. It is taught in the spirit of the book Freakonomics. For Micro Freakonomics, see LABR 14F on page 7. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

DRAMA
7. DRAM 14F, sec. 01: Eugene O’Neill and the Dysfunctional American Family (AA), CRN: 94288 (3 s.h.) M/F, 11:15 a.m.-12:40 p.m., James Kolb

ENGLISH
10. ENGL 14F, sec. 01: Modern American Crime Literature (LT), CRN: 91183 (4 s.h.) M/F, 11:15 a.m.-1:10 p.m., Richard Pioreck America has long been fascinated by crime – it’s the biggest selling category of fiction in America. The seeming freedom to make your own rules and have no boss is the ultimate fantasy of the American dream. While America has always been titillated by crime and its driving forces of lust, revenge, greed and jealousy, the 1960s changed how Americans perceived crime. Joey Gallo was the first of the celebrity mobsters, and George V. Higgins’ The Friends of Eddie Coyle shifted the paradigm of crime literature. Hollywood’s Hays Office morality code, which declared that no one could profit from crime, ceased to be upheld; crime might pay, and a character might not be brought to justice. Examining true crime stories and films helps us understand the American romance with crime and the outlaw. Through crime literature, this course investigates America’s evolving sense of crime and justice. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities. 11. ENGL 14F, sec. 02: Paradise Lost in(to) the 21st Century (LT), CRN: 93415 (4 s.h.) M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Shari Zimmerman Come explore John Milton’s Paradise Lost, a poem that dares to rewrite Genesis, imagine Satan’s rebellion against God, represent the marriage of an unfallen Adam and Eve, and stage epic debates about matters still relevant today, among them: tyranny, revolution, and war; service, submission, and enslavement; love, gender, and sexuality; poetic creation, the acquisition of knowledge, and the exploration of new worlds. Students discover not only the power and beauty of Paradise Lost, but also why writers, artists, and filmmakers continue to engage with this epic poem — in novels such as Frankenstein or Moby-Dick, His Dark Materials or The Satanic Verses; in illustrations by Blake or Doré; or in such films as Fallen, Constantine, and The Devil’s Advocate. In fact, word on the street is Paradise Lost is soon to be made into a motion picture — with an expected release date of 2013 — so check out the poem before it hits the big screen. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities.

Eugene O’Neill, the son of an itinerant actor, grew up in a dysfunctional American family. His mother became morphineaddicted as a result of his difficult childbirth. He shared an enthusiasm for alcohol with his brother and father. In his 20s, he contracted tuberculosis, haunted waterfront dives in a drunken stupor, and married three times, producing two children who died untimely deaths, hastened by drugs and alcohol. But O’Neill found a way out through drama. He described playwriting as an exorcism of old ghosts. This course examines O’Neill’s major plays, with a focus on how they transcend the personal and autobiographical to speak to the rest of us. O’Neill believed that the problems he saw in his own dysfunctional family might serve as a metaphor for much of what he perceived as wrong in American culture and society. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities; it does not satisfy the DRAMA 3 requirement for drama majors. 8. DRAM 14F, sec. A: Broadway (and More)! (AA), CRN: 91883 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 4-5:55 p.m., Maureen McFeely and WSC 1, sec. FZ: Composition, CRN: 92158 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Patricia Navarra (Total = 7 s.h.) Tourists sometimes think theater in New York City means Broadway and nothing else. But New York City also boasts hundreds of exciting off-Broadway and off-off-Broadway productions each season. This drama seminar ventures beyond the classroom to explore the rich variety of these stage offerings. By seeking good theater in all its guises – on Broadway and off, commercial and not-for-profit – we come to understand what makes New York the theater capital of the world. Students also take a required composition course, in which they write about the productions they have attended. Students in this course should not enroll in Thursday evening classes, as we are often at the theater. Please note: DRAM 14F satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities; it does not satisfy the DRAMA 3 requirement for drama majors. WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students.

SEMINARS

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15. FA 14F, sec. 02: Graphic Design Inspirations (CP), CRN: 93298 (4 s.h.) M/W, 1-2:50 p.m., Beth Ocko Design history provides a wealth of inspiration to contemporary graphic designers. In this course we look back at some earlier designers and traditions and examine their influence on graphic design today. Examples of “retro graphics” provide the basis for our class projects in logo, poster, and motion graphics design. This retrospective includes Victorian wood type, the Vienna Workshop, Plakatstil (poster style), Paul Rand, and the Blue Note style in album covers. Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of Adobe graphics software. Please note: This course is subject to a laboratory fee. This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities.

12. ENGL 14F, sec. 03: Jazz, Literature and Film (LT), CRN: 92749 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Joseph McLaren Jazz has inspired numerous literary works of poetry and prose, and has produced classic icons such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Charlie Parker, Dave Brubeck, Sarah Vaughan, John Coltrane, and Miles Davis. This course examines representations of jazz artists, musical settings, and jazz-related social and cultural themes in poetry, prose, and film. Students look at jazz literature in relation to such periods and genres as ragtime, the “jazz age,” the Harlem Renaissance, swing, bebop, free jazz, and contemporary jazz, and we consider the relationship between blues and jazz. The course covers various locales, including New Orleans, Kansas City, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York. We also discuss the connection between jazz writing and the Beat Generation of the 1950s. A field trip to a jazz venue is scheduled. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities. 13. ENGL 14F, sec. 04: The Powers of Darkness: British Gothic Fiction and the Modern Horror Film (LT), CRN: 92868 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Irene Fizer Why do we enjoy reading fiction and seeing films that provoke sensations of fear and dread? Do confrontations between living beings and the living dead — such as ghosts, speaking skulls, and corpses arisen from the grave — purify the world of evil or leave an irreparable experience of trauma? And why does doomed romantic love emerge within an atmosphere of overwhelming loss? In this course, we juxtapose a series of texts published during the first 50 years of the gothic tradition with a selection of modern horror films. Our texts may include, among others, Horace Walpole’s influential short novel, The Castle of Otranto; Jane Austen’s bitingly satiric gothic thriller, Northhanger Abbey; and Mary Shelley’s unparalleled monster tale, Frankenstein. The modern gothic films that we screen and analyze may include, among others: Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining and Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan. In addition, a class trip to New York City is scheduled during the week of Halloween. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities.

