You are on page 1of 99

McMaster University

DigitalCommons@McMaster
The McMaster Collection McMaster University Libraries

1-1-1727

Progymnasmata. The inn-play : or, Cornish-hugg wrestler. Digested in a method which teacheth to break all holds, and throw most falls mathematically. ... By Sir Tho. Parkyns.
Thomas Parkyns

Recommended Citation
Parkyns, Thomas, "Progymnasmata. The inn-play : or, Cornish-hugg wrestler. Digested in a method which teacheth to break all holds, and throw most falls mathematically. ... By Sir Tho. Parkyns." (1727). The McMaster Collection. Paper 39. http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/mcmastercollection/39

This Book is brought to you for free and open access by the McMaster University Libraries at DigitalCommons@McMaster. It has been accepted for inclusion in The McMaster Collection by an authorized administrator of DigitalCommons@McMaster. For more information, please contact scom@mcmaster.ca.

nPOTTMNAJMATA.

THE

I N N-P LAY:
O

R,

Coraith-Himg Wreftler.
DIGESTED

In

Method
and

which teacheth to moft

break

all

Holds,

throw

Falls Mathematically.

Eafy

to

great

be underftood by all Gentlemen, &c and of Ufe to fuch who underftand the Small-Sword

in Fencing.
And by all Tradefmen and Handicrafts, that have competent Knowledge of the Ufe of the Stilliards, Bar, Crove-Iron or

Lever,

with their

Hypomochlions,

Fulciments

or

Baits.

By

Sir Tho.

Parkyns,

of

Sunny,

Baronet.

LuBatnur Achivis doBius unBis. Hor. Ep. Lib. 2. Ep. i. ad Aug.


The ThirdEdition Corretcd,
with

large Additions.

LONDON;
Printed for Tho. We ekes,
at the

White-Hart in
at

Wejlminfter-

Hall;

and

fold
1

by

Humph.

Wainwright,

TSltrmy, in

Not-

t'mgbamfiire.

7 a 71

THE

DEDICATION,
To His Sacred

Majefty

King GEORGE the Second.


Great

Sir,
HAT Old Englifh but True

Proverb, That Policy

pajfetb
more

Strength,
than

was

never

verify'd to a

Demonflsation,

f % Army in
and
your

Head,
at

Sacred Majewitnefs that Athletic which may it vanquifli, in


your

(Ubdue Rebels

home,

as well as give
a

*a

dedication:

Terror to your Enemies abroad; Spread k$ Fame to foreign Nations, and fo bring about,.
confirm,
and

eftablifh

Firm

Peace,

to

the

Joy

of

all your

Lading Loving Sub


and

jects: And
Thoufands,.

as your

Anceftors have flain


your

their

your

Majefty by

unparal-

lel'd Polite, and Incomparable Wifdom, withlittle Blood-ftied, at Gibraltar may, I hope, iuodue and overcome, I don't only fay your Ten Thoufands with David, but even out do him by Myriads. As you have polifhed the Head, fo, in. this my Book, I have endeavoured to make the Hands, Feet, Bodyr and all the Members of your Subjects more Ufeful in your Army on future Occafions j (and wilL further, un dertake to make the moft vicious, ancf un* mann'd Horfe in your, Axmy, if he will but eat Oats, ftand Fire,, without the leaft Flinch, and fcarce ftir hisA Ears, with the RidingMafter of the Great Horfe s leave, while his

Rider,

if

with

Courage, difcharges,

and not

break his Rank) defiring tharyou would give this my Little Book, a Fall under your Feet, in your Library.
And;

DEDICATION,
And (ince

Hi

Pallida Mors AquopulfatpedePauperumfabemas Megumque turns. ? May You and your Royal Confort Queen Live till Caroline Long LiveLive with old Father Abraham, you fhall fay to our Great Lofs) CupimusDijJohi, and from hence translated into thofe Eternal Serene Habitations, of Peace and Tranquillity, where You may be, and Live for ever Tranfcendently Happy. So fervently prays,
~

(tho*

.be

GREAT

SIR,

Your Majestx's
Mop;

Humble,

Mo[t

Faithful,

and

Moft
$uriny,
Auguft u

Dutiful
and

Sdjetf,

Servant,

Tho. Parkyns*

{ H>

THE

AUTHOR
T O

Lord THOMAS MANNERS,


One
of his

SCHOLARS.

My Good and Kind Lord Thomas Manners,


^am iothankyou for your <Boo% of well-deli
%opur4s I received from Mr* Stokes, by the bands of'Mr. Robinfon, at the Blackmoor's Head at Nottingham, hfl Lent Affixes.
neated

fome arefatyi, and that for throwing a Man over your Head by the Hair, is obfolete, and out ofFaJhion, ever fince (port eft Occafio calva) Teruques came up ; andfuch as wear their Hair

Many are true,

long

To Lord Thomas Manners.

f
ef

long,

feldom

come under our rough


out
o1

Combs, for fear

puflirtg their Loch moftly till 'twelve

of Curls,

the

they kept paper d up that their Valet de Day,

Chambres released them*

Could I meet withfuch aT'ofture-drawer at Belvoir, I wait on you there, this Summer, atyourfirft coming down, he would invite mc to print my Wrt'filingBook again, being now out of Brint, and all difpos'd
when

of to Friends.

By the Abridgment of the Duelling AB in the News papers, I fi0d,ithe Mafters at Small- Sword may re
turn their Foins, not into Pruning- Hooks, to

&c. faut in
they''

merit Trujjfes,, Chains, and -Collars, whilft with the Small- Swords, to hanfel the defigtfd weigh ing Stoops, and hang in the open Air to make Mummy

offor the Apothecaries.

to have your "Broad-Sword, made Pattern \ for the Parliament has, and aeew.dikg tbmy it will with your ^Poftures in my fflrefi ling- Book, cut the Small-Sword out offafhion. Might not the fame ABjreB in every Market-Town a Stage for Gentlemen, wearing Swords, tofjew their Refentments of Affronts offered them, once a Month, after at jingle Stick, Jfthey did not cool, and were reconcild, in that time, and+to be parted upoiz the fir ft broken Head? Wmddnot this make SI Gentlemen, &c. fitter to ferve either King or Country 4n the Army, whilft
not

Tray forget

this would make them expert

Broad-fwordi'

s-men,fwce

they

make the great eft on a

Then
ples

Slaughter in a Battle ? Stage for a broken Head, jhould I


the

pre-

/m^Em-plaftrumStypticum,
for
a

Black-Bye from the Fiji ;

faving

of rotten

Ap
of

and a

Belly full

yi

To Lord Thomas Manners.

ofHafty-Tudding to fet a Rib : which, with myHumble Duty and Service to Lord Duke, Lady Dutchefs, Lord Marquefs, Lord William, Lord Harvey, Tourfelf, and the reft of my Difciples, is the Heedful at this

Timet from, my Lord,

Bunny, May

18.

?mr%s ^Demedfyi

WPk Hemt, Hand,

andFoot,

Tho. Parkynsj

vii

*My Lord

Thomas Manners$

ANSWER.
'

My Much-Honour'd,
Can

and

very

Belvtir, May it.


1720.

f uifTant Friend and Mafkr, Sir Thomas Tarkyns, Bart.


never enough thank you
vour

for the Fa dated May the iSth, Letter, whictrl received : Mankind in general are beholden to you for the good Inclina
of your

tions ypu
and
roe

difcover therein
as you

towards

'em,

I, in particular,
in*

have

thought
to me.
weak

I.titentions''addrefs'd'

worthy of having your Happy is it for us that we have


powder'd

this

effeminate,

Age of

EfTence-Bottles,
-

and curled

Coxcombs,

a-Perfdn'Ofroughik^^wrJ", and a robuft

Constitution ^

This in Anfwer to Sir Tho. Parky ns, when he in* ftmtledLord Tho. Manners to play at Broad Sword.
one-

viii

one that can

his own Legs, after Droves of thofe modern waxen Things have fallen before him one that inftrutts Englifhmen to deferve the Title, and teaches 'em to make their Broad-Swords the Terror of all Europe. Men like you liv'd, when Greece knew her happieft Days. It was a Spirit like your's that inftituted, and fupported the Olympic Games, where Boxing, Wreftling, and Cudgelling, were in fuch Perfection, that even to have won a Prize might have become you : But when their luxurious Neighbours once taught 'em to deep till Twelve the Day, to pin up riieir Locks in Papers, to come from the Boxes of their Chariots into the Infides of 'em ; to ufe Almond-Pafte, and RofeWater ; in fhort, to quit Roaft-Beef, and Hafty Pud ding, for Soops- and Ragouts; the Empire of the World was taken from them, tranflated to the tough, finewy, Romans ; and when they ceas'd to me rit thefe Epithets, their Eagle drooped her Wings, and the Brawny Britons were the Favourites of Mars. O, Sir Thomas, You muft preferve our Glory amongft us, and fave the Britifh Sf^ndard from falling. And fince invincible Death will give even you a Trip, as we fee by the moralizing Tomb (tone you have ere&ed, fufFer not your Memory to be blotted out from amongft Men Like Cefar leave your own Commenta ries behind you ; reprint your Athletic Book, with the beft of the well-delineated Poftures I fent you ; or to make it ft ill more valuable, have your own Figure pla ced in the Frontifpiece, that fucceeding Ages, may fee 7our Herculean Labours were finijQYd w ith Herculean Nerves.
ftand
upon

o'

My Lord Thomas

Manners'/ Anfaer*

My

My Lord Thomas
Harvey,
you.

Manners'* Answer,
Lord

My Lord Duke, Lady Dutchefs,


Guard
to

William, Lord
Difciples falute
upon a good

myfelf, and the reft of your For my part, I ftiall always ftand

ferve

you

ofFenfively

and

defenfively,

on all

Stays, my Arm is ever extended, my Foot advanced, my Fift clinched, and my Broad-Sword drawn, when
you call

for it ; in

fhort,
lam, Dear Sir Thomas,

Yours in all

Holds, Poftures,
Inlock
and

and

Guards,

Outlock,

Eret or Inclining,

Infide, Outfide,
Medium
P. S. I have ordered
my Broad-Sword according to your
or

Pendant,

YourTrufty Friend

Directions.

7*. Manners.

*b

TH E

<*

THE

Then DEDICATION
TO
THE

Lord THOMAS MANNERS,


Third Sort
of the

late Duke

And

one of the

Rutland \ Author's Scholars.


of

FIND, my Lord,
of

you are much

Martial's

Opinion, Ciner't
have more, whilft li
you
:

Gloria Jera venit, fince


given me much

ving, than I

defefved

The Glo
whofe

ry

of

fo

noble

Scholar in

Praxis,

Genius, is

as great as

his Birth.

May

To Lord Thomas Manners.

xi

Athletic Inclination continue to tfompleat, what I have given you but a faint Sketch off for the Good of your Country, and Benefit of Mankind ; which, without the Encouragement of fuch generous Patriots,

May

your

and great

Examples,

always,

as your

movingly obferves, degenerate into In dolence and Effeminacy.


moft

Lord-hip
>

Wreftling
Practice

Poftures would not anfwer, or comprize the various Shiftings of Hands and Feet, with the Mathematical Twiftings of Bodies, and their proper critical Turnings in ; (and that it muft be frequent

thoufand

to make

'em ready

at

Shiftings,

and

Holds : As we find, fome of the Hocus Pocus Men with their Cups and Balls are more ready than others, and pur a Deceptio Vifus, a quicker and great er Deceit on the Eyes of their Spectators.)

taking

all advantageous

Which, however, are abfolutely neceffary to be delineated, by the ftrongeft, moft affecting, and mafterly Touches of Art, in order the Genemore effectually to animate the riling *
b
2,

lation

xii
ration

To Lord Thomas
of

Mannersthe

Bold

Britons, in
martial

Purfuit

of

thofe
will

manly,

and

Delights,
Defence

which

qualify

them

for

the

of their

glorious

Conftitution

and

Liberties.
that
this

Your
third

commanding
with the

me,

my
a

Wreftling-Book Ihould

be

publifhed even

Time,

neceltary Addition

of

ocular

Demonftration

by

moft

lively Delinea
Poftures,

tions of the moft

Proper

and

Adroit

is
of
as

full Teftimony of your Lordfhip's Love all Hero.ick Exercifes, in particular this y I found, (with no fmall Pieafure) in the
with which
than you took could give

Aptitude
even

my

LelTons,
them,
where

rafter

you

without mathematical

Demonftration,
it
as

by
is,
in

propofe to make

more

eafy

to

be

obr

tain'd without the ufual

foiling
the
on
all

Difficulties
of

to

Tyro's

and

Learners,

reprinting

it

at the

Readinefs in me,
and

with a

that

Exercife,
have
the

Clofe-Hug
I

Occafions,

would

World know

your

does me the Honour, whilft I readily em brace you and your noble All that I have to glory in, is, that I was the

Lordfhip

firft

To Lord Thomas Manners.

xiii

firft
a

that attempted

My

Method ; and Self outdone

rable

Scholars.
whilft

into that I have lived to fee by my noble, and honou


to

bring Wreftling

And

I only
to

hinted,

wanted a true

illuftrate my Precepts, by the ocular Derrionftratioh of well deli neated Poftures : The Lord Harvey, through Explanations^has far exceeded what I your propos'd by his. Monfiewr le Hoogue, anglice, my Clofe Hug.

Pofture-Drawer,

Being
to
which of

Clergy, in relation my moralizing Monument, my Statue,


attack'd

by

the

I have
confefs

erected

in

the

primary Pofture
at

Wreftling, in my Chancel
the

Bunny, I

muft

much to

I fhould not have done it (fo Offence of that Sort of the


who are too
apt to

Sons

of

Levi,

confult,

Cloth and Humour, more than the Scriptures and Reafon) had I not been authoriz'd by St. Paul's Typical In of the troduction Olympic Wfeft lings into the Church, and New Teftament,
and confider their

and

xi?

To Lord Thomas Manners. oba^ * confirm'd your Lordihip's Appf and

by

tion*

/ am, my Lord,
Tour Lord/hips,

Mop Devoted,
Humble Servant.

Vid, HoffmanV Poem hm Dedicated to

tie

Author*

THE

XV

THE

DEDICATION
To
To

this

Third Edition
the
the

Duke of Rutlancf, Duke of Newcaftle, thepjefentDukeof2G'g/?0#, the Duke of Montague, and Duke of Richmondr the Right Honourable the Earl of Chefierfield, Lord Howe, Lord Montague, Captain Vernon, and all
the thrice
the
other

Noble his Grace

Worthy

Gentlemen

Francis Lewis, John Tlumtree, Efqs; Thomas Bennet^z-nd Job- Stanton Charleton^op; Honoura ble Lord Qoweroi Trentham, Lord (jrc

my

Subfcribers ;

Waldegrave,

that

to this Book is a Compleat In Tell-Troth of its Notable,, and dex, Remarkable Performances, And as it never has been treated of, before I undertook it, larger therefore is Fertile Field, for Reformation, and Improvement,
and

[HE Title

for

marking,

treading,

an

unerring
skilful

and

plain you a

Path

I have only wadded out, Sketch of) by more able and


(what

and given

faint
and

HANDS

fERT.

Suck

xvi

DEDICATION.
the
,

Such are
Earl
of

Lord p^kes

Defervedly Thrice Noble and PuhfanE of Rutland, Kingfton, and Newcaftle :


Lord Howe
at

Chefterfield;

Captain

Vernan,

&c.

Foot-ball, and the Da ring that are not fearful to meet a broken Shin, but able to fupport and keep me on my Legs in my Old Age ;
And
to all other

Fellows

I have done my Endeavour to teach them to STAND STIFF ag'ainft their Opponents, for many Years. This my Fafliionable Paper- Building of the City, rais'd up to the Third Story, or Edition, from a wealas

Foundation,
Dr.

will not

bear
as

the

Halley,
up

or

Vellum,
fall

would

lighted mill'd Lead by have it, but muft


unlefs

take

with a

Calf-Skin
to the

Covering,
your

fupported

ftrongly
which

and underbuilt

by

Patronage ;

would ptherwife

ground, for want of a good firm Bafis, and Foundation, at this its appearing aFor fuch was the Precipitation in gain in the World. which I drew this up, that it could not poffibly be without Faults, fo many and great, as much to need your Patronage, Pardon, and wonted, Indulgence. My only Hopes are, that you will have greater Re gard to the publick Merit of the Subject, than to the. Manner in which I amconftrained to lay it before you, for want of Capacity. I have the greater Reafon for Apology, becaiife what I prefume here to offer you, which has never hi therto been touch'd by any one, is far from being filed, or brought to its due burnilhed, Luftre; tho it be in truth the Mafter-Key in this Work, and ferves right ly to open, and let us into the ATHLETIC A CA DE MT. Your

DEDICATION.
Lo-rcrffl/ps, and all'Others of like Ingenious Difpofttians, would think me
ito the

xv_i
and

Your

Impartial
much

warning
to give

public!;

and

fome Account of ful Studies and Exercifes


mer

My-felf, This, one


;

fhould 'I
of

neglecl

my Diverting Health and t'heSucceft of my for

fome Years ago, which, as Toon as I had fet forth and 'made appear in the Woi'18, 'Proper fudges, especially they, who had app'ly'd

Edition's,

publifhed

themfelves to thofe

fefs'd

this

Matter

Diverting 'Exercifes, -pu'blickiy to be fo highly worthy a more


con.of

attentive

tho'

others,
out
a

Confideration both of themfelves, and of moft or all of my Rules were very full, and

lefted.
In
a

could not be thorowly explain'd with Pofture-Wreftling-Mafter to demonftrate each Rule, which I promife hereafter. They reprefented the Art of Wreftling, as moft Ufeful and Diverting to and regretted its lain fo long nefjMankind; having

fignificant ; but

word, thofe my Books found Fortune fo favour Admirers of that Diverfion fo inclined to able, that in a little time the fecond Edition was called it,
and the

for,

and carried over the greateft part of

Europe,

efpe-

cially among the Italian Princes, by <M&&^\^z^r&t\JSIottingham and


and

the

Gentlemen
where

Wughtat
with

Loughborough,
every
a

my'Houfe at

Bunny
not

and

received

Candour,

and

without

genera!

Approbation.

