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Brigadier General James T,

DlUlk©

C_o_m_71_1c,_Il_Jd_i_1l_g_G_J_e_1t_el_-a_.l,_C_It_a_rl_e_st_o_1t_P_m_·t_o_f_E_1Y._I_ba_,_'

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1

COMMlENCEMlENT
James T. Duke was born in California, ing graduation from the Un iversitv a provisional St. Mary's of Maryland, second

][))A SPJEAKlER Y
County, Maryland, on June 8,1917' 10, 1893. Followwith the degree of St. John's College, Annapolis,

B.s., he was appointed

lieutenant,

Cavalry, on August

PROM01I'ITIQNS I-Ie "vas promoted manent) Colonel
I

to first lieutenant on
I

8 August 1935;

1917; to C'aptain
to

(temporary) on (temporary)

8 June 8 August on March

1918 (per1940; to I7, I943·

Juty 1920; to Major

August

Lieutenant General

Colonel

(temporary)

on 24 December

1941; to Brigadier §lERV[CE

He first served with the roth Cavalry gales,' Arizona, He attended Equitation Equitation the znd Cavalry Course there and participated the Cavalry at The until France, School, Cavalry Troop

from Officers'

1917 to 1922 at Ft. Huachuca, with hostile and Mexicam graduated General Course, at Fort Riley, Kansas, from Duke

Ft. Apache

and No1918. '

in engagem.ents

at Nogales the

in August, Special

in 1922-23, joining Advanced of became and Instructor upon

upon completion; 1927'

then he attended this time Cavalry

School in 1924, after which

During Armored

he was a member Regiment

of the: 9th Cavalry. de Cavalarie

1927-28 called gradua-

him to Saurnur, Returning

where he attended

the Ecole d'Application

tion he served with a French to The Cavalry

on maneuvers

in the Vosgas mountains. Kansas, Arsenal,

School at Fort RileY.in 1928, he again became Instructor of Equitation and General he remained Division the Army Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, at Edgewood with it until Industrial Army J937 when College, War Warfare School (Field Officers' Course) at Fort Bliss, Texas, Washington, Port

until 1932, when he was sent to the Command for two years, and thence Maryland, ferred in 1934. Joining as G-2 on the General to Washington, Duty as Executive to Chemical the 3ld Cavalry,

be was detailed in 1940. in June

Staff of the ,First Cavalry D. C., where he attended

In 1939, he "vas transgraduating followed after which he \Vashington,

Officer in the Office of the Chief of Cavalry, Staff of the Army Ground to, and assumed command Forces,

became G-2 on .the General 1942. He was transferred

College,

of, the Charleston

of Embarkation,

29, 1942.
EQUE§1l.'mAl~ Along outstanding Horse hunter, country with his distinguished rider military career, authority, General Duke has been for twenty-two in horsemanship equestrian Show Exhibitor, years an and as a

cavalryman,

and horse

As an instructor of the leading

Show Juc1ge, he stands am0'l1g the best. racer, steeplechaser, and endurance and abroad for the past twenty Duke's Port executive ability, years.

He has been Horse

polo player, fox events in this

rider in some

General the Charleston able guidance organized
ll1

his clear thinking, inevitable. at that

and clean cut decisions

made

his selection to command Under his

for ail important

post in this emergency of Embarkation,

So, in June, 1942, he was assigned installation.

time a srnall and undeveloped His promotion

in the short space of: aile year, it has developed in supplying

into one of the 'most efficient and wellto Brigadier General

Ports now engaged

our overseas armies.

March,

T943, was tbe result of his success in this accom.olishment. as a cavalryman, with the resultant necessity for quick thinking and accurate de-

His training cisions, has proved

of great value in the more complex

but equally fast moving

Transportation

Corps.

Commandant

C

OLONEL BERNARDLENTZ, author, System of cadenced

professor

and soldier, is the originator throughout the Army. of this post since February, to duty with

of the Lentz Point 1942.
III

drill, used widely

He is a West

graduate,

Class of I905,. and ha_s been born, Colohel Islands. Lentz Returning Utah,

c.o.

Wisconsin Samar, Logan, later.

was first assigned to the United before going

the z r st Infantry three

Philippine

States in "906, he served back to the Philippines

at Fort years

Colo., and Fort Douglas, This time he was assigned

to the Island Barracks

of Mindinao. followed, then and in 1914 he was detailed of Minnesota. assigned stationed Camp. to the Capital, and in .Kan. as a member 1920 he was for a on the Mexican as

A tour of duty Professor returned When of Military

at Vancouver

Science and Tactics World War

at the University

In 1916 he Border. in

to his old regiment, America entered 'as an instructor

the z r st Infantry,

I he was immediately

to the Presidio

San Francisco

in the Officers Training Lentz was detailed there

In the latter of the GenerarStaff graduated

part of '17 Colonel Corps. He

remained

for two years,

from the School of the Line, Fort Leavenworth,

t\ year later he graduof Minnesota

ated from the General Staff School and returned to the University six-year term as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. Colonel attached Islands. In '38 he returned command Discharge to the States and went Depot to Governors Island, to command Lenr·z later the famous attended the Army War College then in
011

'Washington

and

was

to the office of Chief of Infantry z r st Infantry,

upon his graduation. his old regiment,

In 1935 he was assigned duty in the Hawaiian

and in 1940 took ordered here. of

at Fort Dix, N.]. Later the same year he was placed in charge of the Overseas and Replacement Lentz at the N.Y.P.E., a post he held until of a current military book, "The

Colonel Teaching

is the author

Cadence

System

Close Order Drill."

The edition

is based on the new infantry

elrill reg~lations.