GEOGRAPHY
16. GEOG 14F, sec. 01: Child Labor in the World Today (BH, CC), CRN: 92729 (5 s.h.) M/W/F, 12:50-1:45 p.m., Kari Jensen This course presents facts and theories about child labor in the world today. After a general introduction, we narrow it down to a country-by-country approach. (The students participate in the decision about which countries to study in more detail.) We then focus on the country-specific historical and societal context of child labor issues, coupled with a study of governmental policies and nongovernmental organizations’ strategies to help alleviate the problems related to child labor, such as poverty and inadequate access to education. The course is based on lectures, documentary films, and discussions. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 93045). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in either the Social Sciences or Cross Cultural category.

GEOLOGY
17. GEOL 14F, sec. 01 and 01L: Field Geology of New York City and Long Island (NS), CRNs: 93279 and 93280 (3 s.h.) Lecture, T/TH, 10-10:55 a.m.; Lab, T, 2:20-4:10 p.m.; Steven Okulewicz Public health, public transportation, water works, and environmental protection — these affect our daily lives, and all depend on the subjects of geology and engineering. This seminar is conducted in a lecture and field trip format, and involves travel to various sites around New York City and Long Island. We see firsthand how science connects with public policy. Students learn to look at large-scale issues of public concern in New York City and on Long Island through the lens of the field geologist. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences. 18. GEOL 14F, sec. 02 and 02L: Dinosaurs of the Mesozoic Era (NS), CRNs: 91591 and 91592 (3 s.h.) Lecture, T/TH, 2:20-3:15 p.m.; Lab, TH, 3:25-5:15 p.m.; J Bret Bennington Dinosaurs and related “ruling reptiles” were the dominant animals on Earth during the 180 million years of the Mesozoic Era. Recently, there has been a renaissance in dinosaur paleontology, which has

FINE ARTS
14. FA 14F, sec. 01: Leonardo da Vinci to Andy Warhol: Why Art and Artists Cause Trouble (AA), CRN: 94326 (4 s.h.) M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Laurie Fendrich Many people think that art is harmless, and that it is a form of entertainment; but, in fact, art is powerful and dangerous. The class begins with Leonardo da Vinci, who argued that images have more impact than words. We then read Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who concluded that art threatens human happiness, and de Tocqueville, who believed art and democracy are enemies. We read a famous 19th-century short story about the tragic condition of the modern artist as well as a selection of 20th-century essays in art criticism that studies the impact of mass culture on the arts. We finish by studying the role of the fine arts in contemporary American society by analyzing a film by Woody Allen about artistic temperament. Students also travel to art museums and galleries in New York City. Please note: This course is open to all first-year students, including art history and studio art majors, and satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities.

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resulted in a wealth of new fossils and new insights into the nature and evolution of dinosaurs and other animals that first evolved in the Mesozoic Era (birds, placental mammals, modern reptiles and amphibians). In addition, the study of plate tectonics has shown that the Mesozoic Era was also a time of great geological change around the world. Drawing on the latest geological and paleontological research, this course presents the scientific detective work that geologists and paleontologists use to reconstruct the Mesozoic world. The course includes trips to museums in New York City. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences.

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Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911 – to help us better understand the social, environmental and political impact of these events. Could the massive flooding of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina have been prevented? Is Al Gore correct to warn us about the perils of global warming in his film An Inconvenient Truth? Is the scenario painted in the movie The Day After Tomorrow just fiction? This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92968). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 22. HIST 14F, sec. 04: Running for President: Candidates and Issues (HP), CRN: 92742 (5 s.h.) T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Carolyn Eisenberg Does it matter who is president of the United States? How do Americans choose a candidate? During the fall semester, we will be flooded with news about the presidential race. This is especially true at Hofstra since we will be hosting one of the 2012 presidential debates. A major aim of this course is to separate campaign pyrotechnics from substance. What are the real issues our society now faces, and what are some relevant solutions? To what extent does our electoral system facilitate significant choices? In this class, we use an array of sources – newspapers, online publications, films and significant books – to explore these questions and also consider the historical currents that affect the 2012 presidential race. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92972). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

HISTORY
19. HIST 14F, sec. 01: Shop Till You Drop: Desire, Consumer Culture, and the Emergence of the Modern, 1860-1914 (HP), CRN: 92740 (5 s.h.) M/W, 9-11 a.m., Sally Charnow This seminar examines the rise of urban life with its new realms of consumer pleasure. The growth of a mass commercial culture in the late 19th century recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family and political life. We explore this new burgeoning commerce and its impact on the urban landscape, changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, fashion, conspicuous consumption, the birth of advertising, and protests and popular movements organized around issues of consumption. This class also investigates the complex relationship between the new commercial culture and art movements, including impressionism, cabarets, and modern theater. At the turn of the century, the city was the testing ground for modern life. As such, the course includes trips to museums and neighborhoods in New York City. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92973). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 20. HIST 14F, sec. 02: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo: Sweden, Myth and Reality (HP), CRN: 92739 (4 s.h.) M/W, 2:45-4:40 p.m., Johan Ahr This course explores the literary publishing phenomenon that is Stieg Larsson’s The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, an international best-seller. Both a love story and murder mystery, featuring the investigative journalist Mikael Blomqvist and cyber punk Lisbeth Salander, the novel is the first of a series of complex crime thrillers about a contemporary, multicultural Sweden that suffers horribly from corruption and iniquity — indeed, from a mostly hidden, unresolved past with violent political extremism. To what extent is the book’s content a matter of fact? We will use the book as a window through which to view the issues of institutional racism and sexism. Both books and films (fiction and nonfiction) inform the answer to this question. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 21. HIST 14F, sec. 03: Disasters in History (HP), CRN: 92741 (5 s.h.) T/TH, 10:05 a.m.-noon, Susan Yohn What effect, if any, do disasters have on a nation and its people? This course examines a number of natural and manmade disasters – the Galveston hurricane of 1900, the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, the San Francisco earthquakes of 1906 and 1989, and the

