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419-692-0007
662 ELIDA AVE. DELPHOS
Next to Discount Drug • East of St. John’s
$
19
.99
Pizza
Workin’ Family
Deal
Open
5 am-9pm
1 Large 17”
2 Item Pizza
2 Chef Salads
4 Cheesy Breadsticks
Friday, March 30, 2012
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
‘Obamacare’: Vote today, decision
in June, p4

Jays down Wildcats in city clash,
p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Church 9
Classifieds 10
TV 11
World News 12
Index
Partly cloudy
Saturday
with high
in low 50s.
See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
7 vie for
Queen
Jubilee
XXXVII
Thompson Adam
Gasser
Miller
Burchfield
Gent
Goeltzenleuchter
Information submitted
VAN WERT — The
Peony Pageant Committee
has released the information
about the candidates vying
for the title of Queen Jubilee
XXXVII.
The pageant will be held
at 7 p.m. today in the Marsh
Foundation Auditorium.
Tickets are $8.
Candidates include:
Elizabeth Thompson is
a senior at Jefferson High
School. She is the daughter of
Trevor and Angie Thompson
and has four siblings: Destiny,
Arielle, Taylor and Brayden
Thompson.
Thompson loves to sing,
family movie nights, the
musical and spending time
with friends. She is involved
in several activities, choir,
marching band, Fellowship
of Christian Athletes, SADD
and is employed by Arby’s.
She also attends a Christian
Union Church.
After graduation, she
plans to attend the Ohio State
University at Lima to major
in elementary education.
Lincolnview High
School’s Becca Adam is the
daughter of Brian and Janis
Adam. She has four siblings:
Jennifer Adam, Ryan Adam,
Melissa Fallis and Stephanie
Priest.
She is involved in sev-
eral activities such as volley-
ball, piano, writing, National
Honor Society, Beta Club,
Spanish Club, Science Club
and is president of Student
Council. She is involved at
First Baptist and is employed
with Derry Drugs.
After graduation, she
plans to attend The Ohio
State University and double
majoring in finance and busi-
ness administration.
Rachael Gent is a senior
at Crestview High School
and the daughter of Matt
and Storm Mercer and Rick
and Melissa Gent. She has
five siblings: Kennis Mercer,
Kylee Gent, Alyssa Gent,
Elizabeth Gent and Rhyan
See QUEEN, page 12
Photo submitted
Students win poster contest
The Allen County Engineers recently chose the winners of the second-grade poster
contest held in conjunction with their in-school presentation on “What Engineers
Do.” Students were encouraged to create drawings of the work engineers are involved
in each day. St. John’s winners were, from left, second place, Adara Fuerst; first
place, Brady Kerner; and third place, Rose Giambruno-Fuge.
Mega-long odds for
winning record jackpot
By MARGERY A. BECK
The Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. — With
the multistate Mega Millions
jackpot set to reach a world-
record $540 million today,
lottery players across the
country are wondering if
there’s a way to guarantee
becoming an overnight mul-
timillionaire.
The answer: Not unless
you already are one and own
a magic wand.
The jackpot is so large,
someone with enough money
could theoretically buy up
every possible number com-
bination, thereby guarantee-
ing a winning ticket — but
only if you suspended the
laws of physics.
A $540 million jackpot,
if taken as a $390 million
lump sum and after federal
tax withholding, works out to
about $293 million. With the
jackpot odds at 1 in 176 mil-
lion, it would cost $176 mil-
lion to buy up every combi-
nation. Under that scenario,
the strategy would win $117
million — less if your state
also withholds taxes.
But there are too many
limitations. First, if it takes
five seconds to fill out each
card, you’d need almost 28
years just to mark the bubbles
on the game tickets. You’d
also use up the national sup-
ply of special lottery paper
and lottery-machine printing
ink well before all your tick-
ets could be printed out.
With a jackpot this large,
experts say, there also is a great-
er chance of multiple winners.
If you have to share the jackpot
with even one other winner,
you’ve lost $30 million.
Mike Catalano, chairman
of the mathematics depart-
ment at Dakota Wesleyan
University in Mitchell, S.D.,
said he covers the odds of
winning in lottery games
with his students to show
them just how unlikely it is
to win big.
He concedes the math is
clear: The more tickets you
buy, the better your chances
of winning. So, if you buy 10
tickets filled out 10 different
ways, your odds of winning
the jackpot 10 in 176 million.
“You are about 50 times as
likely to get struck by light-
ning as to win the lottery,
based on the 90 people a year
getting struck by lightning,”
Catalano said. “Of course, if
you buy 50 tickets, you’ve
equalized your chances of
winning the jackpot with get-
ting struck by lightning.”
Based on other U.S. aver-
ages, you’re about 8,000
times more likely to be mur-
dered than to win the lottery,
and about 20,000 times more
likely to die in a car crash
than hit the lucky numbers,
Catalano said.
“You might get some
psychological enjoyment
from playing the lottery, but
from a financial standpoint
... you’d be much better
off going to Las Vegas and
playing blackjack or the slot
machines.”
But that chance — how-
ever small — of instanta-
neous, enormous wealth
is leading to long lines at
convenience stores in 42
states and Washington, D.C.,
where Mega Millions tickets
are sold.
It’s why David Kramer,
a lawyer in Lincoln, bought
a Mega Millions ticket
Thursday.
“To me, the value of the
lottery ticket isn’t the real-
istic opportunity to win,” he
said. “It’s the fact that for
three days, the daydreaming
time about what I would do
if I won is great entertain-
ment and, frankly, a very
nice release from a normal
day.”
Local quad prepares for Ohio Has Talent!
BY STACY TAFF
staff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — When
13-year-old best friends
Breece Rohr and Madilyn
Schulte decided to try out
for Ohio Has Talent! for the
second year in a row, they
asked their younger sisters,
Kambrynn Rohr, 8, and Jose
Schulte, 10, to join in on the
fun.
“We’re all best friends;
we do everything together,”
Breece said. “We all dance
together at Dancer by Gina.”
“Gina Wiley taught us all
of our techniques,” Madilyn
added.
The girls, who all attend
St. John’s Elementary, say
there were some minor issues
when they began to prepare.
“It didn’t go as well as
we’d planned. We had a few
It’s Our Passion
Breece Rohr, Madilyn Schulte, Kambryn Rohr and Jose Schulte See QUAD, page 12
Relay team sets
upcoming events
Kruisin’ for a Miracle
Relay for Life team will
hold its annual bowling
fundraiser at 6:30 p.m. May
11 at the Delphos Bowling
and Recreation Center.
The event is open
to all ages.
The cost is $60 per 6-per-
son team or $10 per person.
This covers three games of
bowling and shoe rental.
Other events include
a silent auction, high-
game jackpot and raffle
prize give-away.
The team will also
hold its annual Corn Hole
Tournament on May 27 at
Huggy Bear Campgrounds
in Middle Point.
The cost is $12 per
2-person team with $6
going to Relay and $6
toward the prize fund.
Registration is at 12:30
p.m. with play at 1 p.m.
TODAY
Baseball (5 p.m.);
Jefferson at Parkway;
Columbus Grove at
Leipsic (PCL).
Softball (5 p.m.); Ottoville
at Allen East; Cory-Rawson
at Columbus Grove;
Parkway at Van Wert.
Boys Tennis (4:30 p.m.):
Bath at Elida (WBL); Van
Wert at Wapakoneta (WBL).
SATURDAY
Baseball: Lincolnview
and Antwerp at St. John’s,
11 a.m.; Columbus Grove
at Hardin Northern (DH),
11 a.m.; Fort Recovery
at Crestview (DH), 11
a.m.; Perry at Spencerville
(DH), noon; Findlay at
Elida (DH), noon
Softball
Jefferson at Minster tri
(Jefferson vs. Minster, 11
a.m.; Russia vs. Jefferson,
app. 12:30 p.m.); Hardin
Northern at Kalida (DH),
11 a.m.; Van Buren at
Columbus Grove (DH),
11 a.m.; Spencerville at
Crestview quad, noon;
Lincolnview at Pandora-
Gilboa (DH), noon; Elida at
Bellefontaine, noon; Bryan
at Van Wert (DH), 1 p.m.
Track and Field:
Spencerville and Crestview at
Versailles boys Invitational,
9 a.m.; Elida at Celina
Invitational, noon
2
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Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Mitchell
Kahny.
Congratulations
Mitchell!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Devon
Krendl.
Congratulations
Devon!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Friday, March 30, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY FUNERALS
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 218
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Thursday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $476 M
Pick 3 Evening
8-8-3
Pick 4 Evening
0-2-9-7
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $60 M
Rolling Cash 5
17-19-22-35-36
Estimated jackpot:
$110,000
Ten OH Evening
01-04-11-16-24-26-33-34-
40-42-43-51-53-54-56-59-62-
72-78-79
Corn: $6.00
Wheat: $6.13
Beans: $13.36
Delphos weather
Bluegrass legend Earl
Scruggs dies at 88 in Tenn.
Anna Clay
High temperature Thursday
in Delphos was 55 degrees,
low was 38. High a year ago
today was 35, low was 26.
Record high for today is 80,
set in 1998. Record low is 15,
set in 1923.
By CHRIS TALBOTT
The Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — It
is impossible to overstate the
importance of Earl Scruggs to
American music. A pioneering
banjo player who helped cre-
ate modern country music, his
sound is instantly recognizable
and as intrinsically wrapped
in the tapestry of the genre
as Johnny Cash’s baritone or
Hank Williams’ heartbreak.
Scruggs passed away
Wednesday morning at 88 of
natural causes. The legacy he
helped build with bandleader
Bill Monroe, guitarist Lester
Flatt and the rest of the Blue
Grass Boys was evident all
around Nashville, where he
died in an area hospital. His
string-bending, mind-blowing
way of picking helped trans-
form a regional sound into a
national passion.
“It’s not just bluegrass,
it’s American music,” blue-
grass fan turned country star
Dierks Bentley said. “There’s
17- or 18-year-old kids turning
on today’s country music and
hearing that banjo and they
have no idea where that came
from. That sound has probably
always been there for them
and they don’t realize someone
invented that three-finger roll
style of playing. You hear it
everywhere.”
Country music has tran-
scended its regional roots,
become a billion-dollar music
and tourist enterprise, and
evolved far beyond the clas-
sic sound Monroe and The
Blue Grass Boys blasted out
over the radio on The Grand
Ole Opry on Dec. 8, 1945.
Though he would eventually
influence American culture in
wide-ranging ways, Scruggs
had no way of knowing this as
he nervously prepared for his
first show with Monroe. The
21-year-old wasn’t sure how
his new picking style would
go over.
“I’d heard The Grand Ole
Opry and there was tremendous
excitement for me just to be on
The Grand Ole Opry,” Scruggs
recalled during a 2010 inter-
view at Ryman Auditorium,
where that “big bang” moment
occurred. “I just didn’t know
if or how well I’d be accepted
because there’d never been
anybody to play banjo like me
here. There was Stringbean
and Grandpa Jones. Most of
them were comedians.”
There was nothing jokey
about the way Scruggs attacked
his “fancy five-string banjo,”
as Opry announcer George D.
Hayes called it. In a perfor-
mance broadcast to much of
the country but unfortunately
lost to history, he scorched the
earth and instantly changed
country music. With Monroe
on mandolin and Flatt on gui-
tar, the pace was a real jolt to
attendees and radio listeners
far away, and in some ways
the speed and volume he laid
down predicted the power of
electric music.
Scruggs’ use of three fin-
gers — in place of the limited
clawhammer style once preva-
lent — elevated the banjo from
a part of the rhythm section —
or a even a comedian’s prop —
to a lead instrument that was as
versatile as the guitar and far
more flashy.
Country great Porter
Wagoner probably summed up
Scruggs’ importance best of
all: “I always felt like Earl was
to the five-string banjo what
Babe Ruth was to baseball. He
is the best there ever was, and
the best there ever will be.”
His string-bending and lead
runs became known worldwide
as “the Scruggs picking style”
and the versatility it allowed
has helped popularize the banjo
beyond the traditional bluegrass
and country forms. Today the
banjo can be found in almost any
genre, largely due to the way he
freed its players to experiment
and find new space.
That was exactly what Ralph
Stanley had in mind when he
first heard Scruggs lay it down.
A legendary banjo player in
his own right, Stanley said in
a 2011 interview that he was
inspired by Scruggs when he
first heard him over the radio
after returning home from mil-
itary service in Germany.
“I wasn’t doing any play-
ing,” Stanley said. “When I got
discharged I began listening to
Bill and Earl was with him.
I already had a banjo at that
time, but of course I wanted
to do the three-finger roll. I
knew Earl was the best, but I
didn’t want to sound like him.
I wanted to do that style, but I
wanted to sound the way I felt
and that’s what I tried to do.”
Flowers were placed on his
star on the Hollywood Walk of
Fame on Thursday morning.
Scruggs earned that star
when he and Flatt weaved
themselves into the fabric of
American culture in the 1950s
and ‘60s.
Flatt and Scruggs teamed
as a bluegrass act after leaving
Monroe from the late 1940s until
breaking up in 1969 in a dispute
over whether their music should
experiment or stick to tradition.
Flatt died in 1979.
They were best known for
their 1949 recording “Foggy
Mountain Breakdown,” played
in the 1967 movie “Bonnie and
Clyde,” and “The Ballad of Jed
Clampett” from “The Beverly
Hillbillies,” the popular TV
series that debuted in 1962.
Jerry Scoggins did the singing.
For many viewers, the end-
lessly hummable theme song
was their first introduction to
country music.
In 2005, “Foggy Mountain
Breakdown” was selected
for the Library of Congress’
National Recording Registry
of works of unusual merit.
The following year, the 1972
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s “Will
the Circle Be Unbroken,” on
which Scruggs was one of
many famous guest perform-
ers, joined the list, too.
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born March
29 to Douglas and Dawn
Bockrath of Cloverdale.
March 19, 1936-March 27,
2012
Anna Clay, 76, of Delphos,
died at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday at
Vancrest Healthcare Center in
Van Wert, with her daughter
at her side.
She was born March 19,
1936, in Atlantic City, N.J., to
Martin Edmund and Caroline
Marie (Ritzheimer) Burke.
She was married to Eugene
L. Clay, who preceded her in
death.
Arrangements are being
made out of town.
Flowers and condolences
can be sent to her daughter,
Joanne Acosta, 237 W. Clime
St., Delphos OH 45833.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Cloudy with a
40 percent chance of light rain
in the evening. Then mostly
cloudy overnight. Lows in the
mid 30s. Northeast winds 10
to 15 mph.
SATURDAY: Mostly
cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Highs
in the lower 50s. Northeast
winds 5 to 15 mph.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 40s. Southeast winds 5
to 10 mph shifting to the south
overnight.
SUNDAY: Partly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
showers. Warmer. Highs in
the mid 70s. Southwest winds
5 to 15 mph.
LINDEMAN, Patricia
A., 68, of Delphos, Mass of
Christian Burial will begin
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church, the Rev. Melvin
Verhoff officiating. Burial will
be in Resurrection Cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. today at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, where
a CLC service will be held
at 3 p.m. and a parish wake
service at 7:30 p.m. Memorial
contributions may be made
to St. John’s Foundation or
Delphos Community Health
Professionals.
DICKREDE, Richard J.,
66, of Lexington, Mass of
Christian Burial will be cel-
ebrated at 10:30 a.m. Saturday
at Resurrection Parish with
Fr. Nelson Beaver officiating.
Burial will follow in Mansfield
Cemetery with military hon-
ors provided by Richland
County Joint Veterans Burial
Detail. Friends may call from
4 - 8 p.m. today at Herlihy-
Chambers Funeral Home, 173
Park Avenue West, Mansfield,
with a vigil service at 4 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the American Cancer Society
or the Diabetes Association.
Scruggs
Van Wert Cinemas
www.vanwertcinemas.com
419-238-2100
Mar. 30-Apr. 5, 2012
All shows before 6 pm $5.00
Adults $7.00  • Kids & Seniors $5.00
Book your parties & company outings with us!
Call Ronnie at 419-203-7931
COMING SOON: The Three Stooges-The Avengers-
The Lucky One
Judge ends Lohan’s probation
By ANTHONY
McCARTNEY
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES —
Lindsay Lohan’s days as a
criminal defendant could be
over — if she can behave
herself.
A judge on Thursday
ended the long-running pro-
bation of the problem-prone
actress in a 2007 drunken
driving case after a string of
violations, jail sentences and
rehab stints.
The 25-year-old actress
will remain on informal pro-
bation for taking a necklace
without permission last year,
but will no longer have a pro-
bation officer or face travel
restrictions and weekly shifts
cleaning up at the morgue.
Lohan, wearing a powder
blue suit and black blouse, let
out a sigh of relief as she left
Judge Stephanie Sautner’s
courtroom, possibly for the
last time.
“I just want to say thank
you for being fair,” Lohan told
the judge. “It’s really opened a
lot of doors for me.”
The judge said she wasn’t
going to lecture the actress,
but gave her some parting
advice.
“You need to live your life
in a more mature way, stop
the nightclubbing and focus
on your work,” Sautner said.
She reminded Lohan that
she will remain on informal
probation until May 2014 in
the necklace case and could
face up to 245 days in jail if
she gets into trouble again.
Still, the end of probation
left Lohan looking relieved.
She hugged her attorney,
Shawn Holley, before leaving
the courtroom, and was beam-
ing by the time she walked
past the rows of cameras
waiting for her outside the
courthouse near Los Angeles
International Airport.
Sautner’s regimen of
morgue duty, therapy and
monthly court dates helped
Lohan weather the drunk-
en driving case. The judge
opened the hearing by calling
the case “endless.”
Lohan is now free to focus
on her career for the first time
since May 2010, when she
missed a court appearance
and was later jailed for failing
to complete the terms of her
sentence.
The “Mean Girls” star
has struggled with the case
and her career since the two
drunken driving arrests in
2007.
She had small appear-
ances in films and did some
modeling but came nowhere
near her heyday as the star
of Disney films and movies
aimed at teens and young
adults.
Her career is already show-
ing signs of a comeback. She
is due to guest star on an
upcoming episode of “Glee,”
recently hosted a highly rated
but criticized episode of
“Saturday Night Live,” and is
set to star as Elizabeth Taylor
in a television movie.
“Lindsay is already talking
about her next few projects,”
her spokesman Steve Honig
wrote in a statement after
the hearing. “She is ready to
start the next chapter in her
life and get back to work and
doing what she loves to do —
making movies.”
1
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Board certied in sleep, pulmonary care and critical
care, Dr. Javier Pere is pleased to announce his
association with St. Rita’s Medical Center and
St. Rita’s Professional Services. Now at the Center
for Pulmonary Medicine, Dr. Pere joins two other
board-certied doctors, Marc Rovner and Sreenivasa
Chanamolu. He looks forward to collaborating with
his new colleagues and helping patients get the
sleep, pulmonary care and critical care they need.
You can reach Dr. Pere’s ofce at 419-996-2686.
Meet our newest
Pulmonologist.
Javier Pere, MD
770 W. High St., Suite 240, Lima, Ohio.
THE DELPHOS RURAL
FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP
MEETING
MONDAY, APRIL 2, 2012, 7:00p.m.
AT THE MARION TOWNSHIP BUILDING,
5405 KIGGINS ROAD
Check Your
Smoke
Detector
Battery
Today.
Name