This
a&ive

Sketch, however

drawn, will to Penetration, fuifice to


'*

mean, concife, and haftily Gentlemen of your Capacities, and


give an

Idea

of this Ufe-

ful Exercife.
c

For-

xviii

DEDICATION.
my
own

For
and

part, I

tranfcribe after no

Man, having
Art,

practical

Experience for my Guide in intirely rely on Obfervations made

this whole

with the utmoft

Accuracy. If thorough the Whole you find any thing that gives you the leaft Light or Satisfaction into that Myftery ;
Toftonly flatter my felf, as fanguine, but am five you'll let that Comparatively more than atone for fome in a Super moft of the Faults and Defe&s, Degree ; and believe me always with the greateft lative

I do

not

tho'

Integrity,

My Good Lordsy
Tour

and

Gentlemen,
moft Devoted

more than

Humble Servant,

Tho. Parkym

T O

TH E

AUTHOR.
H E N I firft heard of your Defign of publishing your Art was of Wreftling, I very much delighted, to find, that we have in our Days, a Perfon of your Quality, who that noble Art, out of the Hands will not only refcue (and Legs) of the Vulgar, but reftore it to its antient Honours, by bringing it into fafhion amongft the Gen
tlemen of this

Age.

Etiam inv'tos

trahit

Exemplum.

invited

Youths will be eafily drawn and hopes, into it, fince they have You for a Precedent, whofe Quality andCrerf/iwill not only recommend it to their Praflice,but whofejSkill and will inftruft them in all the Myfteties of the Science, and teach them th&C Experience Hands and Legs were not, only, made for Cards and Dancing.

And I

am

in

great

that our generous

to come

Trade on't ; and perhaps, a Fracture, or Diflocation, may, now and then, fall into the Suvgecns Way, yet he will hardly find Bread to hib But ter, when his Mercury end his Turpentine are become ufelefs, and he has Bole- Armoniack and his Sear-Cloths. nothing to ftick to but his

this means, Sir, You will reftore Pofterity, to the Vigour, Aftivity, Health of their Anceftors ; and the fetting up of one PaUJlra in every Town, will be the pulling down of treble its Number of Apothecaries Shops ; and when our young Gentlemen fhall run the haaard of no other Claps, but thofe of the back Sinews, our poor Do&ors will make but a forry

By

and

tho'

Jsivrnum

quicuvq; mamt, pedibfifve rotave,


capiebit

Vic-r.it,

efciflcd

frondis honorem.
confer'

Thefe were the Honours which Old Gr-ece d upon her Heroes, who diftingi.ifh'd themfelves in the Exercifes of Running andrVre/rlirg; but to degenerate into when fhe fuftcr'd them Luxury and Eafc, fhe gave a

Reproach

to

herfelf,

.ind

an Occafion to the

Poet

to

As

cry out,

Si

(4)
Si nunc, his animis,
Prodita
acies collata

fuijfet,
themfelves with
and to
not

non tantas vidijfst


our

Gracia Clades.

And
the

indeed, bad
the

Anceftors

been fuffer'd to debafe


their
and

Fafhions,
afide their

lay

Cringes, and Buffooneries of Exercifes, of Running, Foot-Ball,


might

Neighbours,

Wreftling; I dare

have been twenty Years in reducing France to a Neceflity of making that Peace, which they accomplifh'd in One. As great a Veneration as I have for Horace, I muft beg his pardon, if I take that for a Tauegyrkk, which he intended for a Satyr upon the Knights of his Time ;
anfwer

but

They too,

Eqtiites
Pugiles.

Media inter

carmina

pofcunt

Where he

upbraids

them, for

their

ill

Judgment,
their

and

Taftc

of

Poetry,

'

in

hilling

at

the

Tragedies,

and

calling for

Wrefthrs,

and

Boxers ; I

it, by fome graver Knight amongft them {Animo maturus & JEto") left their Spirits fhould be diflblved, and melted down into Softnefs and Effeminacy, by the Reign of Auguftus, and
rather

believe they

were encouraged to

Pal&ftra fhould be poftponed, Cothurnick Stage.


their

to

the

fafcinating

Allurements

of the

But fince the fame Poet, in Games of Olympia,


Magna
we
and not the
coronari contemnat

another

place, fpeaks

honourably

of the

Olympia ?

him, and believe, that in that place it was the Poett Roman that fpoke. Virgil had a better Notion of thefe manly Exercifes, when he intro duced Mneas folemnizing his Father's Funeral, with all the Pomp of the Gymnaftick Games ; and I am very forry we have nor a Virgil in our Days,. that can do juftice to your Merits, and celebrate thofe Honours, which are due to your Memory.
muft pardon

However, Sir, fince


a

Lover

of the

Lift ;
to

I have been but alas !


tardante
efftsta

an

Admirer

of the

Mufes,

as

well a*.

Gelidus

SeneBa in
of
corpore vires.

I have
to

Sanguis hebet,
ventured

frigentq:,
fend
this

mitted to

Copy
of

Verfes,
and

which

if they may be
Ages
to

per

Fame

accompany

you to the

Prefs,

by

that means,
the

be tranfmitted come,
that
when

and

fo

Pofterity,

I {hall

obtain

Honours in

near to the

Honourable Name

Parkyns,

they fhall fee

of,

S I

R,
Tour mcfi Humble

Servant,
W. T.

Ph

ilq-Athi,et es.

(5)

To

the

Honourable

Sir Thomas
Of B
u n n

Parkyns, Bar'.
County of Nottingham,
Wrestling.
*Hen'

t, in the

Upon his B
HEN
"

ook of

Gratitude his Soul did move, To celebrate Olympian Games to Jove. From Pifa, then, and warlike Sparta's Plain, The Grxcia?z Chiefs advanc'd the Palm to gain ; And whilft the Annals of Olympia live, Chorabus \ fhall in lafting Fame furvive. fheron Hand Chromius, fhall for ever fhine, In Pindafs Song, and Cowley's tuneful Line :
pious

Alcides * had furpafs'd his Toils With Conquer! fated, and Augean Spoils,
great

"
" *
-

les after be
had
gis,
over
come Au-

and

plundered

hisCountry,
eftablifhed

the

Olym

pian

Games hi

Honour of his Father


Jupiter.

Bur,

a&ive

Chromius,

nor

Shall be intitl'd to a furer Fame, Than thine, (O Parkyns!) could I reach that To fing, like Pindar, or, like write

young Theron's

Name,
:

t Thefirft
that
the
<won

Height, Jotympia.

Prize

Cowley,

But ||
Odes upon Theron
and

PindarV
y^P1*11

Chromius,

both

Viffors,

tranflated

ly

Mr. Cowley.

But thy
Whilft

eager

Not on Wherein

Pen, Time's vain Attempts will mock, Youths, in future Days, (hall look, my Verfe, but thy Gymnaftick jfiook
own
you tread a

Path,

not trod

before,
the
more.

By
*

which

indeed

your

Skill

appears

When fir ft the bold Pancraticks * did engage, And Greece encourag'd the Olympian Stage ; VfrejiLg, or The Ufe of Wreftling, was clumfy Sport,
A
rude
a-

down,bitingtfcrat-

Bherfl "thrlZing

^n art"e^s Combat, and a rude Effort, Till 'fhefeus, (that brave Demi-God !) at length, Nature improv'd, and added Art to Strength.

5?KfIn
fVreftihg, A
.ft"'^

Prize attended with Renown, Laurel did the Vi&ors crown ; lirfdTheir Immortal Heroes to the Lift defcend, Adversary. And Qods themfelves for Victory contend. ^hus w^en Alcides\, for a Foe did call, Hercules had won And urg'd the trembling Crowd to try a Fall ; all the ms sire, great Jove, (for fo the Poets fing,)
anyither

Then

was the
and

Means

^nd <pa/ms

daring to
contend

human shaPe> descending to the Ring; jolly Bulk ! around the Sand he trod, And brawny Flelh conceal'd the nervous God. J

withhim, de%Tdld inhuman

Long did the Strife, with equal Chance abide, And undecided, till Jove laid afide The borrow'd Shape, which had the God bely'd.

_>

Shape, and
'
*

Palm.

Grappt

*jSo

Then the bold Champion, (who had overthrown The huge Jntceus, Earth's Gygantick Son !) Submitted co the Author of his Birth: ! harder 'tis to grafp * with Heaven, than Earth
^^

aWreftler.

(7)
i immortal Palm, The conquering God bore off * :ver And, ever fince retain'd the Wreftler's Name.
th'

Wreftler'

*Pifti*

Thus, Sir,
And
as

you

fee,
and

the

Gods

aflume a

Part,
t On
the

And glory in the Trophies

of your

Art

beheld his Greece ufeful Arts of Peace; Sports, So may our Thames behold her Chiefs renew Their wonted Vigour, when thus taught by You.

Alpheus],

once

Abound in

Banks of Alpheus 'were kept the Olym


pian

Games.

And fince

great

Anna had her Monfters too,

Her Hydras, and her Centaurs to fubdue; Let yearly Jfreftlings, facred to her Name, The foils and Labours of her Reign proclaim. Then vig'rous Youths will exercife the Field, And fam'd Olympia to thy Bunny yield : Then new Epochal from thy Sports fhall rife, And future Years be reckon'd from thy Prize; And Men fhall queftion where the Date to place,

*Thet>-

To thy

new

Annals

*,

or to

Ann

a's

Peace.

lympian Games
were
afi-

Then fhall an aftive, brave, heroick Breed, To this effaeminated Race fucceed ; The limber Minuet, and fantaftick Shrug, Shall yield the Honour to thy Comijh-Hugg:

lemn Com
putation of

Time,from
whence the

Then cheated 'Damfcls fhall no more Embrace, The feeble Off-fpring of a Pocky Race ; But quit their Bullies, and difcard their Beaux,

for above 700 Tears1

Grecians,

dated their
Annals,

And, from thy Ring,

their

Lnfty

Husbands

choofe.

With

(8)
With Men, like thefe, our Edward waged With thefe he won at Crefjey, and Poiffiier,

War,

With thefe, his fhieeti march'd to the dufty Field, And made the ftubborn Scottifh T)avid yield : And whilft the Monarch did his Captive bring, And vaft Crowds convey'd the Gallick King, His brave Philippa, to compleat the Yruce,
thro'

Rode, in
Thus

the

Triumph,
our

with

her

conquer'd

'Bruce.

were

^fauthl
Reward
that
was

By

Shorts
were

made

And

they, now, inur'd


Smugglings

Britons, in the Days of Old, hardy, and by Aftion bold,


to

exercife,

And

all their againfl;

were

Man

Man,

would not would

S//No
Wreftnng,
tofiew that

for Virtue's * Prize. for Power contend,


a private

Luft

of

Wealth
would

Nor Each

Wreftle

Hugg
to

End,

fupplant his Friend.

Men ought
to
contend

more

for

Virtue,
vimfm/s.

Willi am Tuns tall..

THE

(9)

THE

EDIGATION
HAT I
rally.
dibrafs will
rather

may be look'd

upon as a

Yom

fell-froth,

than an

Hiftorian,
not that

Therefore fear be my Portion :


not

I dedicate gene this Part of Hu-

It

matters

So the

left

how falfe or forfl, Things be [aid o'th worft, &c.


all

Therefore I invite

Perfons however
and will

Dignified,
readily

or

Diftinguifh'd,
them
tions

to read

my Scholars,
;

provided

my Book, they have

admit

thefe

Qualifica

be of a middle Size, Jthletick, fullbroad-fhoulder'd ; for Wind and Strength, Brawny-Leg'd and Arm'd, yet clear-limb'd : Terence's Man, that has Corpus folidum atq; fucci plenum, is my promifing Scholar to do me Credit, and be capable to ferve his King and Country, on Occafion, and defend his Friend and Self from Infults. For the moft Part the firft Queftion I ask a Scholar, (if I like his Size and Complexion, for I am an indifferent Phyfiognomift,a Ju

they

muft

breafted

and

dicious

Phyfician,
moft

and

can

prognofticate more

from

Phjs,

than

Phyficians

from

Waters), is,

if his

Parents

10

The dedication.
are alive
no

Parents

Age they dy'd at ? For Scrofulous Tumours ; yet Hereditary Gouts, I'll readily accept of Scorbutich Rheumatifms , becaufe

? if not,

what

admit

or

the

Perfons

Wr ling. I am fo curious in my Admiflion, I'll not hear of one Hipp'd and out of Joint, a Valetudinarian is my Averfion, for I affirm, Martial [Lib. vi. Ep. 54.] is in the Right on't, Non eft vivere fed valere vita : I receive

labouring

under thofe undergo

Maladies

are general of
eft-

ly ftrong

and able to

the

Exercife

no

not rife at

Limberhams, no Darling Sucking-Bottles, who muft Micfummer, till eleven of the Clock, and that
Fire has
air'd

his Room and Cloaths of his Colli quative Sweats, rais'd by high Sauces, and Spicy forc'd Meats, where the Cook does the Office of the Stomach with the Emetick Tea-Table, fet out with Bread and Butter for's Breakfaft: I'll fcarce admit a Sheep-Biter, none but Beef-Eaters will go down with me, who have Robuft, Healthy and Sound Bodies. This may ferve as a Sketch of that Perfon fit to make a Wrefiler, by him who only defires a Place in your Friendfhip.
the

T.P. Galen
Ov
to

fays,
etAAa.

tpepyuv

gij-J to

Cjiauy&v

to

^VetrSr,

"'tis not Atlion, but the Power toperform it, that proves Man in Health. Vide Crawford'.? Curfus Medicine,

P-7-

And
Aia&ecnv

elfewhere

he fays,
<jn>ttntmy,
ena~

Kxmtt (pvciv

evepyblois

natural

lling

Difpofition of all the Parts of the Body, it to perform the Atfions of Ufe.

THE

")

THE

Prefatory INTRODUCTION
T O

T H E

Wreftling

Mafter.

Mart. Epigram Lib. IV*De Rufticatione. LXXVI.


Ure morans quid agam, refpondeo pauca rogatus, * Luce Deos oro, famulos poft arva revifo ; Partibus atq; meis juftos indico labores, Inde lego, Phoebumq; cio, mufamq; lacefTo.
Hinc Oleo corpufq; fiico, molliq; Stringo libens, animo gaudens,
*

the fir

Piety ft
to

thing

be

Palseftra,
ac

foenore liber
coeno,

embraced, laid hold on with both

Pondero,
Dum

poto, cano,

ludo, lavo,
modicum

quiefco.

Hands and Heart.

parvus

Elychnus

confumat olivi :

Hxc dac

nocturnis nox

lucubrata Camsnis.

SO foon
Dr.

as

this

Epigram of Martial'* became my

Busby,
they

at

conflrued and

exaftly
might

thors,

that

and without

Book for

Lejfon, under Weftminfter-School, and that I had truly parfed every Word, as -we did all our Au be the better Underflood, eajier got Memoriter,
our

future Benefit ; B 2

and

1 fearching in GodwinV

12
win'*
*

The Prefatory Introduction


*

My

In-

duceme,,ts

^M**0
"'

Roman Antiquities for the Meaning of oleo corpufq; fr\co ; 1 found that Wreftling was one of the five Olympick Games, and that they oiVd their Bodies, not only to make their
Joints be lefs
more

Supple
to

and

capable

take
and

Plyable ; but that fafi hold of them :

their

Ant agonift
with

might

This,
the

Running,
and

Leaping, Qitoiting,
celeb) at ed

Whork-Bars,

were

famous

moft

Games

of

Greece,

continued

with

great

Solemnity for

five Days, in Honour of Jupicer Olympius, from whence the RunRomans borrowed their Pentathlum, which was compofed of ing, Wreftling, Leaping, Throwing, and Boxing. Likewife it when I found the famous Poet Martial, me a Curiofity, gave his Country was. proud qf the Account he gives of my Author, after his Orifons to his God Agriculture, and his Family Life, Bufinefs he had directed , and with his Book, had flirr'd up his Mufe that he prepar'd himfelf for ; this Heroick Exercife of Wreftling, which they always performed before their full Meal, being their Supper, when all Exercifes were over; for you ne'er but always ad Ccenam ad Prandium, meet with in that Poet,
vocare.

f Therefore 1 advife all my Scholars ne'er to Exercife upon a ^Nottofujj Stomach, but to take light Liquids of eafy Digeftion, to fup17a fug Port Nature, and maintain Strength only. Whilft at WeftminStomach. Iter, I could not learn any Thing, from their Irregular and Rude Certamina, or Struggles: and when I went to Cambridge, / then, as a Spectator, only obferv'd the vaft Difference betwixt the and the Cornifh-Huggers, Norfolk Out-Players, and that
when they pleas d. I do confefs, have in my feveral Pieces of Ar chitecture, Sec. with my ufeful Hydraulicks, and the Ufe and Ap plication of the Mathematicks here in Wreftling, I owe to Dr. Bathurft, my Tutor, and Sir Ifaac Newton, Mathematick Prothe

latter

could

throw

the

other

the

fmall Knowledge Ifhew,

to

fejfor, both of Trinity College in Cambridge : The latter, fee ing my Inclinations that Way, invited me to his publick Lectures, for which I thank him, tho I was Fellow Commoner, and feldom,
if ever, any fuch were call'd to them ; but when I went to Gray V Inn </ Court, and applied my f elf to the feveral Mafters of the Ato learn Fencing and canoedy, Vaulting, I met with Mr. Cornifh,

(h

(by Name)
much

my

young Wreftlers. Inn-Play Wreftling Mafler ; and


to

ij
when

Variety in the feveral Holds, thai it was imp member half of them, without committing them to P^p r ; and him my Defig.i, '<e faid, he had taught Five Hundred Scholars, ing
but
never

I found fo iible to re
tel-

any

one

could

fet

them
:

down

and

that

it

xvould

be in

vain to

attempt

any

fuch Thing

However,

once

in two

Months, I

fi>ew'd him what I had done, and then, about Twenty Six Tears ago, digefled it in this Method, I here pfefent you with, (but have added through Practice much to it fince.) If Chirurgery is determined by the Etymology of the Word Keir, which in Greek, fignifies a Hand, and Ergon which imports Operation, alias, manual Operation, rather to be an Art than a
Science :

No doubt but
the

Wrefiling,
and
all

Hands, Feet,
an

other

be filled both

Art

and

does not only employ and exercife Explodes Parts of human Frame, may well Ignorant SmatterScience j however, I will do my
which
en-

deavour,
look'd
*

both

Hip

and

Thigh,

that

Wreftling

fhall be

no more

ers'

upon by the Diligent, as a Myftery. There are many Ignorants in Gardening, who have only driven * hGara Wheel-Barrow, for a Quarter of a Tear, put on a blue Apron, dcning, fet up fur Efculents, Arborifts, and Florifts, or if their Mothers gathered

Simples for
manner

the

Apothecaries

pretend to

be

profefs'd

Botanifts. f In like

it

often

happens,

that
or

Sweeper

and

Pump-

b> Fen-

Dreffer, Fencing-School, for three fets up for a Fencing-Mafter in Hat,


to a

four

the

Months, County, Qui

with a lac'dclrlS-

vult

decipi
that
-ptd-

decipiatur. Non omnes


carries a

qui

citherant

funt

citharoedi,

Every

Man

been

at a

Fiddle, is not an Orpheus neither is any Man that has * r Sword'sdhrs. Fencing-School, fix Weeks or two Months, a good