SEMINARS

LABOR STUDIES
23. LABR 14F, sec. 01: Micro Freakonomics (BH), CRN: 94170 (5 s.h.) T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Gregory DeFreitas If crack dealers make a lot of money, why do many of them live with their mothers? Is there cheating in the Sumo Wrestling Federation in Japan? What is the economic rationale for joining an urban, rural, or suburban gang? This course is instructed in the spirit of the book Freakonomics. Students develop a short list of core micro-economic concepts and present them in multiple real-world contexts. By the semester’s end, students learn that economics is not limited to textbooks; rather, the material imprisoned between the covers jumps out almost everywhere. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92969). For Macro Freakonomics, see ECO 14F on page 5. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

MUSIC
24. MUS 14F, sec. 01: From iPod to Imax: Making Music on Your Computer (AA), CRN: 91995 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Kenneth Lampl Do you have a hit song in your head? This course explores the fundamentals of making music using Apple’s Garage Band software. The course examines the compositional techniques of song writing, mixing and film scoring through creative exercises. No prior music making or computer experience is necessary. The course includes trips to music production and marketing firms in New York City. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities, and is not intended for music majors.

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refers to the ancient Chinese cosmological concept of the interplay between two opposite yet complementary forces (yin and yang). It is based on the principle of the soft overcoming the hard. No background is presupposed. Students begin with simple movements, and learn not only an ancient form of self-defense, but also learn to calm the emotions and focus the mind. Please note: The course is an elective. The semester hours count toward graduation, but the course does not satisfy a University graduation requirement. 29. PESP 47, sec. F99: Dance, Dance, Dance CRN: 93002 (2 s.h.) T/TH, 4:30-5:50 p.m., Phyllis Hintze Ever wanted to learn to dance? Now’s your chance – no background presupposed. The tango, salsa, merengue, cha-cha, bachata, rumba, swing, waltz, and fox-trot … learn the latest dances that are all the rage. You’ll be sure to impress your friends with your new moves! Please note: The course is an elective. The semester hours count toward graduation, but the course does not satisfy a University graduation requirement.

PHILOSOPHY
25. PHI 14F, sec. 01: The Meaning of Life (HP), CRN: 94148 (5 s.h.) M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Mark McEvoy For us to have a chance of finding the meaning of life, human life must have meaning, or at least the lives of individual human beings must have meaning. But perhaps these claims aren’t true, or don’t even make sense. Further, if claims about life having meaning aren’t true, or don’t even make sense, would that horrify or at least disappoint you? If so, does that reaction itself show that life has some kind of meaning after all? We pursue these questions through class discussions and readings. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 90867). Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 26. PHI 14F, sec. 02: Law and Public Policy (HP), CRN: 92012 (4 s.h.) M/W, 2:55-4:50 p.m., Amy Baehr In this seminar, students investigate the nature of the American legal system and the role of law in American society. This course takes up positions, such as libertarianism, liberalism, republicanism, conservatism and postmodernism. We use this material to explore topics such as increased penalties for hate crimes, physicianassisted suicide, the legal standing of animals and the environment, gay marriage, church and state, and the rights of individuals with disabilities. This course includes trips to legal institutions in and around New York City. Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 27. PHI 14F, sec. A: The Ghost in the Machine: Thinking About the Soul (HP), CRN: 91391 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 4:30-6:25 p.m., Anthony Dardis “The soul” seems like one of those things you can’t really argue or think about, like religion or politics. But philosophy’s business is to reason about everything. And it certainly has reasoned, and continues to reason, about the soul. On the one hand, the world around us is “physical” in the sense that it’s made up of nothing but physical matter. On the other hand, our own awareness of ourselves shows that somehow there’s more to us than just physical matter. This seminar takes a look at this 2,500-year-old puzzle. We read classical texts by Plato, Aristotle and Lucretius, and contemporary philosophical works about the mind/body problem, free will and cognitive neuroscience. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
30. PSC 14F, sec. 01: Law, Politics and Society (BH), CRN: 94253 (4 s.h.) M/W/F, 1:20-2:35 p.m., TBA Every year, tens of thousands of young people enter law school and begin the study of legal rules. Most do so because they see the legal profession as a noble calling, and they enter it with a desire to change the world for the better. In their three years of full-time study, however, these future lawyers will spend almost no time studying how the rules got to be the way they are — who makes the law, who benefits from it, and how it is that, once in place, the law is something most people simply take for granted. In this course, we study how the American legal system interacts with the rest of our political institutions, how it reflects the cultural norms, class distinctions and idiosyncrasies of the society we live in, and whether changes in the law really do have the power to change the world. Please note: First-year students entering the Legal Education Accelerated Program (LEAP) in fall 2012 are strongly urged to register for this course. The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