Amount Due
Amount Paid
Date
Delphos Rural Fire
Protection Association
Membership Card
BRUCE KRAFT, Treasurer
Notice
Bring this ad with payment
This is the only notice you will receive.
MEMBERSHIP NOTICE
DELPHOS RURAL FIRE
PROTECTION ASSOCIATION
Please note any changes on card.
Dues: $8.00 per set of buildings.
Payment Date:
APRIL 2
Address Correction:
Name
Address

May be dropped off at First Financial,
First Federal Bank or Union Bank in Delphos or mail to:
Bruce Kraft, 11120 Dutch Rd., Delphos, OH 45833

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OUR PRICES ARE CONSIDERABLY LOWER!
OR MAYBE A NEW SUIT starting at only $125?
Friday, March 30, 3012 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Photos submitted
Vancrest residents celebrate St. Patrick’s Day
In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, the residents at Vancrest Healthcare Center
acknowledged age old traditions by dressing in green and discussing their Irish roots.
Residents played a game of Truth or Blarney (True or False) about the holiday and
learned how to set a trap to catch a leprechaun. The festivities were topped off with
mint ice cream cookies and Leprechaun Punch. Norma Wittler could be mistaken for
a leprechaun.
Lois Osting, Helen Metzger and Betty Wiechart enjoy their Leprechaun Punch.
Amber Bidlack and Tony Piecenski show off their St. Patrick’s Day spirit.
Just because
you’re going away
for the summer
doesn’t mean
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out on a single
issue of your favorite hometown paper.
All you need do is contact our customer
service department at least 10 days prior to
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forwarded to your vacation address. It’s
simple, and it won’t cost you an extra cent
— that’s what we call really good news!
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NOW
COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio
Gov. John Kasich plans to sign
into law a proposal that des-
ignates the day — along with
each March 30 — as Vietnam
Veterans’ Day in the state.
Supporters say the annu-
al day is set aside to honor
those who fought, died or are
still unaccounted for in the
Vietnam War.
The date to honor the vet-
erans had been in flux as law-
makers wrestled with whether
they should use March 29 like
other states.
Some veterans had balked
at that proposal, noting it’s
the anniversary of U.S. forces
pulling out of Vietnam.
Among those supporting
the March 30 designation is
retired Air Force Col. Tom
Moe, a Vietnam prisoner of
war and director of the state’s
veterans services.
Moe is to attend the bill’s
signing.
Gov. to sign
bill honoring
Vietnam vets
WAVERLY (AP) — Scrap
metal thieves targeting fiber
optic cables shut down 911
service in Ohio’s Appalachian
region and left thousands
without telephone and Internet
services.
WBNS-TV reports four
counties in southern Ohio
were affected by the outage
that started late Wednesday
and lasted until Thursday
afternoon.
Frontier Communications
says fiber optic cables were
cut and stolen, affecting 8,000
customers in Pike, Scioto,
Jackson and Lawrence coun-
ties at Ohio’s southern tip.
Pike County Sheriff Richard
Henderson told the station
such situations are a fear for
his office. He says the office
receives backup from neigh-
boring counties and police
departments but callers expe-
rienced a delay in response.
Credit card readers and
ATMs also were affected.
Theft of cables
leads to Ohio
911 outage
AUSTINTOWN (AP) —
Authorities say one man is
hospitalized and four jailed in
his beating following a gather-
ing to celebrate the memory of
a friend killed in an Ohio high
school shooting.
Police tell The Vindicator
newspaper officers were called
on a noise complaint to an
apartment in Austintown, out-
side Youngstown, where the
group gathered Tuesday, the
one-month anniversary of the
Chardon High School shoot-
ing that killed three students.
Police say officers left and
the suspects beat the 19-year-old
victim, who was drunk, to keep
him quiet. They’re accused of
then dragging him outside and
into a van, with plans to leave
him on a roadside.
Troopers say they pulled
over the van and found the
bloodied victim. He is expect-
ed to recover.
The four others, ages 19-21,
are charged with felonious
assault and kidnapping.
Police: Teen
beaten at Ohio
shooting
remembrance
COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio
Secretary of State Jon Husted
is criticizing the state Elections
Commission for failing to penal-
ize a former sheriff who used
campaign coffers to pay court-
ordered restitution for stealing
cash from the fund.
The commission on Thursday
told the Plain Dealer it would
not immediately review last
month’s decision regarding for-
mer Cuyahoga County Sheriff
Gerald McFaul. It ordered its
executive director to write an
opinion. Husted, a Republican,
says using campaign funds for
restitution is illegal and allow-
ing McFaul to do so sends a
message that campaign finance
laws are useless.
McFaul, a Democrat, was
ordered to pay $130,000 in
restitution in 2010 after plead-
ing guilty to stealing campaign
cash, forcing employees to sell
fundraiser tickets and improp-
erly appointing his son as a
special deputy.
He resigned in 2009.
Ohio elections chief:
Panel wrong in sheriff case
CLEVELAND (AP) —
Attorneys for some defen-
dants charged in beard-cutting
attacks on fellow Amish in
Ohio say additional allegations
won’t change how they fight
the charges.
An updated indictment filed
in federal court in Cleveland
added four defendants to bring
the total to 16 and added alle-
gations they tried to hide or
destroy evidence including a
bag of hair. It said ringleader
Sam Mullet Sr. lied to fed-
eral agents about an October
hair-cutting, considered deeply
offensive in Amish culture.
Mullet said he didn’t order
hair-cutting but didn’t stop oth-
ers from carrying it out to send
a message other Amish should
be ashamed of how they treated
him and his community.
Attorney says no change to Amish defense
“As we advance in life it becomes more and more difficult, but in fighting the
difficulties the inmost strength of the heart is developed.”
-- Vincent van Gogh
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Friday, March 30, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Janice Romes of Fort Jennings, recently received
validation as a writer when she was notified that her short
story, “Square Pot, Round Lid,” would be featured in
the May 12 issue of Woman’s World Magazine and her
book, “Kiss Me,” was to be published in eBook form in April
of 2012.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• Members of Delphos Court 707, Junior Catholic
Daughters of Americas, held a rock-a-thon Sunday afternoon
on North Main Street. Purpose of the rock-a-thon was to raise
funds to send 54 girls to the annual convention Memorial Day
weekend at Pilgrim Hills, south of Mansfield. The Delphos
Court has 168 members and is the largest junior court inter-
nationally.
• Gregory J. Thompson, son of John L. Thompson of
Delphos, has been selected as a resident assistant at Ohio
Northern University for the 1987-88 academic year. He is a
sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering. He is active
on campus in football, indoor track team and outdoor track
team.
• St. John’s dropped a double-header to Perry Saturday 4-3
and 6-5 in 10 innings. St. John’s Duane Wieging was on base
eight of nine times at bat. For both games Wieging was 5-for-8
with four runs scored. Teammate Dave Etgen was 4-for-8 on
the day with two runs scored.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• Election of officers was held during the meeting of the
1917 Club held Thursday afternoon in the home of Mrs. O. J.
Truesdale on North Main Street. New officers are: president,
Mrs. William Rinehart; vice president, Mrs. Paul Harter Sr.;
secretary, Mrs. Virgil Buchanan and treasurer, Mrs. O. J.
Truesdale.
• The Rev. E. C. Herr, principal of Lima Central Catholic
High School, has announced that Bill Clark, head basketball
coach at St. Edward High School in Lakewood, has been
named athletic director at LCC. Clark is a native of Delphos.
He is the son of Lillian Clark, and the late Dr. D. J. Clark.
• Mrs. Lowell Jenkins and Mrs. Fred Kiggins entertained
the officers of the Women’s Society of World Service of
the Evangelical United Brethren Church Thursday evening
in the Jenkins home. Present were Nora Link, Mrs. Murlin
Mullenhour, Mrs. Orville Wagoner, Zedith Wagoner, Mrs.
Ray Upperman, Mrs. M. C. Maloney, Nan Stirn, Mrs. George
Patton, Mrs. Francis Scott, Rev. and Mrs. Walter Marks, and
Lowell Jenkins.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• The Commercial Bank of Delphos, will observe its 60th
anniversary on Wednesday night. A reception will be held in
the banking rooms with a shareholders dinner to be served in
the Knights of Columbus rooms on the third floor of the bank
building. The anniversary of the organization of the bank fell
upon Good Friday, March 26 and because of this, the formal
celebration was set for Wednesday.
• Plans for the annual Jefferson High School Alumni
reception and dance are being held up as the result of the
resignations of the president and vice president. Mary Lou
Armstrong, elected to head the organization this year, and
Mrs. H. F. Buchholtz, vice president, presented their resigna-
tions some time ago. The date for the Alumni reception has
been set for May 28.
• A Teacher’s Certificate Recital, one of the require-
ments in the second year of the Collegiate course, will be
presented by Harriet Viel, young daughter of Dr. and Mrs. H.
M. Viel, West Fifth Street on Saturday evening. Vera Watsea
Downing, recitalist’s instructor in the Morrey Sound of Music,
Columbus, is presenting Miss Viel in recital at the Gallery of
Fine Arts in Columbus.
By MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — While
the rest of us have to wait
until June, the justices of the
Supreme Court will know the
likely outcome of the historic
health care case by the time
they go home this weekend.
After months of anticipa-
tion, thousands of pages of
briefs and more than six hours
of arguments, the justices will
vote on the fate of President
Barack Obama’s health care
overhaul in under an hour this
morning. They will meet in
a wood-paneled conference
room on the court’s main
floor. No one else will be
present.
In the weeks after this
meeting, individual votes can
change. Even who wins can
change, as the justices read
each other’s draft opinions
and dissents.
But today’s vote, which
each justice probably will
record and many will keep
for posterity, will be followed
soon after by the assignment
of a single justice to write a
majority opinion, or in a case
this complex, perhaps two or
more justices to tackle differ-
ent issues. That’s where the
hard work begins, with the
clock ticking toward the end
of the court’s work in early
summer.
The late William
Rehnquist, who was chief
justice for nearly 19 years,
has written that the court’s
conference “is not a bull ses-
sion in which off-the-cuff
reactions are traded.” Instead,
he said, votes are cast, one by
one in order of seniority.
The conference also
is not a debate, says Brian
Fitzpatrick, a Vanderbilt
University law professor who
worked for Justice Antonin
Scalia 10 years ago. There
will be plenty of time for
the back-and-forth in dueling
opinions that could follow.
“There’s not a whole lot
of give and take at the confer-
ence. They say, ‘This is how
I’m going to vote’ and give
a few sentences,” Fitzpatrick
said.
It will be the first time the
justices gather as a group to
discuss the case. Even they
do not always know what the
others are thinking when they
enter the conference room
adjacent to Chief Justice John
Roberts’ office.
By custom, they shake
hands. Then Roberts will take
his seat at the head of a rect-
angular table. Scalia, the lon-
gest serving among them, will
be at the other end. The other
seven justices also sit accord-
ing to seniority, the four most
junior on one side across from
the other three.
“They generally find
out how the votes line up
at the conference,” said Orin
Kerr, a George Washington
University law professor who
worked for Justice Anthony
Kennedy nine years ago.
The uncertainty may be
especially pronounced in
this case, where the views of
Roberts and Kennedy are like-
ly to decide the outcome, Kerr
said in an interview Thursday.
“I don’t think anyone knows.
I’m not sure Justice Kennedy
knows.”
No one’s vote counts more
than the others’, but because
they speak in order of senior-
ity, it will become clear fairly
quickly what will become of
the health care overhaul.
That’s because Roberts
speaks first, followed by
Scalia, then Kennedy. If the
three men hold a common
view, the Obama health care
overhaul probably is history.
If they don’t, it probably sur-
vives.
If Roberts is in the major-
ity, he will assign the main
opinion, and in a case of this
importance, he may well write
it himself, several former law
clerks said. If Roberts is a dis-
senter, the senior justice in the
majority assigns the opinion.
The court won’t issue its
ruling in a case until drafts
of majority opinions and
any dissents have circulated
among the justices, chang-
es have been suggested and
either accepted or rejected.
Justices to vote on health
care insurance reform
By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
chairman of the House Budget
Committee said Thursday he
doesn’t believe the nation’s
commanders gave Congress
a budget based on military
strategy, prompting a push
back from the chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff.
In one statement, Rep.
Paul Ryan challenged both
President Barack Obama’s
defense budget request of
$614 billion for next year
and the weeks of testimony
from the leaders of the armed
services, who have said the
defense blueprint was crafted
based on a revised military
strategy.
“We don’t think the gen-
erals are giving us their
true advice,” the Wisconsin
Republican told a National
Journal forum on the budget.
“I think there’s a lot of bud-
get smoke and mirrors in the
Pentagon’s budget.”
Gen. Martin Dempsey, the
chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, said he didn’t inter-
pret Ryan’s comments as
suggesting the generals were
lying. Instead, Dempsey said
the remarks indicate that the
generals have failed to per-
suade lawmakers that the
budget was based on strategy,
not numbers.
“So my response is, I stand
by my testimony,” Dempsey
said during a trip from Latin
America to Washington. “We
started with a strategy. We
mapped it to a budget. It’s just
the first step.”
Obama and congressional
Republicans agreed on a bud-
get last August that calls for
defense cuts of $487 billion
over a decade, a reflection of
the drawdown of two wars in
Iraq and Afghanistan and the
pressure to reduce the nation’s
deficit.
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta has said the budget
shifts the Pentagon’s focus
from the long wars to future
challenges in Asia, the
Mideast and in cyberspace.
In congressional testimony,
Dempsey and other military
leaders have said the strat-
egy shaped the budget. But
Republicans contend that the
spending plan was built on
budget numbers — the ones
they agreed to last summer.
Asked for clarification,
Conor Sweeney, a spokesman
for Ryan, said the congress-
man “believes the integrity
of our generals and admi-
rals is unimpeachable. They
serve our country with dis-
tinction and unparalleled
honor. Unfortunately, there is
an inconsistency between the
strategic goals and the bud-
getary targets that our gener-
als and admirals have been
given by the White House.”
The top Democrat on
the House Armed Services
Committee, Rep. Adam Smith
of Washington, demanded
that Ryan apologize.
“It’s very, very irresponsible
and shows a high level of igno-
rance on Paul Ryan’s part about
how the Defense Department
goes about making decisions,”
Smith said in an interview. “I
guess if you want to justify
your position you say whatever
you have to say, but there’s no
question that the Pentagon did
a major, major strategic review
and as General Demesey and
others have said, this is the plan
they support and they believe
it’s the right direction for the
country.”
After budgets nearly
doubled over a decade, the
Pentagon is looking at tighter
spending for next year —
$525.4 billion in base spend-
ing and another $88.5 billion
for the wars in Afghanistan
and Iraq. The total is near-
ly $32 billion less than this
year’s budget.
Lawmakers complained
Thursday that as the Pentagon
works to rein in spending,
the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter
program continues to exceed
expected costs.
Frank Kendall III, who has
been nominated to be under-
secretary of defense for acqui-
sition, told the Senate Armed
Services Committee, that the
program is about $150 billion
over budget but officials are
trying to minimize additional
overruns in the future. He
said there will continue to be
cost adjustments as the test
program goes on.
Budget chairman challenges generals on defense
LOLITA C. BALDOR
and PAULINE JELINEK
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — U.S.
military commanders in
Afghanistan have assigned
“guardian angels” — troops
that watch over their com-
rades even as they sleep —
and have ordered a series of
other increased security mea-
sures to protect troops against
possible attacks by rogue
Afghans.
The added protections are
part of a directive issued in
recent weeks by Marine Gen.
John Allen, the top U.S. com-
mander in Afghanistan, to
guard against insider threats,
according to a senior military
official. And they come in the
wake of a spike in attacks on
U.S. and coalition forces by
Afghans, including the point-
blank shooting deaths of two
U.S. advisers in Afghanistan’s
Ministry of Interior.
Some of the changes have
been subtle, others not so
much.
In several Afghan min-
istries, Americans are now
allowed to carry weapons.
And they have been instructed
to rearrange their office desks
there to face the door, so they
can see who is coming in,
said the official, who spoke
on condition of anonymity
to describe the internal direc-
tive.
While Allen did not detail
the new measures in a briefing
earlier this week, he acknowl-
edged that changes had been
made.
“We have taken steps nec-
essary on our side to protect
ourselves with respect to, in
fact, sleeping arrangements,
internal defenses associ-
ated with those small bases
in which we operate,” Allen
said, adding that now some-
one is “always overwatching
our forces.”
The security measures
came after the U.S. military
mistakenly burned Qurans
and other religious materials
in February, triggering anti-
American demonstrations and
riots. And on Feb. 25, two
U.S. military advisers were
gunned down at their desks
in one of the most heavily
guarded ministry building in
Kabul.
As a result of the shootings,
more than 300 advisers were
pulled out of the Afghan min-
istries. So far, several dozen
have returned, but many will
not go back until additional
security measures are put in
place by the Afghans. That
would include better vet-
ting procedures, background
checks and physical security
measures at the ministries.
The military official also said
some advisers may not return,
since commanders have deter-
mined that some may no lon-
ger be needed in the jobs.
The military official said
Allen issued the directive
“to get every single troop in
the war zone to read it and
think” — and to emphasize
that troops should be aware of
their surroundings as they go
about their jobs.
U.S. commanders and
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta say the killings do not
represent a trend, and they say
that less than half of the kill-
ings have been by Afghans
associated with the Taliban.
Instead, Allen said, these
types of attacks come with
fighting an insurgency and
happened in Iraq and Vietnam.
The enemy, he said, will do
what it can to disrupt efforts
to train and grow a nation’s
indigenous security force.
Still, the recent spike in
Afghans gunning down troops
they are serving alongside
reflects increased tensions
between the two countries
just as the coalition escalates
efforts to train Afghans to
take over their own security
so that most NATO forces
can leave by the end of 2014.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The number of people seeking
U.S. unemployment benefits
dropped last week to the low-
est level in four years, adding
to evidence that the job market
is strengthening.
The Labor Department said
Thursday that weekly unem-
ployment benefit applications
fell by 5,000 to a seasonally
adjusted 359,000. That’s the
smallest number of applicants
since April 2008. The four-
week average, a less volatile
measure, declined to 365,000,
the lowest since May 2008.
The department also made
its annual revisions to the
past five years of unemploy-
ment benefit data. The revi-
sions increased the number of
unemployment benefit appli-
cants in recent months. But
the downward trend remains
intact, though it is less dra-
matic.
In the past six months,
applications have fallen about
12 percent. Before the revi-
sions, the decline was 16 per-
cent.
“The trend remains unam-
biguously downwards,” said
Ian Shepherdson, an economist
at High Frequency Economics.
“We think the rate of decline
... is slowing ... but they are
still consistent with robust,
sustained payroll gains.”
When unemployment ben-
efit applications drop consis-
tently below 375,000, it usual-