I maintain the worfe for it; becaufe as he is confcious his Ignorance, and Daring, he is eafily beat out of. his Small-Play, of and lefs Guard, being capable only to make defenfive Parryings, with out advantageous Purfuits. t So it is with the Smatterer in Wrefiling, that can Play a little t-1'nWteft,lr!&' Off-Play, and now and then give a Fall by Chance, by a fwitig with

Man, but

his loofe

Leg,
he's

or

knows but

few Inn-holds,
i

and net

how
that

to

break
fiands

any

when

engag'd with a

true Inn-

Play Gamefier,

camps or

j4

The
and

Prefatory
and croffes

Introduction
laugh'

fianJi loofe

him h his little Play, breaks all h is d at, and Holds, and taketh what he pleafeth of him ; he is biffed out of the Ring, for an Ignorant. Therefore 'tis that I advife you to be no Smatterer, but a thoin breaking and taking rough-pac'd Wreftler, Perfect and Quick, whene'er ycu break a Hold, if you don't proceed all Holds ; otherwife

low,

floatply

to give your

Adverfary
you rfnot

Fall,

according

to

the
at

feveral fol

better then one engag'd lowing Paragraphs, but does not purfue him only parries his Adverfary,
and

with

Sharps, who a binding


Small-Sword

home

Tlrruft.
that the compleat
never

'Tis cbfetvable,
or

much Play, Wreftling, becaufe they never pur and the Reafon is plain, Ignorant; fue, make Play, nor catch, but with Judgment, with a right and cri tical Tir^eingf/ their Advantages, which the Ignorant cant. * TbedifT/ierefore 'tis that the * Ignorants at the Small-Sword, purfefurijerencebeou^ m^ ^ as wra/^ ie thought Wreftlers, pluck and tear Cloaths, m^ ^/Cik irregularly, which is all the Advantage they expect to have, lenorant to overcome their Adverfary by chance ; by which you may obfer.ve, that and an Anift. the rafhforwardnefs proceeds in one from Ignorance, and the Delibera

in

is fo raflily

Artifi, forward,

whether
or

at

{hews fo

as the

tion

in

the

other, from

having

Art

with

Judgment.
a or whole with

I rather advife new Beginners to go through t t Both Hands. Courfe of Lejfons often, with all forts of Play, and after
-And

both

Hand\;

that

they may be
and

perfect

Ambidexters,

and

know how
ac-

to ufe

Feet alike, to which Practice they are to cufiom themfelves when they begin to learn to Wrefile; thofe who not fo dexterous with the Left-hand and Foot, as with thofe of Right, avoid playing with the Left, but are to be pittied, being both Hands

are

the
in-

Advantages, whilft more Left, and few with naturally play both ; and I would fooner choofe to teach new Beginners, that are altogether ignorant of any Holds in Wreftling, efpecially fuch as know nothing of that bulling Exercife Tripp, for the fame Reafon the 'am~* Grammarian gave, he muft have double Wages, with one who

difpenjably

necejfary,
with

lofing

many

opportune

their

Right

than with their

was

entered with

him in his

School, becaufe he
him off from

is like
the

to

have

triple
and

the

Pains

to reclaim and

bring

ill Foundation

Method his firft Mafter bad laid.

Who-

to
*

young Wreftlers.
a compleat
much
or

15

Whoever

would

be

taken in

Drink,

which

very

Wire filer, muft avoid enervates, or being in

being
a

over-

*Exceive

Paffion Drinking.
Cafes*

having receiv'd a Fall, in fuch he's bereav'd of is lefs not being Mafter of himfelf, of his Art, but fheweth too much Play, or none at all, or rather pulleth, kicketh, and ventureth beyond all Reafon and his Judgment,
at the fight

of his

Adverfary, his Senfes,

when

himfelf.

Farcundi That Man's


From
a

calices quam

non

fecere Mifellum.

Fool

that
and

hopes for

Good,
Paracelfus

flowing Bowls
have been

fev'rifh Blood.
and even s.

Since the

Diluvians, Bacchus, Ceres,


celebrated

their tells

Subftitute,
you

Wreftling- Mafter

The firft

he has and does fiill teach all over Europe, and has many Scho lars even in Emperors, Kings and Princes Courts. That the Popes and received many a Foil and Fall and Cardinals have tried him, from him ; and that moft of the religious Houfes in Chriftendom are He inftrutts at the two Devil Taverns in London, and his Scholars. his Affifiants, as Sack, Claret, &c. in all Taverns. Ceres keeps School at all Checquers with his Affiftants, Notting ham, Derby, Burton, Eafingwould, &c. at moft Public Houjes. Stout has the fullefi School amongft the Porters, Carmen, Chair-men,

Paracelfus admits for the moft part, at the Golden-Stills, &c. his Method he extracted from, and is an Abridgment of the two for Ufquemer, his Journeymen Affiftants are, Brandy, a French-man ; bagh, an Irifh-man ; Rum, a Moloflonian, &c. Heart's Eafe, on he recommends as his head Ufloer ; but I never knew any Perf that received Benefit from him : He is the finifl)er, and feldom receives any

but fuch
and can

pac'

as are thorough

fcarce

eat the

he has over-exercifed Stomachs ; he prefcribes hot


to

Methods, Leg of three-penny Chicken in a Day. When them by Drams, that they have quite loft their
thorough all the other
a

d, and gone
them
the

Subterraneous and Sulphurous Bath-Waters, may depend upon't, all thefe Mafter s teach moftly the Tripp, which, 1 affure you, is no fafe and found Play, you may know them by their Walkings and Gefiures, they
to

drink

; you

flag-

i6

The
and

Prefatory Introdu&ion
crofs a

ftagger,
avoid,

reel,

and

Legs,

which

advife

my Scholars

to

and receive

were your
you yield on your

foul Fall in the Sink or Kennel ; and many Conftitutions of Porphyry, Marble or Steel, they'll make to your laft and only fair Fall, they'll affuredly give you

Backs.

advife all my Scholars, feriouftyto weigh this Caution Sir John Floyer'i againft immoderate Drinking, and I affu/e them of alfo, there are many dig their Graves with their Teeth.

Therefore I

Truft
And
As

not to

Confiitution, 'twill decay,


wears

twifted

Strength its Fibres

away

clofe-wove

Garments
tho'

of a

ftrong-fpun

The Woof frets out and tears away the Web ; So Soul and Body, ne'er fo well conjoin'd, The longer that they wear, the more they grind, Then the crack 'd Organ muft impair the Mind. All finite Things tend to their own undoing, But Man alone's induftrious to his Ruin.;
For
what with

Thread,
")
S

Royal Delicate s

and

Wine,

Turns Pioneer, himfelf to undermine. Befides the hidden Snares laid in our Way, The fudden Deaths we hear of ev'ry Day, The fmootheft Paths have unfeen Ambufcades,
And

Infecurity Security

invades

For no Man knows what's the next Hours event, Man lives, as he does die, by Accident. How foft is Flefh, how brittle is a Bone ! Time eats up Steel and Monuments of Stone, And from his Teeth art thou Exempt alone ? What Warrant haft thou, that thy Body's Proof Againft the Anguifh of an aching Tooth ? How foon's a Fever rous'd by acute Pains ?

The fmalleft Ails have all their Partizans ; And in inteftine Wars they may divide, And Life's Deferters lift on the wrong fide.

Difeafes

to

young Wreftlers.
their
whence

17

Dfeafes,

like

true

Blood-hounds feize
Carcafs

A d prey

upon the

they
and

Dam, fprang ;
Wife,

Be always on thy Guard, Watchful Left Death fhould take thee napping
*

by

Surprize.
which which
run-

Out
to

Play-Wreftling,

is

juft

like French Fencing,


to

neth much upon

falftfying,
than

taking andfpending of Time,

ap_

*'

pears

the

Spectator's

Eyes,
a

Way

of Wreftling,

Inn-Play :

be a much but you may believe


and on

neater and genteeler

me

when

affirm, Out-Players

undergo

much greater

Fatigue than
particular

Inn-Play
Draughts

ers, depend
and

much upon their


which

Strength,

Twiftings,
to

Strains ; at leaft I affirm it depends

foon wear them out, by giving Surfeits or having but few Holds, and lefs Shift to trufl unto,
much upon

plucking

and

tearing of
chance

Cloaths,

waft
an
un
,

ing Time
decided
j-

break his Adverfary s Shins, Hour's foiling he may give his Adverfary a

and perhaps

after tr

Catch,
whofe

Foil,

to fet all the

Ring together by
the
that

the

Ears,
the

it was,

cr whether one or no.

Whereas

the

Inn-Play foon decideth

who

is

better

Gamefter, t **to

by

an

undifputable

Fall,
they
the
alias

Head

and

Shoulders coming

the ?laJ'

Ground

firft,

and

under/land

Inn-Play laft,

and {land

Country, by Green, (from his Grandfather, who edu wore the Bays, and frequently won moft Priz.es, befides other By-Matches, reign'd Champion of Nottinghamfhire, and about and the Neighbouring Counties for twenty Tears at leaft, Months before this was Printed, he Wreftled for a fmall Priz.e, 8 where at leaft twelve Couples were Competitors, and without much Fatigue won it. || Whoever underftands Wreftling, will ne'er befides the Inn-Play wiH + Outthe Out-Play a fafe and fecure Play Jooner fecure a Man's Perfen, when Playing at Sharps, than the Out pjay.
as appears

Champions longer for

my Friend Richard

Allen of Hucknall, cated him) who has

callWnn-VUy.

;*

Gentlemen to learn to Wrefile. hi.***" Advantage has an Inn-Play Wreftler over has either Parried his Thruft, or difarm'd Adverfary, when he j to learn t him, and dares make ufe of the Advantage, and clofe with him ? When I had made fome Part of this ready for the Prefs, I taught wrefile.
+
which ought to encourage

What

a great

^'our

at

leaft fifteen

Perftns far feveral

Days,
C

that

they might be hereafter,


not

i8
not

The
only better
and

Prefatory Introduction
thro'

able to take

out,
to

and run

fuch Leffons,

as

feenr

moft intricate
who

difficult

being

altogether

be underflood, but even to teach others, Ignorant of the Terms, and hard to put all
would

in
or

a practical
rather

Series,

look

upon

it, only

as

fo

much

Gibberifh,

Wreftlers. 'Tis obfervable, Qui Ignoratus terminis Ignoratus & Ars. Therefore 1 advife them, firft to learn the Terms, and then they'll be fooner Mafter of this Art. And I have taken fome Pains to draw the whole in fome Me (fince Order is the Life of a Book, and that which hath no thod,
Banter
put upon
all
tho'

method, has but

confus'd

may

refer

perhaps to

Ideas of many more;


and

what
yet

when

it advanceth) you have

that one
run

Hold
the

over

Holds readily, you'll find break, provided out fome of your felf, mere natural for your own taking, you obferve the Directions I here give you ; and I appeal to your Experience and Practice, if you think them not as good. Therefore
whole

feveral Times,

and take

be

not

difcouraged

at the

feveral Tryals,
the oftner you
as you

at

firft, if
them

you<

don't

un

der{land e'ery
you take

Point; for

exercife you'll

over,

provided

every thing as trite Experience, and be better


advife

can,

find,

you'll gain more

pleas'

where there or

is

never a your

d with your Undertaking. I further. Mafter to Inftrutt you, when you are

Reading, Proficias,
you take all
with

Saying

Paragraphs without

Book, Ingredere

uc
as

muft lay read, or fay them,


you

your

Hands

on

and that
.

will

gradually, and in order be the beft Way to learn

to

Holds perfectly, &c and each other, but rather humour


a

that you
the

don't flruggle
each

or

ftrive.
and

taking of

Hold,

yielding he
the

Fall,

till you
and

have
able

them

true and perfect ; then will


your

you,

whene'er

opposed

thwarted

by

Antagonift,
another,

in any

readier and

better
.

Hold,

to proceed to

that, more

advan-

Ifay nothing but what's true, believe there is not the Man living that kills another, ei verily ther in hot or cold Blood, though he look'd upon him as his worft Enemy, but would kifs his Pofteriors, if that would him
and

tageoufly offers it felf Tm J-anguine and fully perfuaded,

to

Life

bring
as

again. encourage

A
m.

Claufe to

Act-

for obliging Perfons of fuch

Wreftling

in

ev'ry

County,
to

there's

Eftates,

exercife

the

long Bow^

to
.Bow,

young Wreftlers.
Piftols
if
the were
when

19

before Guns
the

and

that

Act againft him

Duelling,

in ufe, would be effential in the Parliament pleafeth, as was


and even more

fhould

Wreftling Merciful, than he could be, did he nvt know how to come into his Adverfary, when he had parried moft home Thrufts, and had him at his Mercy, but muft be oblig'd to parry, and bind his s Sword, him with a home Thruft, Se Defendendo and kill left it be his Fate to fall the next Pu{h his Adverfary made. If Wreftling was more prabtis'd by Gentlemen, Sec. few or none but a fevere Fall would be kill'd by the Sword in Rencounters, or two, a black Face or the like, would allay their Fury and
propos'd on
will make account more

late Duke of Hamilton.

Daring, Bold,

Adverfary'

nay, perhaps till quite forgotten. Armies we carried againft our Enemies,* Soldierv. for many Tears lafi paft, make good Vim vi Repellere licet, that ev'ry Man, as the greater comprehends the leffer, may improve his Strength, and defend himfelf; as we fortified our Cities, which lay moft open to be attacked, with all the Art imaginable, no Man will fay, but that Wreftling is lawful and even ufeful, and re
that
*

Heat for

Time,

Since

our

great

itfelf as fo to our King atid Country, Wreftling tri Armies, Sieges, and Skirmifhe?, 'tis there that its Neceffity is own'd, 'tis there that its. Performance, and not Words, exprefs its Elogy; for who will deny that an Army of Wiefilers
commends
umphs

in

are

not

rather

to

be chofen,
or

than

fuch
to

as
or

can't,

who

being
all

dif-

mounted

in

Bickering,

otherwife,
able clofe with

having fpent
coop

their
with

Ammunition, knowing
their

themfelves

and grapple

Enemies,
perhaps

rather choofe to

them than turn their

Backs

of

them.

Some
to
a

to make a

may object, that Man more Contentious,


which

Wreftling is of no ufe, and Quartelfome, and


I anfwer,
as
an

Gamefter

break Mens Bones ; to indeed, but is


another

that

you

but apt fit only feldom find


up
neither

fuperlatively Paffive,
refent

and will put

what you

{hall
a

call

and

Affront
any

find

that

true

Gamefter

does,
C

or

receives

when

highly
and

tentious

Inflead of a Quarrelfome, he'll laugh


provok'd.
2

true
at

Gamefter beini Con

Harm,

do but
and

fmall

Indignities,

witb

20
with the

The
upon the

Prefatory

Introduction

Maftiff Dog,
who are can't

Pifs in

bite, lift up his Curs in Contempt. little wafling yelping


rather than

Leg

and

only

Others
the
the

naturally carping
allowing,
that

Criticks,
of efpeciaUy
all

and would

find Spots
is

Sun,

help
in

Exercifes
to

Wrefiling

moft

ufeful

to all forts

of

whilft

young

and

a perfect

Men, ftate
cope

learn
then
an

and practice
when-

of

Health;
and

may fuch

old, many young Ignorants.

with

Infirmities,

with,

be

Over-match for

moft Part our Country Rings for Wrefllings, at Wakes Feftivals, confift of a fmall Party of young Women, who to choofe a Coward, but the Daring, Healthy, come not thither I dare fay, and Robuft Perfons, fit to raife an Offspring from: Fur
the
and other

they fufficiently recommend themfelves to their Sweet-hearts, when they demonftrate that they are of hail Conftitutions, and enjoy a perfect {late of Health, and like the Fatigue of that Day, fit on occafion at any Time, to undergo any bodily Exercife. I ne'er could hear that the Women approved of the Norfolk OutHe /<*
qui mal

P'aV>
y of
rubb'd

t^e

Shins,
;

Senfe..

rending and tearing of Waftcoats, kicking and breaking rendring them fo tender, they could not endure to be but that their Inclinations were the ftrongefi, for the Bedand

fordfhire
good at

Inn-Play,
Cornifh
at

and

the

clofe

for fuch Hugg.

as

approve

themfelves to

be

beginning of the Preface, I take Notice, that Vogue, great Credit, Eftimation, and Reputation, Wreftling tn^vid in Martial the Poet's Days, Wreftling without all doubt is of Fuller'/ Medic Gen. Chap. 3 2. Ver. 24. Jacob greater Antiquity, as appears, or wreftle^ with an Angel, whether it was real and corporal, an^ fpwtually in *ts Signification, I leave Pool and the reft 4th p 2zo ft'cah
p
.

Though

the

''

was

in

ia

Cymnafti-

my-

'

'

&a
.

of

the

Divines to determine.
advife

But I
tho*

all

my

Scholars,

to avoid

Wrefiling

with

Qp?*'for
'

they may

maintain the

Struggle 'till Break

o'th'

Angels, Day, and


have

feem
the
Tiunbg-

to lay their Adverfaries Supine, and on their Backs, Foil, and be out of Joint, with Jacob'* Thigh.

they'll

fcWB2>-

I conclude, that it requires a much abler Pen than mine, it : And that it remains only ingenuoufly to aflure ne'er had. been indued to write this firft Treatife of you, I
to explain

Wreft-

to

Wreftling,

that ever
and

young Wreftlers. was publifh'd by any,


might

21

it myfterious,

hoped it

but that I found fall into fuch ingenious


and

Hands,
that

as

would

make good

Facile eft inventis addere,

fill up the feveral Blanks, I have left for that Purpofe. Then I further promife, if this is acceptable to Gamefters, and thofe that would be fuch, to illuftrate, and

fuch

would

make clear

and plain each


of the

Letter,

with two or three

Copper-

Plates at leaft, Poftures in Wreftling, which can't be well done, till my Blanks are fill'd up; that it may be in time a correct Treatife of Wreftling, and invite many Perfons to look into it, with an itching Curiofity of reading and exercifing the whole Book frequently through, till they are become compleat Wreftlers ; 'tis difficult to pitch upon a Subject like this, that has not been in fome manner or other treated of by others ; but much to be wondered at, if I am not laugh'd at, for being the firft Undertaker, being fearful I have com mitted many Faults, yet am concerned that I cannot apolo gize for my felf, in the Words of the great and celebrated Se neca, to his Lucilius de alienis liberalis fui ; Quare autem aliena dixi ? Quacunque Bene dicta funt ab uUo, mea funt. And Martial 1 peaks for me, Epig. lj.Lib. 1. Sunt bona, funt Qua legis hie
quadam

tho'

mediocria, funt

mala plura ;

aliter non

fit, Avite, liber.

neither am I confident of my own I can perform any thing like Others, or Sufficiency, do I fet a greater Value on the Spider's Web, for being fpun out of its own Bowels, however, I declare, by a notum fit om nibus & Jingulis ; that if upon perufal of this my Book of Wreftling, my Readers fhall laugh at it, till they lie down : I hope they'll be fo ingenious, as to own the Fall which anfwereth the Defign and very End of this Undertaking. Now I have done every thing requifite and neceffary, in a good Wreftling-Mafter, 'tis not my Fault, if Scholars do not obtain the defired and propos'd End, which is a Total Van quishing, and Overthrowing of their Adverfaries. I will not enlarge my Preface, with Encomiums of Modern Wreftlers, and what Encouragement the Students, even at the Univerfities, give the Exercife of Wrefiling, who lie un der
not a

'Tis

Book, if not fo,

to think

22

My
a

Inftitutes to

Toting

Wreftlers.
neither

der

pecuniary

Mulct, for
for
that
or

not

Eappearing in the Summer

venings,
was the

appointed

Exercife;

do I
the

fay,

Jacob
to the
me

firft Inftitutor
of

Mafter: but leave

whole

Cenfure

the

Reader,

who will

judge

as

he pleafeth, let
with

fay

what

I will,
noftra,

without

my concluding

Martial,

Car

per e vel noli

vel tde tua.