PSYCHOLOGY
31. PSY 14F, sec. 01: Psychology Through Film and Literature (BH), CRN: 93353 (4 s.h.) M/W, 2:55-4:20 p.m., Lola Nouryan This course provides a basic understanding of psychological disorder through film and literature. By studying the work of selected writers, directors and filmmakers, we investigate the basis of “abnormal” behavior. Our goal is to understand mental illness and its treatment. To that end, we examine the ways in which writers and filmmakers portray character, communication, and perceptual experience. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
28. PESP 32, sec. F99: T’ai Chi CRN: 93239 (2 s.h.) M/W, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Craig Gee T’ai Chi Chuan (also referred to as Tai Chi, Tai Ji, or Taijiquan) is one of the oldest styles of Chinese martial art, and is the most widely practiced martial art in the world today. The term “Tai Ji”

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32. PSY 14F, sec. 02: Consumer Psychology (BH), CRN: 93352 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 12:10-2:05 p.m., Terri Shapiro Why do we buy the things we buy? How do advertisers persuade us that one product or service is better than another? What influences our satisfaction with a product, and how does that affect our future purchasing behavior? What happens when a product or service fails, and how does an organization recover from failure and win back its customers? What is the influence of e-commerce? In this seminar, we integrate theory, research, and current practice to examine the psychology of consumer behavior, market research, and advertising. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 33. PSY 14F, sec. 03: The Resilient Child (BH), CRN: 91989 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Brian Cox To what extent do experiences in childhood affect who we become as adults? Can we overcome a bad start? How are our personalities formed by learning, temperament, and the events of lives caught up in history and cultural change? In this seminar in developmental psychology, we begin by examining our beliefs about children’s natures in the past and present. Then we examine the scientific evidence ranging from case studies to extraordinary longitudinal studies of children’s development that have lasted as long as 50 years. The course concludes with a discussion of adult “identity crises” and how we explain the process to ourselves in biography and autobiography. As the philosopher Kierkegaard has said: “Life is lived forward, but understood backward.” Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 34. PSY 14F, sec. 04: The Psychology of Health and Wellness (BH), CRN: 94248 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Sarah Novak Why is it so hard to consistently engage in healthy behavior? We usually know what to do, but knowledge just isn’t enough. The main goal of this course is to explore health behavior (e.g., healthy eating, relaxation, smoking cessation) from the perspectives of health psychology and behavioral medicine. In this course, we apply theoretical perspectives and methodological techniques to understand how biological, psychological and social factors interact to affect health behavior and well-being. We learn how to assess health behavior, think critically about current research, and identify the best strategies for success in reaching health-related goals. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92456). Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

fall 2012

RELIGION
35. RELI 14F, sec. 01: Illusion, Magic and Disenchantment (HP, CC), CRN: 93357 (4 s.h.) M/W, 11:15 a.m.-1:10 p.m., Sophie Hawkins In recent years, religion, death, race, consciousness, democracy, truth, and even reality itself, have all been declared to be “illusions.” Indeed, we, in the technological age, seem to be preoccupied with illusion. It has been said that the more familiar we become with the virtual world, the more unsure we are of the real world. In this course we primarily study illusions as a means to enrich our skills of critical thinking. Just as a good magician’s trick evokes both wonder and puzzlement, we read texts that challenge our everyday assumptions. Illusions often “work” by revealing one truth while concealing another; our seminar focuses on how to negotiate these contested truths. We read across disciplines (religious studies, psychology, art history, film studies, political science) and across genres (peer review journals, film reviews, political comment, fiction, and scripture). This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 90899). Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in either the Social Sciences or Cross Cultural category. 36. RELI 14F, sec. 02: Visions of Malcolm X (HP), CRN: 94192 (5 s.h.) T/R, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Julie Byrne This course introduces students to Malcolm X through his autobiography, a new biography by Manning Marable, and Spike Lee’s 1992 film, X. Few books rise to the level of The Autobiography of Malcom X as a teaching tool, and few books have an impact on students’ lives more powerfully. Course materials are supplemented with online resources about Malcolm X and field trips to Harlem and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Students learn about this most amazing and influential American seeker from different angles, as well as about religion, race, America, and themselves. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92967). Please note: This course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

SEMINARS

SOCIOLOGY
37. SOC 14F, sec. 01: Fight the Power: Global Justice Activism in the Contemporary Era (BH), CRN: 92872 (4 s.h.) M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Lyndi Hewitt-Corzine Today’s globalized and globalizing world is faced with a set of pressing social problems that threaten the flourishing of many societies and cultures. Poverty, environmental degradation, dirty water, human trafficking, war, genocide, and gender-based violence reflect the most harmful features of contemporary globalization, and also represent serious, continuing obstacles to human development. But even in the face of intractable problems, global justice activists work relentlessly to change the world. In this course, we investigate various social movements fighting for social justice and human rights. We examine their visions, rhetoric, and protest strategies, and as well as the challenges to successful social change. The course is based on lectures, class discussions, and documentary films, and includes intensive focus on critical thinking and writing. Students also have the opportunity to visit the United Nations and hear from global justice activists based in New York City. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

Living/Learning Community Housing Option:
Presidental Politics Arts PreP

Math/Science/Engineering

W.E.L.L.

L.E.A.D.

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TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY
41. TPP 14F, sec. 01: Stem Cells: Science, Ethics and Politics (NS), CRN: 92432 (4 s.h.) M/W, 9:05-11:05 a.m., Sina Rabbany Stem cells have become front-page news. Why all the fuss? We explore the biology of stem cells, their potential uses in medicine, and some of the challenges facing stem cell research – from selfrenewal through clinical applications. We then focus on the various types of stem cells, as well as their isolation, growth and potential in regenerative medicine. The moral, religious and policy concerns surrounding this intensely debated area of science are also covered. Please note: This course is designed for non-science majors, but does satisfy a University graduation requirement in the Natural Sciences.