ly signals that hiring is strong
enough to lower the unem-
ployment rate. The decline
has coincided with the best
three months of hiring in two
years.
Separately, the U.S. econo-
my expanded at a solid pace in
the final three months of last
year, but growth is expected to
slow in the current quarter.
The economy grew at
annual rate of 3 percent in the
fourth quarter, the Commerce
Department said. But econo-
mists forecast it likely dipped
below 2 percent in the current
quarter.
Businesses have been
restocking their shelves at a
slower pace and shipping fewer
long-lasting manufactured
goods. In addition, Europe’s
debt crisis and slower growth
in Asia have reduced demand
for U.S. exports.
Stronger hiring in the
first two months of the year
probably hasn’t offset those
weaknesses. That’s because
Americans’ pay has barely
kept pace with inflation while
gas prices have spiked. So
consumer spending, which
accounts for 70 percent of
economic activity, probably
hasn’t increased much from
the end of last year.
Most economists expect
growth to pick up later this
year, as more hiring lifts the
economy.
From December through
February, employers added an
average of 245,000 jobs per
month. That has pushed down
the unemployment rate to 8.3
percent, the lowest in three
years.
Companies are hiring more
workers because the economy
is picking up. The economy
grew at an annual rate of 3 per-
cent in the final three months
of last year. That was better
than the 1.8 percent rate in the
previous quarter.
The number of people
receiving unemployment
benefits also fell. More than
7.1 million laid-off workers
received unemployment aid in
the week ended March 10, the
latest data available. That’s
about 130,000 lower than the
previous week.
New security for American troops in Afghanistan
Jobless claims
lowest in 4 years
1
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Friday, March 30, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Shelterhouse
Stadium Park
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
MARCH 31
Nathan Garber
Jean Lindeman
Cassandra Feathers
Evelyn Gilliam
Jean Wittler
Rose M. Fox
TODAY
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store, North Main
Street.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos City
Council meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
Delphos Parks and
Recreation board meets at the
recreation building at Stadium
Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
8 p.m. — The Veterans
of Foreign Wars meet at the
hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.
At the movies . . .
Van Wert Cinemas
10709 Lincoln Hwy. Van Wert
The Hunger Games (PG-13) Fri.: 5:00/8:00 Sun.:
Sat.: 2:00/5:00/8:00; Sun.: 2:00/4:45/7:30; Mon.-
Thurs.: 5:00/7:45
Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.: 5:00/7:30; Sat.:
2:00/4:30; Sun.: 2:00/4:30/7:00; Mon.-Thurs.:
5:00/7:30
Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG) Fri.: 5:00/7:00/9:00;
Sat.-Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon-Thurs.: 5:00/
7:00
21 Jump Street (R) Fri.: 5:00/7:30; Sat.: 2:00/4:30;
Sun.: 2:00/4:30/7:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00/7:30
Wrath of the Titans (PG-13) Fri.: 5:00/7:00/9:00;
Sat.-Sun.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Mon-Thurs.:
5:00/7:00
American Mall Stadium 12
2830 W. Elm St., Lima
Saturday and Sunday
Mirror Mirror (PG) 1:20/2:10/4:30/4:50/6:50/7:
25/9:30/10:00
Wrath of the Titans (PG-13) 4:30/9:40
Wrath of the Titans 3D 1:50/2:20/5:00/7:05/
7:35/10:10
Hunger Games (PG-13) 1:00/1:30/2:00/2:30/4:10/
4:40/5:10/5:40/6:45/7:15/7:50/9:10/9:50
21 Jump Street (R) 1:45/4:35/7:20/10:05
John Carter (PG-13) 4:05/9:55
John Carder 3D (PG-13) 1:05/6:55
A Thousand Words (PG-13) 1:25/4:25/6:40/
9:25
Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG) 4:15/9:15
Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) 1:40/7:00
Eastgate Dollar Movies
2100 Harding Hwy. Lima
Saturday and Sunday
This Means War (PG-13) 1:00/3:00/5:00/ 7:00/
(Sat. only 9:00)
Big Miracle (PG) 1:00/3:00/5:00/7:10/(Sat. only
9:15)
War Horse (PG-13) 1:00/4:00/6:45/(Sat. only
9:30)
The Descendants (R) 1:00/4:00/7:00/(Sat. only
9:20)
Shannon Theater
119 S. Main St., Bluffton
The Hunger Games (PG-13) Show times are
every evening at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. with Saturday
and Sunday show times at 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m.
Delphos CLC planning card party
The March 6 meeting
of the C.L.C.’s court #40
opened at the K of C hall in
Delphos.
President Catherine
Hammons opened with a
prayer and Irma Hilvers led
the Stations of the Cross. Roll
call of officers was read, as
was the treasurer’s report.
Sixteen members were pres-
ent for the meeting. Bills were
submitted and Barb Bockey
made a motion to pay them,
seconded by Irma Hilvers.
Card Party tickets were
handed out to those present,
the remaining tickets will
be sent by mail. There was
a 6:30 p.m. meeting of the
committee members for the
card party to discuss plans for
the event.
Irma Hilvers made a
motion for a donation to be
made to the Right to Life.
It was seconded and passed.
Ideas were discussed for the
matching funds to be received
from the home office.
Insurance agent Velma
Wehri talked about insurance
policies for grandchildren and
adults. She said the rates are
good and it is a good time to
invest.
Raylene Fischer won
the attendance award. Pat
Patton, Raylene Fischer and
Martha Ardner won the 50/50
awards.
The next meeting will be
April 6 at the K of C Hall
with Mary Lou Beckman and
Carlene Gerdeman as chair-
ladies.
CAMPUS NOTE
Miller, Martin inducted into UF
Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society
Brian Miller, a graduate of the physi-
cal therapy program at The University of
Findlay, was recently inducted into the Phi
Kappa Phi honor society.
A 2005 graduate of Jefferson High
School, Miller is the son
of Steve and Jeanne Miller
of Venedocia.
At UF, Miller is active
in Phi Kappa Phi Honor
Society.
Dana Martin, a senior
occupational therapy major, was recently
inducted into the Phi Kappa Phi honor soci-
ety.
A 2008 graduate of St. John’s High
School, Martin is the daughter of Jeffrey and
Linda Martin, 7096 Redd Rd., Elida, Ohio,
45807.
At UF, Martin is active in dance team, Student Occupational
Therapy Association, Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society and Psi
Chi International Honor Society.
Founded in 1897, the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society pro-
motes academic excellence in all fields of higher education
Martin
Miller
The Delphos Herald ...
Your No. 1 source for local news
6 – The Herald Friday, March 30, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
The fourth inning Thursday night saw St. John’s put up
seven runs against host Jefferson. Blue Jay junior Curtis
Geise slides under the tag attempt by Wildcat sopho-
more shortstop Ross Thompson, with senior Tony George
backing up the play, during the uprising as the Blue Jays
whomped their crosstown archrivals 19-0 in 5 innings.
Lincolnview catcher Brady Niese tags out Cody
Warnecke to complete a double play. The visiting Lancers
grabbed a 7-2 non-league victory.
Tom Morris photo
Charlie Warnimont/Putnam County Sentinel photo
ST. JOHN’S (19)
ab-r-h-rbi
Curtis Geise ss 4-3-4-2, Jordan
Bergfeld dh 3-3-2-2, Andrew Metzger
rf/ph 1-0-0-1, Tanner Calvelage cf 5-2-
2-1, Troy Warnecke 3b 3-3-2-2, Austin
Reindel c 3-1-1-1, Austin Jostpille ph
1-1-0-0, Cody Kundert p 2-1-1-2, Brice
Schulte ph 1-0-0-0, Alex Wehri 1b 2-1-
0-1, Isaac Klausing ph 1-1-1-2, Ryan
Buescher lf 3-1-1-1, Ryan Densel 2b
4-2-1-1. Totals 33-19-15-16.
JEFFERSON (0)
ab-r-h-rbi
Tony George p/2b 2-0-0-0, Mike
Joseph cf 2-0-0-0, Ross Thompson ss
2-0-0-0, Curtis Miller 1b 2-0-0-0, Austin
Jettinghoff 3b 0-0-0-0, Jeff Schleeter
ph 1-0-0-0, Zach Kimmett rf 1-0-0-
0, Seth Wollenhaupt ph 0-0-0-0, Kyle
Anspach lf 1-0-0-0, Evan Neubert ph
1-0-0-0, Justin Rode c 1-0-0-0, Zach
Ricker 2b/p 1-0-0-0. Totals 14-0-0-0.
Score by Innings:
St. John’s 4 2 0 7 5 - 19
Jefferson 0 0 0 0 0 - 0
E: Thompson 2, Kundert, Densel,
George, Anspach, Rode; DP: St.
John’s 2; LOB: St. John’s 5, Jefferson
1; 2B: Bergfeld, Kundert; SB: Geise 3,
Bergfeld, Calvelage, Buescher; POB:
Kundert (by George).
IP H R ER BB SO
ST. JOHN’S
Kundert (W, 2-0) 5.0 0 0 0 1 5
JEFFERSON
George (L, 0-1) 2.0 4 7 4 5 2
Ricker 3.0 11 12 8 1 1
HBP: Wollenhaupt (by Kundert).
By Charlie Warnimont
Sentinel Sports Editor
FORT JENNINGS —
Defense, pitching and timely
hitting.
Lincolnview used all three
of these elements of baseball
to record a 7-2 win over Fort
Jennings Thursday afternoon
in non-league action at the Fort
Jennings Community Park
Diamond. The win moves the
Lancers to 2-1 on the season,
while the Musketeers dropped
to 2-2 with the loss.
Coming off a 13-3 loss to
Van Wert Wednesday after-
noon, the Lancers turned to
Clayton Longstreth to get
them back in the win col-
umn. Longstreth did that as
he pitched six solid innings
of baseball, allowing two runs
on six hits. He had five strike-
outs in game and walked six
but was able to work out of
several jams as he only retired
the Musketeers in order once
in the game.
The key inning for
Longstreth was the fifth
inning as Fort Jennings loaded
the bases and had no one out.
That’s where Longstreth’s
defense bailed him out with a
key double play and a hustle
play by third baseman Connor
McCleery to end the inning.
Just after the Lancers had
taken a 3-2 lead in the top of
the fifth, the Musketeers were
threatening as they loaded the
bases on a Cody Warnecke
single and walks to Nick
Verhoff and Zach Schuerman.
Designated hitter Alex Vetter
sent a fly ball to left field that
Lancer Kyle Williams hauled
in. Williams then fired a strike
to home plate and catcher
Brady Niese, who tagged out
a sliding Cody Warnecke
to complete a double play.
Dylan VanLoo was up next
and popped up a pitch down
the third-base line. McCleery
chased down the pop-up and
hauled it in for the third out of
the inning.
“That was a huge play
there,” Lancer coach Brad
Mendenhall said of the double
play. “It was a great play.
Kyle got behind it a little bit,
like he is supposed to, and
that helped get his momen-
tum going forward. The next
inning is where we scored
four runs.”
The defensive gems turned
in by the Lancers inspired their
offense in the top half of the
sixth inning as Lincolnview
sent nine batters to the plate
to score four times.
Pinch hitter Derek Friesner
opened the inning with a
single before Niese followed
with a double to left-center
that put runners at second
and third base and forced the
Musketeers to make a pitching
change as Verhoff took over
for starter Troy Hellman.
Verhoff didn’t get off to
a good start as he hit Mike
Klausing in the back to load
the bases. After a strikeout,
Nick Leeth padded the Lancer
lead with a single to right that
scored Friesner and Klausing.
Dalton Kayser sent a ground
ball towards first base that
was fielded by Nolan Neidert,
who then threw home in an
attempt to get Klausing, who
was trying to score. Klausing
beat the throw home, giving
Lincolnview a 6-2 lead. A
single by Longstreth allowed
Leeth to score making the
score 7-2. A strikeout and
groundout ended the inning.
“Derek Friesner had start-
ed both of our first two games
and he struggled a little bit
Wednesday and I told him to
be ready tonight and he was,”
Mendenhall said. “He got us
off to a good start and we had
a lot of timely hitting, includ-
ing a big hit by Brady Niese
to left. Clayton had a pair of
big RBIs tonight and he did
a good job on the mound.
Brady Niese is our number
two catcher and goes back
there when Clayton pitches
and he did a great job back
there tonight.”
After retiring the
Musketeers in order in the
bottom of the sixth, Fort
Jennings made things interest-
ing in the seventh as Hellman
walked and Cody Warnecke
doubled to center to put run-
ners at second and third base.
Lincolnview made a pitch-
ing change as Eli Farmer was
called on to get the final three
outs. Farmer did just that as
he used a line drive to right, a
ground ball back to the mound
and a strikeout to strand the
two Musketeer runners.
Fort Jennings stranded 10
base-runners in the game.
“We missed out on a lot
of opportunities today,” Fort
Jennings coach Jeff Swick
said. “We had the bases load-
ed twice and couldn’t come up
with a key hit, hitting a couple
of ground balls to shortstop.
He threw well and mixed up
his pitches. We are a work in
progress and we have to be
ready to step up in those kind
of situations and know what
we need to do with the ball.”
Despite leaving a large
amount of runners on base in
the game, Fort Jennings had a
1-0 lead after one inning.
Kurt Warnecke opened
the Musketeer first with a
double down the right-field
line. A groundout by Neidert
moved Warnecke to third
before Hellman walked. An
errant pickoff attempt allowed
Warnecke to score from third
base.
Lincolnview had a base-
runner in each of the first
two innings but was unable to
score them.
In the third inning, the
Lancers broke through as
they pushed two runs home
to take a 2-1 lead. With one
out, Dalton Schmersal sin-
gled and Leeth was hit by a
pitch. A ground ball to first
base allowed the runners to
advance a base before they
scored on a single to right-
center by Longstreth.
Fort Jennings came right
back to tie the game as Kurt
Warnecke walked and took
second on a groundout.
Hellman singled, putting
runners at the corners. Cody
Warnecke showed bunt and
when Hellman drifted too far
off base, Niese threw to first
base in an effort to get him
retreating to first. Hellman slid
under the tag but Warnecke
was able to scamper home
with the tying run.
Lincolnview regained the
lead in the fifth as Williams
had a 2-out RBI single to left
that scored Leeth, who had
reached on an error and stole
second base.
Leeth had two singles in the
game, scored three runs and
stole two bases. Longstreth
had two singles and three
RBIs and Niese had a single
and double for the Lancers.
“Of our three games,
this was probably our best,”
Mendenhall added. “We hit
the ball better tonight and
take away a couple of situa-
tions we played really good
Lancers put basics together to
down Musketeers in hardball
See LANCERS, page 7
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Both St.
John’s and Jefferson were
coming off baseball victories
the night before: the Blue
Jays scoring a late run to
best Crestview 7-6 at home,
while the Wildcats pummeled
Hardin Northern 23-2 on the
road; when they met up in
their annual crosstown battle
Thursday night at Wildcat
Field.
The Blue Jays carried it
over, scoring four times in
the top of the first, while
the Red and White were in
the doldrums, getting no-hit
(5 innings) by senior hurler
Cody Kundert, as the Blue
and Gold erupted to a 19-0
romp.
“We carried it over from
the night before. It’s so much
easier for everyone involved
when you get off to a good
start in the very first inning,”
St. John’s coach Dan Metzger
noted. “We got the bats out
early and hit the ball well; that
relaxes your defense and your
pitcher. We’ve been working
to be consistent for the entire
game at the plate and we
were. We were swinging at
good pitches and not swing-
ing at bad pitches. Jefefrson
made some errors and we
capitalized.”
The Jays (2-1) got off well
against Jefferson (2-3) senior
starter Tony George (0-1),
making his first appearance
on the mound since a late
pre-season arm injury eight
days ago. Junior Curtis Geise
(4-for-4, 3 runs, 2 runs batted
in, 3 stolen bases) led off with
a single to left. Senior Jordan
Bergfeld (2-for-3, 3 runs,
2 RBIs), himself recovered
ahead of schedule from off-
season shoulder surgery, got
aboard on a catcher’s-inter-
ference ruling by the home-
plate umpire. Senior Tanner
Calvelage (2-for-5, 2 runs)
slapped a knock to left to
plate Geise and sent Bergfeld
to third, himself taking sec-
ond on the throw. After junior
Troy Warnecke (2-for-3, 3
runs, 2 RBIs) walked and a
strikeout, Kundert helped his
cause with a 2-run (Bergfeld
and Calvelage) double to left
center. Senior Alex Wehri
bounced out to second to plate
Warnecke for that 4-0 lead.
“I take full responsibil-
ity for starting Tony in that
situation. He hadn’t pitched
in over a week and that’s a
tough spot against a good-
hitting team,” Jefferson head
man Doug Geary explained.
“He had good velocity but he
didn’t have his location. St.
John’s played an aggressive
game and played well; that’s
to their credit.”
George led off the home
half by getting aboard via
an error; an out hence, he
hustled to third on an error
on a pickoff play. Sophomore
Ross Thompson flied out to
center and a picture-perfect
Calvelage-Ryan Densel-
Austin Reindel relay — the
umpire ruling that Reindel
held onto the ball long enough
— caught George at home
for an inning-ending double
play.
“That is the type of play
we’ve been making on defense
so far; we’re making the rou-
tine plays we need to make
and some of the not-so rou-
tine,” Metzger added. “Cody
was mixing his pitches —
speeds and locations — well.
He was throwing all three of
his pitches: fastball, changeup
and breaking ball — where he
wanted. That allows him to
keep batters off-balance.”
The Jays scored three
more in the second, started
by a Geise leadoff walk and
stolen base. Bergfeld walked.
George tried to pick Geise off
second but he broke for third
and easily swiped that base,
with Bergfeld following suit
a pitch later. An out later,
Warnecke’s single to left cen-
ter got Geise home and put
Bergfeld at third; an error on
the pay allowed Warnecke
to go to second. The senior
Reindel bounced out to short
to plate Bergfeld and move
Warnecke up a base. Kundert
walked. He got caught stray-
ing too far off first but got
into a rundown long enough
to allowed Warnecke to swipe
home for a 7-0 spread.
Austin Jettinghoff drew
a 1-out walk from Kundert
(2-0; 5 innings, no hits, 1
walk, 1 hit batter, 5 strike-
outs; 53 pitches, 31 strikes) in
the second but was left there.
Jefferson junior reliever
Zach Ricker retired the side
in order in the third.
Reindel made a diving
catch in foul territory for the
third out in Jefferson’s half of
the third.
The Jays blew it open in the
fourth, sending 12 to the dish.
Geise again started it with
a knock to center, burgled a
base and scored via a double
to left-center by Bergfeld.
Calvelage put runners on the
corners with a bloop to right
and stole second. Warnecke’s
grounder was booted, with
both runners coming across
the plate and a 10-0 edge.
Reindel grounded a hit into
left. Warnecke was forced at
third by a Kundert ground-
er. Wehri walked to load
the bases. Ryan Buescher’s
ground ball was misplayed,
with Reindel scoring and
leaving the bases loaded.
The senior Densel forced
Buescher at second, letting
Kundert touch the dish for a
12-zip score. Geise singled to
right to plate Wehri and move
Densel to third, from where
he scored on a single up the
gut by Bergfeld and a 14-0
bulge.
The visitors finished it in
the fifth. Warnecke beat out
an infield hit to deep short.
An error on senior pinch-hit-
ter Austin Jostpille’s ground-
er allowed both runners on
board; both advanced on a
groundout by senior pinch-
hitter Brice Schulte and
scored courtesy of senior
pinch-hitter Isaac Klausing’s
2-run knock up the middle.
Buescher’s sinking liner just
eluded a diving try by senior
centerfielder Mike Joseph for
a single. Densel beat out a
nibbler to third; an error on
the play allowed Klausing to
score and advanced Buescher
and Densel. Geise’s knock to
left plated Buescher for an
18-0 lead and a groundout
by junior pinch-hitter Andrew
Metzger scored Densel from
third for the final tally.
Kundert plunked junior
pinch-hitter Seth Wollenhaupt
with one out in the home fifth
but senior pinch-hitter Evan
Neubert — in perhaps a fit-
ting way to end the game this
day — had a Kundert pitch hit
off the nub of the bat and into
fair territory. An alert Reindel
threw to second to begin a
game-ending twin-killing.
“I also take full responsi-
bility for us not being ready
to play today,” Geary added.
“We didn’t hit anything and
we made mistakes in the field.
We will find out what kind of
character we have to bounce
back from this tomorrow
night. This is the type of game
we simply have to forget, learn
a lesson and move on.”
The Wildcats have the
chance to get right back in
the swing of things tonight
(weather permitting) as they
head to Rockford to take on
Parkway.
The Jays host Lincolnview
and Antwerp for the annual
tri-matchup starting 11 a.m.
Saturday.
Blue Jays roll past crosstown
archrival Wildcats 19-0
Ottoville and Fort
Jennings at Paulding
Track and Field tri-meet
Girls Team Scores: Fort
Jennings 14, Paulding 64,
Ottoville 86.
Shot put: 1. T. Wannemacher
(O) 37-1 1/4; 2. L. Kramer (O)
35-1 1/2; 3. R. Beining (O) 33-1;
4. Kohart (P) 21-10.
100-meter hurdles: 1. E. Grone
(F) 18.3; 2. VanCleave (P) 18.4; 3.
E. Maag (F) 19.2; 4. S. Chandler
(F) 21.2.
100-meter dash: 1. Ma.
Schroeder (F) 13.1; 2. Weller (P)
13.6; 3. LaFountain (P) 13.9; 4. M.
Brown (F) 14.5.
1,600-meter run: 1. A.
Siefker (O); 2. Johanns (P); 3.
A. Schimmoeller (F); 4. B. Inkrott
(F).
High jump: 1. Shuhrer (P) 5-0;
2. Nardone (P) 4.6.
Long jump: M. Brown (F) 11-0;
2. Clemens (P) 10-8; 3. Shepard
(P) 9-4.
Discus: 1. T. Wannemacher
(O) 107-9; 2. R. Beining (O) 98-10;
3. L. Kramer (O) 95-3; 4. Kohart
(P) 84.3.
300-meter hurdles: 1. E.
Grone (F); 2. VanCleave (P); 3. K.
Eickholt (O); 4. E. Maag (F).
400-meter relay: 1. Fort
Jennings 56.0; 2. Paulding A 59.9;
3. Paulding B 60.0.