My
Young
MOft Problems
in

Inflltutes

to

Wrestlers.
Mechanicks
are

of the

more

ufeful to

than

the curious, they commonly Execution of the moft neceffary Things in the Way of Life ; fo that I might be very large on my Subject, but that my Book

regard

relate

may not exceed fome Wreftlers Pockets. 1 only explain the fmall Sword, Lever or Stilliard, which are all one, in the Reafon of their Operations, and how far Ufe ful to the Wreftler ; but as this is a new Application of mine, I'll explain my felf with all the Perfpicuity and agreeable Eafinefs to be underftood, and deduced into the Practice and Ex of ercife Wreftling : therefore both at the longer end of the

Stilliard, as well as Props, may be call'd


from
the

of

the

the

Lever, from their Fulciments and Feeble, becaufe as thofeEnds are farther

Centers,

mand the greater

they eafier with lefs Weight and Force com Weight or Blows, on the fliorter Sides of the

Fulciments
I
cannot
on your

and Props. demonftrate the fharp ftroke of your Adverfary 's Feeble Wrift or Arm, which

Elbow,
are
of

up
the

greateftConfequence,
a

and preferable

too,

and

before the Weight


better

My
than

Infinites

to

Young

Wreftlers.
and

25

Mvxon's better following Words, Mechanical Powers, who treat of the Lever, Stilliard, and Stroke From Propofition the 4th, to the 5 th. of the Hammer. For all other ftatical Motions of human Bodies, fuch as are curious, may find them Abridg'd, from Alphonfus Borellus, in
thefe

in

in Mandy's

Lib.
the

1.

De

Lines

MotuAnimalium, Prop. of Directions, p. 175, The


true

iy<5.

by S'urmius's Staticks,
Power of Engines.

with

177, 178, 179, 184,

187.

Reafon of

increafing
us

here, be Matter, and we enquire the Principle of natural and fenfible Motion, which perhaps that al will not prefently occur : One Thing I muft fay, though I do not affect the Thing, yet by removing Things there out of the Way, I fhall open a Door to let into it ; fore I fhall attempt many Methods, that fo if one arrive not at it, I may make Way for another: Firft, in the Ballance I will endeavour to fettle that common Maxim, while the
N'One
will require of we are a
caufe

ftrict Demonftration

bufied in Phyfick

Weights and Diftances from the Centre in ALquilibrio;. As if in the Ballance AB


two

are reciprocal, the

Weight

of

it is A of

to the Weight of B. in one Pound, as ths CB of two Feet to the Diftance of A C of one. Foot. If from a Piece of Timber, you hang a Ballance from the Point C, to be in AEquilibrio; fo that you remove it fo far from the Centre to anfwer the Addition that fhould be made to the Weight, that is, if the Weight of one'Pound hang in the Point D, and in A, a Weight of two Pound, to make them in JEquilibrio, the fame Weight fhould be added, and inftead of the fame Weight you may add the fame Diftance, the Centre that CB be double to CD: or fo remove it from Thus a Weight of one Pound being placed in B, it will beagain in JEquilibrio; Experience fhews this, but the Reafon is * to be fought. ' Firft, I fuppofe any heavy Body to refift a Motion ' ward, and the greater it is, the greater Motion it will refift ;. * fo that a greater Violence or Force is required to move upt wards a Weight of one Pound the fpace of two Feet, than to

Pound, is
of

Diftance

up-

'

raifer

24

My

Infiitntes to

Toting Wreftlers.

raife the

fame Weight but one Foot high, or at leaft it re time. quires a Force to be applied of a longer continuance of ' is moved downward, Secondly, I fuppofe while the Weight the Weight on the other part of it may move fomewhat up
ward, fo that it may
pofite
overcome

the

Refiftance
;

which the

op-

is

moved more

Weight hath down

to

motion upward

alfo while a

Weight

together with that

lower, it produces a greater Impetus, Motion, which would have been if the
or

Motion had been lefs. This laft

part of the
more

be given, diftinct for the moft part from the principal Aas in Things projected or gent to which Motion is afcribed, caft from one, I think in good Philofophy, it can fcarcely be denied, fuch like Caufe befides Motion, which is fucceffive,
and no part whereof
other cannot exifts with

hard, I fuppofe, Thirdly, fome


therefore
'

I fhall

explain

it

productive

Suppofition feems largely. Caufe of Motion to

the other; and therefore the

Caufe adteth its Action exifts, itfelf alfo exifts, and while its Action exifts, the Effect exifts by fuch Actions produced : Therefore while any Effect is pro duced and exifts, its Caufe exifts ; but while one part of Mo
not

be but when it

the

Caufe, for

every

effective

exifts ;

therefore while

tion

exifts,

another part

exifteth

not,

therefore

one part of

Motion

from another, and therefore ano ther Caufe of Motion ought to be admitted. But this Caufe is not the principal Agent to which Motion is attributed ; for firft in Things projected, the Hand which throws the Stone, is not any more join'd with the Stone in conveying it
cannot

be

produced

through

the

Air, and
be

therefore produces

nothing

further, nei
wit, that

ther can that the

attributed to

Air,

that

fome do

; to

it impels the Stone, impels likewife the con and that Air other Air, until it make a Circu tiguous Air, lation, and this laft Air carries the Stone farther ; but on the contrary, in the fame precife Moment and Time wherein the Stone joined to the Hand moves the Air juft before it, (fince the Penetration is not granted) in the fame time alfo Hand
while

this

Air

moves

the

following Air,
at the

and

fo confequently

makes

'he whole

Circulation

fame

precife

Time,
*

and

there

My Inftittttes
there

to

Toung

Wreftlers.

25

is found only the Priority of Dependence: Suppofe the Motion of the Stone to be from the point A to B, and in the fame precife Time it makes the whole Circulation and the Air which was in E follows in F, neither hath it greater Force to farther Motion than it hath from the Stone ; from the following Time I ask whether the Motion of the Air F depends on the Motion of the Stone, or the Motion of the Stone on the Motion of the Air. If you fay the firft, I de mand again from whence the Stone is moved : if the fecond, I ask from whence the Air is moved ; for the paft Motion of the Stone cannot be the caufe of Motion of the prefent Air, therefore it is neceflary to fay fomething is added to the Stone from whence it is carrried through the Air ; and this I call Impetus, or Force, whatfoever it be. 1 Moreover, I will fhew, Impetus being granted, viz. While a Body defcends, it feems to me a Reafon to be alledg'd, why, in the firft Space of Time, the Body defcends one Foot, in the fecond three, in the third five, in the fourth fe-> ven ; and fo on, unlefs the continual Production of fome Impetus be admitted ; which is the immediate productive Caufe of Motion, which Impetus is permanent, and may beincreafed.

in itfelf, and alfo in the Body which they hang on; let^^. Weight be moved by the fpace of three Inftances, or Mo ments, fo that after that Third it hath an Impetus as Three ; let down the fecond Weight in the beginning of the fourth Inftant, wherefore it hath not the Impetus as Three, as the 0ther Weight ; becaufe (you'll fay) it remains unmoved, and the other is moved ; therefore Motion is the Condition to the producing a farther Impetus, at leaft, fuch Motion whofe Im petus is according to Nature. ' Which I (hall likewife make good from other Experi ments : Firft, Why, while I drive a Nail with a Hammer of a longer Handle, I produce a ftronger Blow or Stroke. In like manner, if I lift the Arm and the Hammer higher, fo
tus
one

follows, that a fecond Impetus is not produced, This to firft hath, and produces fome Motion: Let twowf'"w^ Weights be fufpended in the Air, each produces fome Impe-y^r'toft
untefe the

'*

Alfo it

that

it defcribes

a greater

Circle,

the

Stroke is

made more
*

valid

2d

My

Inftitntes to
; no other

Toung
Reafon

Wreftlers.
can

valid and

ftrong

be given,

but

that

by

the greater

Motion (whether as the Condition, or as the Caufe, it matters not) a ftronger Impetus is produced, fo that the Power, unlefs it be moved, never produces in the beginning fuch Impetus in the Nail, how great foever of its Motion, the Endeavour be, as it produces while it hath fome Motion;

fo that if ten Men prefs with their Weight upon a Nail, it doth not enter the Wood fo well, as if it be drove with an
While any one runsa-pace, if his Feet be ftopt he cannot but fall \ and fo a Horfe on full fpeed can fcarce be held in, whence they lift up their Fore-feet, as it were a contrary Motion, to affuage every conceived Impetus While a Boat is and is fuddenly ftopt at the carried with a great Impetus, becaufe now the are moved, Shoar, all that are in the Boat conceived Impetus is conveyed farther, they bend forward,
chufe

Hammer.by one Man.


'

being
'

ftopt. And I ihall fhew,that

Weight

of one

tle

farther from
placed

the

Centre

than another

Pound placed a lit Weight of one Pound,

will raife

lttip ; fuppofe two Weights

equal each to the

Pound,

Ballance that one is double the Diftance of the other from the Centre ; whence I thus argue. The Weight of one Pound, while it moves downward two Feet, may overcome the Refiftance which a Weight of one Pound hath to motion upwards one Foot; therefore if they are fo fitted in the Ballance, that while one is depreffed two Feet, the other is only rais'd one Foot, it raifeS that upward ; the Antecedent is prov'd, while the Weight of one Pound is moved downwards two Feet, its active Force, or Impetus, which it puts forth, together with fuch Motion, is precifely equal to that Refiftance which the oppofite and equal Weight hath to motion upwards two Feet but the ; fo
in
a

Refiftance

is lefs than to mo Pound weight therefore, is mov'd downwards two Feet, the other Pound weight may be moved upwards one Foot ; but when two equal Weights are foplac'd in a Ballance that one is doubly diftant from
to motion upwards one

Foot,

tion upwards two

Feet

while one

the

Centre

to

the other ;

it

alfo affects

double Space
'

to

that

My
that which

Inftitutes

to

Toung Wreftlers.
Therefore
we

its Oppofite

effects.

have

one

27 Rea

fon now, why between equal Weights, that which is fartheft diftant from the Centre it depreffed, and raifes up its oppofite Weight, which may be alfo proved in this manner ; when two uneqal Weights are equally diftant from the the greater raifes the leffer, becaufe the Parts of Mo Centre, tion downwards are more than thofe upwards ; and in like manner when equal Weights are fo placed in a Ballance, that one is farther diftant from the Centre than t'other; the Parts of Motion downwards will be more in one than the Parts of Motion upwards, are in the the other, (or its Oppofite) there fore the Weight which is fartheft diftant from the Centre will raife the other Oppofite being equal to itfelf. ' The Motion upwards of heavy Things is againft Nature, and the violent Motion of them downwards is agreeable to Nature ; but how much that is which is againft Nature, fo much is the refiftance to that ; and how much that is which is agreeable to Nature, fo much is its Inclination and active Force to overcome the oppofite Refiftance : therefore where there is a greater Motion downwards than the Motion up
active Force of refitting will overcome. The fecond Reafon is ; a greater Impetus is required to move the fame Weight a greater Space than a lefs, whether the whole Impetus be produced together, as happens in things proje&ed or thrown ; or fucceffively, as when a Weight is

wards, the
*

drawn.
*

Alfo

greater

Impetus is
than

required

to

move

greater

lefs Weight the fame Space ; whence I thus argue, an Impetus which is required to move a Weight of two Pound one Foot, is double to the Impetus which is required to move one Pound one Foot ; but the Impetus which is required to move one Pound two Feet, is in like manner double to that which is required to move one Pound one Foot ; therefore the Impetus which is required to move two Pound one Foot, is equal to the Impetus fary to move one Pound two Feet, for thofe fame things which are doubled are equal among themfelves : But when two are fo placed in a Ballance that the Weight of two Weights
Weight fome Space,
to move a
necef-

'

Pound

28

Mylnftitutes to

Toung

Wreftlers.

Pound is diftant from the Centre one foot, and the Weight of while the Weight of one one Pound is diftant two Feet ; two Feet, the Weight of two Pound is moved downwards Pound is elevated one Foot ; and one Pound Weight as mo downwards two Feet, is in JEquilibrio with one Pound
two Feet : Therefore one Pound moving two moving upwards JEquilibrio with two Pound moving upwards Feet, will be in one Foot. ' univerAnd that we may render the fame Reafon more fal, and that we may apply it not only to Weights and Ba lances, but that we may extend it to all Engines in general : Suppofe, as before, by how much more the Power is that is Impetus pro moved, by fo much the greater and ftronger is the

ving

it is moved one Foot, can fame Power is moved two Feet, it will move 200 Pound one Foor. To clear which Point, fuppofe, for Explication fake, a certain Opinion re jected by moft Philofophers, to wit, that Time inereafes, or grows from.indivifible Inftants fucceeding each other : Sup that which neceflarily follows from fuch an pofe likewife, Opinion, to wit the flownefs of Motion is pofited in more or lefs little Stays of Reft ; which Opinion I do not propofe that in it I may found my Reafon, but only that I may fhun that Confufion which the common Sentence begets, concerning the continued Compofition from Parts infinitely Divifible 1 for when they treat of this Infinity, 'tis no wonder if they mix Obfcurity and Darknefs together; therefore, fuppofe a Power, which while it is moved one Point, may move ioq Pound one Point, and being fitted in an Engine, fo that while the Power is moved two Points, the Weight is moved only
duced ; therefore, if a
move

Power,
;

while

ioo

Pound

one

Foot

while the

one
'

Point.
a

Power will be moved the fpace Weight all the while no Ways refilling Point, ; fuch a Motion, becaufe the Weight, as yet, is at reft, but * when the Power is moved to the fecond Point, it hath a double Impetus, viz,, the Impetus produced in the mean time,, while it is moved through thofe two Points, but a double

In fuch

Suppofition, the
the

ct one

Impetus

moves a

double Weight

therefore the

Power

which
'

is.

My Inftitutes to Toung Wreftlers.


is
moved two

29

Points will move a double Weight one Point, if it be fo fitted in an Engine that necffarily its Motion ought to be double to that which follows in the Weight. ' And although this Opinion concerning Continuals fhould not be true, and the Power fhould never be moved but the
Weight fhould be moved, although flowly ; neverthelefs fince a Power exerts a greater Impetus when it is moft mov'd, as often as the Motion is greater in it than in the Weight, fo often the Impetus will be greater in it, than if it had been mo 0ved equally with the Weight : but a greater Impetus can
vercome a greater

Weight,
with a

therefore

greater

Motion

of a

Power,
'

compared

overcome a greater

leffer Motion Weight.

of a

Weight,

can alfo

To make it clearer. Sappofe, to move a Weight of 100 Pound one Foot, an Impetus be required as 4, which the Power A may produce ; and as I may fo fay, to lift it up while it is moved one Foot ; there will be required to move a Weight of 200 Pound one Foot, an Impetus as 8 ; but an Impetus as 8 is produced from a Power if it be moved 2 Feet,. for more Impetus is produced from a Power while 'tis moved
two

Feet, than
remains,
as

while
viz,.

ciple

'tis moved one Foot, therefore that prin The Power as moved two Feet, effects
which are
moved

the
and

fame,

two

Powers

only
of

one

Foot

we muft

not think

Impetus

to

be fo fluent

not to

maintain, and, as it were, heap together; Power be moved for fome time, it fhould not increafe ; alfo its intenfive Impetus is not refilled by fuch Impetus. In like manner, a Weight is not fuppofed to refift a leffer Motion, whence if a Power be fo compared with a as a greater ; Weight, that while it is moved one Foot, the Weight is
ne-

Nature, as that is, if the

ceffarily

moved the

fame,

and the

Refiftance

of the

Weight is

moving one Foot, than the Impetus which is pro duced from the Power being moved one Foot, no Motion fol lows ; but if an Engine thus diftributes the fame Impetus thac the whole be employed in moving the fame Weight half a
greater as

Foot, it will make fome Motion. Neverthelefs, becaufe this thing is


'

and

contains

the moft univerfal

of fo great Moment, Principle in Nature, fore


there'

go
1
c

My Inftitntes
and to
'

to

Toung Wreftlers.
the

fore 'tis
ther,
plainly.

worth our while to profecute

apply it in every part,

that

thing a little it may appear more


ap-

far-

*
f *

firft, that 'tis equivalently the fame thing to fupa motive Power, as one fucceffively to move a Body, ply fo that it move in the firft time the pofe thefpace of y Feet,
I fuppofe fpaceof
i

Foot

; moreover, the

fame Power

moveth

in

the fe-

1
'

cond time

'
' '

'
*
'

in the fecond in the fecond time following, the Foot, third by the third, and fo on : for the moving Power as?one, if it be applied to the fecond time, may as well move another therefore the fame will be Equivalent alfo like itfelf, or another like to it be ther the fame Motion continue, firft
time 1 the
whe-

by another, and fo on, and to apply 5 moving to wit, the firft moves ers fucceffively as 1 ; of which,

Pow-

Subftituted.