38. SOC 14F, sec. 02: Power, Protest, and Your Future in America’s Democracy (BH), CRN: 94199 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Cynthia Bogard What kind of democracy exists in the United States in the early 21st century? How does democracy play itself out in America — in the political institutions we’ve created but also in our everyday lives? Who has power and why? How does the distribution of power influence our life choices? How are issues framed in public discourse? Who defines those issues and why does it matter? How does our political system support our democracy and civil institutions, and what happens when it doesn’t? How can we change our democracy and when would we need to? What is the purpose of protest in America and what determines whether it is effective? To explore these questions, we read and react to the news of the day and the words of leaders, protesters and citizens. We discuss what holds the country together and what can drive it apart. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences. 39. SOC 14F, sec. A: The Transition to Adulthood on Facebook, in a Recession, and after Obama (BH), CRN: 94200 (5 s.h.) T/TH, 4:30-6:25 p.m., Carrie Alexandrowicz The current generation of young people is more educated and technologically savvy than previous generations — yet are more likely to face unemployment than their predecessors. This course examines how social, economic and political factors affect young people in the contemporary United States. In doing so, we learn, through a sociological lens, about the inequalities that cut across age to affect people by gender, socioeconomic position, racial/ethnic backgrounds, and ability. The class includes reading, discussion and critical analysis of popular media, as well as opportunities for offcampus learning. This course includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRN 92315). Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences.

WRITING STUDIES AND COMPOSITION
42. WSC 14F, sec. 01: The Campaign for Your Mind (CP), CRN: 92212 (4 s.h.) M/W/F, 10:10-11:05 a.m., Adina Verbit Wasserman Language is a powerful tool – it can be used to encourage, beat down, solve problems, argue, persuade or brainwash. This semester we examine the many ways language is used in presidential campaigns. From campaign ads to press conferences, and from debates to inaugurations, the art of persuasion is at the center of elections. We begin by looking at some inaugural addresses; what is the language used to unite a people after an election? Campaign ads are another central means of persuading the public. We examine how the ads differ across mediums (television, Internet, radio, print). Finally, we study and review the format of the 2008 presidential debate here at Hofstra. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities. 43. WSC 14F, sec. 02: Rebellions in the Wilderness (CP), CRN 93409 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Frank Gaughan In the television program Man vs. Wild, the host lands in a remote forest and hikes for days, eating meals that most of us would find revolting. At a time when 80 percent of the nation lives in an urbanized area, such programming may be as close as most Americans come to an encounter with the natural world. Fortunately, American history, art and politics offer compelling alternatives to survivalist television shows. The wilderness, as both an idea and a physical place, has long been used to challenge definitions of progress and success in America. We examine key moments of environmentally driven rebellion, including Henry David Thoreau’s two years spent living at Walden and Julia “Butterfly” Hill’s two years living in a tree to protest the logging of old growth forest. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities.

SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES
40. SBLY 1, sec. F40: Introduction to Sustainability (IS), CRN: 94465 (3 s.h.) M/W, 2:55-4:20 p.m., Robert Brinkmann This course exposes students to major ideas of sustainability within three themes: environment, equity, and economic development. The course includes a history of the development of the field of sustainability within the context of issues such as energy, water, natural lands, resource conservation, urban and suburban development, food and agriculture, brownfields, environmental justice and equity, green entrepreneurialism, and sustainability management. We also review the major political and social movements associated with sustainability. The course is highly interdisciplinary in nature, and utilizes lectures, readings, films, websites, and a variety of social media. Please note: The course satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Interdisciplinary Studies.

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first-year connections

fall 2012

CLUSTERS
Clusters are sets of two or three classes, linked by a common theme, that fulfill general education requirements. Many of the clusters involve activities in New York City. By taking a few courses with the same group of students, you’ll make friends more quickly, form study groups, and come to feel at home on the Hofstra campus. PSYCHOLOGY
F1: The Psychology of Everyday Life (Total = 11-12 s.h.) Everyday life is filled with complexities that range from the minor to the extraordinary, including life-altering choices that affect our relationships, career options, health and well-being. Especially for first-year college students, it may seem that every aspect of life requires thought and attention, all at the same time. In this cluster, we examine psychological and philosophical approaches to the challenges of everyday life. Issues include personal goals, conformity, stress, relationships, health-promoting versus health-damaging behaviors, self-deception, and the role of morality and ethics in defining a good individual life. Students are encouraged to think critically about the topics studied, understand how they apply to their lives, and express and examine their opinions about current controversies. Please note: PHI 14 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. PSY 1, sec. F1: Introduction to Psychology CRN: 92406 (4 s.h.) M/W, 2:55-4:50 p.m., Keith Shafritz PHI 14, sec. F1: Introduction to Ethics (HP), CRN: 91796 (4 s.h.) M/W, 5-6:55 p.m., Kathleen Wallace WSC 1: Composition sec. F1: CRN: 92157 (4 s.h.) M/W/F, 9:50-11:05 a.m., Jennifer Rich or sec. FA: CRN: 92163 (3 s.h.) M/F, 11:15 a.m.-1:10 p.m., Jennifer Rich

RTVF 10, sec. F2: Introduction to Film and Television Study (AA), CRN 92212 (3 s.h.) F, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., John Freitas PHI 10, sec. F2: Introduction to Philosophy (HP), CRN: 91389 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 12:10-2:05 p.m., Amy Karofsky WSC 1: Composition (4 s.h.) sec. F2: CRN: 92400 M/W, 12:50-2:45 p.m., Lisa Dresner or sec. FB: CRN: 93406 M/W, 2:55-4:50 p.m., Lisa Dresner