*

* * *

* *

*

* *

* * *
Colonel B'eJrnarrli Lell1ltz
Commandant

!i

III

i

D. HOTCHKISS: native of Central New York, bega~ his _Army a 1924 after graduating from Homer Academy. He enlisted III the Army with a view to receiving an appointment to West Point and was stationed with the 62nd Coast Artillery Corps, Anti-Aircraft, Fort Totten, New York, for three years and rose to the position of personnel sergeant major.
~ERVEY

CA~T. hfe

in

Upon discharge from the Army, Capt. Hotchkiss entered college and has been in college work as student and teacher ever since. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Buffalo, a Master of Arts degree from Cornell University and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from New York University. He is at present on leave as Assistant Professor of Economics from The Citadel, sometimes called the "West Point of the South" and headed by General CharlesP. Summerall. Capt. Hotchkiss became a reserve infantry officer in 1936 and entered on the present tour of duty in September, 1941. He is a charter member of the Atlantic Coast Transportation Corps Officers Training School and has employed .his talents as a teacher and administrator there since its inception.

CAPTAIN

HERVEY D. HOTCHKISS
Commandant

Assistant

Capt. Acting

A. K. Hagedorn, Asst.

T:C,

Capt.

H. G. Willson. Secreta 'Y

T.C.

Capt.

J. G. Oliver, T.C.
Administrative

Ist Lt. D. E. Wilson, T.C.
Administrative

Commandant

Senior Administrative Military Instructor

Military

Instructor

Military

Instructor

Capt.

H. H. Hopple, T.C. Senior Basic Military I nstruetor

2nd Lt. H. L. Johnson, 2nd Lt. A. J. Carnesi, T.C. Basic Military Instructor Basic Military

T.C. 2nd Lt. J. W. Smith, T.C. Basic Military Instructor

Instructor

Major J. B. Ward, Supply Officer

T.C.

,Major

G. M. Gum, T.C. Mess Officer

Capt.

A. S. Rogoff, M.C. Medical Officer

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Bouteillier was a merchant of the Island of Martinique as early as 1678, and, upon his removal to New York, he became actively interested in assisting other refugees from the Island upon their arrival in tho city and gan much to the financial support in- promoting the Huguenot colony in Vi estchester County. Fort Slocum, which is geographically a part of ~ew Rochelle, the latter of which is corrrraonly referred to as the "Queen City of the Sound", was first called "Bouteillier Island" from Jean Bouteillier, the original owner and one of the late promoters of the first settlement of the 'Town. He sold it to Jacob Leiskr, L, and Guillaume LeConte, who divided it between them, but they later sold it to Colonel Anthony Lispenard. The latter sold it to Joseph Rodman on March 21, rn2, and, for a long period of time it was known as "Rodman's Island". Another [oseph Rodman, one of his grandsons, who became its owner in [759, in o:fifetimg iit for sale in 1755, described it as containing sixty acres of land and hi~ residen ..e, having a small dwelling h01!lse, outhouses and a new barn erected on it.

La
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r

it was called "Myer's of Davenport Neck during the war period. By 1790, it had become the propeety of Lawrence Hewlett, but the old name of "Rodman's Island" seems to have been retained. Later it was called "Hewlett's Island", and also "Allen's Island". The DavenpaFt family who had purchased Davenport Neck fina1ly acquired the Island too, in I823, and owned it for a long time. In this period, it was often. culled "Morse's Island", from Robert Morse, who occupied it as a tenant. Eventually, it was sold Do Thaddeus Davids, the manufacturer of ink Who was long a resident of New Rochelle, and from whom it acquired the name by which it was known for half 11 Gentury or more, "Davids' Island",

At one tirneafter

the Re\'(\)lution

Island", from J(Dhn R. M¥ef, proprietor

In r86~, the island was lease@ by the United States, from the owner, Simeon Leland, for a hospital site. It was used as such during the Civil War and designated as the DeCamp General Hospital, Davids Island, New York Harbor. In all probability the hospital was narned after Dr. Samuel G. DeCamp, an Army Surgeon, who was appointed ro the Service from New Jersey in [~h3,and retired in I862. Wooden structures were immediately erected which housed thousands of wounded prisoners from the battlefields of the Civil War. ~n 1867 the United, States pur chased the island and subsequently jurisdiction was ceded to the United States government by an act elf New York State Legislature, approved April 20, r868. It remained a military post under the cog.nornen of Davids Tsland. Although the property appears to have been known locally by several other names, reflectiens fWU1 various owners, the name "Davids" appears to have remained a definite title and to have been so addressed bF the War Departl'l1Lent, urntil oAiiciaUy changed by a Presidential Order, July [, [g96, and became designated as Fort Slocum, in honor of the late Major General Henry W. Slocum who was :blam OB. September 24, r827, D!i:lphi, Onodaga County New York. General Slocum was a West Point graduate and served with distinction in the Civil War. In 1869, it was made a sub-depot for the feception of recruits, and on December 3, 1887, General Order No. 257 from the War Department, it was designated as "Principal Depot, General Recruiting Service". From that time it has been a Post of varied military activities, but has always remained in the recruiting arm of service. Prior to the

an

Spanish-Amesican Wll![", IDarvicls lslalfld became part of the coastal defense (If New York Harbor and for several years was fortif.ied and serviced by C»ast Artillery detachments as well as the several G@a:ac'luments(If infantry. A serious fire occurred at this _wilitary post on March 30, 1899, which destroyed tfu:e Admiaistratiom Building and practically all i~s centents, imcl1!ld!ing mamy historical regimental records. The Q~sllrubtion Qil: these records leaves a gap in the ~iSMlFY. .0~ the Post. However, d.u.rip.g the period, a general ~mpT0vement in the buildimgs ami equipment was contrilil1!laliy:lil'1 p~illgress. Ike use @f keroseae lamps had been supp:lamtecll DY d@cn!:'lcity. 'ffue add systelWl of water supply from a ttli@sh-wa~~l';P0m:<i en the .i.s1and, pumped to a brick tower fer stora.ge a1lJd,.pfessure, had 'hew i>rotJllnwedby connection via a submarine linain to the mainland, serviced by the New Rochelle Water CO!,illlpamy. A s}'sr-em of drainage and sewerage disposai, to tldewafier, was !installed which has in turn, been SOlPW1aIl!ted by a samitary sewerage disposal plant. on tlhe resoorces o.f Port Slocum, dorring the WaI, WI.':F~ linet aIlJdl; disJPIDsecl of without particular iut::jcieJltt. 'I'll'Le j;)0S't·Waol' activities wen; s0l')lewhat abnormal as Fegamjs hospital ll'e!:!l\aiJJeJJlilems necessirated ami tempGrary aC0oIDlffiQclatioNS no), ccnvaleseent (Cases, ott which there were MaJilY at[tel' that €'~'perience. The demands