*
'

Secondly, I fuppofe to move or fuftain a Body, to be the fame, as to apply 5 Powers each, of which is a Power as 1,
and to

apply

fo

that

lance

you

may

put a

5 Bodies of each 1 Foot of another matter, which is Virtimes lighter than Gold, for neither hath the cy moving ' tue in itfelf, as the firft Quality; for if j Heats or warm 1 Things are put as 1, they can never be produced in the Sub* ject but as one Heat: But and if 2 Powers fufficient to ' move each of them a weight of 100 Pound, if they are join'd
out-weigh
are

it may be a Power as 5, Body of Gold of 1 Foot,

as

the

if in 1 fame

Balwill

'

they will overcome or move a weight of This Rule is common in all equivocal Agents, * fo if the Powers of 2 Candles in fome determinate Place, ' each of them produces 1 Degree of Light, acting together in c the fame Place, they produce a greater Degree of Light ; fo 1 while the Sun in an Eclipfe is hid in fome parts, the Light 1 fhineth more weakly, therefore in thefe Cafes Extenfion be' gets Intenfion, or is equivalent to it. ' Suppofe 2 Men move uneqally, to wit, with a double Velocity one to the other ; what is in one that is not in the the other ? And firft, it is certain that the Motion of the one is * always double to the other, fo that while one is moved one Foot, the other only moves half a Foot ; and while the firft
'

and concur together


200

Pounds:

'

paffes

My
'
c

Inftitutes to

Toung

Wreftlers.

%i

paffes over half a Foot, the other paffes over a quarter of a Foot ; and in whatsoever time aflignable, the parts of Motion ' in the one are more than in the other, whence 'tis certain in ' the fecond place, if the Motion of the Power confers to this, ' that it move the opprfite Weight, while the Power hath 1 in the oppofite ter Motion, it produces a greater Impetus 1 fr.->m whence the Argument may be formed. Wei;:.ht, c A Power advances its Force by Motion, therefore while f'vs moved with a double Velocity, 'tis equivalent to a doubie Fore? ; but a double Virtue or Force can move a Weight ' doubly greater, or as great again, therefore a Power moved * with a double Velocity can move a Weight doubly greater : * the firft Antecedent is certain, for a Power however it be ap' ply'd will not move unlefs it be moved, whether its Motion be the Condition to this that moves, or whether the Mo tion itfelf be the immediate Caufe of Motion, it matters * not ; neither is there need to examine thefe Things, fince " divers Explications arife from divers Phyfical Principles : For 1 fome acknowledge no Motion which takes not its rife from
grea'
*

'

Impetus

"
1

f c

or Force, and confequently to produce a greater Motion in a Power, they require a more ftronger Impetus ; therefore if a Power be moved with a Velocity double to the

Weight,
which

it

produces

an

Impetus

doubly ftronger

to

that

'

have had, if it had been moved equally with ' But if it be moved equally with the Weight : Weight, ' the Impetus which is produced in itfelf fhould be fufficient ' to remove ioo Pound fuch a Space J therefore if it be mov' ed with double Velocity, it will move 200 Pound, the fame ' Space ; being explain'd, we'll fuppofe a free Power to impel ' lightly fome Weight, fo that by the Force of its Impreflion * it is not moved, it will ufe a greater Endeavour, and at ' length moves it. I ask what makes that greater Endeavour * unlefs a more ftronger Impetus be produced (fuppofing al' ways that fuch Impetus is granted) but if the Power itfelf be ' moved more fwiftly, it produces a greater Impetus : Therefore ' by the greater Motion of a Power is adhibited that which ' is neceffary, that a Weight may be moved doubly greater
it
would

(or

as great

again)

each part

'Body

is

moved more

fwiftly,

is proved, to wit, ftronger Impetus is

while

any
1

produced ;
or

j2
or the

My
the

Inftitutes to

Toung Wreftlers.
what

intenfe Motion

being fecluded

Way foever from

Succeffion of fo much local Motion is agreeable for the Velocity of Motion is fome Perfec with Intention ; tion which cannot be explicated, becaufe of the Succeffion Notwithof Motion, and the infinite Divifibility of Time. ftanding, in each Opinion, Velocity or Swiftnefs is faid to be fome Perfection of Motion : For fuppofe in Fig. 14. fome Motion in Andes, in as much as feme think them Indivifible, let A B C D, a potent Angle, in one inftant alfo indivifible, befo moved, that leaving the former Space A BC D, it poffelfes the next following C D E F ; fuppofe another An or as fome call it, a phyfical Point GHKI, be fo mo gle, ved in the fame indivifible Inftant, that leaving the former Space GHKI, it poffeffes the Space LMON, furely the former Motion is a more perfect Motion than the fecond; and therefore if there be required an Impetus to Motion, there is required a more ftronger to effect the firft Motion than the fecond : But if no Impetus be required, but immediately Mo tion be produced from the Power, there is required a far ftronger Endeavour to obtain the former than the latter :

Impetus,

Wherefore,
vour of

to

moveth a greater

conclude, the Weight than


while a

greater a

Endeavour
but

of

leffer ;

a greater

Power Endea

Power is advanc'd

while

flowly
'

; therefore
the

'tis moved fwiftly, than while Power is moved fwiftly, it alfo

moves a greater

Alfo,

ved with a

for fare it is,

Weight. firft Confequent is plain, (while a Power is mo double Velocity, 'tis equivalent to double Power)
while

any Power adhibits,

or ufes an

Endeavour
adhibit-

'tis equivalent to two Powers, doubly an Endeavour or ting, ufing doubly leffer. So
greater,

each one

Horfe, if he endeavours much, may draw a determin'd Weight, which he may draw twice as eafy, and without fo great Endeavour if another Horfe be joined with him to affift. if it be moved more fwiftly, it will be equivalent in order to move a Weight of a greater force, although fometimes the Weight doth not increafe its Motion ; for if the Motion
Power be

Wher

of the

increafed,

the

Motion

of

the

Weight is
'

qually

My Inftitutes

to

Toung

Wreftlers.

3?

A Power moved more fwift will indeed equally increas'd. be equivalent to a greater, but all that perfection,which hap pens to it from Motion, relates to the making the Motion of the Weight greater ; for a Weight of a greater Motion refifteth more, therefore in Motion thefe two are always taken for the fame, to wit, to move a greater Weight to a lefs Space, and a lefs Weight to a greater Space, for as to move a greater Weight, a greater Endeavour is required ; fo to move a Weight to a greater Space, a greater Endeavour is alfo required. The whole Artifice of Engines then confifts in comparing the greater Motion of the Power with the lef fer Motion of the Weight, and according to the proportion of excefs, the Force of the Powers are increas'd ; becaufe Powers increafe not their Force but by Motion, and therefore Motion doubly fwifter, produces Impetus doubly greater.
*

I illuftrate how

ufeful

Wreftling

is

to a

Gentleman in

* Gentle-

Fencing, in the following Example of Parrying, and leave to the ingenious, to make a farther Application as oft as an Op
portunity fhall offer itfelf. f He that will parry with his
thick

it""**'

left Hand,

Glove,)
Point
and

muft
of

ing
out,

the

low,

camp his Sword within a Foot

or

ftand low, lying open,

(having
but

on a

and and not

hold- Swurrf.
wide near

long

t Smalh

Hoping downward,
of the

Ground,

fo

as to

flick in

the

Ground,

and

draw in his

right

Hanch, which

is to bend well over his right Waiftband, his left Hand muft be in a Semi-circle advanc'd, be fure high enough, about a Span off, and before his Brow, and mind when his Adverfa ry 's Shell advances, then 'tis fuppos'd the Thruft is a coming; then muft his left Arm fling or fwing Compafs enough round his Adverfary 's Sword, his left Arm being extended ftreight out, with the Palm outwards, and Fingers ftreight at length, over the infide of his with the back-fide of his left Hand,
left Knee, fetching the Compafs with his Hand, about the height of the Pit of his Stomach ; he muft be fure not to throw his left Arm wide outwards, but as before, ftreight towards his right Knee. When he has fecured his Adverfary 's

Sword,

upon

his home,

and

not

half

Thruft,

and

the longer

34
ger
mind

My Inftitutcs to Toung

Wreftlers.

his Adverfary's Sword is, the better he may if he has a upon to kill him, (as a Swordfman) make a Thruft his right Foot; but if he has a mind to difhim, by advancing arm him, and have him at his Mercy, (as a Wreftler) he muft ftep forward with his left Foot, and throw his left Elbow over his Adverfary's right Feeble Wrift and Sword, and come in tor the Gripes ; if he will, he may throw his own Sword from him, and take his Adverfary's Sword from be twixt their Bodies, he being difabled by that Lock from hold it fait, and kill him with his own Sword, as in Figure the ing Eighth of this Book. Hippocrates was not a little Proud that he had adapted Ex ercife to Medicine, and he might think with many more as I do, that Exercife is the Vnum Neceffarium, he would not deftroy Pharmacy, and fhut up all the Apothecaries Shops at once, but introduceth it into the Art of Phyfick, and diz'd it to that great Perfection, that in his third Book de Diata, Sett. 12. he faith, he could diftinguifh Wonpov tlcn'iov
tho'

metho-

ivi Tovaf. ij 01 ts'ovoi to. a-jriet,


cibus

nt]eia<

%Xil
aut

^f'0*

aAAiiAa,

Utrum
ha-

fuperat labores,

ut

labores cibos,
and

moderate

inter fe

beant.

The Effeftseven
in his
tains whilft
2d

of

Chafing

Friction,

which

Book deDiatd Se_t. 42. is to my Purpofe, it incarnates and makes the Flefh increafe
he
affirms

as

he explains he main
thrive,
in

and

Carnes

calefatta acficcata

alimentum

feipfas

per venas

trahunt, deinde augefcunt.


his Thoughts
the
upon

He

gives

the

'Avaxtr>iy.ttlet,

or prepara

Wreftlers for the more vehement ones. In fome Cafes he prefcribes ndw, or common Wreftling, in other the 'tupx*'?" or Wreftling by Hands only, with out coming in clofe. But of the n.'Aw </W B-vy.-ThoKiiv kr n Ivuovjo a/,AAo/f it w\irpi7*/. i. e, Luttaper complexum, in qua confertis, impaitis, vel complicatis corporibus res agebatur, which is
Tpofin-

tory Exercifes ; to warm and fit

which were made ufe of amongft the

Ancients

our

Cornish-Hugg,
that that

mention

full well,
would

or Inn-Play Wreftling. He makes no (forsdn dedita opera, perhaps on purpofe) as knowing

fuperfede the

Manly Exercife, if Neceffity of Phyfick.

generally practis'd,

Fig.

i.
M-M-WAL^n.
_j.tt3

.ajass.gA-g

Fort,

or

Strong.

Feeble, or Weak.

One Parrying his Adverfary's

One

Thruft
with

given

in_ within
a

giving Thruft:
the

within his fword

firft

his Fort Parrade in

Sword with his Feeble and his


it Fort Shell.
ries

Adverfary Par
with

Quart.

his

near

the

One giving in
a

Fig.

4-

Fig.

5.
^_,

Thruft with
above

out,

the

:'Ai\

his Adverfary's

OneVarrying
given

Sword, betwixt
his Fort Feeble.
and

y//M
szij'A

Thruft
without

his

^| H

Sword,with the firft Parrade in Terce betwixt


bis Fort
and

Feeble.

Fig. 6.
1, 2,
3, 4,5,

6, 7, 8,9,

10

Sir Thomas Parky

ns's

Inn-Play

WRESTLER.
to

HOOSE rather Linnen Drawers,


above

Wreftle in
at

pair

of

wide

Knees,
a

eafy

ty'd

the

Knees,
rather

than

in

pair of

ftreight
narrow

Shoes, than with broad Heels; for in the firft you'll ftand much falter, whether on a Caufey way, wet or dry Ground; and with narrow-heel'd Shoes, you'll eafier difingage, and come off from the hanging Tripput Tacks into your Heels to prevent Aiding. flipping Sir John Flayer in the nth Part of his cold Baths, Pag. 201. explodeth high-heel'd Shoes, and commendeth low-heels, which I found fo much to apropofe and advantageous to Wreft lers, that I here give you his very Words. ufually are the Caufe of moft Strains, either in the Ankle or Knee, &c. for no Man treads ftreight and per Wearipendicular with a Heel ; nor can he walk far without in the Knees and Mufcles cf the Thighs, from nefs, efpecially fo that no the ill Figure the Limb is in upon every Step ; Man with a high-heel can tread ftrong and bodily, efpecially
your

Breeches. 2. Choofe low-heel'd

to

wreftle

with

pet, &c. You may


and

-High-heels

with

38
with

Szr Thomas Parkyns'j


the

Inn-Play Wrefllef.
on

leaft Weight
ufes

and

Burthen
one

him.
and

Should
cripple

man

that

Pumps,
a

but

Day

wear a

Heel,

but

high,

and

work

fo, it
Man

would

lame

Chair Inch him for a


a
an

his Progreffion, the Heel comes Horfes and moft Quadrupedes the firft to the Ground, but ia Toe; and if the Heel be high he cannot ftep with the whole

Month

for in

upon

bending forwards verges towards be feen by making a ftrait Line, Angle, may making from the Heel and Hip, &c. and in fuch an unnatural Pofture no Man can walk far and long without Pain and Weafor rinefs ; but we muft be wifer (forfooth) than our MAer, infinite Wifdom, that has made all Things by a right and
Limb ftrait
an
:

For

the
as

Knee

unerring Rule, by Weight, Meafure, and Number, furely would have fet a high Heel to Man at firft, when he made if he had thought it to have been neceffary, &c. And him, That one thing more I add as a moft neceffary Remark, viz,. no Man ever fprain'd his Ankle, and rarely his Knees, that never wore a Heel higher than the natural Plan of the Foot ; neither have they Corns under the Foot, nor on the Toes, without the Shoe be too ftrai^ht : I could wifh our Soldiers
would think of this.
1

That I may yet farther reconcile my Scholars to low-heel'd *Di-Pr "Shoes, 'twill be convenient in this Place to define a Diftortion tio Strain <fe-by Strain, f A Diftortion is an Effort, or Strain in the Joint of
find.

hi Caufes.

Extenfion of the Ligaments, Leg. Diftortions are of two forts, one is when the Ligaments of the Outward Ankle have fuffer'd ; and the other, when thofe The firft is when the Foot is of the Inward one are hurt. turn'd Inwards ; and the fecond when it is turn'd Outwards; the firft is very frequent, but the latter rarely happens. Bytij are occafion'd by falfe Steps (from high-heel'd Shoes)
the

Foot, by

a violent and painful to the

which

faften it

Bone

of the

made

in

Wreftling, Running, Leaping,


when

and

even

in

Walking,
tp the

frequently
Bend
that

the

Perfon's Heel

and

Foot

come

Ground, if they don'c (efpecially the Heel which fhould come firft) meet with a plain and even Ground, they yield and

Way

which the

Floor

or

Ground inclines

them.

In

Sir Thomas

Parkyns'j-

Inn-Play
or

Wreftler.
Joynts

39
and

In all forts of Sprains, and Tendons, (fays Sir John Floyer) the or Verjuice and Water, cold Water,
the

Wrenches

of the

prefent

Application of Verjuice alone, are

belt Remedies yet known. No doubt but whoever begins his Apparatus with clap ping the Foot into a Pail of cold Spring Water, according Reperto his cold Baths, may conclude, there are no ftronger of the Water contracts cuffives than it, and that the coldnefs the too much extended Ligaments, and prevents any Afflux
Blood and Humours falling on the Part, whilftHeat promotes Suppuration. But if the Strain or Diftortion be very violent, infomuch that it is accompanied by an Extravafation of Blood and Hu the whole Foot and Leg, or in either of them : mours
of
thro'

bleed three or four Times to prevent a Mortifi cation; yet leaft every one fhould not rely upon his Hypothefis, I fhall here infert fome proper Methods and Applications. I my felf have abated the Pains and Swellings by Strokes and Sprains, having mixed Oil of Turpentine and Beer of equal Parts, and well rubbing the grieved Part therewith. Some advife to take a pickled Herring, beaten in a Mortar to a Cataplafm, and apply it to the ftrain'd Part. Other eminent Surgeons at firft for a Recent Sprain, make ufe of a little Defenfative made with the Whites of Eggs,

advife

to

of

Oil-rofar, and powder'd Allom, which they fpread on the bit, Linnen, A, as in Fig. 10. for the two firft days, covering it
Bolder B,.
and the

with the

On
gent

the third

day

they

prepare an

Bandage C drawn a little tight. Aromatick and Aftrin-

thick Wine, Rofes, Wormwood, Rofemary, Rinds, Allom, and common Salt ; with this Wine on it a Bolfter dipt very Hor, they foment the Foot, and lay and over that a Bandage, which I would have in the fame,

Wine,

with

Pomgranat

drawn
much

tighter than the

former.
Bolfter
and

The Application
to the to

of the

Bandage

contribute as

ought

Therefore it be methodically applied, the Bolfter is to Joe four doubles about four Fingers Breadth broad, and about half an Ell
Cure
of the

Strain

as the

Remedies.

40

Sir Thomas
you are to

Parkyns'j-

Inn-Play Wreftler.
on

Ell long,
the two

fix its

middle

the

Sole

of

the

Foot,

Ends coming to crofs on the Inftep ; and each of them ending with a Circumvolution, which takes in the An kles; the Band is to be of the Breadth of two Fingers, and two
Ells

long

You

muft

place

Strain,

that

having

paffed under the

up again, and keep it in a thefe Circumvolutions which


a

firft End oppofite to the Feet you may mount it ftrait Pofture ; you muft continue
the

Circular
When

one above the

to reprefent a
you

Spica,
have

or

all crofs the Inftep, and end by Ankles, and if neatly perform 'd it is Ear of Corn, on the Foot.

made ufe of

Days,

you muft

ed on a

bit
and

of

lay on Leather,

the

this Wine for ten or twelve Aftringent Searcloath D, extend and over that fix on the plain Band E,

fhorter
make

narrower than the

firft,

with which

you

muft

fame Circumvolutions ; the leaft End of which you few, in order to leave it on till the Patient finds his Foot has no further occafion for a Band. Which Time does not always come fo foon as you with, for when a Strain has been Great, you fometimes feel it whole Years ; and you tread never fo little on an incli you'll find your Foot difpofed to yield that ning Ground, Way
the
tho'

which

has before been turn'd;

wherefore

you are

look

where you

fet

your

Ufe low-heel'd Strength. have occafion to make ufe Wreftling.


If
we choofe an
or

Foot, Shoes,
of

till

it has
and

recover'd

carefully to its former


ever,
thro*

you'll

feldom, if

any

of thefe

Prefcriptions

Horfe for
don't

Strength,

hunting,

burthen,

we take a particular

has fhort Fet-Lock Joints, that his Exercife and Bufinefs? For. (hame let us leave off aiming at the out-doing our Maker in our true Symmetry and Proportion, let us likewife for our own Eafe, fecure treading, and upright walking, (as he defign'd we fhould) fhorten our Heels. Since the Women have lower'd their Top-Sails and HeadDreffes, and find it a vain Attempt of theirs in offering to add one Cubit to their Stature.
3.

for the courfe, Care that he he may n'r "Strain thofe Parts in
whether

Un-

Sir Thomas Parkyns *s


Fig.