400-meter dash: S. Korte (F)
1:10; 2. Shepard (P) 1:16; 3. G.
Clay (F) 1:18.2.
Pole vault: 1. Salinas (P) 9-0.
3,200-meter run: 1. A.
Schimmoeller (F).
800-meter run: 1. A. Siefker
(O) 2:42.7; 2. K. Stechschulte (F)
2:43.6; 3. Nardone (P) 2:51.2; 4.
Shepard (P) 3:00.7.
3,200-meter relay: 1. Paulding
11:24.9; 2. Fort Jennings 11:27.6.
800-meter relay: 1. Fort
Jennings 1:54.1; 2. Paulding A
2:01.2; 3. Paulding B 2:07.6.
200-meter dash: 1. Ma.
Schroeder (F) 28.0; 2. L. Bruskotter
(F) 29.1; 3. Weller (P) 30.5; 4.
Cook (P) 32.4.
1,600-meter relay: 1. Fort
Jennings 4:46.7; 2. Paulding
4:53.1.
Boys Team Scores: Ottoville
14, Paulding 64, Ft Jennings 86.
Shot put: 1. G. Rue (O) 47-10
1/2; 2. A. Krietemeyer (F) 42-9
1/2; 3. K. Schnipke (O) 38-6 1/2;
4. Shrider (P) 37-0.
110-meter hurdles: 1. Echols
(P) 17.4; 2. Carnahan (P) 18.4;
3. A. Eickholt (O) 18.4; 4. J.
Schimmoeller (F) 19.4.
100-meter dash: 1. J.
Schroeder (O) 12.2; 2. M. Burgei
(O) 12.4; 3. Gamble (P) 12.9; 4. K.
Schnipke (O) 12.9.
1,600-meter run:1. R.
Honigford; 2. Layman (P); 3. J.
Turnwald (O); 4. Dunahan (P).
High jump: 1. Blenel (P) 5-10;
2. G. Rue (O) 5-10; 3. Echols (P)
5-8; 4. Burnett (P) 5-2.
Long jump: 1. Carnahan (P)
16-9 1/2; 2. L.Maag (O) 16-8 1/4;
3. J. Schroeder (O) 15-5 1/2; 4. A.
Meyer (O) 14-9.
Discus: 1. A. Krietemeyer (F)
140-5; 2. G. Rue (O) 136-10; 3. J.
Schroeder (O) 135-1; 4. Schindler
(P) 106-5.
300-meter hurdles: 1. J.
Turnwald (O) 48.2; 2. Echols
(P) 48.9; 3. Pack (P) 51.1; 4. J.
Schimmoeller (F) 51.4.
400-meter relay: 1. Paulding
49.0; 2. Ottoville 49.2; 3. Fort
Jennings 50.2.
400-meter dash: 1. Bland (P);
2. Valdez (P); 3. Manley (P); 4. L.
Kortorkax (O).
Pole vault: 1. A. Eickholt (O)
11-0; 2. L. Kortorkax (O) 10-6; 3.
D. Klima (O) 10-6; 4. Carnahan
(P) 10-0.
3,200-meter run: 1. Dunahan
(P); 2. J. Turnwald (O); 3. Troyer
(P); 4. T. Blankemeyer (F).
800-meter run: 1. R. Honigford
(O) 2:14.5; 2. Burnett (P) 2:16.9;
3. Layman (P) 2:22.5; 4. Munger
(P) 2:28.8.
3,200-meter relay: 1. Ottoville
9:21.7; 2. Paulding 9:23; 3. Fort
Jennings 10:39.2.
800-meter relay: 1. Ottoville
1:49.9; 2. {aulding 1:46.1; 3. Fort
Jennings 1:48.3.
200-meter dash: 1. Bevly
(O) 25.6; 2. Kleman (F) 26.5; 3.
Gardner (P) 26.7; 4. Valdez (P)
27.3.
1,600-meter relay: 1. Ottoville
3:58; 2. Paulding 4:04.5; 3. Fort
Jennings 4:06.8.
-----
Wildcats pound
Bearcats
SPENCERVILLE —
The defending Division
IV baseball champion
Minster Wildcats served
notice Thursday night at
Spencerville that they are out
for more as they pounded
the host Bearcats 12-1 in a
5-inning affair.
The Wildcats (2-0) outhit
the Bearcats (2-3) 13-3
Jared Rex, Matt
Youngpeter and Danny
Settlemire (double) had hits
for the hosts, who host Perry
for a noon-time doubleheader
Saturday.
Minster 0 2 7 0 3 - 12 13 1
Spencerville 0 0 0 0 1 - 1 3 2
WP: Adam Niemeyer. LP:
Jonathon Shimp. 2B: Andrew
Knapke (M), Drew Elson (M),
Danny Settlemire (S).
LOCAL ROUNDUP
SPORTS BRIEFS
The Associated Press
GOLF
AUGUSTA, Ga. — The appoint-
ment of a new chief executive at
IBM has revived the debate over
Augusta National’s all-male mem-
bership just one week before the
Masters.
IBM hired Virginia Rometty as its
CEO this year, which could mean a
break in recent tradition if Augusta
sticks to its history of never having
a woman as one of its roughly 300
members.
The last four CEOs of IBM all
belonged to the club. However, a
woman has never worn an Augusta
green jacket since it opened in 1933.
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. —
Amy Yang shot a 6-under 66 to
take a one-stroke lead over Lindsey
Wright in the opening round of the
Kraft Nabisco Championship.
HUMBLE, Texas — Angel
Cabrera and Carl Pettersson shot
7-under 65 in calm morning con-
ditions to top the Houston Open
leaderboard before first-round play
was suspended because of a thun-
derstorm.
Only 51 players completed play
before the horn sounded at 1:27
p.m.
Defending champion Phil
Mickelson, Fred Couples and Ernie
Els, who needs a victory to qualify
for the Masters next week, were
playing their front nines when play
was suspended.
SCIACCA, Sicily — Ireland’s
Peter Lawrie shot an 8-under 64
at Verdura Golf and Spa Resort to
take a 1-stroke lead after the first
round of the Sicilian Open.
Wales’ Jamie Donaldson,
Denmark’s Soren Kjeldsen and
Argentina’s Tano Goya were tied
for second. John Daly opened with
a 71 and Italian teenager Matteo
Manassero had a 71.
PRO FOOTBALL
NEW ORLEANS — The Saints
were still weighing whether to
appeal Sean Payton’s suspension
and who to hire as an interim coach
should his season-long punishment
be upheld.
Payton, GM Mickey Loomis and
their staffs were in meetings at the
team’s suburban headquarters and
focused primarily on preparations
for next month’s NFL draft, a per-
son familiar with the situation said,
speaking on condition of anonym-
ity because the Saints have not
announced their plans.
Payton’s suspension in connec-
tion with the Saints’ bounty scandal
is slated to begin on Sunday and
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell
has ruled he has until Monday to
appeal.
SAN FRANCISCO — Carlos
Rogers says he re-signed with the
San Francisco 49ers this month on
a $31.3 million, 4-year contract.
1
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Friday, March 30, 3012 The Herald — 7
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Close of business March 29, 2012
The Jefferson “Red” sixth-grade girls hardwood team took first place on a last-
second shot in overtime at the Ada Tournament with a 5-0 record, finishing the
2011-12 season at 14-1. Members of the team are, front left to right, Marissa Sheeter
and Maggie Kimmett; second row, Devyn Carder, Greta Fitch, Sarah Miller, Macy
Wallace, Katie Pohlman and Mikayla Bennett; and back, head coach Butch Lucas
and assistant coach Eric Wallace. Absent is assistant Randy Fischbach.
Jefferson ‘Red’ girls cagers
Photo submitted
(Continued from Page 6)
defense. We made the plays
we are capable of making.
That’s what it takes to be
a good team in high school
baseball: throw strikes, don’t
give any free bases, bases on
errors and make the plays you
are capable of making and we
did a good job of that.”
Hellman took the loss
for Fort Jennings as he went
5-plus innings, allowing six
runs on 10 hits with five
strikeouts. Verhoff allowed
one run one two hits with five
strikeouts.
Kurt Warnecke and
Cody Warnecke both had
a single and double for the
Musketeers.
Lincolnview is in a base-
ball tri-matchup with Antwerp
at St. John’s starting 11 a.m.
Saturday.
Jennings hosts Ottawa-
Glandorf 5 p.m. Monday.
* * *
Lincolnview 002 014 0 - 7 12 1
Fort Jennings 101 000 0 - 2 6 1
WP-Longstreth. LP-Hellman.
Lancers
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 28 22 .560 —
Boston 28 22 .560 —
New York 26 25 .510 2 1/2
Toronto 17 34 .333 11 1/2
New Jersey 17 35 .327 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 36 13 .735 —
Orlando 32 19 .627 5
Atlanta 30 22 .577 7 1/2
Washington 11 39 .220 25 1/2
Charlotte 7 41 .146 28 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Chicago 41 11 .788 —
Indiana 30 20 .600 10
Milwaukee 23 27 .460 17
Detroit 18 32 .360 22
Cleveland 17 31 .354 22
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 35 14 .714 —
Memphis 27 21 .563 7 1/2
Dallas 29 23 .558 7 1/2
Houston 27 24 .529 9
New Orleans 13 38 .255 23
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 39 12 .765 —
Utah 27 24 .529 12
Denver 27 24 .529 12
Minnesota 25 27 .481 14 1/2
Portland 24 27 .471 15
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Lakers 31 20 .608 —
L.A. Clippers 29 21 .580 1 1/2
Phoenix 25 26 .490 6
Golden State 20 29 .408 10
Sacramento 17 33 .340 13 1/2
x-clinched playoff spot
———
Thursday’s Results
Indiana 93, Washington 89
Miami 106, Dallas 85
Portland 99, New Orleans 93
Oklahoma City 102, L.A. Lakers 93
Today’s Games
Denver at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Miami at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
New York at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.
Boston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
New Jersey at Golden State, 10:30
p.m.
Portland at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
p.m.
Saturday’s Games
New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 3:30
p.m.
Charlotte at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-N.Y. Rangers 77 49 21 7 105 213 172
x-Pittsburgh 77 47 24 6 100 259 205
x-Philadelphia 77 45 24 8 98 248 214
New Jersey 78 44 28 6 94 214 205
N.Y. Islanders 77 33 33 11 77 190 230
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 77 45 28 4 94 251 189
Ottawa 77 39 28 10 88 236 227
Buffalo 77 38 29 10 86 202 210
Toronto 78 33 36 9 75 218 249
Montreal 77 29 34 14 72 199 214
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 77 37 24 16 90 191 211
Washington 78 39 31 8 86 209 221
Winnipeg 77 35 34 8 78 207 227
Tampa Bay 77 35 35 7 77 220 266
Carolina 77 31 31 15 77 205 228
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis 78 48 20 10 106 202 151
x-Detroit 77 46 26 5 97 239 191
x-Nashville 77 44 25 8 96 219 202
Chicago 78 43 26 9 95 235 225
Columbus 77 25 45 7 57 181 252
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver 77 47 21 9 103 231 187
Colorado 79 40 33 6 86 201 208
Calgary 78 35 28 15 85 191 215
Minnesota 77 32 35 10 74 164 212
Edmonton 77 31 37 9 71 207 226
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas 77 42 30 5 89 205 204
Phoenix 78 38 27 13 89 202 202
Los Angeles 77 38 27 12 88 178 165
San Jose 78 39 29 10 88 211 201
Anaheim 77 33 33 11 77 194 213
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Thursday’s Results
Washington 3, Boston 2, SO
Chicago 4, St. Louis 3, SO
Philadelphia 7, Toronto 1
New Jersey 6, Tampa Bay 4
N.Y. Islanders 5, Pittsburgh 3
Minnesota 3, Florida 2, OT
Phoenix 2, San Jose 0
Today’s Games
Winnipeg at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Florida at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Dallas at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Washington, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Florida at Detroit, 4 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
The Associated Press
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 2 0 0 1.000 121 97
San Antonio 2 1 0 .667 161 145
Iowa 1 1 0 .500 118 132
Kansas City 0 3 0 .000 95 157
West Division
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 2 1 0 .667 197 164
Utah 2 1 0 .667 177 162
San Jose 1 1 0 .500 130 130
Spokane 1 1 0 .500 126 129
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
South Division
W L T Pct PF PA
Georgia 2 1 0 .667 157 130
Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 93 97
Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 98 117
New Orleans 0 2 0 .000 104 128
Orlando 0 3 0 .000 109 138
Eastern Division
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 2 0 0 1.000 147 121
Milwaukee 2 1 0 .667 193 153
Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 88 80
Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 139 173
———
Thursday’s Results
San Antonio 47, Orlando 34
Milwaukee 63, Pittsburgh 40
Arizona 56, Kansas City 28
Today’s Games
Jacksonville at Tampa Bay, 7:30
p.m.
San Jose at Spokane, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Chicago at Iowa, 8:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
NHL GLANCE
ARENA FOOTBALL LEAGUE
In 1927, in Hinckley, Ill., the Harlem Globetrotters played the
first game of their long franchise history. The original team was
actually from Chicago. They didn’t play a game in Harlem until
1968.
By EDDIE PELLS
The Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS —
Looking for those charming
underdog stories? Go find the
DVD from last year.
This year’s
Final Four brings
together an
ensemble of big-
name schools,
all saddled with
their typically
big-time issues
— a reminder that
everything in col-
lege sports is not
as pure as the NCAA and its
“student-athletes” would like
us to believe.
In the national semifi-
nals Saturday, Kentucky
plays Louisville and Ohio
State meets Kansas. All the
schools have made headlines
for a variety of off-the-court
reasons over the last several
months, including the prolif-
eration of one-and-done play-
ers, stories about coaches in
courtrooms and a handful of
financial misdeeds involving
recruits, players, coaches and
even ticket managers.
And so, while there are no
little vs. big stories this year
— the way tiny Butler or over-
looked VCU beat the odds
last season to make it to col-
lege basketball’s pinnacle —
we’re regaled with tall tales of
redemption and resurrection:
Teams and coaches that over-
came their problems and got
everyone thinking about bas-
ketball instead of the under-
side of a business driven by a
$10.8 billion TV contract.
“There are a lot of good
players out there who are per-
forming right now,” Kentucky
coach John Calipari said.
For his part, Calipari is per-
fecting the art of luring a play-
er for one, maybe two seasons,
to contend for a championship,
then saying a guilt-free good-
bye. During his more candid
moments, he’ll tell you he’s
no fan of the rule that allows
players to leave college after a
single year. But it’s out of his
hands. It’s the NBA that put in
the rule stating players must
be 19 before they can enter
the draft.
What’s a coach to do?
“I think they trust that
when the year is out, they’re
going to get the right infor-
mation and be treated fairly,”
Calipari replied. “They don’t
worry about it. Historically,
we don’t convince kids to stay
who should leave. They are
going to get the information
and they know that. They are
just going to play basketball.”
It means freshmen Anthony
Davis and Michael Kidd-
Gilchrist, both projected as
high lottery picks, probably
will be gone after this season
and it’s not impossible to think
the rest of the starting lineup
— all freshmen and sopho-
mores — could leave, as well.
Calipari, who has had
NCAA trouble at every step
along his college head-coach-
ing career, said this is a price
worth paying for running a
“players-first” program —
with players who worry about
winning first, then reap the
benefits when the NBA comes
calling.
While he applauds his
team’s unselfishness, the
NCAA insists it is toughen-
ing its academic standards and
isn’t so concerned with the 15
players who do leave after one
year but rather the 5,500 who
don’t.
“I’ve made no secret of the
fact I’d prefer to have a dif-
ferent model,”
NCAA presi-
dent Mark
Emmert said.
“Most people
want a differ-
ent model. It
would be nice
if that were
the case but I
don’t think we
should blow one-and-done out
of proportion and suggest this
is undermining the educational
mission of the NCAA.”
While the NCAA spins
that issue, its rules police have
spent plenty of time visiting
Ohio State’s athletic depart-
ment over the last several
years. First, there was the fir-
ing of coach Jim O’Brien,
who was found to have given
money to a recruit, then later
sued the school for wrongful
termination because he got the
ax before the NCAA had offi-
cially determined he’d done
anything wrong.
Thad Matta cleaned up that
mess and has led the Buckeyes
to the Final Four twice in the
last seven years. Though the
basketball program has recov-
ered nicely, the athletic depart-
ment didn’t learn all its les-
sons: The football team is on
probation because of viola-
tions that happened during Jim
Tressel’s tenure.
The takeaway quote from
that entire episode came from
university president Gordon
Gee, when asked if he was
going to dismiss Tressel while
the coach’s problems were still
unfolding.
“No; are you kidding?” Gee
asked with a laugh. “Let me be
very clear. I’m just hoping the
coach doesn’t dismiss me.”
The last year has not been
the greatest for college sports,
with child sex abuse allegations
at Penn State and Syracuse
and a number of scandals
uncovered at Miami, North
Carolina, Southern California,
Tennessee and elsewhere.
This week, of course, is sup-
posed to be a celebration of
what’s right with college sports.
Yet it’s hard not to ignore some
tidbits that came up on the road
to the Final Four:
—Louisville spent the first
two weeks of the tournament
off campus, not wanting to fly
back and forth to play games
scheduled by the NCAA in
Portland and Phoenix.
—Last year’s champion,
Connecticut, isn’t eligible to
play in the tournament next
year because of NCAA aca-
demic sanctions, though the
school is appealing.
—This year’s Final Four
coaches are making between
$2.5 million and $3.8 million
this season and will cash in on
six-figure bonuses if they win
the national title.
The NCAA hasn’t been as
big a player at Kansas but
that’s not to say the Jayhawks
are immune to corruption.
Last May, five athletic
department employees and
consultants got between 37
and 57 months’ prison time
for unlawfully selling football
and basketball season tickets
to ticket brokers and others,
then pocketing the money.
Athletic director Lew
Perkins saw his name sul-
lied, and although he wasn’t
accused of any wrongdoing,
he retired a year ahead of
schedule in the wake of the
scandal.
At Louisville, the NCAA
didn’t get involved, but Pitino
certainly landed in the head-
lines for all the wrong rea-
sons.
His name was trending for
months while details of his
extramarital affair and the ensu-
ing extortion trial were aired out
in public. Pitino’s reputation
was damaged, and the woman
who tried to bribe him to keep
the thing secret got a seven-year
prison sentence.
“A lot of times the last two
years I took a lot of grief from
a lot of people saying a lot of
things,” Pitino said last week
after Louisville beat Florida to
make his sixth Final Four. “And
I never thought in my life I
could turn the other cheek and
just walk on. And I did. And
some of the most ugly things
I’ve heard, I just took it inside.
And today, as I look back on it,
I’m real proud that you could
turn the other cheek.”
This week, Pitino keeps
looking forward, refusing to
take the bait from all those
Kentucky Wildcats fans,
who may never forgive the
59-year-old coach for leaving
them, heading to the NBA,
then coming back a few years
later to coach their archrival.
The Kentucky-Louisville
story line is the best thing
going this week in New
Orleans, for what Calipari pre-
dicts will be an epic Final
Four. Without any little teams
cluttering up the court, this
weekend will feature the
most talent, Calipari says,
since 2008, when he brought
Memphis and Derrick Rose to
the Final against Kansas and
Mario Chalmers.
Jared Sullinger (Ohio State),
Thomas Robinson (Kansas)
and Davis (Kentucky) are
first-team AP All-Americans.
Those three teams all have
other players who look very
much like NBA material in the
near future.
“2008 was ridiculous,”
added Calipari, whose trip to
the final later was vacated by
the NCAA because of viola-
tions. “Guess what? This Final
Four will be very similar to
that.”
Final Four brings big
programs to Big Easy
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8 – The Herald Friday, March 30, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
Read it. Live it. Love it!
One look at The Delphos Herald and you’re sure to fall in love with it. For the best in business,
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419-695-0015
PITSENBARGER
SUPPLY
234 N. Canal St.
Delphos, O.
Ph. 692-1010
Professional Parts People
RAABE FORD
LINCOLN
11260 Elida Road
DELPHOS, OH 45833
Ph. 692-0055
Toll Free 1-800-589-7876
HARTER
& SCHIER
FUNERAL
HOME
209 W. 3rd St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-692-8055
130 N. MAIN ST.
DELPHOS
PHONE
419-692-0861
•CARPET
•FURNITURE
Daily 9-5:30
Sat. 9-4, Sun. 12-4
Vanamatic
Company
AUTOMATIC
AND HAND
SCREW MACHINE
PRODUCTS
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, O.
A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sunday: 11:00 Worship Service -
Everyone Welcome
Communion first Sunday of every
month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and
assisted living.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast
Sunday-8:45 a.m. Sunday School
(Adults only, no children); 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service
Wednesday - 11:15 a.m. Good
Morning/Good Shepherd; 7:00 p.m.
InReach/OutReach Meeting
Thursday - 6:00 p.m. Light
Supper; 7:00 p.m. Worship with First
Communion
Friday - 12:00 p.m. Delphos
Ministerial Community Service; 7:00
p.m. Tenebrae Service
Saturday - 8:00 a.m. Prayer
Breakfast; 9:30 a.m. Council Meeting
Sunday - 7:30 a.m. Easter Sunrise
Service; 8:30 a.m. Breakfast; 9:00 a.m.
Egg Hunt; 10:00 a.m. Easter Worship
Service
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Lead Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - “Celebration of
Worship” with Kids Church & Nursery
provided.; 6:00 p.m. Youth Ministry at
The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Discipleship
in The Upper Level
For more info see our website: www.
delphosfirstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main,
Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberlin
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m,
6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Saturday - 10:00 a.m. - The Big
Hunt - Children, toddler through 5th
grade, are welcome in going on a
hunt for 3,000 eggs!
Sunday- 8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE, 5 til 10 meet you at the Altar;
10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE
Tuesday - 9:00 a.m. - MUMS
Thursday - 6:30 p.m. Tennebrae
Communion Service
Friday - Good Friday - Office
Closed
Saturday - 8:45 a.m. Youth Trash-
A-Thon

SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Tommy Sandefer, lead pastor
Ron Prewitt, sr. adult pastor
Sunday worship & children’s minis-
try - 10:00 a.m.
www.vwvcoh.com
facebook: vwvcoh
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - Services: 9:00 a.m., 10:30
a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday - 10:00 a.m.-noon Banquet
Table Food Pantry
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Worship
Service
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Father Tom Extejt
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship Service/
Communion; 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible
Study; 9:30 a.m. Church School for
all ages; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service/
Communion; 11:30 a.m. Radio Worship
on WDOH, Sr. Hi Adopt-a-Highway: 1:00
-2:30 p.m Easter Kids Festival; 1:30 p.m.
Nursing Home Communion; 4:00 p.m.
Confirmation Class
Tuesday - 7:00 p.m. Outreach
Committee
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Chancel Choir
Thursday - 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
Supper’s On Us; 7:00 p.m. Maundy
Thursday Service
Friday - 12:00 Noon Good Friday @ St.
Peter Lutheran

MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
Easter celebrations
Wednesday, April 4, 2012
7:30 p.m. - Tenebrae
This service recalls the suffering
of Christ in the Garden of Olives and
in his Passion. This ceremony is held
in semi-darkness with singing, prayer
and scripture that enters into Christ’
sorrow and yet proclaims the resur-
rection.
Thursday, April 5, 2012
7:30 p.m. - Mass of the Lord’s
Supper
Good Friday, April 6, 2012
12 Noon – Stations of the Cross by
the 8th Grade
12:45 p.m. – Reflections in Song
and Spoken Word by the High School
1:30 p.m. – Celebration of the
Lord’s Passion, the second of the three
holy days
7:30 p.m. – Celebration of the
Lord’s Passion
Holy Saturday, April 7, 2012
8:00 p.m. – The Easter Vigil
Easter Sunday, April 8, 2012
Masses are at 7:30, 9:15 and 11:30
a.m. This day completes the Paschal
Mystery, the Sacred Triduum, the holy
days of Christ’s suffering, death and
resurrection. We who have entered
into the suffering and death with Jesus
Christ shall also celebrate His trium-
phant rising from the dead.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
ELIDA/LIMA/GOMER
VAN WERT COUNTY
PUTNAM COUNTY
LANDECK
DELPHOS
SPENCERVILLE
Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.
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e
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www.delphosherald.com The Herald —9
Friday, March 30, 2012
The graphic tattoos that cover
the bodies of millions of Russian
prisoners symbolize their sins and
crimes, their pain and suffering.
Some of the tattoos are beauti-
ful and hint at redemption. Others
are disgusting, especially those
etched involuntarily into the faces
of victims by other prisoners as
punishment for especially shame-
ful crimes behind bars or on the
outside.
Put all of these images together,
said artist Scott Erickson, and they
tell the stories of broken people.
That’s the big idea that gripped
him as he studied tattoo culture
while creating a set of “Stations of
the Cross” images for a Lenten art
exhibit at Ecclesia Church in the
hip, edgy Montrose neighborhood
near downtown Houston.
For many young Americans,
it’s impossible to talk about their
tattoos without needing to candid-
ly describe the peaks and valleys
of their own lives. The tattoos are
like emotional maps that are hard
to hide.
“We have lots of people who
have tattoos. Some members of
our church have criminal records.
Some have been shamed and
abused. Some have struggled with
drugs,” explained Erickson, who
serves as “artist in residence” at
Ecclesia.
“A lot of these people thought
they needed to cover up their tat-
toos when they started coming to
church. They weren’t sure that
they wanted to share those parts
of their lives with others,” he said.
“What we’re trying to do is tell
them that their tattoos are part of
who they are and now we want to
talk about who they are becom-
ing.”
Thus, the leaders of Ecclesia
Church -- created in 1999 by a co-
alition of Southern Baptists, Pres-
byterians and others -- have raised
eyebrows and inspired headlines
by embracing tattoos as the artis-
tic medium for their eighth annual
art exhibit during the 40-day sea-
son that leads to Easter. The title
is “Cruciformity: Stations of the
Cross on Skin.”
The plan, explained the Rev.
Chris Seay, was for 10 members
to have Erickson’s images perma-
nently tattooed onto their bodies
shortly before Ash Wednesday.
These volunteers would stand in
the church’s gallery on the first
night of Lent, surrounded by pho-
tos of their tattoos -- photos that
would then remain on display
throughout the season.
Instead, at least 60 members of
the church have visited one of the
dozen or so nearby tattoo studios
to mix blood, sweat and ink and
another dozen have scheduled ap-
pointments. Seay said as many as
150 may end up taking part, out
of a flock averaging about 1,500
worshippers in five weekend ser-
vices.
“I have spent way more time
than I ever expected trying to talk
some people out of doing this,” he
said. “People need to give this de-
cision some serious thought. ... It’s
also good to seek the permission
of your spouse.”
The pastor decided to cover his
right upper arm with an image of a
tree growing out of an empty cof-
fin -- Erickson’s symbol for Jesus
rising from the dead. Seay had a
tattoo artist inscribe a tribute on
the trunk in honor of his grandfa-
ther, a prominent Southern Baptist
pastor who died this past year.
“I was a bit worried at first,”
he said, “but my grandmother said
she thought it was beautiful.”
One church member, who
works with cancer patients, had
the “Jesus is Laid in the Tomb”
image -- a rose in a coffin -- tat-
tooed on one foot and plans to
add the resurrection image on her
other foot. One mother selected
the “Jesus Meets His Mother” im-
age, which is a rose surrounded
by symbols of suffering. Another
member, with his wife’s blessing,
plans to have all 10 images tat-
tooed onto his body.
The project has already created
buzz in the tattooing community,
said Erickson.
But the key is not that some
members of this church decided
get tattoos. The key is that more
than half of its members already
had tattoos -- like 36 percent of
Americans between 18 and 25, ac-
cording to a Pew Forum study.
“Our invitation to do this was
not for everybody,” said Erickson.
“We’re not creating a tribe, here.
You don’t have to have a tattoo
to come to this church. ... But we
already have so many people here
who do have tattoos and those
images are part of their stories.
We’re telling them that it’s good
for them, that it’s normal, to add
Christian symbols into that mix.
They get it.”
(Terry Mattingly is the director of the
Washington Journalism Center at the Council
for Christian Colleges and Universities and
leads the GetReligion.org project to study re-
ligion and the news.)