Spanish-American

7th Artillery,

of Lieutenant Colonel W 00ct1fUff, rprae:tice with the 1111 ortars , was discontinued October r899, because of d<ID\age to puJblie prope{~y, resulting from shocks from gllltTIfi e..
target The r<O)hgiouswork here is conducted .in accordance with Ar~y: Regl!l]aJtions under nhe glflioane€: of the Post Cernmander and tWID Clu_aplaoins. 1'fue Post Chapd wlhich is known as rille "Cfuapel !£Itt Saimu S~lb9JSIl~a,1il" as buiLt with w funds raised by T'l1i€ R€'1. Fatner Thom1as F. M€Laugh:lim, a passer of a chureh ~tl Ne-w Roclhd~e, a·utlhmized by the Secretatry Qf War, aI'ld Iinc!Ql,:rsedby Peesident Theodore Roosevelt. It was dedicated 01'1 November I'll. [909, "for the promotion of tlite sQcia~, physical, imemeotl!lal aIild. moral welfare of the Post," At the time of the WorM Wa.r, the WaiF :Department set date for volunteer enlistments as December 15, ]917. Om the loth 0~ that month recruits begam to atrive and by aiglhtt oftrhat @ay, liacillifii~sat the Fmtr 'Were exhausted. It was the ]a.rgestt station east qL: the Mississippi and was referF~d to as 0))),(1:of .he busiest recm~tliliJJg.snatli0.ID.S irn ~he

During

the Gom:manQ

nile dosing

WUV,tF)(.

The CommandaJilt, Celonel OC<il'lgsbury, appealed to the citizens of the aduoimiNg communities. Within tih€ week the people of Mount Vernon amcl ew RocheHe and other dose towns, had temporarily eared fer about lii&eel'l thousand mum, in churches, club rooms, lodge halls, car barns, and other places of refuge. 'F 0 e:llipress the apprecrati0ll of the personnel at the .F 0Ft andi that of th<t G0:vernment, the 3eGretaFY of War directed a message 0f "15ra~@fQ~ apprecc1ation" 11Q the pe01"le 0£ 1!h€ Reiglhb0!1hoodi wh@nad acted i.m the @mergen<ry, and at a laten date mead)' $I4,@@O.oo was cllishl<lfsed t1hrol<l,g.h ~he Post Quarteniraste» in am elJfoFt at [1eimbursem.el1t.

=:;;:;

=?!!i:lcemly in cooperation with the authorities entertainment and comforts for the recruits. ~ ~= same connection it is to be recorded that the same ~~ ·-·e;1t on record in acknowledgment of a vast =CC'~=;0': sen-ice, rendered by the Commandant and per==:.. coward the success 6f the numerous Red Cross :=.c;:i-i;:ies, Liberty Loan Drives, formation of Home Guards =c D"Um Corps and many other movements that carne ia;o being at that time. -=-:::e horse-car line was succeeded .by electric trolley cars, o?,~ated by the Westchester Elecnric Railway Company since December, 1898, connecting with the ferry to Fort Slocum '::~om -;';eptune Island, maintained by the United States Go':efrrment. In I938, horses and mules were replaced by motor driven equipment. In the files there are photographts that record me breaking of one of the romances of military life; one showing the mutes reluctamtly ooar;ding the ferry ~0r shipment, somewhere, but surely away from the home and life they had known so l<mg; another, of a horse-drawn ambulance, painted white ami boldly marked "COMMISSAR1[.", a tribute to the careful handling Clf food. The Cemetery at Davids Island has been abandoned and the bodies buried there removed to the Government Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. On September 21, F938, a hurricane which visited New iEngland and the North Atlantic Seaboard, struck Fort Slocum in the afternoon and before its abatement, durlng the nigkt, ~reated a considerable damage to trees, buildings andae4"ial telephone and light.~,x,;:~~

;:-

5"2i.=':?::~

mg wires,

An extraordinarily high tide, ten to twelve feet above normal, attended the high wind and did a large amount of damage by flooding basements. At Neptune Dock, the main land, the water inundated to about four feet, doing some damage to the buildings and cr~ated a serious loss amorrg tho: automobiles, property of the personnel, which are continually parked there. During 1936 to 1939 funds were appropriated for various projects and Colonel Edwin CUlmer, Post Commander art: that time, started a remedernization plan which included extensive work on public buildings, utilities, and recreation. These improvements have resulted in beautifying this Army camp to a point that it is often called the "Garden Spot of the Army." The School for Bakers and Cooks, under the direction of Lieutenant Colonel Talmage Phillips, QMC, was also situated here. More than 3,000 student-mess sergeants, bakers and cooks graduated from this school during the first five months of [941. Today, the country is in the throes of another World 'War; Fort Slocum agaiu is the scene of American soldiers being trained to preserve the many privileges of a democracv instituted in this part of the country se many long yeaFs ag@ by the Huguenots. The history of Slocum is synonymous of the trend of all phases of American history and it is an inspiration for all soldiers who come here in the future, in keeping in mind with the kmowledge of her accomplishments by assuring all in their power to make the Iuture of Slocum more glorious than her past. The present Post Commander and Comniaridant of the Atlantic Coast Transportation C(l)rps Officers Training School is Colonel Bernard Lentz. The school, one CJ£ two in the whole country, is one of the pnmary functions ali the Post,

_-

IN RETROSPECT

L
•.