Inn-Tlay
10.

Wrefiler.

41

3. Unbutton

bands, for
Shirt
want

'Neck,
of

Shirt Neck, with your Wriftfear your Antagonift fhould get his Hand into your and by or Collar, holding his Arms up, and
or

untie

your

thrufting

his

Knuckles

againft

your

Wind-pipe,
Fall
with

you

for

Breath be

oblig'd to yield

him

4.

Camp (as in Fencing)


Knees

or

ftand low
Elbow

your

Toes

out

benr,
not

and

your

left

clofe your

to your

Body,
and

that

he

gets

his

right

Hand betwixt

left Elbow

"Side.

fhe
TAKE him

Fifing
the
right

Horfe.
Left,"

by

Palm

being

upwards,

as

Hand with your if you defign'd only

your

to

(hake
-him

42

Sir Thomas Parkyns'j

Inn-Play Wreftler.
at

him

lift it upwards to make Way for your and put your Head under his right Arm-pit, and hold Head, his Hand down to your left Side ; hold your Head ftiff back him out of his Strength, then put your right wards, to hold Arm up to the Shoulder betwixt his Grainings, and let your Hand appear behind paft his Breech, without taking hold ;
twift

by

the

Hand in

friendly Manner

the

beginning,

and

it

outwards, and

but

if

you

fufpect

they'll cavil at that

Arm,

as a

breeching,

lay your fame Arm along his Belly, and lift him up as high as your Head, and in either Hold, when fo high, lean back ward and throw him over your Head.

(H.)
i.

The
you

Flying
it
that

Mare.
bring
his
your

"OE fure

when

take

you

Arm

J_J
let
your

paft

the

Bent

of your

Arm,

under your

keep

Arm be bent upwards towards him from flipping from you.

Arm-pit, and Head, and 'twill

Hanging Trippet.
THE
hind

Hanging
your

Trippet is

when
on

you put your the

Toe be
with a
on

defign Back.

to

Adverfary's hook his Leg up


the

Heel,

fame

fide,

forwards,

and throw

him

his

When
go

you take

Leg forwards,
pluck

flide

before his other hard by his Elbow, and throw him backwards. And the only way to prevent the Hanging Trippet, Trip or Draught, is to turn in upon him the contrary way, take him
the

Hanging Trippet, but can't bring his Leg behind his, and let your Toe ftanding Ankle ; bear him backwards, or
your

under

by

Arm, or ftrike his ftanding Leg from In-Clamp, which fee.


your

under

him

Sir Thomas ParkynsV

Inn-Play

Wreftler.

41

In-Clampy
IS throwing
would

your

Heel

on

the

Infide

of

his,
to

as

if

you

take the

him with your der him with your Heel, as you are directed Back-clamps you. Vide Back-clamp.

In-lock ; fall in clofe to him, bear upon Breaft and Chin, and ftrike his Leg from un

do

when one

Back-Clamp.
Back-clamps you, which is his Heel in your Ham, with a defign to throw you backwards, fall in clofe to him with your Arms as for your about him, the Gripes ; bear upon him with Breaft and Chin, and kick your own Breech with your own Heel, with his feeble Heel in your ford Harr. ; and his Head and Shoulders will come to the Ground firft, that throwing him out of the Line of Direction.
your
when

WHEN

he

Adverfary

claps

(I.)
rS
right
when or

The Pinnion.
right

he hath his

Side,

and you get

Hand ; lift your der-bone turns his Arm together with the Twift of your right Hand upon his Wrift, or his left Hand being at your Right, take hold of his Wrift with your left Hand, and without
your
right

Arm upon your Shoulder,Arms, hold of his right Wrift with your Arm very high, and your Shoul

lifting up Hand, and

Arm,

only

gripe

hard

with your

left

Knuckles backwards, and pluck down wards ; and the higher his Hand-hold is, (as ifatyour Hair) the eafier 'cis to be taken, but it may be taken from your F 2 'Side
twift your

44
Side

Sir Thomas ParkynsY

Inn-Play

Wreftler.
plucking-

throwing your Arm on the infide of his, and his Elbow inwards with your other Hand, or it may be taken from your Elbow by holding his Wrift there, and turning your Arm over that which is held, or itmay be taken as in A the 6th; and be fure when you take this Hold don't let his Wrift go, until you are fure of the Hold. With whatfoever Arm you take the Pinnion, befure you bring your Hand of that Arm to his Elbow, which will prevent him from flipping from you, then can he neither rife nor fall without your Permiffion, and your other Fift is at liberty to box him or throw him forwards.

by

(K.)
i.

The Gripes,
laying
the
your right your

ARE nothing but


j[%.

fmall

Ribs,

and

putting

Arm amongft his left Hand to your right


when you

Arm,
gripe,
you
2.

to

augment your

your

Strength

get

Head

on

outfide

in griping ; and of his Arm,

then

may

lift

the better.

and

Never delay the Gripe, but get that as foon as you can, hold him ftrait, and your Head clofe to his Breaft, that he doth not give you his Elbow, and ftand low with your Knees bent and Toes out, and 'twillprevent Buttock, Backlock, In-lock, and Trip. one hath you up 3. When Belly to Belly, put your Knees upon his Thighs, and hold your Toes wide out, and your Legs beat-as_.ifyou was Kneeling ; but if you have one up fo, throw out your left Leg a great height, and fall upon him: and if he puts his Legs about your Thighs behind you, Cower down to throw him upon his Back ; and when you are both Belly to Belly, and he puts his right Leg behind your left Leg to lock you backwards, or the proper Term (Clamp you) kick your left Leg up backwards to your Breechi and erufh him, bear on his Breaft clofe with yourChin, and it throws him flat on his Back. 4. One having his Arm up ony our Collar, or further down

Sir Thomas Parkyns'* Inn-flay Wreftler. 45 down your Back, put your Hand down to the Elbow, with Armwhich he holds you, and bring your other Arm to his from thence proceed Pit, of which you hold his Elbow, and to the Gripes, but better in C the firft.
5.

one of his Arm into the Arm-Pit, being hollow of his, to keep him out, be fure as foon as he moves his hollow Arm, gripe him quick, or he may throw his Arm

When both
at your

of

his Arms

are at one

of

yours,

and you put your other

over your

Neck.

(A.)
1
Palm

A Method far
the
right as

the

Inn-Play.

HP A K E him by

being

upwards,
a
and

Hand with your Left, your ifyoudefign'd only to (hake

him

manner, at the beginning, and lift it upwards to make way for your Head, and put your Head under his right Arm- pit, and hold his Hand down to his left Side ; hold your Head ftiff back wards, to hold him out of his Strength, then put your right: Arm up to the Shoulder betwixt his Grainings, and let your Hand appear behind, paft his Breech- without taking hold :

by

the

Hand in

friendly

twift

it outwards,

but if
your

fufpect they'll cavil at that, as a breeching, lay you fame Arm along his Belly, and lift him up as high as in either Holds; when fo high, lean back your Head, and throw him over your Head, which is call'd the ward, and

bend

Hold, he will be apt to hold up and continue your way Twift, and ftep fharply with your left Foot to his Left, then throw your right Leg clever behind his, even to his right Heel ; and at the very fame time, with a fharp Stroke at the middle of his Breaft, with your right Elbow, that your Hand may reach his right Arm, throw him Head and right Shoulders over your right Thigh. your right 2. With Hand, having your Palm upwards, atake him by the left Wrift, your little Finger, and next
Or
when

Flying

Horfe.
you

twift

him in
;

that

or

lean

the

other

bouc

Sir Thomas ParkynsY/^-S0/^ Wreftler. bout his Thumb, his Palm being behind, or downward, then Hand down toward his left Knee, and turn his thruft your F ngers up backward, and with your left Hand help to hold his Fingers, whilft you fhift all your right Fingers round his Thumb, which hold up, and pain him till you pleafe to throw him forward, by laying your left Hand upon his Neck. And if his Palm be upwards and yours downwards, you help the Twift at the firft, with your left Hand, laying your Fingers upon his Wrift, and your Thumbupon his Knuckles and pain him eafily ; put your left Hand to his left Elbow,
46
and

pluck

it

inwards

till

his Arm falls

in

for

the

Pin

nion.

Set him your left Leg with a ftep at leaft three Quar a Yard ters forwards, bearing your whole Weight upon your Haunch or Leg, leaning backwards with your Body, twift your Body with your right Hand on your left Arm ; if he trips at your left Leg, fuddenly ftep into him with your Right (drawing your Left backwards) and play your left Leg loofe behind, with your left Elbow crofs over his Breaft, that your Hand may reach his left Arm, as in A the firft your Right
3.
of

did. You
near

be fure to make your Step with your left Leg, fo if he doth not trip at your Left, you may in at one Step eafily, with your Right to his Right, and ftep play the loofe Leg with your Left behind him,even to his left Heel, and with a lharp Stroke with your left Elbow fo far over his Breaft^ that your Hand may reach his left Arm, ftrike him backward over your left Thigh, as in A the firft3
muft

him,

that

him over your Right. Be fure to keep your left Arm clofe to your Body, that he getteth not his Arm betwixt your Arm and your Body, and keep it clofe, though he puts his on the outfide towards your Back, for then you are better for the Gripes; but if un awares he Arms betwixt yours and your Body, gets his
you

threw

4.

crufli

you,
your

lift yours up inwards, and when he fhrinks to Gripes, but don't let his Arm go that's betwixt Side and Arm, until you have your Arm about his

his,

and

take

the

middle.

And if he

gets

his Hand betwixt

your

Arm

and

Body

to

ut; nrd

Sir Thomas ParkjuiV


wards your
at

Inn-Way Wreftler.
that

47
and

Side,

you

may break

his Elbow, and our. 5. Holding both your Arms higher than your Head, bid him take what Hold he will, and be fure he'll come to gripe you; but us foon as his Arms are going about you, put your Arms under his, and take hold of both your Elbows, and lean backwards: let either of your Arms go, lean backward?, lifting your other up, and from thence take the Gripe. 6. If he take hold of your right Wrift with his right Hand, throw your left Arm on the infide of his right Arm, and take the Puinion, or throw your Liberty Elbow over his and in for the Gripes. Arm,
thrufting

hold by thrufting your Breech

fecuring

(B.)
rF
your right

Hold but

by

one

Arm.

Adverfary hath you by the Collar, with your Hand hold his Faft there by the Wrift, and with your left fort Elbow,prefs on the top of his Arm upon his feeble, betwixt your right Hand and his Elbow, or come quick over his Wrift for the Gripes, following him with your left Knee in his right Ham, and bear him backwards as in E. 11. Both of your Arms being at his Breaft, or either Arm at his Elbow, and he beareth at your Leg hard, and is ready to draw you over either Legs, ftrike his Leg with your con trary Knee againft his drawing Thigh, with the turn of your Body ; the fame way inclamp and catch his ftanding Leg with the fame Heel inwards, and bearing him backwards, throws
him
to
an

excellent and

ready Fall ;

or

if

you

fhift

either

his Back (under-hold)

then you

are

ready for
to

the

Arm In-!ock

with a

backwards or forwards, Draught.

Buttock,

or

return to

the

Trip

of thefe Falls, will lodge your Knee upon his Belly, if have a mind to difable him for Wreftling any more. 2. When he beareth at the outfide of your Leg, having you by the left Arm, take him up under your Arm, (Vide B

Any

you

the 4th.)

if he ftops it

by

putting his Arm along

your

Belly

48

Sir Thomas Pa rk y flay Wreftler. then go to the Flying Mare, and if he flops that, give him your Elbow under his Chin, if he offers to gripe from it. 3. If he hath you faft by the Side with either Arms, with
v&s.Inn-

the

fame Arm
Arm

of which

your

near the

Side he holds, then with the infide of Elbow, hold his Clofe to your Body, and
and moving round, Gripes fuddenly, when in if he hath hold of your right Side with and take the
to pluck you to

by lifting
you

it up,

and

leaning backwards,

may

torment

him

draws him to you ; his right Arm, and intends


right

Arm Gripes. 4. When

over

the outfide of

his

right

him, turn your Wrift, and in for the

both

of

you

have hold but

by

one

Arm,
the

and

that of your

Mare,
your

or take

Shoulder
Hand
to

to

left Side, bring your right Flying hold under his right Arm-pit, and your right his Right, bearing hard againft his Breaft with

Arm for

right

Elbow,
right

from

thence to the
as

Gripes,

or

your right

his

Shoulder,

in C

the 3d; or your right

his Breaft or Collar, as in C the 14th ; and if his right Arm hath hold of your left Side, you muft hold your left Elbow clofe, or as in B the 3d, or offer to lift his right Elbow^ up to take the Gripes; and if he refills you by holding his Elbow down, at the fame time turn over his Wrift with your left Arm and for the Gripes ; but if he hath hold of your Arm or Shoulder, you need not lift his Elbow, but turn over his Wrift, and if his Arm be pretty far over your Shoulder, lay the Edge of your right Arm upon

Hand

crofs upon

his,
or

and with your

put

your

Arm-pit,
latter
j.
end

Left laid upon your Right, prefshis down, Arm to his Elbow, and your Right to his left as in C the ift, but rather twift his Arm as in the of C the ift.

What firft Hold you have with one Hand, get your to his left Side, and foto the Gripes. 6. If you put your right Arm to his left Shoulder, and he takes hold of your right Arm, with both of his Arms, you drop your Right to his fide, and with your left Hand ftrike off his Elbow ; come for the Gripes, with your Knee in his Ham, bearing him backwards, as in C the 4th, 7. If you take hold of his right Shoulder, with your left Hand, and he has his Hands upon your right and left Shoul
right

Hand

ders.

Sir Thomas Parkyns'j


your right

Inn-flay

Wreftler.

49
right
your

his left Side, and over his ders, drop Wrift, with your left Arm, and in for the Gripes, with left Knee in his Ham, bearing him backwards.
to

Hand

(C.)
1.

Hold by both Arms.

T7JTHE N your Adverfary hath you by both Arms, and V V beareth at your left Leg, drop your right Arm, and take the Flying Mare ; or drop and lift him under your Arm, efpecially when he thrufts you backwards : but if he doth not bear at your Leg, drop your right Hand to his right Arm-pit, and your right Shoulder and your Head clofe to his Shoulder, fhift your Stand a little towards your Left, and if he doth
not
move

with

you,

venture

to get

the

out

Back-Lock,

or

the

Gripes,

which

is

the

fureft

; or get

his thus (efpecially when inftead of holding his Elbow and Arm-Pit, put your der,) Left hand on the outfide of his Right round to the infide of his, a little above his Wrift, and there hold, and your Right round on the outfide of his fame Arm, towards his Shoulder ; and with both your Arms and Shoulders you may twift him, or when one Hand is at his Elbow, the other at his Arm-Pit, either of your Arms over his Neck, accord you may throw ing as you fee your advantage ; or if his Arms be at your Side, and you have both Arms at his, take your Hand from his and lift under his Left Arm with your Left Arm-Pit, Hand, as in B the third : or when both your Arms are at one of his, whether at his Shoulder or Arm-Pit, be fure to thruft your Elbow againft his Breaft hard, and it will prevent his throwing his Arm over your Neck. 2. If his Right Hand be at your Side, you muft hold your Left Elbow clofe, and lift his Elbow to get the Gripes ; but if he refills you, by holding his Elbow down, at the fame time
one of

both your Arms to his hand is at your Shoul

turn over

his Wrift,

and

in for the G

Gripes,

and when

he hath
you

50
you

Sir Thomas

Parky nsY Inn-Play


with

Wreftler.
and you the

by
of

the

left Side,
at

his Right
time
with your

Hand,
over

fame
the

hold
and

him,

the

fame

turn

his Wrift
the

for
belt
to

Gripes,

pluck him to you but prefently lift him up;

Right Hand

Way
you

you need not pluck

him

Left Shoulder. if his Right Hand be can get, is to hold him by the Right 3. The belt hold you your Left Hand and your Right Hand upon his Elbow with
at your that you bear at his Left,and to ftop that to Leg throw you at the fame time, he muft claphis Right Knee into your left Ham, (being the hopping Leg) and bear you backwards getteth hold of one of your 4. And C the ift, When-one Arms with both his, if either of his is upon your Arm or Shoulder, then with your other Hand that's at liberty you may ftrikeat his Elbow, break his hold, and come in for the Gripes: but if one of his Hands hath hold under your Arm-Pit, you muft get your Elbow (that is, at liberty) into the Hollow of his Arm, that hath hold of yours, by the Arm-Pit, and when you fee your Ad thruft your Elbow from you, and get the (that is, if he holds his Elbow ftiff vantage, Gripes, out, but if he holds his Elbow low, and ftands clofe to you, turn over his Arm, and if high, he can't avoid the Gripes) and in all theParenthefes, or betwixt the two Half-Moons, you muft fuppofe his Hand to be upon your Shoulder, and not at

Right

with your

Shoulder, and at the fame Right, hop up with

time

your

Arm-pit. When one offers to come to your fide with his left Hand to gripe you, let him have faft hold of your fide, and at the fame rime take the crofs Buttock from the Under-hold, your Hand being paft the middle of his Waift or Back, for he'll humour and lean to the Buttock very well, upon ftriving to get the infide of your Arm and Side; or put your right Arm
your 5.

taking hold of his right Arm with your his Arm-Pit, pluck with your right and left Hands, and thruft him down with your Shoulder, or lift your Right Arm up under his Left ;and when you draw him to
under and

his left,

Right

towards

wards

you,

then gripe with your

him,

or

ftep

up

in

to

him

at the

fame
6. If

time,

and

lift

Arms

and

Thighs

as

in D

the

Fifth.

Sir Thomas
6. If
you

Parkyns'j-

Inn-Play Wreftler.
will
get the

<j i
Under-

are
a

fearful

your

Adverfary
him
your

Elbow under hisChin, little, hold, fly and from thence to his fide, with your Right, &c 7. If one hath your Arm betwixt his Side and Arm, fo that you can'c pluck it out, turn your Elbow upwards, and your Hand downwards, and it will turn it out. 8. When you have hold of your Adverfary by both Arms,
and give
you

back

may

drop
his,

either

with your other

Elbow
the

Arm
9.

and go to as

Sides, and come over his Wrift Arm, for the Gripes ; or drop one Flying Mare, drop and go both Arms
to

his

and

-or

C the firft. both your Shoulders, with both his Hands, and would throw his Head in your Face, drop your Right, and take him by the right Wrift, and hold your El bow againft his Face, then lift up your left Arm and twift it with your Right, and take the Pinnion ; Or drop your Right for the Flying Mare, but if he be a heavy ftrong Man, and fo high, that will not eafily come, but holdeth up his Arm you cannot lift your Elbow above his Arm, to help you to take
to one of

is

the

latter

end of

If he hath

you

by

Pinnion, then if you have hold of his right Wrift with your Wrift hard, being at your left right Hand, gripe his right and lift up your left Hand as high above his Right, Shoulder, 'tis the and turn your Face and Body towards the Right; for and the Turn of your Body which turneth his Shoulder-bone,
the

Hand for
10.

the

Pinnion.

