Appeal

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For other uses, see Appeal (disambiguation).

The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with the United States and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article and discuss the issue on the talk page. (April 2011) This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2007)
An appeal is a petition for review of a case that has been decided by a court of law. The petition is made to a higher court for the purpose of overturning the lower court's decision.

The District of Columbia Court of Appeals, historically known as District of Columbia City Hall and District of Columbia Courthouse, located at 451 Indiana Avenue, N.W., in theJudiciary Square neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Designed in 1820 by architect George Hadfield, the Greek Revivalcourthouse is designated as a National Historic Landmark. The marble statue (1868, Lot Flannery) honoring Abraham Lincoln is the country's oldest extant memorial to the assassinated president.

The specific procedures for appealing, including even whether there is a right of appeal from a particular type of decision, can vary greatly from country to country. The nature of an appeal can vary greatly depending on the type of case and the rules of the court in the jurisdiction where the case was prosecuted. There are many types of standard of review for appeals, such as de novo and abuse of discretion. An appellate court is a court that hears cases on appeal from another court. Depending on the particular legal rules that apply to each circumstance, a party to a court case who is unhappy with the result might be able to challenge that result in an appellate court on specific grounds. These grounds typically could include errors of law, fact, or procedure (in the United States, due process). In different jurisdictions, appellate courts are also called appeals courts, courts of appeals, superior courts, or supreme courts.

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