LAW, POLITICS AND HISTORY
F3: Presidential Politics (Total = 13 s.h.) This cluster examines the role of elections in American politics, with particular attention to the upcoming 2012 presidential and congressional elections. The question underlying the course is, How do elections influence the nature of representation in American politics? Specific topics include the relevance of the electoral college in the 21st century; the decline of political parties and the rise of independent voters; and the demands of the 24-hour news cycle on political campaigns. Students study the importance of elections through historical, political and expository windows, and they have special readings and assignments that bridge all three courses. This cluster includes one semester hour of instruction in library research methods (CRNs 92970 and 92971). Please note: HIST 14C and PSC 1 satisfy University graduation requirements in the Social Sciences, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. HIST 14C, sec. F3: American Civilization (HP), CRN: 92737 (4 s.h.) M/W, 12:50-2:50 p.m., Michael D’Innocenzo PSC 1, sec. F3: American Politics (BH), CRN: 91988 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 10:05 a.m.-noon, Meena Bose WSC 1: Composition (4 s.h.) sec. F3: CRN: 92160 T/TH, 12:10-2:05 p.m., Daisy Miller or sec. FC: CRN: 92763 T/TH, 2:15-4:10 p.m., Daisy Miller

CLUSTERS

FILM
F2: Film and Philosophy (Total = 11 s.h.) This cluster integrates introductory courses in film and philosophy with first-year composition. The film course introduces the basic language of filmic expression and the methodologies of film study, including their influence on television and video. Emphasis is on ways of looking at films and television, the major concepts of theory, the various forms of film and television, and the techniques that determine visual styles. In the philosophy course students consider whether film is a passive mirror of a pre-existing reality, or whether we should think of it as possessing the power to actively construct a reality of its own. Can film be morally or socially dangerous? In the composition course students write in a variety of genres about their work in the other two courses. Please note: RTVF 10 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Humanities, PHI 10 satisfies a University graduation requirement in the Social Sciences, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students.

Living/Learning Community Housing Option:
Presidental Politics Arts PreP

Math/Science/Engineering

W.E.L.L.

L.E.A.D.

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fall 2012

My.Hofstra.edu
MUSIC/DRAMA/DANCE
F6: Elements of Music and Music Theory (Total = 8 or 9 s.h.) This cluster is designed primarily for music majors and minors, but is also suitable for advanced music non-majors with strong musical backgrounds. MUS 48 is a survey of the elements of music, the main formal structures and the principle musical genres found in the various style periods of Western music. MUS 69 and 69A are intensive and comprehensive surveys of the fundamentals of music theory. (Students will be placed in either MUS 69 or 69A on the basis of their scores on Hofstra’s music theory placement test.) In WSC 1, composition, students write on themes and topics developed in the two music classes. Please note: MUS 48 satisfies a University degree requirement in the Humanities, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. MUS 48, sec. F6A: Musical Styles and Structures (AA), CRN: 90134 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Herbert Deutsch MUS 69, sec. F6A: Music Fundamentals and Species Counterpoint CRN: 91361 (2 s.h.) M/F, 11:15 a.m.-12:05 p.m., Lisa Behrens WSC 1: Composition (3 s.h.) sec. F6A: CRN: 94316 T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Ethna Lay or sec. F6B: CRN: 94317 T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Ethna Lay or MUS 48, sec. F6A: Musical Styles and Structures (AA), CRN: 90134 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Herbert Deutsch MUS 69A, sec. F6A: Music Fundamentals and Species Counterpoint CRN: 90540 (3 s.h.) M/F, 11:15 a.m.-12:40 p.m., Trevor DeClercq WSC 1: Composition (3 s.h.) sec. F6A: CRN: 94316 T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Ethna Lay or sec. F6B: CRN: 94317 T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Ethna Lay

F4: Law and Economics (Total = 9 s.h.) What is the relationship between law, economics and business? The legal studies in business course examines the sources of American law and the ways in which our legal system affect our business and personal lives. The class focuses on the Constitution, statutory law, common law, and administrative law. The economics course asks: What is capitalism? Why are the property relations and legal and political institutions so crucial to the operation of a capitalist economy? How have the legal forms of business and the overall business structure evolved over time? What challenges do global corporations create for policymakers? Please note: Both ECO 2 and LEGL 20 are required for all business majors. LEGL 20, sec. F4: Introduction to Legal Systems, Environment and Contracts CRN: 93189 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Martha Weisel ECO 2, sec. F4: Principles of Economics CRN: 91886 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Massoud Fazeli WSC 1, sec. F4: Composition CRN: 94315 (3 s.h.) M/W/F, 10:10-11:05 a.m., John DeCarlo

COMPUTER SCIENCE
F5: The Making and Breaking of Codes (Total = 7 s.h.) Cryptography is the science of encoding messages so that only the intended receiver can decipher them. Cryptography has a long, rich history. It is an area of active research today and has gained a high profile since the attack on the World Trade Center in 2001. Students will learn to solve problems and to implement their solutions on a computer. Students will develop their mathematical skills (especially logic, proof and counting), and will apply these skills to the development and analysis of several strong encryption systems. Teaching methods will emphasize collaborative work and experimental learning. Priority is given to computer science and computer engineering majors, but non-majors are welcome. For students who are primarily interested in satisfying their distribution requirement, the cluster will provide an opportunity to develop creative problem solving and analytical skills in the context of a problem of current political and social import. Please note: CSC 14 and 15 satisfy University graduation requirements in Mathematics/Computer Science.. CSC 14, sec. F5: Discrete Structures for Computer Science I (MC), CRN: 91680 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:10-2:05 p.m., Gretchen Ostheimer CSC 15, sec. F5 and FAL: Fundamentals of Computer Science I: Problem Solving and Program Design and Lab (MC), CRNs: 91681and 91682 (4 s.h.) Lecture, M/W, 9:50-11:05 a.m.; Lab, F, 9:50 a.m.-noon; Krishnan Pillaipakkamnatt