Having one by the right Elbow, and your right Hand at his Back, ftep up with your left Leg betwixt his Legs, and with your Arms, Breads, and right Knee, againft the lower Part of his Thigh, raife him, and throw him, as in D the Fourth ; and if he thrufts you backwards, when you have this Hold, move tideways towards your Left, and fo to the Gripes, but part not with his right Elbow till you have
them.

Arm at his fide, and your Left he lies out, having his Head againft your Breaft, throw your Elbow Arm over his Neck, and bear him down, or when one hath both his Arms at your Sides, and throws G 2
n.

If

you

have

your right

at

his

Elbow,

and

52

Sir Thomas Parkyns'i


his Head
againft your right and your

Inn-Play

Wreftler.

throws
your

put your left Arm to Arm over his Head, and Elbow, prefs your right Elbow upon the Brawn of his right Arm, or and lift it up, and fo to put your right under his left Wrift, the Gripes, as in B the Third. you have 12. When hold of his Elbow with your left Hand, and your right at his fide, be fure you get your right Shoulder clofe to his right Shoulder ; and if he offers to get his Elbow-arm round your Neck, fuddenly throw your Head his up and Body, and prevent him by lifting him out of all thefe Holds from that Strength fuddenly, and you may take Hold, when he offers to bring his left Arm within your Right to your Side [viz,-l the ftepping up, Crofs buttock, Flying Mare, and the Crufh, (/. e.) your right Arm being under his Left, and take hold of his Right with your Right, &c. as in C the Fifth, and Eibows to his Chin, and from his Chin to the Gripes. 13. Be fure to fecure his right Elbow with your left Hand, and keep your left Elbow clofe to your Body, that he gets not his right Arm about your Back, and get your Right to the then may you bear at his middle of the fmall of his Back ; Leg, and take the Buttock, &c. Vide A the 4th, and C the 2d and 10th, and D the 4th and if they, having this Hold,

Breaft,
right

bear

over and lift their Elbow up, and Or inftead of holding his right Elbow with your left Hand, put your left Hand under his Right to the Waiftband of his Breeches ; then may you trip, ftep up, or you may lift your left Hand up higher, and crufh his right Arm betwixt your Body and left Arm, and from thence to the Gripes, as in C the 5th. 14. Having one by his right Elbow, put your right Hand to his Elbow or Breaft, and turn your right Elbow as high as his Head, and your right Arm will be clofe to the left fide of his Face; fo that if he offers to come over your right Elbow, he at
your

Leg, hop

get the

Gripes.

throws
can

he

himfelf, being
come

out of the

Line
to

of

Direction
this

neither

in for

the

Gripes. But
your

break
on the

Hold

(being
a greac

one of

the

belt)

link both

Hands

outfide,

way

Sir Thomas ParkynsV Inn- flay Wreftler.


way
to
above

55
you,
and

his bent that,

Elbow,
foon

and

draw him down


fee
either of

to

prevent

as

as you

above and to which

your

the

Elbow, drop your bent Gripes, or flip your bent

his Arms move to his fide, Elbow under his Chin,


Elbow-arm

in that Hold is more natural. 15. If your Adverfary taketh hold of your right Wrift, with both of his Hands, throw your left Arm into the infide of his right Arm, and take the Pinnion and Gripes ; or if he holds by your Breaft, his Wrifts being crofs, to break that Hold, take hold of his uppermoft Wrift, and take the Pinnion, or lay both your Arms edgeways upon his, and crufh them down wards towards your Breaft, fall in for the Gripes and Cornifh, Hug Belly to Belly, lift him and throw him.

(D.)
NEver
take the upper
either of

The Buttock.
Hold
with either of

the

Arms,

over

his Shoulders but when you can fafely and adfecure his Head either backwards or forwards. vantageoufly Never take the In-lock backwards or forwards, or the But tock, from the upper Hold ; for if your Adverfary has a loofe and tender Waiftcoat and Shirt, you'll pluck the firft over his Head, and the latter even out at his Breeches, which will deceive you, whilft you have only a firm Hold at his Elbow ; and the other being loofe, will fooner. occafion your falling than his, which was my Friend Richard 's Cafe, at Repton Wreftling. Whereas if you would give any of the abovementioned Falls from the under Hold, having faft hold of his Elbow, with one of your Hands, and the other Hand under his Arm, paft the middle of his Waift, let his Waiftcoat and Shirt be ne'er fo tender and loofe, they can't deceive you, but you'll give him the Fall, Vide C5.
Allen'

1.

Be fure

to gripe

him

hard,

and

ftand

with the

that

Toe

out

and

Leg bent,

over which

he intends

to take

Buttock,

or

Back-lock ;

then with your other

Knee in his Ham,

and your

Arm

Sir Thomas Parky nsY Itm- flay Wreftler. Arm upon his furthermoft Shoulder, pluck him backwards ; but a better way to prevent the Buttock and Back-lock, Vide
54

In-lock
2.

the 2d.

his

Having him by both Elbows, turn your right Arm over Left, and get fall hold of the middle of his Back, and

Buttock at the fame time. When your left Hand is at his right Elbow, and your right at or paft the middle of his Back or Waift, turn in your Breech in his Lap, and fet your right Foot beyond his Right, and fet it faft on the Ground, [with all the Quicknefs imagi nable, as every thing muft be perform'd] but don't offer to turn him, till you have raifed him with your Breech in his Lap ; then pluck his right Arm down, and bend with your Body, and throw him over your Buttock. But if you offer to throw him by bearing him forward, before you raife him off from the Ground, with your Breech in his Lap, he will be apt to Fore-foot you, by putting his right Leg before you:J} and throw
take the
3.

Nofe. If he offers to get the infide of your Arm, that hath hold of his Back, as foon as he hath hold of your Side, [for then he's out of the Line of Direction, and humours that Fall] take the Buttock, being one of the fureft Holds; or elfe let hm take his infide Hold faft, then drop your right Arm urder hs Left, and take hold of his right Arm-pit, and crufh his Arm, by bearing upon him with your Shoulder ; take the Ad vantage of the Back-lock, Vide C the ift. 5. When you have thrown him once upon the Buttock, the next time, having him by the right Elbow and left Side, and your right Shoulder clofe to his right, ftep in with your left Leg the infide of his Right, and with your left Shoulder thruft him, and with your lefc Hand thruft up his Elbow, and with your right Hand pluck down his Side, and the next time ftep up, and lift with Arms, Breaft and Thighs, Vide C
you
on your
4.

the 10th.

6. When

ing
him

at your

or

he offers to take the Buttock, his right Hand be Back or Elbow, juft as he turns his Body, gr^pe lift him out of his Strength; and if he takes his Hand
away

Sir Thomas Pavkyns's


away from
your

Inn-

flay Wreftler.

55
the
of

Back,

then affure yourfelf


with

Flying-Mare,
his Back.

then

ftop

your

he intends for Fift juft in the Small

(E.) The
i.rTpO

In- Lock.
you would take

prevent

his

JL In-Iock,
far
as

put your
until your

lifting you when locking Toe


Thigh is

the
as
and

betwixt his Legs

you

can,

clofe to

his

Grainings,

keep that Toe upon the Ground ; but if he chance to lift you, (as he may if he gripes you hard) hold your other Leg wide out, and as foon as he fets you down, take the Buttock, or when
he lifts you, lock him both ways; and to break that, when both ways, ftretch that Leg out (which is are lock'd lock'd on the infide) with a Spring, and pluck him back by the neareft Shoulder, you may prevent the In-lock by ftanding ftiff upon your Knee-Joynt, and turning your Toe out. 2. You may break the In-lock by the Spring, or turning your Toe out ; and a little after you fpring his Leg out, lift him and and hitch him up higher, clap your Hand upon his But tock to throw him. 3. If you will let him take the In-lock, lift him, but ftand on both Legs a while with him up, then let his Liberty Toe to the Ground to eafe yourfelf; then fpring his Leg our, and hitch him higher and throw him, or rather throw your Lock Leg out with a Spring, and clap him upon the Buttocks, or at the fame time that he's ftepping up to turn you, ftanding low before, fink low and yield forwards with that Leg he took the Lock on ; or if you will not lift him, throw your lock'd Leg againft his ftanding Toe, and lift with all at the fame time
you

a good way.
4. If you Spring him out, and he putteth the Spring Leg behind the other to throw you, keep the Leg on the Ground that he ftrikes at ; and leaning the contrary way, ftretch your Leg out, and pluck him backwards by the neareft Shoulder.

5.

If

56
5.
you

Sir Thomas Parky nsY


If
you

Inn-

flay
and

Wreftler.
offer to pufh

have

one

in

the time

In-lock,
leave

they

forwards,
the

at the

fame
the
and

your

Lock,

and take

the

Buttock. 6. You
take

muft pluck

neareft

Shoulder,
the
when

when

he
as

would

Back-lock,

fometimes in

In-lock,
taketh
the

in E

the

fourth,
tock.
7.

but the fartheft Shoulder ;


offers

he in

the

But
clap

If he

to throw

you

forwards

In-lock,
will

your

Fift in

the
or

fmall

the

Shoulder,

hop

his Back, and pluck him back by full forwards with your ftanding Leg,
of

bear and der you. 8. Put

prefs

hard

yourfelf upon

him,

and

he

fall

un

your right
proffer

Arm
the

over

his left Shoulder

towards

his

Back,

and

at

your Right about his Right Leg before his. p. When one hath the In-lock of your right or left Leg, at the fame time he fteps in with his other Leg to turn you, throw your liberty Leg behind on the infide of his ftepping in Leg, and you'll fave your felf, and throw him on his Back. If your Adverfary taketh the In-lock from the upper hold, be fure you put your Head on the outfide of his Arm, toward his Back, (otherwife he may catch your Head with his Arm and hurt you,) and ftand up clofe with your Body to his Locking Leg, and as foon as he fteppeth up with his other Leg, and lifteth you up to turn you, as you are turning, lift your lock'd Leg up inwards towards the Knee of your other Leg (as if you was lifting your Leg from off the hanging Trippit at Arms end,) and 'twill throw his locking Leg out. Then may you by drawing him up, (with lifting) ftrike at his farthermoft Leg, and throw him either backwards or forwards and follow him a great! way either ways. But if he ftandeth to throw you forwards, from the In-lock, hop forwards and he cannot throw you ; and beware, for if he perceiveth he cannot throw you forwards, he'll try to throw you backwards as before, and if he taketh the Buttock or Back-Lock, ftrike at his Leg or Ham with which he locketh you, with your Knee that is

In-lock; then put your left Arm to Neck, and crufh him down, and put your

at

Sir Thomas Parkyns'j


at

Inn-flay Wreftler.
backwards,
the

57

liberty,

then you

him

by

the

may eafily bear him farthermoft Shoulder: This is

plucking very belt wayto


or

throw him that taketh the In-Lock, Back Lock with very little lifting..

Backwards, Buttock,

(F)
1.
_L

The

Out-Play
a

or

Loofe Leg.

rX^Here's
the

perfect

as well as

in Phyfick,
are
to

Crifis, or true timing in Wreftling which the Inn-Players, as well


obferve,
when

as

Out-Players,

their

Adverfaries Adverfa
themfelves

even throw themfelves.

The Out-Players ry at Trip, &c. muft


out of the

and

fuch

as would throw their when

obferve that
either

they

put

crofting

ing,
their
their
1.

or

by moving at Arm's End, of Legs, or Counterpoifing as they defign the Bear Draught by the Arms, or Tripping and drawing paft
Line
of

Direction,

Line of Direction ; then's the loofe Leg, and trip, or ftrike at Stand ftraight and wide, but

perfect their not

Crifis

to

catch at

ftanding

out of

Leg. your ftrength

with your

Toe

out,

and your

Leg

that

he

trippeth at, fome-

backwards ; and as he moves round, move you too, and bear at his Leg he moves, when you obferve he's paft the Line of Direction ; but don't bear with your Body and Arms, touch his Leg with yours, then do it with a fuduntil you
what

den Jerk.
3.

When
take

you
your

bear

don't
the

take the

Leg hanging Trip


any
one

any one's Leg, and away, but move a little


at

can't

fetch them,

on one

fide,

and

but

then

have

a care

they

neither take

Buttock,
When

nor you under their

Arm.

4.

hath

moft, fwing it back, and ftrike at his ftanding Leg. 5. If one Trips at you,
enough

Leg up, yours being the infuddenly with your ftanding Leg
your

and

you

think you can't

to get the

Outfide

of

his

Leg, by
ftrike

the

be fure

then at the

fame

time you

at

be quick Loofe Leg Play, his ftanding Leg ;


or

58
or if Toe other

Sir Thomas ParkyasY


one
on

Jnn-PUy Wreftler.

Leg, and you flop it by putting your ftanding Leg, as foon as he fets his remove your Leg from the infide to the out Leg down,
bears
at your

the

infide

of

his

fide,

and

bear at his Leg.


one taketh

6. When

the

hanging Trippet,
and

bend but

your

Knee forwards againft hisLeg, let him take it, turn in to him
under
your

it

preventeth

it;

or

if

you

the other

Way,
at

and

take

him

Arm,

or

throw your

Leg

liberty

behind his

ftanding Leg. 7. To prevent the Trip, ftand low with your Toes out, to kick you, meet his Shins with your and when he offers Knees; but if he be ready to draw you, meet his Thigh with your contrary Knee, and ftrike his Leg off, and at the fame Time let your Arm come down to the middle of his Back:
when you you ready for the In-Clamp. fteppingup, Buttock, In-Lock, 8. But if you intend to fhift, and play the Loofe Leg, don't (ftand wide as in) but narrow and loofe, and fet your Leg

have ftruck his Leg off,


or

then are
or

which

he

defigneth

to

Trip, inmoft,
and

may know

by

the

Hold he

taketh on you :)

his Foot to draw you over, throw your Heel Leg backwards, as if you would kneel upon his Leg ; then may of his Leg, or down quick with you, if quick, catch the outfide recover your ftand. yours to the Ground, and
your

Leg

which

you

fet backwards,

(which you eafily ftand faft on that fo foon as he toucheth

with

A Contentious Man.
IF
Collar
you

have
be

Companion

that

difturbs
put

your

Mirth,
hold

and

wou'd

rid of
and

him,

with your

left Hand

take

of

his

between his Legs as far as his Codpifs, and lift him up eafily, and thruft him out of the Room, for he can never turn upon you, but if you life him too hard, you'll throw him on his Nofe.

behind,

with your right

(G)

Sir Thomas Parkynslr

Inn-Play Wreftler.

59

(G)
I.

Boxing.

TD Y

JD

at

Battle, by

means have the firft Blow with your Head or Fift his Breaft, rather than at his Face ; which is half the reafon it ftrikes the Wind out of his body.
-11

2. If you have long Hair, foap it : The beft Holds are the Pinnion with your Arms at his Shoulders, and your Head in his Face, or get your right Arm under his Chin, and your Left behind his Neck, and let your Arms clofe his Neck ftrait, by holding each Elbow with the contrary Hand, and crufh his Neck, your Fingers in his Eyes, and your Fingers of your right Hand under his Chin, and your left Hand under the hinder Part of his Head ; or twift his Head round by putting your Hand to the fide of his Face, and the other behind his Head. But if your Adverfary taketh faft hold with each of his Hands of each Side of the Collar, and thrufteth his Thumbs

not

that you may Hand hold his faft there by the Wrift, and with the left Fort Elbow, prefs on the top of his Arm upon his Feeble, betwixt your right Hand and his Elbow, or quick over his Wrift for the Gripes. Or proceed for the Pinnion as in Pag. 43. or if he hath his Hands at your Hair, and he thrufteth his Thumbs in your
againft
yeur

Throat

and

Windpipe, fpeedily

want

Wind,

with

your right

Eyes,

you proceed after the

foregoing Method.

M-

6o

Sir Thomas ParkynsV Inn-Play- Wreftler.

INDENTED ARTICLES, Perfons fhall Wreftle for a Sum


JRIICLES
agreed
1714.

That two of Money.


concluded and

ofjgreement

bad, made,

upon, the

AnnoDom. 'Day of Between William Alexander, of

in the County (/Cornwall, on the fart and 'Behalf in the faid County, of of David Cornifli of the one fart ; and Henry Lightfoot of in the County of'Norfolk, on the fart and Behalf in the faid County of of Abraham Bull of

Norfolk, on the other fart, asfolloweth.