OOKING back we see our life at Slocum not as a series of isolated events to be recorded in chronological sequence, as so many who have proceeded They are experiences full of

us have done; for to those of u~ who live them, our activities here are more than welcome events in the academic calendar. humor, tions escape the construction
s-:

pathos, tenderness . . . these elements coalesced into specific direcof time. experiences=-episodic and

Taken

as a whole, however, these individual a tangible reminder

disconnected as they may seem tell a story . . . it is our profound hope; then, in this piece of memorabilia, of your days here on career at purpose, of Davids Island, to accomplish a two-fold purpose: to recreate each experience as we knew it, so that in later years we may rcalive our military who have known Slocum as we have, to understand accomplishments, "Dignity and Tone". Much has been said of discipline and training at Atlantic Coast Training its traditions, Slocum and to combine these experiences into a story that will enable us all and customs. Always bearing in mind the enhancement

Corps Officers Training

School; little has been said of how an institution

like Slocum manages to combine hundreds of creeds, hundreds of ideals, hundreds of diversified philosophies of life into one single, useful way of 1ivinga service of life of honor, patriotism, virtue, loyalty and subordination. How it is accomplished? The secret lies hidden in the years. We cannot

now' retrace our steps, but we can focus the telescope of time back-backall the way to an early era of American history, an Elysian field of green grass and Doric colonnaded buildings ... to Honor and Devotion to Duty.

I
:s
.

T

HE spotligh! is more on transportation and transportation agencies at the present moment than at any time in historv: and well should this be so. Soldiers by the tens and hundreds of thousands must be dispersed with utmost speed to all corners of the globe, as a glance at any map will show. Greenland, Iceland, the British Isles, Alaska, Panama, Hawaii, Australia, Egypt, and the Persian Gulf, are but some of the destinations to which ships of the Army 'I'ransport Service run. With our soldiers must go tanks and trucks and planes and all the paraphernalia of modern war by the hundreds and by the thousands. Once there men must have food; their engines, gas; their guns, powder and shot. The quest for one of these aolne-gas, and its allied products-has been a major part of the Axis strategy to date. For the Japanese, Sumatra and Borneo were a first objective. Singapore .was important only as a bastion standing in the way. For the Germans, control of Roumanian oil fields was an ear-ly move, and .already a dear price has been paid in their fight for the oil of the Caucasus.

If our problems of transportation were not hard enough already, there are other factors enough that would make it so. First and foremost is the constant menace of the submarine. You can have no idea what disappointments are suffered both ..by our forces overseas and by the Services of Supply back here at home when a ship which has been speeded on a vital mission is torpedoed and sunk, perhaps only a day or two out of port, or, even worse, ouly a day or two from its distant destination. No amount of disappointment is al1owed, however, to delay for a single moment the prompt duplication of every lost shipment. A tank or gun that is merely "on order" is of no account when the chips are down; and it is our job in the Transportation Corps to see that each item is shipped and shipped again, and yet again if need be, until at last it is on hand in tile grimmest reality to throw a wall of steel in the face of the enemy.

Another factor is the necessity of marrying men to their equipment. The tactical worthlessness of a soldier without his gun is such that it has become an axiom of the Transportation Corps that a soldier must never be separated from his gun. Combat Ioadtng-e-whlch is a special technique of loading to enable troops to launch into battle immediately upon disembarkation-presents still further complications which must be met by the Transportation Corps. 'Then, too, our ships must be so equipped and geared as to enable us to preserve enroute and unload at almost any destination a whole galaxy of items running from fresh fruit and meat to full-sized railroad locomotives. All in all, the problems of wartime transportation are sufficient to challenge the ablest and boldest; but I am ha.poy in the belief that my own Army Transportation Corps and the varIous other Government and civil ian agencies interested in transp ortat iou, including the group convened here today, are meeting that challenge with outstanding success. From,
before a(lcl1-eSS of Genera; the 1'ntns-Miss01t1'i-Kansas an

Charles P. Gross Shippe1's Board.

7 <.

t

I,

Raymond Halt

Lt.

Col. Louis G. Jamison Willi.<lDl H. Buri Goorge W. Cover+

Major Major

Major Major

John Clarence John

K. Mount S. Stroup H. Adair

Captain

Captain Cep+ain C.aptain

Daniel J. Barrett Laurence Harry H. Bedack Birdsall, Sr.