(EDITORS: For editorial questions, please
contact Kendra Phipps at kphipps@amuni-
versal.com.)
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syn-
dicate
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL
UCLICK FOR UFS
1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106;
816-581-7500
TERRY MATTINGLY
On
Religion
Lenten art, on skin
10 – The Herald Friday, March 30, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
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(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Advertise Your Business
DAILY
For a low, low price!
419 695-0015

We are Growing! Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a start of the art
facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record, Desire to
enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing a plus.

Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including Medical, Rx,
Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards premiums. Company paid
Basic Life Ins, STD,& LTD. 401k Plan w/company match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we are unable
to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.

Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a state
of the art facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Laboratory Technician
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record,
Desire to enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing required.
Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including
Medical, Rx, Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards
premiums. Company paid Basic Life & Disability Ins. 401k Plan w/company
match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we
are unable to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.
MANUFACTURING OPPORTUNITIES
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 24 years of steady
employment. Now, our business is growing again, creating the following new
employment opportunities:
MACHINE REPAIR TECHNICIANS:
•Performs installation, troubleshooting, and repair of various machinery and
equipment.
Qualifications: At least 3 years of multi-trade experience/training with indus-
trial electrical, mechanical, hydraulics/pneumatics, robotics, and PLC’s; Work-
ing knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges, test equipment, and
blueprints/schematics
MACHINING TECHNICIAN
•Develops, implements & modifies CNC programs for high-volume production
and new product launches
•Monitors equipment/tooling, processes, and procedures and assists in imple-
menting actions to support safety, quality and productivity
•Trains others in set-up, operation, and maintenance of equipment
Qualifications: At least 3 years of related experience and formal training in pro-
gramming of CNC lathe and mills; exposure to SPC and blueprint reading also
required
FIRST-LINE PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
•Plans and directs work of up to 15 production associates
•Analyzes production processes and results and takes actions in support of safety,
quality, productivity, and cost containment
•Provides regular communication and coaching of associates through daily con-
tact, departmental meetings, and performance evaluations
Qualifications: Associate degree, or equivalent, and at least 3 years of pro-
duction supervision required. Prior experience with painting/coating processes
preferred.
In return for your expertise, AAP offers a competitive salary plus profit-sharing
and excellent fringe benefits--including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career opportunity with
a growing company, then we want to hear from you. Please send your qualifica-
tions with salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
3 bedroom, 3 car garage.
New roof, updated kitchen, bath, and more! $70,500.
Approx. monthly payment -
$
376.48
details, pics and more chbsinc.com 419-586-8220
Open House
9am-5pm
Fri., Sat. & Sun.
$0 Down • $0 Closing
Home warranty.
Remodeled!
604 W. 7th St., Delphos
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
Kreative
Learning
Preschool
340 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH
45833
419-695-5934
2012/2013
Registration
Going On
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
CONSTRUCTION COM-
PANY needs reliable and
experienced person. Ex-
perience in concrete, roof-
ing, siding, framing help-
ful. Must be willing to
learn. Send replies to Box
172 c/o Delphos Herald,
405 N. Main St., Delphos,
OH 45833
080

Help Wanted
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Sales Reps.
Responsibilities: Greeting
customers, paperwork, ex-
plaining company benefits,
and procedures. Flexible
hours, days, nights, week-
end shifts available. Full/
p a r t - t i me . C a l l
(877)623-9160
DRIVER NEEDED: Local
business is seeking a
part-time driver for late
night/early morning. Ap-
proximately 10 hours per
week plus additional deliv-
eries as needed, up to 30
hours per week. No CDL
required. Driver must sub-
mit to pre-employment
physical/drug screening
and random drug screen-
ing during employment.
Retirees welcome. Please
send replies to Box 166
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
FULL TIME Graphic Artist
is needed by local com-
pany. Website knowledge
and able to do page lay-
outs a plus. Benefits pack-
age includes: Health, Den-
tal, 401K & Vacation.
Send replies to Box 165
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
HELP WANTED
Local business seeking
part-time office help. Ap-
plicant will need to be de-
tail oriented and willing to
learn. Applicant will per-
form various office tasks
along with industry spe-
cific duties. Must be profi-
cient in Microsoft Office
and general PC functions.
Position will include some
benefits, including vaca-
tion. Send replies to Box
169 c/o Delphos Herald,
405 N. Main St., Delphos,
OH 45833
HELP WANTED. Must be
18 yrs old. Flexible hours.
Apply in person -no phone
calls- at Suever’s Town
House Carryout, 944 E.
Fifth St., Delphos, OH
45833.
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
JUVENILE RESIDENTIAL
Program looking for pa-
tient, caring and energetic
people to teach and rein-
force social, academic and
self-help skills to troubled
youth. 4 day work week
with either Saturday or
Sunday off, mostly after-
noon and evening hours.
Competitive salary and
benefit package. Send re-
sume and cover letter to:
Recruitment Director, P.O.
Box 150, Van Wert, OH
45891
LOCAL BUSINESS look-
ing for full time office clerk.
Applicant should be or -
ganized, reliable and good
with money. Must be
friendly with customers
and computer knowledge
is preferred. Send replies
to Box 171 c/o Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
ALPLA of Lima, an extru-
sion blow molding facility
is accepting resumes for
the position of Mainte -
nance Technician. Some
of the responsibilities for
this position will include
Mai ntenance of bl ow
molding machines, instal-
lation of machines, per-
form mechanical and elec-
trical layout, routine pre-
ventive maintenance, per-
forms troubleshooting and
repairs machines inde -
pendently and provides
training.
ALPLA offers competitive
wages and benefits includ-
ing medical, dental, and
vision insurance, plus
401K plan. To be consid-
ered for the position an
applicant must be able to
successfully pass a back-
ground check and a drug
screen.
Resumes should be sent
to the below address:
ALPLA
3320 Ft. Shawnee Indus-
trial Drive
Attn: Human Resources
Lima, OH 45806
OPTOMETRIC OFFICE
looking for Part-time op-
tometric assistant. Medi-
cal office experience pre-
ferred. Mail resumes to
Fishbaugh Family Eyecare
825 W. Market Street
Suite 201. Lima, Ohio
45805.
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
PART-TIME ACCOUNT-
ANT 16-20hrs/week. Ac-
counts receivable/payable,
reconciliations, payroll,
b u d g e t i n g a n d
record-keeping. Needs to
be proficient in Quick -
books. Flexible hours, ex-
perience required. Send
resume to CCC 238 N.
Main, Delphos, OH, Attn:
Bruce.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
FOR SALE: Cochrane
oak round claw foot table
with 4 chairs and 2 leaves.
$300. Excellent condition.
Entertai nment center,
35x30” TV opening. In
good condition. $30 OBO.
Large wall picture, country
steps, $20 OBO. Have
pictures - can email.
Ph o n e o r t e x t
419-303-7930.
340

Garage Sales
340

Garage Sales
725 N. Water Street, Fort
Jennings. Furniture, toys
and Thirty-One products
only. Furniture includes
cherry credenza, 3-corner
desks, office chairs, dress-
ers, end tables, lamps, TV
with stand, 3-piece break-
fast set, queen bed,
queen/king bed rails, baby
crib, book case, floor mir-
ror, copper kettle, old
school desk, electric key-
board, mi scel l aneous.
Thursday 4pm-7pm, Fri-
day 9am-6pm, and Satur-
day 9am-2pm.
GARAGE SALE
Sponsored by the Junior
Optimist Club. 114 North
Main St. by Lehmann’s
Furniture. Thursday 3/29
(4pm-8pm), Saturday 3/31
(9am-4pm). All proceeds
go to MAKE A WISH
FOUNDATION!!!
501

Misc. for Sale
FOR SALE: Pair of Khaki
Campbell ducks. Asking
$30.00
560

Lawn & Garden
WILL DO Lawn Mowing
and odd jobs. Specializing
in the elderly. Over 30
years experience. Call
419-303-0865
600

Apts. for Rent
2 BEDROOM ranch du-
plex, range/refrigerator.
539 Toomey St .
$400/Month plus utilities.
Nice clean Apartment.
419-286-2816
780

Business Property
FURNISHED OFFICE
space. 3 large upstairs of-
fices conveniently located
in downtown Delphos.
Completely furnished with:
desks, file cabinets, book
cases, chairs, phones,
copier available. Private
entrance, waiting room,
kitchen & copy room. All
utilities included. Rent 1 or
2 for $350/mo. each, or all
3 for $950/mo. Cal l
(419)236-6616 for details.
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
OAK FINISH Entertain-
ment Center -4 yrs old, ex-
cellent condition. TV com-
par t ment measur es
28Hx39Wx19D, will hold
up to a 40in TV. $50. Call
419-203-1590
999

Legals
RESOLUTION #2012-2
A resolution authorizing
the Board of Control for
the City of Delphos to do-
nate two (2) Family Sea-
son Swimming Passes to
the Chamber of Com-
merce for the annual
Chamber of Commerce
Dinner and declaring it an
emergency.
ORDINANCE #2012-16
An Ordinance authorizing
the City Auditor to transfer
certain funds within the
funds of the City of Del-
phos, Allen and Van Wert
counties, and declaring it
an emergency.
Passed and approved this
19th day of March 2012.
Kimberly Riddell,
Council Pres.
ATTEST;
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete text of this leg-
islation is on record at the
Municipal Building and
can be viewed during
regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller
Council Clerk
3/23/12, 3/30/12
080

Help Wanted
080

Help Wanted
Answer to
Puzzle
Today’s Crossword
Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Tooth-fillers’ org.
4 Pitcher
8 Bonny miss
12 Felt boot
13 El --, Texas
14 Rainbow god-
dess
15 To the point
17 Air duct
18 Slow to under-
stand
19 “Alfie” star
21 Drapery sup-
ports
23 Make like a bea-
ver
24 Made cookies
27 Type of synthe-
sizer
29 Rink surface
30 Sevareid of the
news
32 Prune
36 Block brand
38 Low voice
40 APB datum
41 -- fixe
43 Written in the
stars
45 Mr. Lugosi
47 Foolish
49 Arrowhead ma-
terial
51 Cr yst al - f i l l ed
rocks
55 -- -eyed
56 Forever
58 Seance sounds
59 Compos mentis
60 FedEx truck
61 Pr oof r eadi ng
mark
62 Warty critter
63 Stopped for
lunch
DOWN
1 Lhasa --
2 Paint hastily
3 CPA’s record
4 Part of a serial
5 Ebbed
6 PC button
7 Cadet’s org.
8 Occupations
9 Place for a ro-
deo
10 Tendon
11 Former JFK ar-
rival
16 Antidote
20 Historian’s word
22 S e e m e d
pleased
24 Keane of “The
Family Circus”
25 Poker card
26 Beer barrel
28 Autumn mo.
31 Charlotte -- of
“Bananas”
33 “Unforgettable”
singer
34 1950s prez
35 Water lily leaf
37 Most unctuous
39 Volunteered
42 Mr. Rather
44 Like -- -- of
bricks
45 Musical key(2
wds.)
46 Wed on the run
48 Booster rocket
50 Semester ender
52 Prima donna
53 Coup d’--
54 New Year’s Eve
word
55 Almost grads
57 Chinese “way”
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Howard G. Metzger
Loving Trust, Harriet
E. Metzger Loving
Trust to Allen Dale
Lowe, Carol Brooks
Lowe, inlot 315,
Delphos.
Patricia A. Vorst
to Chris A. Vorst,
portion of section 6,
Washington Township.
Pamela J. Barnhart
to James H. Barnhart,
portion of section 35,
Hoaglin Township.
David J. Schulte,
Carol S. Schulte to
David J. Schulte Jr.,
portion of inlot 1763,
Van Wert.
Estate of Cheryl
S. Hayes to Richard
W. Hayes, portion of
section 17, Pleasant
Township.
Dennis R. Fox,
Rose M. Fox to Dennis
R. Fox, Rose M. Fox,
portion of inlots 515,
516, Delphos.
Van Wert County
Area Joint to Amanda
Kitson, Jeremy Kitson,
inlot 1506, Van Wert.
Estate of Joseph
W. Pratt to Joan Tope,
Dennis W. Pratt,
Rocksanna J. Daniels,
Stanley E. Pratt, Kim
R. Phillips, James M.
Blythe, Lori A. Farris,
Dawn M. Blythe,
Gregory R. Blythe,
Ronda S. Merkle,
Jeffrey L. Blythe,
portion of inlots 77,
78, Scott.
Newspapers
Deliver!
By newscarrier,
newstand or online
... subscribe to bring
all the latest in local
and national news
and sports to your
door.
THE DELPHOS
HERALD
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
10 – The Herald Friday, March 30, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
950 Welding
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Q
uality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARMMACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STE EL
STAINLESS STE EL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Advertise Your Business
DAILY
For a low, low price!
419 695-0015

We are Growing! Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a start of the art
facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record, Desire to
enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing a plus.

Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including Medical, Rx,
Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards premiums. Company paid
Basic Life Ins, STD,& LTD. 401k Plan w/company match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we are unable
to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.