WHEREAS it is
ties,
tween that a
the faid
agreed

by

and

Wreftling- Match

between the faid Par fhall be had, by and be


upon

David

Cornifh,

and the

faid Abraham Bull,


next,
and

the

intent and meaning of the faid and between the faid William Alexan Lightfoot, that if either the faid David Cornifh, or Abraham Bull, when they Wreftle, fhall Fall upon two Joynts, to be 'accounted a Foil ; but if they fall upon any to be accounted a fair Fall, and not part of their Bodies, therwife : Therefore now it is agreed by and between the faid that a Meeting fhall be had on or upon the Parties, in attheHoufe of Day of in the faid County, on or about the Town of eleven and one of the Clock, of the fame Day. Item, the faid William Alexander does Promife, Covenant and Agree to and with the faid Henry Lightfoot, then and there to depofite into the Hands of T. J^.the Sum of twenty Guineas of good and law
the true

Day

of

in

order to

underftanding Parties, it is agreed by der, and the faid Henry

the

o-

ful

Sir Thomas Parky ns\r Inn- flay Wreftler.


ful for

61

Money
on

of

Great-

Britain,

the

Wager

agreed to

the

part of the

faid David Cornifh

; and

the

be Wreftled faid Henry

Lightfoot does alfo Covenant, Promife, and Agree, with the faid William Alexander, then and there to depofite into the hands of T". W. the Sum of twenty Guineas, of like Lawful Money, the Wager agreed to be Wreftled for on the part of Abraham Bull. the faid Item, It is agreed by and between the faid Parties, that fome convenient piece of Ground near to be fet out the Houfe of L. M. in the Town of
and Henry Ring, for the faid Abraham Bull and David Cornifh co Wreftle in, and the Ring to contain at leaft Thirty Yards Diameter, and that no Perfon be ad and

appointed and

by

the

faid William
a round

Alexander

Lightfoot,

Roped in

mitted

in

the

Ring,
of

but David Cornifh


on
the

and

R. H.

of

in

the

County

Sidefman,
part
as
of

chofen

by

the
and

faid
the

Sidefman chofen by the faid Henry Lightfoot, on the part of Abraham Bull. And fuch as they fhall chufe to beat out and maintain the Ring, not exceeding fix of each fide, and that they fhall not come nearer the Gamefters than ten Yards,unlefs to defend them from Infults; and if in cafe any Differences fhall happen, that the faid R.HandS,P. can't Determine, then they fhall be referr'd folely to the Deoifion of G. H Gentleman, as UM PIRE ; and that if the faid R. H. and S. P. or either of than refufe to act as Sidefmen, on the behalf of the faid Parties of them, that then the faid David to thefe Prefents, or either Cornifh and Abraham Bull, fhall and may be at liberty to chufe any other Perfon or Perfons then prefent, on the faid as and for a Sidefman or Sidefmen on Day of the behalf of them, the faid David Cornifh and Abraham Bull. Item, It is agreed by and between the faid Parties, and the faid William Alexander doth Covenant, Promife and Agree, to and with the faid Henry Lightflot, that if the faid Abra ham Bull fhall throw the faid David Cornifh the firft three Falls, or give him nine Foils, three Foils to be accounted one Fall, or throw him a Fall or Falls, and giv. him Foils befides
and

William Alexander faid Abraham Bull

David Cornifh ;

S. P.

62

Sir Thomas ParkynsY Inn- flay Wreftler.


to
amount

fuch Fall or Falls to three Falls, that then the faid Henry Lightfoot fhall have and receive the faid two feveral Sums of Twenty Guineas, fo to be depofited into the hands of the faid T'.W. And the faid Henry Lightfoot does alfo Covenant, Promife and Agree to and with the faid William Alexander, that if the faid David Cornifh, doth and fhall throw the faid Abraham Bull the firft three Falls, or give him nine Foils,(three Foils to be accounted one Fall) or throw him or Falls, and give him Foils befides, enough to amount a fuch Fall or Falls to three Falls ; that then the faid William Alexander fhall have and receive the faid two faid feveral Sums of Twenty Guineas, fo depofited into the Hands of the faid r. W. And laftly, It is agreed by and between the faid Parties, and the faid William Alexander and Henry Lightfoot, do Cove nant Promife and Agree each with the other, that if in cafe either of the faid Parties hereto, refufe to perform the Articles, Covenants, and Agreements, hereby, herein before fpecified,

fides enough,

-Fall

according
then

to

the

intent,
other,
to

and

true

meaning
upon

thereof,

that

the
and of

faid
pay

Party
to

fo refufing to
be

perform the

fame,

fhall for
the

feit
Sum

the

immediately
paid upon

fuch refufal,

five ^ound,
to
above

fo refufing Parties firft


and

perform

the

fame.
thefe

named

to

Seals

have hereunto put,

the

In Witnefs whereof, the ARTICLES their Hands Day and Year firft above

Demand, by fuch Party

Written.

Sealed
in

and

the

Delivered Prefence of

William Alexander.

Henry

Lightfoot.

John Goodheart. Peter Throwall. N. B.


the

To

make

thefe

they may be Wreftled for.

-with

Noverint

Conditions

indented

Wreftling Articles yet more flrong, Univerfi, &c. and the Breach of Penal by made doubling the Sum
Rules

(<5_)

Rules

Conditions, which were to be obferv'd and performed by all and every Gamefter, who Wreftled for a Hat of twenty two Shillings frice; a free frize, which was given by Sir Thomas Parkyns of
and

Bart. for fifteenTears fucceffively. The Gamefters which were allowed to Wrefile for the aforefaid frize, were to have it, if fairly won,

Bunny

according to the following


I.

Rules.

two Gamefters that Wreftle together, fhall be fairly chofen by Lot, or Scrutiny, according X to the ufual Practice. 2. The faid two Gamefters fhall Wreftle till one of them be thrown three Falls, and he that 13 firft thrown three Falls, fhall go out, and not be allow'd to Wreftle again for this Prize : And it is hereby ordered and agreed, that he who firft comes with two Joynts at once to the Ground, (as Joynts are com monly reckon'd in Wreftling) fhall be reputed to be thrown a Fall. 3. No Gamefter fhall hire another to yield to him upon any condition whatsoever; and if any fuch Practice be disco vered, neither of them fhall be capable of the Prize. 4. But he that ftands the longeft and is not thrown out by any one, (hall have the Prize, provided he does not forfeit his right, by breach of thefe Rules; if he do, the Gamefter that ftands the longeft, and obferves thefe Rules, fhall have

Impf * 'HE

it.
If any Differences fhall happen concerning the Wreftling, they fhall be determined by two Men, which fhall be chofen by the moft Voices of the Gamefters, before they begin to Wreftle ; and in cafe they can't decide fuch Differences, then they fhall be referr'd folely to the Decifion of the faid Sir
5.

Thomas Parkyns

as

UMPIRE.

6. He

(<*4 >
Wins the Prize and Sells it, fhall be uncapable of here any more. Wreftling 7. That none fhall have the Prize, that Wreftle with Shoes that have any fort of Nails of Iron or Brafs in them. 8. He alfo that Winneth the Prize one Year, fhall be Ex cluded from Wreftling for it the Year following, but the next year after that, viz,, the third inclufive the firft, he may put in and Wreftle for the Prize again ; and ever after that, unlefs he fhall Win a fecond Prize, and from that time ever after
6. He
that

Excluded.
o.

can't

fay

with the en

enterprizing Moderns in
and
off

Arts,
that

that

they

perform'd all

faffant,
a

hand

But

took

pains to

bring Wreftling into

method,

and that

Finis Coronat Opus.

W^W'^pz

Hold but by me Arm to his R'gi.t.

your

Left
47

N
Men

"what

Drefs to be ready to

Adverfary Right
Left

at your

leftfide.
48.

meet y(ur

Adverfary
make

p. 41.

would reftore

their Adver
18.

Aim laid
at

upon

your

Right
48;
48

fary they
His Advice

kill
14,
to new

to augment y>w

Strength

Ambidexters to

18 18.

Left Aim

hit Elbow

Beginners

JEneas
tion

made a pompous

C lebra-

by

the

of his Father's Funeral Gymunflick Games 4. of Hucknal


an
continu'd

Tcur Adverjaiyhau.- hdd by both Arms 48. Both your Arms to one of his
48.

49

50.

Allen

Arm Tour

Adverfary'

over your

'j Neck
49-

many years ler


Apothecaries

Inn-Play Wreft
17.
right

Arm

to

his left Shoul


48.
right

deftroy'd

3.

Both Arms higher than your Head to invite your Adverfa 46. ry to take the Underhold Both
Arms

der Both his Arms to your


Arm
oaught

A',

48

57-

his Arms going


avoided

about your 46.


47.

Waift
at

betwixt yvur Arm and Side hew difengag'd 50.


verfwfs
your

his

Breaft
you

Having
Arms

Adverfary bj

both
50.
,

Breaft by the Adverfary having


Arms
crofs at your

52.

left
47.

Arm

Stepping up and lifti- g and Breaft

with sz

ns t.

Adverfary s
right

right

Arm

at your
47.'

fide

Mr. Tunftall tothe Author 5. Article* for a Sum <f Money.


60. 61, 6z

Fora Priz.e

6z. 63, B.

INDEX.
B
)Acklock and Buttock 53, 54 New Beginners eafieftto be taught to beperfeSi in all Holds
and
compleat

A Contentious Man in Company


how
manag'd
50

There's

Crifis in
in

well as

__

Wreftling as Phyfick, and in moft


1

humane

Affairs

4, 5 7
12

Wreftlers
your

14
47

Country

Life

Arms

his Breaft Arms crofs at Adv.


at

Breaft
47,
5*

Head againft

your

Breaft

Betty

to

Belly
47, 51,

56

Wreftler

Difarming
at

his

Adverfary
and

fmaU
34 deftn'd
ibid.

Buttock Crofs-Buttock

53, 54
50
50

Sword

33,

taken from the un

Diftortion
p.

Strain

der Hold

38.

its Caufe s

Boxing
Right
at

Tour left Hand at your Adver fary's right Elbow, and your
his Elbow
perform'

or

Breaft
56

Buttock truly

Doctors and Apothecaries ten d ufelefs by Wreftling 3 Draught 47 Exctfftve Drinking to be avoiaed becaufe it enervate* 1 j SVV John Floyer with the Au thor's Perfuafive againft Drinkder'

ing

15,1^,17
of ufe in Duels 17

Wrefiling
ELbow
under

his Chin to pre

vent the

Gripes

47,

52

Back

Clamp

what and

how
43,

to

be

THE
V andy

taken

%6

(harp
and

ftroke of

the

Chirurgeons little to do with Wreftlers p. 3 with low Heels 37.38, 30, 40 Lov-heel'd Sloes never caufe Corns 3
.

Elbow

demonftrated Moxon
Stroke
upon

by
2

Elbow

right

the

Breaft

35>45

Inn

Clamp what, and

how

to

be
57

taken

43, 47
46.

Elbow ftruck off, p. 48. Sect. 6. p. 40. Sect. 4. Elbow can't be ftruck eff if his
Hand be
at your Arm- pit

Collar Hold.

Elbow
the

5o
^2

under

his Chin

to prevent

Gripes

^.-j}

Hold

INDEX.
Hold

by both

his Elbows
after and

53
with

Gripes

Exercife

often

both Hands

that

they may be
18

how d and prevent ed 47. Seel. 2. by Elbow un der bis Chin 52

flop'

Ambidexters 14, Wuat Food for Exercife 1 2,

16

H
Abiliment
a
requifite

Not

to

exercife

upon

a full

Sto
16 and

mach

12,

ejfentiaiy ntuffary for Wreftler 37 Hands and Legs not made j or "0
Feeble
prevent

his
your

throwing
Face 5 o 47
and

Card*

and

his Head in

His Hands hold on your Collar how


The Reafon
of

Dancing

only
each

3 Side

broken off
47
48>4S>

Wrefiling
all

ufeful

in

Fencing

forts of Swords
and

33
vesical

the

Hammer

Fencing

ftatical Figures
in
the
to

driving
Parrying
as

the

Nail
48

25
,Sec~l.

Fift
10

fmall of

the

35 Back

Tuur Knee in his Ham


with the

left Hand 3 3
p.

flop

the

Flying
the

Mare 47, 5 4
the

in

Figures 8.

p.

Fiji in
wards

the

fmall of

Back

tour Right Hand


Side

to

his
48,

left
53

(lop
to

Inn-Lock

for
5f
41 42

Adverfary
Hand

taken

by

the

Right
Left Right
45
the
right
45

Horfe what be taken how Food proper for Wreftlers.

Flying

with your

Left 4 1 , 44

1o

Adverfary Wrift
Hand

taken
with

by
your you

the

Fort.

47

Adverfary
right

taketh

by

Wrift

with

his

Hand

GEntlemeu
learn Wages
to

encouraged

to
1

Wreftle
required

His Hands in difengag'd


His Hands
on

the

Hair how 59, 60


your

Grammarian
with

another's

double Scho
15

both
at

Shoul
50
50

lar
Gripes
what
are

ders Tour right Hand

48, his Side


you

the

Cornifh Hugg,
to

and

how

be

taken
50.

Adverfary right Wrift


Hands

taketh

by

the

with

both

his

43,44, 4^47.48,4,

52

(Si,

5h

Si-

2-

Twr.

INDEXTour

his Elbow his Side your Right at aud taken from Holds what Left Hand
at

Tour Knee in Ham

your

Adv -rfary 48,

j?

thence

51,
not proper

58
40

High

Heels

38,

Low-heel'd

Shoes

never

caufe

LEgs

and

Corns

38,
3.

40

Cards

Hands ir: and Da

made

for

ing

Heroes Honours p. vent his fecuring

To

pre

your

Head
51

Head againft his Breaft 'Tis effential and neceffary


quick
all

to

51 be 14 5o

in

breaking

and

taking

Holds
commended dif
as a

Under Hold to prevent


Upper- Hold

Tour Left Hand at y, ur fary's right Elbi w, your right at his Elbow or B.eaft 51 Left Leg fet to invite your Ad verfary to trip at, how ftipt, and him thrown 45 Left Leg thrown behind to his

only 3 Adver

Upper-Hold

Falfifie

Flying Horfe,
be in
taken
your

p. 41 42.

53 56 How to
41 42

left Heel
Right

46

Leg

thrown

behind to his
4J
22 and

right

Heel
with

Lever

applied to

To prevent his throwing his Head


Face
5o

Lifting

Wreftling Arms, Breaft

Thighs

54

1a Country Life Stepping up andlifting with Arms


and

Thighs,^.

50. with

Arms
52
Out-

JAcob
gel

vreftled with an

An
20

and

Breaft
Leg
or

Poflure for loofe

and Smatterers e ploded 13 The difference between an Igno

Ignorants

Play Luctamur
unftis

Achivis

57

dochus
*, 37

rant and an

Artift

14 47
1

Inn-lock

when to take

Inn-play commended
K

MAndy rtK^Moxon'/Afechanical

contentious

Neel

upon

his

Leg

and
as

hop
in

how

Powers 23 Aha in company


5q

managed

over,

p.

52.

or

43,44

Flying

INDEX.

Fly

ng Mare
taken

what andhowtobe

Pcfture the firft in

45, 47

A fecure Pcfture

Wreftling
to
meet

41 your

Flying Mare, Stop'd, Flying Mare p. 47.


Borellus
Prize
s

47, 54

Sect.
48, 5,

4.

Adverfary, and prevent Trip, Camp, and ftand low with your
your

51

ftatical Motions
p.

Money Articles,

60,

23 For a

Elbows clofe to your fides, and Hands extended ftreight

<?3

forwards in a right Angle from your Elbows, with a full


and not

N
TH E Reafon of
mer

thin

Body,

as

in Fen
45

the

driving
O

the

Ham Nail 25

cing A 4. and in 41 , Pofture for loofe Leg Prize Articles

Pag.
j7

o"j

f"\U
Out-

T-Play
perform'

difcommended
d
45, 47

Wreftlers

feldom
or

Ojtarrelfome
ip
contentious

Play

quarrelfome

Man in nag 'd

Company
R

how

ma-

j0

PAlm

only Reward given to ViElors at Wreft 8 ling with the left Hand p. Partying 33. as in Figures 36 8, o. Avoid Paffton, which deftroys your Judgment 1 5
was the

YOur left Hand at


verfary's
your
right

your

Ad
or

Right

at

his Elbow

Elbow,
f2

Breaft

Peitathlu'n, what Piety the firft Thing


braced
kn

i_

to

be
to

em 1 1

Pinnion what,
43-

and

how

be

L L of Sauces JL Se Defenden^o

10

ta-

What Shoes for


Shut
v

Wreftler
N-k

19
37
and 41

Toe Turn of the Shoulder-bone for the Pi'm.i n r j


The
f>ut

45,46", 50,

J2.

wibauw

at

Wl(iS

Riufn of

Tour Adverfary's Hands


your

cnbnh
4S -)0

Power by Engines

emreaftng
23, &g.

Shoulders

Tour

I N D E X.
Tour
right

Arm

to

his Left
4S

Surgeon r \uill have little


with

t<>

d&
3

Shoulder

Wreftlers

"The Turn of the Shoulder-bone for the Pinnion 5 1 Pluck by thefurthermoft Shoul der to prevent the Buttock or Back-lock 53 Pluck by the nearmoft Shoulder} when he would take the lock or Inn- lock 55 Adv. right Arm at your right

TO

teach
and

the

miftaught,

hard

Many dig
their
to

their

difficult Graves
what
and

14
with

Teeth
taken

Hanging Trippet
be

ho iu
42

Side,
His
right
r

p.

4 7.

Sect.
at your

3.

Trip
A fecure Pofture
,

47
to
meet

Arm
,

left Side
48

your

Adverfary's Arm how broken off

at

your

fide
47

Adverfary and Trip, Camp, and


with
your

to

prevent

ftand low
to your
extend
a
right

46.

Elbows

clofe

Smatterers

exploded

ing,
in

in Fencing, Wreftling

iu Garden in Fidling,
1

fides,

Hands ed ftreight forwards in


and your

Angle, from
as

your

Small Sword applied to


Sprains
p. 37.
occafioned

Wreftling
22

with a full and not thin

Elbows, Body,
and

in

Never

by

by high Heels low Heels 38


defin'd,
38

Fencing,
p.

the

4th,

in 41. 46". Mr. Tunftall

58.

to the

Author
enough

Sprain

3
be
54

and

Diftortion
p. 39.

Twift
left

him down
his

its Caufes

by flopping your
ycur

Sprains cured,
10. p. 41.

Vid. Fig.

Leg full far

twixt

His Thumbs in
and veclical

Eyes how
59, <fa.

Fencing, ftatical,
Figures

dfingag'd

35 Stepping up and lifting with Arms and Thighs, p. 50. Arm's and

u.

Breaft Step up
Stilliard

5
with

your

left

FEncing

infide of his him down

Leg

the

Right,
to

and

twift

ftatical and Figures His Perfuafive againft ofVenery


a

veElicai

the

3 5 Ufe
20

54

adapted

Wreftling
22

Vevfes,

Copy

'upon

Wreftling
5

Virtue

IN
Virtue rather to be for than Covetoufnefs
Students
at

D E X.
Wreftlers

contended

feldom
wiU

Quanelfome

Univerfities delight in

Wreftling
queror

make

the

19 Con 19

and pratlife

Wreftling

21

merciful,

and prevents

To prevent

by

your

Under-hold p. 5 o Elbow under his Chin


the

Blood-fhed

Jacob

wreftled

with an

Angel,

52

Upper Hold difcommended 53 Vigor reftor d of our Anceftors


to

Cave 20 This the firft Treatife of Wreft

ling
Students in delight in
the
and

21

Pcfterity by Wreftling
w.

Univerfities
pratlife 21

Wreftling
A Wreftler

difarming

his Ad

HE

his Scholars Women 20 Wreftlers dearer to the Women


perfuades
not to ufe 20

verfary

at

Small Sword

3 3.

Wreftlers Shoes
Habiliments
requiftte

34 37
and
ef-

Wreftlers Size and Make Virgil upon Wreftling

9
4

fentially
Wreftler

neceffary

for

3 7, &c.

of the five Olympick Games 12 17 Wreftling of ufe in Duels The Author teacheth to Wreftle

Wreftling

was one

Adverfary taking you by the right Wrift, with his right


Hand
45
taketh
you

Adverfary
right

by

the

18

Wrift

with

both his
52

Wreftling

ufeful

in Armies

19
5.

Hands
ad

Mart. Epig. Lib. Vos


tamen

Regulum.

noftri non

feftinate libelli,
non propero.

Si, poft

Satavenit Gloria, Mart.

Epig 26.
gloria

lib.

1.

Cineri

fera

venit.

FINIS.