Captain Captain Captain

Wallace Robert

E. Brown' E. Carnes

Roy E. Cauble

Captain Captain

Matt Charles john

J. Coughlin M. Council, F. Downey Jr.

Captain

Captain

John C. Ehrman

Captai n Everett J. Fahey Captain AJbert J. Fuge

Captain Captain Captain

Joseph F. Gillen William O. Glenn Elmer G. Haeckl

Captain Captain Captain

Clarence E. Hall

James W. Higgins, Jr. Hervey D. Hotchkiss

Captain LaVerne V. Johnson Captain Captain Samuel S. Kossove John Livingston

Captain

Michael E. Maher

Captain Timothy J. McCarthy Captain John F. McGee

Captain Captain Captain

James Seneca

J. Menagh D. Milliken Moore

Horace

Captain Captain Captain

John

H. Morris

Edwin Raskin Max K. Rawson

Captain

Charles

E. Riker

Cap+a in John S. Rockefeller Captain Edward Saphir

Captain Captain Captain

Collis P. Suderman Anthony Norman T. Veltri E. Weigel

Captain Captain

William Charles

R. Wheeler W. Wilkerson

I st Lt. Leon C. Albert

I s+ Lt. Emil J. Arndt Is+ Lt. James P. Biuker

1st Lt. John C. Beck

Is+ Lt. Robert 1st Lt. Charles Ist Lt. Everett

D. Bennett A. Bone E. Briggs

1st Lt. William
l s+ Lt. Hal

J. Burke

H. Campbell

Ist Lt. Daniel J. Calnan

·It Lt. Willis

H. Caudle

Ist Lt. Wililam I st Lt. Jacques

J. Coombe
A. DeLaBastide

1st Lt. Jeremiah

E. Delaney

1st Lt. Louis T. Dinsmore Isf Lt. Elmer E. Dunn

GRADlJATES OF ATLANTIC COAST

Reading from left to right: First row-Captains Max K. Rawson, Daniel J. Ba:m:tf ...... William H. Buri, Lt. Col. Louis G. Jamison, Capt. Hervey D. Hotch kiss, Majors ""'-'-=""= Maher. Second row-Captains Matt J. Coughlin, John F. McGee, John F. Doo- ~. - -Morris, Chas. W. Wilkerson, James W. Higgins, Jr., Edwin Raskin, ElmerG. T. Veltri, Norman E. Weigel, Albert J. Fuge, Roy E. Cauble, Harry Birdsall, S _, ~ -_.e_ =_ Alfred L. Milam. Fourth row-I st Lts. Fr.ancis Shan.ahan, Chas. A. Bone, Gu l;:;-~==Laurens, Willis H. E~mes, Frederick E. Mitchell, Michael A. Gaffney, Jo C.' William H. Mann, Houston F. McPherson, Joseph F. Harrington, Lawrence ._ Sixth row-1st Lts. Thomas F. Tugwell, George E. Wisch, Ernest D. Trehea e, C. Kuntz, Emi~ J. Arndt, Daniel J. Calnan; 2nd Lts. Emmett W. McGowan, . eis- :: ~ --=--McCafferty, Galyn A: Wilki(1s, Albert P. Villa, Arthur G. Grothaus, Hal H. Cd ~Morgan, Thomas G. Maddalone, Elmer E. Dunn, Clarence S. Lewis, Ralph S. .e • -:-:: W. Libstaff, Levern L. Cockrell, Victor B. Harrison, William D. Graves. Ninth rn- Reidar Arnesen, William H. Eggers. Clarence D. Nicholson, Andrew N. Ferre -. -""

-=-~

=-

:: - Care ce :E. Hall; Major John K. Mount, Capt. John S. Rockefeller, Major _:ITcilrs obe r+ E. Carnes, Laurence H. Berlack, Laverne V. Johnson, Michael E.
=rd Sap ir, Timothy J. McCarthy, W. E. Brown, William O. Glenn, John H. row--Captains Everett J. Fahey, Joseph F. Gillen, Collis P. Suderman, Anthony • Meag h, William R. Wheeler; 1s+ Lts. Edward Joyce, Joseph R. Smith, '9 an, Ernest T. Perkins, Jeremiah E. Delaney, Everett E. Briggs, John B. ease, William J. Coombs, Jacques A. DeLaBasfide, Ezekiel limmer, "'eD eft F.. LitTleton, Louis T. Dinsmore, Wendell W. Gaffney, Leon C. Albert. ~ ::a-':-" I. aHare, William J. Burke. Edwin A. Geoghegan. Robert D. Bennett, Edwin I '. Archie T. Tidwell, Sidney C. Mele, Edward P. Joyce. Robert A. .' "' . 2 Us. Robert C. Youkeles, Robert C. Westley. Eighth row-I st Us. Ralph T. -=-"'='"~----:5 '. West, e ry G. Studeman, Orlan J. Norgaard, David B. Armstrong, Elmer Ralp . Collins, Wililam H. Cudworth, Henry F. Lucas. John D. Clothier. Jr., .--aIDaS A. Drago, Fr,ederic Wagner, Charles R. Woods. -"

=-

=_ - - --,

I st Lt. Ralph S. Lewis
I s+ Lt. Ezekiel Limmer

I st Lt. Stephen

F. Littleton

I.

s+ Lt. Robert H. McCafferty
Y. McPherson
G. Maddalone

1st Lt. Houston I s+ Lt. Thomas

I st Lt. William 1st Lt. Thomas
I st Lt. Sidney

H. Mann S. May C. Mele

Ist Lt. Alfred 1st Lt. Frederick
Ist Lt.

L. Milam E. Mitchell

Stanley P. Mohan

1st Lt. Walter

L Mook

Is+ Lt. Ralph T. Morgan I s+ Lt. Lawrence P. O'Ke~fe

l s] Lt. Ernest T. Perkins
I sf Lt. Olaf
I s+ Lt. John

N. Rye

C. Schilling

1st Lt. Francis 1st Lt. Joseph
l s+ Lt. Daniel

Shanahan R. Smith Soffar

I st Lt. Ralph H. Sprung man I st Lt. Frederick 1st Lt. Ernest R. Tellier

D. Trehearne

1st Lt. Archie T. Tidwell I st Lt. Thomas F. Tugwell

I s+ Lt. Albert

P. Villa

1st Lt. G,alyn A. Wilkins, 1st Lt. George E. Wisch

2nd Lt. David B. Armstrong

2nd Lt. Reidar 2nd Lt. Kenneth
2 nd Lt. Anthony

Arnesen R. Bailey
Bevilacque

A..

2nd Lt. John

D. Clothier,

Jr.