Various Positions Available!
Kettle Creations in Lima, OH is a growing food manufacturer, operating in a state
of the art facility as a SQF Level 3 Food Manufacturer.
Recruiting various shifts:
Laboratory Technician
Production Team Members
Maintenance Technicians
Quality Technician
Requirements:
High School Diploma/GED, Team player, Flexible, Excellent Attendance Record,
Desire to enjoy your job, Previous food manufacturing required.
Kettle Creations offers a friendly environment with full benefit package including
Medical, Rx, Dental, Vision plans with a generous company contribution towards
premiums. Company paid Basic Life & Disability Ins. 401k Plan w/company
match, Paid Holidays and Paid Vacations.
Visit www.kettlecreations.net to apply. Due to facility security and quality policy we
are unable to accept walk in applications. Please no phone calls.
MANUFACTURING OPPORTUNITIES
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 24 years of steady
employment. Now, our business is growing again, creating the following new
employment opportunities:
MACHINE REPAIR TECHNICIANS:
•Performs installation, troubleshooting, and repair of various machinery and
equipment.
Qualifications: At least 3 years of multi-trade experience/training with indus-
trial electrical, mechanical, hydraulics/pneumatics, robotics, and PLC’s; Work-
ing knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges, test equipment, and
blueprints/schematics
MACHINING TECHNICIAN
•Develops, implements & modifies CNC programs for high-volume production
and new product launches
•Monitors equipment/tooling, processes, and procedures and assists in imple-
menting actions to support safety, quality and productivity
•Trains others in set-up, operation, and maintenance of equipment
Qualifications: At least 3 years of related experience and formal training in pro-
gramming of CNC lathe and mills; exposure to SPC and blueprint reading also
required
FIRST-LINE PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR
•Plans and directs work of up to 15 production associates
•Analyzes production processes and results and takes actions in support of safety,
quality, productivity, and cost containment
•Provides regular communication and coaching of associates through daily con-
tact, departmental meetings, and performance evaluations
Qualifications: Associate degree, or equivalent, and at least 3 years of pro-
duction supervision required. Prior experience with painting/coating processes
preferred.
In return for your expertise, AAP offers a competitive salary plus profit-sharing
and excellent fringe benefits--including medical, dental, life, vision, and disabil-
ity insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid va-
cation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career opportunity with
a growing company, then we want to hear from you. Please send your qualifica-
tions with salary history to:
AAP ST. MARYS CORP.
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, OH 45885
Attention: Human Resources
3 bedroom, 3 car garage.
New roof, updated kitchen, bath, and more! $70,500.
Approx. monthly payment -
$
376.48
details, pics and more chbsinc.com 419-586-8220
Open House
9am-5pm
Fri., Sat. & Sun.
$0 Down • $0 Closing
Home warranty.
Remodeled!
604 W. 7th St., Delphos
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
Kreative
Learning
Preschool
340 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH
45833
419-695-5934
2012/2013
Registration
Going On
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
CONSTRUCTION COM-
PANY needs reliable and
experienced person. Ex-
perience in concrete, roof-
ing, siding, framing help-
ful. Must be willing to
learn. Send replies to Box
172 c/o Delphos Herald,
405 N. Main St., Delphos,
OH 45833
080

Help Wanted
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Sales Reps.
Responsibilities: Greeting
customers, paperwork, ex-
plaining company benefits,
and procedures. Flexible
hours, days, nights, week-
end shifts available. Full/
p a r t - t i me . C a l l
(877)623-9160
DRIVER NEEDED: Local
business is seeking a
part-time driver for late
night/early morning. Ap-
proximately 10 hours per
week plus additional deliv-
eries as needed, up to 30
hours per week. No CDL
required. Driver must sub-
mit to pre-employment
physical/drug screening
and random drug screen-
ing during employment.
Retirees welcome. Please
send replies to Box 166
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
FULL TIME Graphic Artist
is needed by local com-
pany. Website knowledge
and able to do page lay-
outs a plus. Benefits pack-
age includes: Health, Den-
tal, 401K & Vacation.
Send replies to Box 165
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
HELP WANTED
Local business seeking
part-time office help. Ap-
plicant will need to be de-
tail oriented and willing to
learn. Applicant will per-
form various office tasks
along with industry spe-
cific duties. Must be profi-
cient in Microsoft Office
and general PC functions.
Position will include some
benefits, including vaca-
tion. Send replies to Box
169 c/o Delphos Herald,
405 N. Main St., Delphos,
OH 45833
HELP WANTED. Must be
18 yrs old. Flexible hours.
Apply in person -no phone
calls- at Suever’s Town
House Carryout, 944 E.
Fifth St., Delphos, OH
45833.
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with
respect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
JUVENILE RESIDENTIAL
Program looking for pa-
tient, caring and energetic
people to teach and rein-
force social, academic and
self-help skills to troubled
youth. 4 day work week
with either Saturday or
Sunday off, mostly after-
noon and evening hours.
Competitive salary and
benefit package. Send re-
sume and cover letter to:
Recruitment Director, P.O.
Box 150, Van Wert, OH
45891
LOCAL BUSINESS look-
ing for full time office clerk.
Applicant should be or -
ganized, reliable and good
with money. Must be
friendly with customers
and computer knowledge
is preferred. Send replies
to Box 171 c/o Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
ALPLA of Lima, an extru-
sion blow molding facility
is accepting resumes for
the position of Mainte -
nance Technician. Some
of the responsibilities for
this position will include
Mai ntenance of bl ow
molding machines, instal-
lation of machines, per-
form mechanical and elec-
trical layout, routine pre-
ventive maintenance, per-
forms troubleshooting and
repairs machines inde -
pendently and provides
training.
ALPLA offers competitive
wages and benefits includ-
ing medical, dental, and
vision insurance, plus
401K plan. To be consid-
ered for the position an
applicant must be able to
successfully pass a back-
ground check and a drug
screen.
Resumes should be sent
to the below address:
ALPLA
3320 Ft. Shawnee Indus-
trial Drive
Attn: Human Resources
Lima, OH 45806
OPTOMETRIC OFFICE
looking for Part-time op-
tometric assistant. Medi-
cal office experience pre-
ferred. Mail resumes to
Fishbaugh Family Eyecare
825 W. Market Street
Suite 201. Lima, Ohio
45805.
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
PART-TIME ACCOUNT-
ANT 16-20hrs/week. Ac-
counts receivable/payable,
reconciliations, payroll,
b u d g e t i n g a n d
record-keeping. Needs to
be proficient in Quick -
books. Flexible hours, ex-
perience required. Send
resume to CCC 238 N.
Main, Delphos, OH, Attn:
Bruce.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
FOR SALE: Cochrane
oak round claw foot table
with 4 chairs and 2 leaves.
$300. Excellent condition.
Entertai nment center,
35x30” TV opening. In
good condition. $30 OBO.
Large wall picture, country
steps, $20 OBO. Have
pictures - can email.
Ph o n e o r t e x t
419-303-7930.
340

Garage Sales
340

Garage Sales
725 N. Water Street, Fort
Jennings. Furniture, toys
and Thirty-One products
only. Furniture includes
cherry credenza, 3-corner
desks, office chairs, dress-
ers, end tables, lamps, TV
with stand, 3-piece break-
fast set, queen bed,
queen/king bed rails, baby
crib, book case, floor mir-
ror, copper kettle, old
school desk, electric key-
board, mi scel l aneous.
Thursday 4pm-7pm, Fri-
day 9am-6pm, and Satur-
day 9am-2pm.
GARAGE SALE
Sponsored by the Junior
Optimist Club. 114 North
Main St. by Lehmann’s
Furniture. Thursday 3/29
(4pm-8pm), Saturday 3/31
(9am-4pm). All proceeds
go to MAKE A WISH
FOUNDATION!!!
501

Misc. for Sale
FOR SALE: Pair of Khaki
Campbell ducks. Asking
$30.00
560

Lawn & Garden
WILL DO Lawn Mowing
and odd jobs. Specializing
in the elderly. Over 30
years experience. Call
419-303-0865
600

Apts. for Rent
2 BEDROOM ranch du-
plex, range/refrigerator.
539 Toomey St .
$400/Month plus utilities.
Nice clean Apartment.
419-286-2816
780

Business Property
FURNISHED OFFICE
space. 3 large upstairs of-
fices conveniently located
in downtown Delphos.
Completely furnished with:
desks, file cabinets, book
cases, chairs, phones,
copier available. Private
entrance, waiting room,
kitchen & copy room. All
utilities included. Rent 1 or
2 for $350/mo. each, or all
3 for $950/mo. Cal l
(419)236-6616 for details.
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
OAK FINISH Entertain-
ment Center -4 yrs old, ex-
cellent condition. TV com-
par t ment measur es
28Hx39Wx19D, will hold
up to a 40in TV. $50. Call
419-203-1590
999

Legals
RESOLUTION #2012-2
A resolution authorizing
the Board of Control for
the City of Delphos to do-
nate two (2) Family Sea-
son Swimming Passes to
the Chamber of Com-
merce for the annual
Chamber of Commerce
Dinner and declaring it an
emergency.
ORDINANCE #2012-16
An Ordinance authorizing
the City Auditor to transfer
certain funds within the
funds of the City of Del-
phos, Allen and Van Wert
counties, and declaring it
an emergency.
Passed and approved this
19th day of March 2012.
Kimberly Riddell,
Council Pres.
ATTEST;
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete text of this leg-
islation is on record at the
Municipal Building and
can be viewed during
regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller
Council Clerk
3/23/12, 3/30/12
080