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first-year connections
F7: Drama and the Visual Arts (Total = 9-10 s.h.) This cluster is designed for students who are considering a major or minor in drama. It includes DRAM 9, a required course for the major. Students explore representative plays from a wide variety of traditions as an access point to a larger discussion about the development of Western drama and art from the ancient Greeks to the present day. Assignments focus on sharpening and refining analytical and observational skills through discussion, lecture and writing. By the end of the semester, students will have gained an overview of the history of Western drama and its relationship to major movements in the visual arts, and they will have developed their writing skills through integrated assignments. Please note: AH 4 satisfies a University degree requirement in the Humanities, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. DRAM 9, sec. F7: Play Analysis CRN: 91010 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Christopher Dippel AH 4, sec. F7: Religion, Rulers and Rebellion (AA), CRN: 92019 (3 s.h.) M/F, 11:15 a.m.-12:40 p.m., Martha Hollander WSC 1: Composition sec. F7: CRN: 92161 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Patricia Navarra or sec. FG: CRN: 93408 (4 s.h.) T/TH, 9-10:55 a.m., Robert Vestigo F8: The Soundtracks of Our Lives (Total = 6 s.h.) Soon graduates from the Class of 2016 will reflect on the “oldies,” such as Beyoncé’s “Put a Ring on It,” and listen with curiosity to their children’s recordings of sonic distortion. Even relatively recent music —like the funk-inspired grooves of Grandmaster Flash — sound as if they could only come from a VH1 retrospective or a car commercial. Revolutionary music often begins with outrage and ends with commercialization. Many listeners encounter Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” in films (Apocalypse Now) and cartoons (Elmer Fudd’s “Kill the Wabbit!”), but not in the opera house. Similarly, the Beatles’ 1968 release, “Revolution,” eventually finds its way into a commercial for Nike sneakers. This cluster explores these phenomena in Western music, ranging from Beethoven to the births of rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop. Please note: Not for music majors. No experience with theory, notation, or any musical instrument is required. MUS 3 satisfies a University degree requirement in the Humanities, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. MUS 3, sec. F8: Music Appreciation (AA), CRN: 93408 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Cathy Callis WSC 1, sec. F8: Composition CRN: 92156 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Allison Perry F9: Modern Dance (Total = 8.5 s.h.)

fall 2012

This cluster is designed for incoming dance majors. DNCE 11 focuses on technique in contemporary dance forms, and it is the first course in a four-year major sequence. Along with DNCE 11, students take Rhythmic Training and Accompaniment for Dance, a study of musical concepts as they apply to dance. In the composition class, writing assignments are connected to dance criticism. Students attend a variety of dance and music performances in New York City during the semester. Please note: DNCE 11 satisfies a University degree requirement in the Humanities, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. DNCE 11, sec. F9: Modern Dance I (CP), CRN: 92380 (2.5 s.h.) (for dance majors only) T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Stormy Brandenberger DNCE 11, sec. FA: Pilates Lab CRN: 92381 M, 10-11 a.m., Eleanor Kusner and DNCE 11, sec. FB: Modern Dance Lab CRN: 92382 W, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Robin Becker and DNCE 11, sec. FC: Freshman Performance Lab CRN: 92383 W, 4-5:25 p.m., Maxine Steinman and WSC 1, sec. F9: Composition CRN: 92159 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Robert Vestigo and MUS 151, sec. F9: Rhythmic Training and Accompaniment for Dance CRN: 92159 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 4-5:25 p.m., Glen Fittin

CLUSTERS

DISTRIBUTION COURSE LEGEND
AA BH CC CP HP IS LT MC NS Appreciation and Analysis (Humanities) Behavioral (Social Sciences) Cross Cultural Creative Participation (Humanities) History/Philosophy/Religion (Social Sciences) Interdisciplinary Studies Literature (Humanities) Mathematics/Computer Science Natural Sciences

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My.Hofstra.edu
F11: Engineering (Total = 6 s.h.) This cluster explores the world that humans have designed — the products and processes used in its development. There are three main components of the first-year engineering design course. First, the informed design process connects basic science and mathematics to an eight-step design cycle that enables students to grasp the basics of conceptual engineering design. Second, teamwork is emphasized: Students collaborate on homework and compete with other teams in designing lab projects. Third, communication skills are explored and developed through problemsolving activities and brainstorming sessions. Class sessions are composed of rich media content, including Flash animations, video clips, graphic images, music, and active learning methods to enhance student involvement, learning and change. The six lab projects allow teams to design and build their own prototypes within project specifications and time constraints, develop good interpersonal team dynamics, and improve their oral and written communication skills. Please note: ENGG 15 satisfies a University degree requirement in the Natural Sciences, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. ENGG 15, sec. F11: Designing the Human-Made World (NS), CRN: 93970 (3 s.h.) M/W, 12:50-1:45 p.m., Mauro Caputi and one of the following groups: ENGG 15 Lab sec. FAL, CRN: 91468 M, 2:20-4:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi and WSC 1, sec. FK: Composition CRN: 92164 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 2:20-3:45 p.m., Dan Cole or ENGG 15 Lab sec. FBL, CRN: 91469 W, 2:20-4:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi and WSC 1, sec. F11: Composition CRN: 93405 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Dan Cole or ENGG 15 Lab sec. FCL, CRN: 91467 F, 12:50-2:50 p.m., Mauro Caputi and WSC 1, sec. F99: Composition, CRN: 91467 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 12:45-2:10 p.m., Paul Carson or ENGG 15 Lab sec. FDL, CRN: 93853 T, 2:20-4:20 p.m., Mauro Caputi and
L.E.A.D.