2nd Lt. Levern L. Cockrell 2nd Lt. Ralph W. Collins

2nd Lt. William 2nd Lt. Thomas 2nd Lt. William

H.·Cudworth

A. Drago H. Eggers

2nd Lt. Andrew

N. Ferretti

2nd Lt. Ralph C. Fowler 2nd Lt. Willaim D. Graves

2nd Lt. Lawrence 2nd Lt. Vidor

Johansen B. Harrison

2nd Lt. Elmer W. Libstaff

.-:;0

I

2nd Lt. Henry F. Lucas 2nd Lt. Emmett W. McGowan 2nd Lt. Clarence D. Nicholson ~ ~ ~

eJ!!t
~ 2nd Lt. Orlan J. Norgaard 2nd Lt. Robert R. Rex ~ ~

..,
~ ~ ~ ~

2nd Lt. William F. Savage

_, .,
2nd Lt. Peter P. Stewart

.,
f!!!!!I
~ ~ 2nd Lt. Henry G. Studeman 2nd Lt, George R. Thomson ~

'1!!fI!1

,_'

2nd Lt. Frederic

Wagner

2nd Lt. Thomas W. West 2nd Lt. Robed C. Westley

'.,
'~ '~

f!l!1

., ., .,

.. ., .,
'~

.,
~
'~

2nd Lt. Charles

R. Woods

.,
~ ~

2nd Lt. Joel L. Youkeles

w1

'''1

"'1 cfI'J4

EDITORIAL

STAFF

CAPTAIN C.

HILBERT

..

"__public

Relations

T ISGT.

DANIEL

R.

JORDAN

Editor

T 13
SGT.

RICHARD BRIAN

W ILLIAMs..

,

.Staf] Artist Cover Design

McGRATH

Front

Class Book
CAPT. WALLACE

Committee
CAPT. JOHN

E.

BROWN

F.

MCGEE

IS1: LT. 'WALTER

L

MOOK

Ft. Slocum's

Motto;

"Leeve the Place

d

Better Place Then You Found 1+Fcr Having Belonged

Leave Your Organization

a Better Orqanize+icn

To It."

...
fIiiiiii IJii!i

ROSTJER OF THJE GRADUATJES OF THJE ....
Atla.ntic Coast Transportation ..

LT. COL. Lours G. JAMISON -----36 Duncan Ave., Jersey City, N-TMAJOR WILLIAM H. BURL , --------------------40 Parkvale Road, Needham, Mass, MAJOR GEORGE W. COVERT__ - General Neville Mansionette, Pittsburgh, Pa. MAJOR JOHN K_ MOUNT-------------------------------------------~~---56 Beverly Pkwy., Freeport, L I., N_Y_ MAJoR CLARENCE S_ STROUP . ~ I6o! Chestnut St., Wilmington, N. C. CAPT AIN JOHN H. ADAIR . ~ -.________ __ _ Slaton, Tex. CAPTAIN DANIEL J. BARRETT.. -----------915 Franklin St., Gretna, La. CAPTAIN LAURENCE H. BERLACK. ._~~ -4910 17th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN CAPT AIN CAPTAIN CAPTAIN HARRY BIRDSALL, SR-----------------'--------------------------------5Topland Road, Hartsdale, N. Y_ \VALLACE E. BROWN .. . •__ Elgin St., Newton 70 Centre, Mass. ROBERT E. CARNES ~ -----2855 Peachtree Road, Atlanta, Ga. Roy E. CAUBLL __ !. . I I4~44 226th St., St. Albans, L 1., N. Y. MATT J. COUGHLIN . ------------------------2I937 Westlake Road, Rocky River, 0_ CHARLES M. COUNCIL, J R.--------------------------------------692! Fairfax Road, Bethesda, Md. JOHN F. DOWNEY ~___ 1758 Ryder St., Brooklyn, N_ Y_ JOHN C. EHRMAN , I 243 Hull St.,. Bal tirnore, Mel. EVERETT J. FAHEY . 37~42-99th St., Corona, L. L ALBERT J. FUGE :290 VV est Jackson St., York, Pa. JOSEPH F.GILLEN , . 105 Carlisle Ave., Paterson, N_ J. WILLIAM O. GLENN .... Delmar, .Albany Co., N. Y. ELMER G. HAECKL . -._______________ _ RR II, Box 30, Mt_ Healthy, O. CLARENCE E. HALL ---25 Broad St., New York, N. Y. JAMES '0.1. HIGGINS, JR. ----------------HERVEY D. HOTCHKISS LAVERNE V. JOHNSON SAMUEL S. KOSSOVE. --740 Fairacres Ave., Westfield, N. J. ~ ~~ Fort Slocum, N. Y. • 260]' Crestway, Utica, N. Y. 580 Empire Boulevard, Brooklyn, N. Y.

.. .. ... .. .. .. ..
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JOHN LIVINGSTONE -------------------------------------1434 Boulevard Ave., FI untington, W _ Va. MICHAEL E. MAl-mn .. 88-14 Ridge Blvd., Brooklyn, N. YTIMOTHY J- MCCARTHY 1I Crockett St.,_ Dorchester, Mass. JOHN F. McGEE . . . 6 Brownell Place, Pittsburgh, Pa_ JAMES J. MEN AGH 1I7 Main St., Farmingdale,. N. Y. SENECA D. MILLIKEN · 260 West 7th, Oswego, N_ Y. HORACE MOORE.. ---1715 No. I5th Ave., Phoenix, Ariz. -----------------------------------------------134 Clyde Street, Hampton,

CAPTAIN J~HN H. MORRIS

Va.

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..... ...
._
~

t:EIG·HTH

....

:COll"PS Officers Training School

...

TRANSPORTATION CORPS COUIRSIE

CAPTAIN EDWIN RASKIN CAPTAIN MAX E_ RAWSON CAPTAIN CHARLES E. RIKER CAPTAIN JOI-IN S. ROCKEFELLER._. . .. CAPTAIN EDWARD SAPHIR______ _ ----CAPTAIN COLLIS P. SUDERMAN. • CAPTAIN ANTHDNY T. VELTRL CAPTAIN NORMAN E. WEIGEL.. . CAPTAIN VlhLLIAI>.1R. 'VVHEELER .. CAPTAIN CHARLES W. WILKERSON . 1ST LT. LEON C. ALBERT . ..__. . 1ST LT. 1ST LT. 1ST LT. 1ST LT. 1ST LT. 1ST LT.

.. . ..