Help Wanted
080

Help Wanted
Answer to
Puzzle
Today’s Crossword
Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Tooth-fillers’ org.
4 Pitcher
8 Bonny miss
12 Felt boot
13 El --, Texas
14 Rainbow god-
dess
15 To the point
17 Air duct
18 Slow to under-
stand
19 “Alfie” star
21 Drapery sup-
ports
23 Make like a bea-
ver
24 Made cookies
27 Type of synthe-
sizer
29 Rink surface
30 Sevareid of the
news
32 Prune
36 Block brand
38 Low voice
40 APB datum
41 -- fixe
43 Written in the
stars
45 Mr. Lugosi
47 Foolish
49 Arrowhead ma-
terial
51 Cr yst al - f i l l ed
rocks
55 -- -eyed
56 Forever
58 Seance sounds
59 Compos mentis
60 FedEx truck
61 Pr oof r eadi ng
mark
62 Warty critter
63 Stopped for
lunch
DOWN
1 Lhasa --
2 Paint hastily
3 CPA’s record
4 Part of a serial
5 Ebbed
6 PC button
7 Cadet’s org.
8 Occupations
9 Place for a ro-
deo
10 Tendon
11 Former JFK ar-
rival
16 Antidote
20 Historian’s word
22 S e e m e d
pleased
24 Keane of “The
Family Circus”
25 Poker card
26 Beer barrel
28 Autumn mo.
31 Charlotte -- of
“Bananas”
33 “Unforgettable”
singer
34 1950s prez
35 Water lily leaf
37 Most unctuous
39 Volunteered
42 Mr. Rather
44 Like -- -- of
bricks
45 Musical key(2
wds.)
46 Wed on the run
48 Booster rocket
50 Semester ender
52 Prima donna
53 Coup d’--
54 New Year’s Eve
word
55 Almost grads
57 Chinese “way”
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Howard G. Metzger
Loving Trust, Harriet
E. Metzger Loving
Trust to Allen Dale
Lowe, Carol Brooks
Lowe, inlot 315,
Delphos.
Patricia A. Vorst
to Chris A. Vorst,
portion of section 6,
Washington Township.
Pamela J. Barnhart
to James H. Barnhart,
portion of section 35,
Hoaglin Township.
David J. Schulte,
Carol S. Schulte to
David J. Schulte Jr.,
portion of inlot 1763,
Van Wert.
Estate of Cheryl
S. Hayes to Richard
W. Hayes, portion of
section 17, Pleasant
Township.
Dennis R. Fox,
Rose M. Fox to Dennis
R. Fox, Rose M. Fox,
portion of inlots 515,
516, Delphos.
Van Wert County
Area Joint to Amanda
Kitson, Jeremy Kitson,
inlot 1506, Van Wert.
Estate of Joseph
W. Pratt to Joan Tope,
Dennis W. Pratt,
Rocksanna J. Daniels,
Stanley E. Pratt, Kim
R. Phillips, James M.
Blythe, Lori A. Farris,
Dawn M. Blythe,
Gregory R. Blythe,
Ronda S. Merkle,
Jeffrey L. Blythe,
portion of inlots 77,
78, Scott.
Newspapers
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THE DELPHOS
HERALD
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
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SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
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HI AND LOIS
Friday Evening March 30, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
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WHIO/CBS Undercover Boss CSI: NY Blue Bloods Local Late Show Letterman Late
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©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Friday, March 30, 2012 The Herald – 11
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Catholic converting
to Judaism
Dear Annie: I’m 20 and
attending college near my par-
ents’ home. Despite what my
Catholic family wants, I’ve
been exploring other religions
for the past five years and
have decided that Judaism is
the right road for me. I want
to let my family in on this
process, but I’m afraid they’ll
react badly and insist that my
Jewish fiance is swaying my
decision.
My mother is starting to
pick up on the fact that I
haven’t been going to church
with her. She has
informed me that
she would be
greatly insulted if
I became Jewish,
because all those
years of putting me
through Catholic
school would be for
naught. She recent-
ly hoped loudly that
eventually I would
“do the right thing
and come back.”
I’m tired of lying
when they ask where I go on
Friday evenings. Help? -- At
the Crossroads
Dear Crossroads: There
is some validity to the claim
that your fiance may be influ-
encing your decision, but that
is to be expected. Even if
he isn’t making a concerted
effort to convert you, his pref-
erences and beliefs would be
persuasive on their own.
We respect the fact that
you have spent five years
considering your decision,
which indicates you’ve done
a great deal of thinking.
But we also recognize that
most of this five-year period
took place while you were
a teenager and quite young
for such a life-changing deci-
sion. Regardless, please stop
lying to your parents. If this
is the path you have chosen,
you must be able to stand up
for your beliefs in the face
of their disappointment. The
sooner you start, the more
time they will have to recon-
cile themselves to the situa-
tion. You also can enlist the
help of your rabbi.
Dear Annie: I am writing
this to help military families
who are at home while their
spouses are deployed. As a
military spouse for 20 years, I
am sometimes overwhelmed,
exhausted and isolated.
Deployments are lengthy, and
training adds to the time we
are separated. Life is chal-
lenging.
We often encounter people
who want to thank my hus-
band for his service. I thank
them for their support. But if
you know of a military spouse
who is alone, here are a few
suggestions:
Offer to babysit for free.
Older children often miss out
on evening events because
younger siblings need to be in
bed or it’s too difficult to take
them all to the event. Offer to
drive the children to practices
or games and supervise them.
Include their children in your
family outings, and give the
military spouse an afternoon
off.
Take a meal to the family.
A frozen casserole is a treat on
a hectic day. Or treat them to a
meal out. Anywhere.
Offer to mow the lawn,
wash the car, check under
the hood or take a pet to the
vet. Check on them when the
weather is extreme. Send their
spouse a letter. Call and ask
what you can do to help.
Please help the military by
helping out military families.
A little kindness goes a long
way. -- A Soldier’s
Spouse Anywhere
Dear Soldier’s
Spouse: Thank you
for reminding our
readers of the simple
things they can do to
help out our service-
men and women
and the families that
stand behind them.
Dear Annie: I
read the letter from
“Old in Indiana,”
the 90-year-old
woman who wondered how to
divide her possessions among
her daughters and daughters-
in-law.
Several years before my
lovely mother passed away,
she had all her valuables
appraised. Then, in her own
handwriting, she wrote who
got what next to each piece.
I encourage everyone to do
the same. It made a difficult
time so much easier when we
knew we were honoring her
wishes. I consider it her final
gift to us. -- Missing Mom in
Maryland
Dear Annie: Would you
please ask your readers to list
a charity or medical organiza-
tion in lieu of flowers in death
notices? Too many people
send flowers when there is a
decline in giving to medical
research.
At a recent visitation,
there were two rooms full of
flowers. Within a few hours,
flowers die. Please help raise
awareness that there are other
significant ways to remember
the deceased. -- Friend of a
Young Lung Cancer Victim
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012
You won’t let more work or larger
responsibilities in the
year ahead intimidate
you. You’ll realize
that the bigger the
jobs are, the more
significant the returns
are likely to be.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Keep your disagreements with your
mate or special someone to yourself
when out in public. You won’t feel
any better if you let things rip -- in
fact, you might find yourself being
frowned upon.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Be understanding, not critical, when
someone is trying to help you, even if
he or she is going about it all wrong. If
the person feels you don’t appreciate
the help, it’ll never be offered again.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If
you’re not careful, extravagance could
get the better of you, leaving you
with inadequate resources to acquire
something that you really need. Put
necessity ahead of desire.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- Stick to matters that are
materially meaningful, which you are
exceptionally good at handling, and
leave the social concerns -- where you
could bomb -- up to someone else.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Most
limitations you experience will be the
result of your own negative thinking
and/or behavior. If you want to
succeed, you must have an expansive,
optimistic outlook.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Giving is a two-way street. People
will treat you kindly if you’re equally
as generous with them as they are with
you -- that can mean with your time as
well as with your possessions.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- It
might not be too smart to request a
business favor from someone you
know purely on a social basis. Once
you cross that line, it could chill the
relationship.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Unfortunately, thinking and doing
are not one and the same thing. You
might simply seek out accolades and
endorsement, yet not necessarily want
to do anything to earn them.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- If you’re not getting the best
results by using traditional techniques,
experiment with some new procedures.
It may be time for a change.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Forming an association for
the wrong reasons might drag you
down instead of making your position
stronger. Make sure any big move you
make has a legitimate purpose.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Before making any impulsive
promises to an old friend, you should
think twice. Your good intentions
could go by the board when you
realize it’s an inconvenience.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
When taking on a job or performing
a service for another, be absolutely
certain you estimate the cost
accurately. Any oversight will come
out of your pocket, not the client’s.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Answers to Thursday’s questions:
Early 20th-century baseball great Pittsburgh Pirate short-
stop Honus Wagner, in 1905, was the first player to have his
autograph burned into the barrel of his bat.
Landlocked Liechtenstein and Uzbekistan are surrounded
by countries that are also landlocked.
Today’s questions:
What is the first name of Mr. Peanut, the monocled mas-
cot of Planters Peanuts?
What is a guillie suit?
Answers in Saturday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Caballeta: a melody imitating a horse’s gallop
Landrone: a mercenary
The Outstanding National Debt as of 9 a.m. today was
$15,586,338435,194.
The estimated population of the United States
is 312,492,966, so each citizen’s share of this debt is
$49,877.
The National Debt has continued to increase an aver-
age of $4 billion per day since Sept. 28, 2007.
12 – The Herald Friday, March 30, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Florida shooter’s race a complicated matter
By SUZANNE GAMBOA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — At first, the shooting
death of an unarmed black teenager at the hands
of a white neighborhood watch volunteer was
playing out like many previous tragedies that
cut short the lives of young black men.
Soon however, it became obvious that sort-
ing out racial dynamics in the death of 17-year-
old Trayvon Martin would not be simple. Police
described the shooter, George Zimmerman, as
white. His father called him a “Spanish speak-
ing minority” with many black relatives and
friends.
While public outrage simmered over per-
ceptions that local police didn’t do enough
to investigate Martin’s death, possible racial
motives on Zimmerman’s part became tough to
pin down. His background and associations cut
across racial lines, and his racial identity didn’t
fit neatly into a box.
“It’s easy to label this as an act of white rac-
ism, but it’s really an act of stereotyping, which
many groups are capable of and it is occur-
ring in the context of extraordinarily permis-
sive laws,” said Manuel Pastor, a professor of
American studies and ethnicity at the University
of Southern California.
On Twitter, there was genuine confusion
about Zimmerman’s race. Is he Latino or white?
Is Hispanic a race, or not? Shouldn’t he, a
Latino, have known better than to engage in
racial profiling? Might he be Jewish, based on
his last name? Many said his Hispanic lineage
had nothing to do with the fact that the justice
system had failed Martin, while some said
Zimmerman’s identity was very important.
“I’m actually happy that George Zimmerman
is Hispanic so the usual white people are all
guilty by virtue of their skin color stuff won’t
work,” said a March 22 tweet by John Hawkins,
who described himself as a professional blogger
at Right Wing News.
Hispanic people can be black, white, Asian
or mixed. Some 18 million Latinos checked
the “some other race” category on their 2010
Census forms — which admonished in bold
letters that Hispanic is not a race. So many
Hispanics identified themselves as white, the
overall number of white people in the United
States increased.
“We sit in this in between place in the United
States. In the U.S., when we think about race,
it’s usually black and white. ... Latinos com-
plicate that dichotomy,” said Cynthia Duarte,
associate director of research for the Institute of
Latino Studies at Notre Dame.
On voter registration forms, George
Zimmerman identified himself as Hispanic,
as did his mother. His father, Robert, listed
himself as white on voter registration forms.
Zimmerman’s mother, Gladys, is originally
from Peru.
Ethnicities in Peru run the gamut.
Descendants of the original people or
Amerindians of Peru, those who were under
rule of the Inca empire, are the largest eth-
nic group, followed by those who are a mix
of Spanish and Amerindian ancestry, also
known as mestizos. Whites are about 15 per-
cent of the population, followed by blacks,
Asians and other groups. Class distinctions
based on race and language persist in Peru,
with whites at the top of the societal hierarchy
and indigenous people often at the bottom, a
vestige of Spanish colonialism.
Kay Hall, a former neighbor of the
Zimmermans when they lived in Manassas, Va.,
said Zimmerman’s mother spoke fluent English
and Spanish but she’s not certain if George
Zimmerman or his brother spoke Spanish. She
didn’t remember Gladys sharing any stories
about her life in Peru or seeing the family
carrying out any traditional Peruvian cultural
activities.
“I saw Hispanics, blacks, all kinds of people
visiting over there,” Hall said. “I don’t think
they had any kind of racial problems.”
Neither Zimmerman nor his family members
were available to comment about their fam-
ily history. Beyond what’s in the police report,
Zimmerman has yet to give his side of what
happened the night of Feb. 26, when he called
police to say he was following a “suspicious”
person he believed was on drugs, while Martin,
wearing a hooded sweat shirt, walked through
the gated Sanford, Fla., townhome commu-
nity where Zimmerman lives. Police have not
charged Zimmerman, who told them he shot
Martin in self-defense, something considered
justified homicide under Florida’s “stand your
ground law.”
What Martin’s case represents most pro-
foundly is how hazardous it is to judge people
simply on the basis of the way they look,
said Janet Murguia, president of the National
Council of La Raza. The cautionary tale applies
both to Martin and to Zimmerman, she said.
“The bottom line is you can’t tell if someone
is Latino simply by looking at them,” Murguia
said.
Where Zimmerman may fit within the
range of Hispanic identity is another matter.
Although Robert Zimmerman described his son
as “Spanish speaking,” it’s clear from the 911
call made that night that George Zimmerman
is comfortable speaking English. Some Latinos
may not consider Zimmerman to be truly Latino,
since only one of his parents is Hispanic.
Stacy Taff photo
Jefferson hosts blood drive
Ashley Stevenson from the Red Cross draws a pint of blood from the arm of
Andrew Jacobo, during the Red Cross Blood Drive at Jefferson High School Thursday
afternoon. The drive collected 44 units.
(Continued from page 1)
Gent.
Gent enjoys playing soc-
cer, cheerleading, baking,
hanging with her friends and
blogging about beauty and
lifestyles. She is a member of
the National Honor Society,
Honor Roll, FCCLA, SADD,
Blue Club, Junior Curator
and has been recognized for
being a student-athlete.
After graduation, Gent
plans to major in speech-lan-
guage pathology at Ball State
University.
Parkway High School’s
Rachel Miller is the daughter
of Mark and Sally Cox. She
has two siblings Derek and
Alisha Cox.
Miller enjoys hanging out
with her friends and family,
scrapbooking and going to
the movies. She is involved in
the choir, Friends of Rachel
volunteer group, scholastic
bowl, National Honor Society
and Science Club.
After graduation, she plans
to attend Baldwin-Wallace to
study pre-physical therapy
the onto graduate school to
pursue a doctorate in physical
therapy.
Ashley Goeltzenleuchter
is a senior at Wayne Trace
High School and the
daughter of Chad and Lisa
Goeltzenleuchter. She has
one sibling, Ruger.
She enjoys golfing, hunting
and fishing. Goeltzenleuchter
is involved in FFA, Academic
Team and is a youth group
leader at divine mercy.
After graduation, she plans
to attend the University of
Northwestern Ohio to major
in sports marketing in hope of
obtaining her dream job of work-
ing with the Cleveland Indians.
Jenna Gasser, a senior at
Paulding High School, is the
daughter of Roger and Susan
Gasser. She has five siblings:
Brad, Greg, Trent, Mindy and
Christa Gasser.
She enjoys volleyball,
piano, playing the violin,
shopping at boutiques and
reading. Gasser is the vice-
president of the National
Honor Society and on the
honor roll, very active in
choir, Varsity Quartet and
theater.
Gasser is taking post-sec-
ondary classes at Defiance
College. After graduation,
she plans to attend Akron
University to major in music
therapy with a minor in sign
language.
Van Wert High School
senior Alex Burchfield is the
daughter of Marty and Susan
Burchfield.
She enjoys competitive
dancing, laughing, spending
time with family and friends.
Burchfield is a member of First
United Methodist Church and
also involved in several other
activities, including Student
Body as president, editor of
the high school paper, choir,
Beta Club, Student Council,
Globally Active People,
Service Pack and Blessings
in a Backpack.
After graduation, she
plans to majoring in public
relations at the University of
Dayton.
Queen
(Continued from page 1)
little fights along the way,”
Breece said. “We’re doing a
jazz number to ‘Shake Your
Shimmy.’ We changed the
song five times.”
“We kept changing it
until our parents made us
stick with that one,” Madilyn
said.
The girls pride themselves
on having taken charge of
their project.
“We choreographed the
whole thing ourselves,” Jose
said.
As is the case with most
contests of this nature, the
auditions were the part the
girls found most difficult.
“They were scary. Also it
was a really small space, so
it was hard for us to dance
our routine,” Breece said.
The time of the try-outs
also added to their discom-
fort.
“It was really early in
the morning, too,” Madilyn
said. “We were all half-
asleep and shaking.”
Even with all of the
nerve-wracking moments,
the quartet is still finding
the contest enjoyable.
“It’s been a lot of fun
so far,” Jose said. “Not the
practices so much but we’ve
had fun preparing for it,
doing our hair and stuff.”
“Except for when
Kambrynn got mad at us for
dumping glitter all over her
face,” Breece added.
Madilyn and Breece, both
having been in dance for 10
years, have come to appreci-
ate dancing as an emotional
outlet.
“You get to express how
you are feeling and I like
that,” Madilyn said. “Plus
it’s just a lot of fun to do.”
“I like that I can express
myself,” Breece agreed. “If
I get mad I can go to dance
and let it all out.”
Younger sisters Jose
and Kambrynn, in dance
for eight and seven years,
respectively, have their
own reasons for sticking
with it.
“I like that I get to dance
with my sister and my
friends,” Jose said. “Also,
I’m good at it.”
“You get skinny,”
Kambrynn giggled. “It’s
also a lot of fun.”
As for whether or not they
plan to try out in the future,
the two sets of friends are
split on the matter.
“Breece and I might try
out again but probably not,”
Madilyn said.
“Kambrynn and I are
going to try out together
next year — just us two,”
Jose said.
Quad
Autism: Doctors say check early
By LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press
CHICAGO — At 18 months, Cristina Astacio spoke only a few
words, wouldn’t respond to her name and shunned other kids in her
day care group. Last October, her worried parents found out why.
She has a mild form of autism, a diagnosis being given to more
U.S. children than ever before, largely because of more awareness
and better diagnosis.
According to new government statistics, the rate is about 1 in
88. That means autism is nearly twice as common as the govern-
ment reported just five years ago. The largest increases are in
Hispanic kids like Cristina.
The definition of autism has changed over the years, and Cristina
might not have been considered autistic two decades ago.
But experts say kids like her are lucky in a way, because her par-
ents recognized early that something was wrong. The Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention report issued Thursday found that
40 percent of kids weren’t diagnosed until after age 4. Evidence
shows that children who are identified early and get help have the
best chance for reaching their potential, said CDC Director Dr.
Thomas Frieden.
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends autism
screening for all children at age 18 months and 2 years.
Diagnosing the developmental disorder relies on observing
behavior. Autism can’t be cured, but treatment including intensive
behavior therapy can help many kids function better.
The academy’s Dr. Susan Hyman said many children who
aren’t making eye contact and aren’t talking “may have autism,
but they may have other things.” She said it’s important for parents
to be persistent about their concerns with their doctor so their kids
can be evaluated.
Kristy Batesole, of Atascadero, Calif., says she suspected
something was wrong with her son, Keegan, even when he was
a hard-to-calm overly fussy baby. He learned words, but by age 2
stopped talking, would spend hours opening and closing doors and
sometimes bang his head on the ground.
Though he started getting special help in preschool in Nevada,
he wasn’t formally diagnosed with autism until last year, at age 6,
after the family moved to California, where there are more autism
specialists.
Cristina Astacio gets two hours of behavior therapy six days a
week. Her mom, Charisse, says the little girl now responds to com-
mands and speaks about 50 words. The most special are two words
Cristina never said before. “Now she says ‘mommy’ and ‘daddy,”’
Astacio said. “It’s wonderful.”
Museum plays April Fools’ joke
CINCINNATI — Fool me once, the saying goes. But 50 times?
That’s what a convincing art forger did for nearly three decades when
he donated his copies of Picassos and other works of art to unsuspect-
ing museums in 20 states.
Mark A. Landis, who has dressed as a Jesuit priest or posed as
a wealthy donor driving up in a red Cadillac, apparently never took
money for his forgeries and has never been arrested.
Now his “works” have been collected into their own tongue-in-
cheek exhibit, called Faux Real and opening on April Fools’ Day at
the University of Cincinnati.
Educating people about forgery and letting people know about
Landis “is the only way to stop him,” said Mark Tullos, director of
the Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum in Lafayette, La.,
which was duped in 2010 with a donation of a painting supposedly
by American Charles Courtney Curran.
Landis creates works in oil, watercolor, pastels, chalk, ink and
pencil, making most of his copies from museum or auction catalogs
that provide dimensions and information on the originals.
He sometimes bestows gifts under different names, such as the
Father Arthur Scott alias used at Hilliard. In that case, he told offi-
cials that his dead mother had left works including Curran’s oil-on-
wood painting “Three Women” and that he was donating it in her
memory.
Tullos said museum employees became suspicious when Landis
kept changing the subject under questioning. After he drove off, the
museum quickly concluded it was a forgery.
To convince museums he is a philanthropist, he also concocts
elaborate stories about health concerns, said Cincinnati exhibit co-
curator Matthew Leininger.
“He has been having heart surgery for almost 30 years,” Leininger
said with a frustrated laugh. “This is the strangest case the museum
realm has known in years.”
Landis, 57, acknowledges what he’s up to. He told The Associated
Press in a phone interview from his home in Laurel, Miss., that he
made his first forgery donation to a California museum in 1985.
“They were so nice. I just got used to that, and one thing led to
another,” he said. “It never occurred to me that anyone would think
it was wrong.”
The Cincinnati exhibit of about 40 works given to 15 museums
grew to around 100 when Landis donated 60 pieces he possesses,
along with his priest’s outfit.
The Faux Real show will run through May 20 at the Dorothy W.
and C. Lawson Reed Jr. Gallery. It depicts famous art forgers, details
of how Landis made some donations and ways of detecting fakes.
Visitors can view some works under ultraviolet light that causes sec-
tions to glow if they contain contemporary ingredients.
Company says alert system worked in Colorado wildfire
By REMA RAHMAN
The Associated Press
CONIFER, Colo. — Mary
Thuente says her neighbors
got an automated call warn-
ing them to flee their home
as a wildfire spread over
the mountains southwest of
Denver but she never got one
before she left.
Jack Ogg doesn’t think
he got a telephone warning
either, though it’s possible it
may have come while he was
outside rounding up his dogs
and his neighbors’ pets. After
that, he rushed away with 15
people and animals squeezed
into his Jeep after firefight-
ers asked him to take some
neighbors with him.
Authorities said Thursday
that an estimated 12 percent
of people in the path of the
wildfire, apparently sparked
by a prescribed burn that
flared up, never got a call to
evacuate. Jefferson County
sheriff’s spokeswoman Jacki
Kelley said a software glitch
may have been to blame,
though officials were still
reviewing what went wrong.
But FirstCall Network
Inc., which handles the coun-
ty’s system that automati-
cally calls residents, said the
system worked exactly as it
should. The 12 percent rep-
resents residents who either
had disconnected numbers or
didn’t answer, said Matthew
Teague, president of the
Baton Rouge, La., company.
“Reaching 88 percent of
people in the middle of a
weekday is a great percent-
age,” he said.
Officials originally said
about 900 residences received
automated evacuation notic-
es. Teague said it would take
a few minutes to notify that
many households.
A couple found dead in
the burn area — Sam Lamar
Lucas, 77, and Linda M.
Lucas, 76, who was known
by some of her friends as
Moaneti Lucas — received
an evacuation call, but it was
not clear when, Kelley said.
Fire zone resident Ann
Appel, who remains missing,
also was called, Kelley said.
The Appel family issued a
statement Thursday saying
they were “deeply grateful”
to those searching for her.
One of the Lucases’ neigh-
bors, Eddie Schneider, said he
didn’t get a call and he knew
the couple were packed to go
if they received an order to
evacuate. Schneider said he
left after a firefighter warned
him to leave.
The fire has damaged or
destroyed about 25 homes
and has blackened about 6
square miles in the most-
ly rural area southwest of
Denver’s populous suburbs.
More than 500 firefighters
were at the blaze Thursday,
hoping to expand their con-
tainment line in case hot and
windy weather returns this
weekend as predicted.
Crews cleared lines on 45
percent of the fire’s 8.5-mile
perimeter and made enough
progress to allow some
residents to return home
Thursday. Kelley said 180
homes were still evacuated.
Two planes that drop fire
retardant were diverted to a
fire in South Dakota, but four
Black Hawk helicopters from
the Colorado Air National
Guard were still dropping
water on the blaze.

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