PRE-HEALTH SCIENCES/ENGINEERING
F10: Pre-Health Sciences (Total = 11 s.h.) Most medical, dental and veterinary schools require a solid foundation in science, particularly biology and chemistry. After all, organisms are massive collections of biological molecules executing complex combinations of chemical reactions in a highly controlled and regulated manner. This cluster explores general chemistry, animal form and function, and the interplay between these disciplines in the function of organisms, particularly humans. Throughout the cluster, we consider how various chemical and biological processes are related and influence the human condition. The cluster includes first-year composition (WSC 1), which will emphasize writing in the sciences. Please note: BIO 12 and CHEM 3A and 3B satisfy University degree requirements in the Natural Sciences, and WSC 1 (or its equivalent) is required of all students. BIO 12, sec. F10: Animal Form and Function (NS), CRN: 92685 (4 s.h.) M/W/F, 9:05-10 a.m., Charles Peterson BIO 12 Lab sec. FAL: CRN: 92686 M, 2:20-5:20 p.m., Charles Peterson or BIO 12 Lab sec. FBL: CRN: 92687 T, 2:20-5:10 p.m., Charles Peterson and CHEM 3A, sec. F10: General and Inorganic Chemistry (NS), CRN: 91410 (4 s.h.) M/W/F, 10:10-11:05 a.m.; TH, 8:30-9:25 a.m. Vandana Bindra CHEM 3B Lab sec. FA, CRN: 90898 W, 2-4:50 p.m., Ronald Strothkamp or CHEM 3B Lab sec. FB, CRN: 90898 TH, 2:20-5:10 p.m., Vandana Bindra and WSC 1, sec F10: Composition CRN: 92759 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 9:35-11 a.m., Margaret Stein or WSC 1, sec. FJ: Composition CRN: 93407 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Margaret Stein

Living/Learning Community Housing Option:
Presidental Politics Arts PreP

Math/Science/Engineering

W.E.L.L.

14

WSC 1, sec. FDL: Composition CRN: 94320 (3 s.h.) T/TH, 11:10 a.m.-12:35 p.m., Elizabeth Hynes-Musnisky

First-Year Seminars and Clusters
Q. A.
Can all first-year students take seminars and clusters?
YES! You may take seminars or clusters in the fall semester and seminars in the spring semester of your first year. If you are enrolled in Honors College you may take seminars and clusters, but you should speak with your academic advisor to manage your schedule appropriately.

FAQ:

Q. A.

What will my fall course schedule look like if I take a first-year seminar or cluster?
If you take a seminar, it will be one class out of the set of four or five you will take between September and December 2012. If you take a cluster, you will have two or three cluster classes — for example, philosophy, psychology, and composition classes — in addition to two or three other classes, to total four or five classes between September and December 2012.

Q. A.

I’m a psychology major. Will an economics seminar count toward graduation?
Yes. First-year seminars and clusters help you move closer to graduation. All students at Hofstra must take distribution courses — general education requirements — and almost all first-year options fulfill these requirements. In fact, we have designed these first-year options to help you explore your major and other paths you may choose to fulfill your career goals.

Q. A.

I’m planning to major in business. Which cluster or seminar is right for me?
All Hofstra undergraduate students (including business majors) must satisfy the same set of required courses, so ANY of the clusters and seminars will count toward your general education requirements. We are offering one cluster — F4: Law and Economics — which includes a required business course, so you might look at that one first. However, any one of the clusters or seminars will satisfy your graduation requirements.

Q. A.

Can I change my mind about my preferences?
Yes! When you come to New Student Orientation, you and your advisor will work out your full fall course schedule together. At that time — or when you get to campus in the fall — you are welcome to choose different courses than the ones you choose here.

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For more information, please contact: Center for University Advisement 101 Memorial Hall, South Campus Phone: 516-463-6770 107 Mack Student Center, North Campus Phone: 516-463-7222 Email:

advisement@hofstra.edu

Campus Crime Reporting and Fire Safety Statistics In compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and other federal law, an annual campus safety report which contains detailed information on campus security and fire safety, including statistics, is available by accessing the Hofstra website at hofstra.edu/campussafetyreport or by contacting the Advisory Committee on Campus Safety. Crime statistics are also available at the U.S. Department of Education website at ope.ed.gov/security. The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus crime and fire safety statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. For additional information or a paper copy of the report, please call the Department of Public Safety at 516-463-6606. Nondiscrimination Policy Hofstra University is committed to extending equal opportunity to all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, marital or veteran status in employment and in the conduct and operation of Hofstra University’s educational programs and activities, including admissions, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other school administered programs. This statement of nondiscrimination is in compliance with Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act, the Age Discrimination Act and other applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to nondiscrimination (“Equal Opportunity Laws”). The Equal Rights and Opportunity Officer is the University's official responsible for coordinating its adherence to Equal Opportunity Laws. Questions or concerns regarding any of these laws or other aspects of Hofstra’s Equal Opportunity Statement should be directed to the Equal Rights and Opportunity Officer at EROO@hofstra.edu, 516-463-7310, C/O Office of Legal Affairs and General Counsel, 101 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549-1010. Hofstra University Harassment Policy Hofstra’s prohibition against discrimination is also addressed in Hofstra’s Harassment Policy. The Harassment Policy prohibits harassment-including sexual harassment and sexual violence--based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, marital or veteran status. Hofstra University is committed to professional and interpersonal respect ensuring that no individuals are subjected to harassment or discriminated against in any way on the basis of any of these protected characteristics. Harassment based on any of these protected characteristics is a form of discrimination prohibited by law and by Hofstra University’s Harassment Policy. The Harassment Policy, which is available online at the link referenced below, contains complaint procedures for resolving complaints of harassment in violation of Hofstra’s Harassment Policy. Harassment policy link: http://www.hofstra.edu/ pdf/Faculty/Senate/senate_FPS_43.pdf

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