EMIL J. ARNDT.. .. ~c-------.... -....... ---.. ---------------------------- 757 Murray __ St., Elizabeth, N. J. JAMES P. BARKER.. . .. .. _ 430 East 86th St., New York, N. Y. JOHN C. BEcK .. ... . .. ------370 Old Garden Land, York, Pa. ROBERT D. BENNETT.. .. .. ----------------7°40 Colonial Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. CHARLES A. BONE. .. ... 830 Aubudon Bldg., New Orleans, La. EVERETT E. BRIGGS____ . .... ._.. .... . 160 Cunningham Ave., Ferguson, Mo.

414 Ea~t 52nd St., New York, N. Y. 86 First Street, Melrose, Mass. 2110 Westbury Court, Brooklyn, N.Y. . R.D. No. I, Greenwich, Conn. .. .1700 Albemarle Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . ... 39 I oR Yz., Galveston, Tex. 459 Ogden Ave., West Englewood, N. J. ._.. .. 1382 Park Ave., Plainfield. N. .. .II4 East 84th St., New York, N. Y. .. 336 Suffolk Road, Baltimore, Md. .._. • .. P. O. Box 252, Illmo, Mo. .

r.

1ST LT. WILLIAM J. BURKE -------------------------------------1551 Constance, New Orleans, La. rST Lr, HAL H. CAMPBELL.. . 5TI4 Fort Totten Drive, NE., Washington, D. C. 1ST Lr. DANIEL J. CALNAN .... 6 Homewood Ave., Y onkers, N. Y_ 1ST LT. VV'ILLIS H. CAUDLE . --------.... ---..----3830 Lakeshore Drive, Port Arthur, Tex. 1ST Lr. Wu .. IAM J. COOMBE._· L .. .. f208 West Wabash Ave., Crawfordsville, Ind. 1ST LT. JACQUES A. DELABAsTlDE 573 East 22nd St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1ST LT. JEREMIAH E. DELANEY 85-or Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. IST LT. LOUIS T. DINS MORL ..__ . • .23 4 East 63rd St., New York, N. Y. IST LT. ELMER E. DUNN .. . .. 437 West- School Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 1ST LT. WILLIS H. EAMEs.. -----304 Burleigh Ave., Norfolk, Va. 1ST LT. MICHAEL A. GAFFNEY 295 Lyndhurst Ave., Lyndhurst, N. J. 1ST LT. V./ENDELL 'vV. GAFFNEy 55 Laurel Ave., Staten Island, N. Y. 1ST LT. EDWIN A. GEOGHEGAN 53 Versailles Blvd., New Orleans, La. IST LT. EDMUND O. GlSLASON 423 Meridorr St., East Boston, Mass. 1sT LT. ARTHUR G. GROTHAUS 5448 Genevieve St., St. Louis, Mo. 1ST LT. EARL L. GUILLOT---.. ... 2448 No. Galvez St., New Orleans, La. ISTL'r. JOH·N F. HAASE . -- -421 Dale Avenue SE., Roanoke, Va.

"

1ST LT. JOSEPH F. HARRINGTON
1ST

--------------.----------.140 _ ____

Bonad 54 Beach

Road,

Lr, EDWARD P. JOYCE

St., Jersey

Brookline, ~Izss._ City, X_ J_
York, K_ y_ City, '\fo.. Oak

_____________________________________ 61st St., New 253 East IST LT. EDWIN C. KUNTZ IST LT. JOHN B. LAURENS
~.

---------------------------_-------83I9 Fullerton .. . . .

Ave.,

Un.iversity

1ST LT. BENJAMIN I. LAFLARE.

.._._--.14I N. Ridgelan.d, ------.. --146 Willow Avenue Road,

Park,

m_
I<lL

St., Brooklyn, North, N.W., Estherville, Atlanta,

N._ Y_
Ca,

IST LT. CLARENCE S. LmNIs IST LT. RALPH S. LEWIS
t

--------------------------------1009 Fifth

----"'-"

-'-

-----1916 Greystone Harrison

~
::::y_

ST LT. EZEKIEL LIMMER-----------------------------------4432

St., N. W., VI ash ington.,

rST LT. STEPHEN F. LITTLETON 1sT LT. ROBERT H. MCCAF FERTY. 1ST LT. HOUSTON Y. MCPHERSON 1ST LT. THOMAS G. MADDALONE ------------------.115-46 IST LT. WILLIAM H. MANN 1ST LT. THOMAS S. MAY 1ST LT. SIDNEY C. MELE I5T LT. ALFRED L. MILAM JST LT. FREDERICK E.lvhTCI-IELL
1ST

41 Washington ..
II

Ave., Winthrop,
26 Palmer, Pueblo,

D_ C_ Mass_ CoL
Ala, L. I. Tenn. \I\lis_

28 Amos I46th

St., Montgomery,
Park, Ave., Flushing, Jamaica, Superior, Bldg., Nashville,

St., So. Ozone House 37th . Axe.,

Market _ . .. . . .. _ . 189-29

2016 Hammond

L. 1., N .. Y. Tex_ Calif. Mich.

II J 5 Hayden

St., Amarillo,

-------------------.-----2315 Observatory 2334 E;st

Ave., Los Angeles, Judd Road, Flint, Ave., 1675, St., 'West

LT. STANLEY P. t'10HAN

JST LT. WALTER L. MOOK 1ST LT. RALPH T. MORGAN 1ST LT. LAWRENCE P.O'KEEFE 1ST LT. ERNEST T. PERKINS 1ST LT. OLAF N. RyE. 1ST LT. JOI-IN C. SCHILLING
rST

Bissemer ~ Hopkins . .
c

E. Conneaut,
Berkeley, Boston, Hartford, Cranbury, Haven,

0_
Calif. Mass. Conn.

156 Stanwood 399 South Quaker Land, R.F.D.

.____________________

No.
Place, St.,

I,

N .. J.
Conn. N.

. .______________ __1I65 Forest Road, 69 Liberty -------. . . 2704 Drew . 345 \Vest

New

LT. FRANCIS SHANAHAN LT. DANIEL SOFFAR. L'r. RALPI-I H. SPRUNGMAN ..

Weehawken, Jacksonville, City,

J.

1ST Lr. JOSEPH R. SMITH __
rST
1ST

21St

Fla. Tex. Minn. Mass. Calif, Ala. Calif.

.__ 426 1St Ave. N., Texas Avenue South, Minneapolis, Rd.,

1ST LT. FREDERICK R. TELLIER 1ST LT. ERNEST D. TREHEARNE 1ST Lr, ARCHIE T. TIDWELL JST LT. THOMAS F. TUGWELL : . .

94 Glendale .__ 55 Hermann ._ .308 South . 32nd

Quincy,

St., San Francisco, 8th St., Opelika,

.__ 9J8Y;; West

St., Los Angeles,

/'

1ST LT. ALBERT P. VILLA. __ .

2608

Cleveland

Ave., Cleveland,

New

Orleans, Guthrie,

La. Okla. Minn.

1ST LT_ GALYN A. WILKINS. -----------------------------------:------1904 West 1ST LT. GEORGE E_ WISCH 2ND LT. DAVID

---------------------------------.173 I E_ Sixth _ ._____________________ -----4U-54th, r020 Leland --------------54 Parrot Madison , , -----------424 Alleghany . I Juniper

St., Duluth, East Ely, Brooklyn,

B. ARMSTRONG__

Nev.
I. Y. Calif.

2ND LT_ RElDAR ARNESEN 2ND LT. KENNETH R. BAILEY 2ND LT. ANTHONY A_ BEVILACQUE 2ND Lr, JOHN D. CLOTHIER JR.-------------2ND LT. LEVERN L COCKRELL. 2ND LT. RALPH \V. COLLlNS.

St., San Pedro, Place, Place, Road, Road, Ave., Ave., Mowry Brooklyn, Staunton, Hampton, Hingham, St. Paul, Hanford,

N. Y.
Va. Va. Mass. Minn. Conn. Pa.

2ND LT. WILLIAM H. CUDWORT~1----------------------------------------709 Linwood 2ND LT. THOMAS A. DRACO 2ND LT. \VILLlArvI H. EGGERS 2ND LT. ANDREW N. FERRETTI______________ _ 2ND Lr. RALPH C. FOWLER 2ND LT_ WILLIAM D. GRAVE$__ 2ND LT_ LAWRENCE JOHANSEN 2ND LT. VICTOR B. HARRlSON 2NDLT. ELMER W_ LIBSTAFF 2ND LT. HENRY F. Lucxs., --------2ND LT. EMMETT \1.1. McGOwAN ~ND LT. CLARENCE D. NrcHOLsoN 2ND LT. ORLAN ,._. .• .. 258 Hillside 218 "Vest 21 King R_F.D_ -----------------------------------2724 Bachman --------2627 Rahregway Ave., ----------------.50 Fairview ---------------------------------------1705 King .502 Lincoln R.R. No. II Long · .. Street 12, Saylor Beach j020 Ave.,

St., Chester,
York, Lombard,

St., New
NO.1,.

N. Y. Ill. Tex.
Calif.-

.'"

.-t

Blvd., Dallas,
Long Beach, A ve., Verona, Aye., Columbus,

N.

J.
0_

North,

Aberdeen,

S. D. O. Nebr.

Pk. Sta., Cincinnati, Roosevelt, St., Omaha,

L. 1., N. Y_

J. NORGAARD
F. SAVAGE

Chicago

2ND LT. ROBERT R. REX. 2ND LT. Wn;LlAM 2ND LT. PETER P_ STEWART 2ND Lr. HENRY G. STUDEMAN_. 2ND LT. GEORGE R. THOMSON ~ND LT. FREDERIC WAGNER_ 2ND LT. THOMAS \V. WEST.. 2ND LT. ROBERT C. WESTLEY 2ND LT. JOEL L. YOUKELES --------

-332 So. Main --3720 Avenue Stoneleigh

St., West Milton, 0_
H,Brooklyn, Hotel, Dallas, N.

y_

Tex.

___________________________________________________________ Port Arkansas, Tex. ________________________________ 710r Shore -----------------------------3I48 1217 . .. N. Park 265 'B" Eliazbeth Hull Road, Brooklyn, N_ Y. Pa.Calif.

Ave_, Philadelphia, Ave., Coronado, Ave_, Laureldale, Beach, Bronx, Avenue,

Pa.
Calif. N. Y.

2ND LT. CHARLES R. WOODS --------------------------------------------------.715 E. 5th St., Long .3217

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CLASS DINNER COMMITIEE Reading from left toright-Captains Ist Lt. Stephen Collis John H. Morris, F. Littleton,

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Matt J, Coughlin;

Che irman : Captain and

O. Suderman, R. Smith.

1st Lt. Joseph

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CLASSBOOK Reading

COM M ITTEE Wallace E, Brown

from left to right-Captains and

, John F. McGee,

1st Lt. Walter

L. Mook.

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PRESENTATION COMMITTEE Reading from left to right-Captain Major John K. Mount, Captain Ist Lt. Olaf Chas. E. Riker, James W. Higgins,

E. Rye "~d 2nd Lt. Wm. H. Cudworth

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dUTHETlIME BARRACKS

BAG"

that future civilization-if any-may know what Slocum was like in the year 1943 AD, we propose a "Time Barracks Bag" into which may be placed various articles and implements characteristic of our age. The Time Barracks Bag should be made from some time-resisting weather-proof substance. Vie propose some plastic to conserve metal and to be known as "our deeds." This plastic will have the charge of preserving the past for us. Caesar's world conquering tour, for instance, speaks quite well for its time-resisting and weather-proof qualities. In packing the barracks bag we must remember to put into it only those things which will give future archeologists a good idea of what our lives and their burdens here at Slocum were like. Our school, by all means, should be packed first. We feel that somehow or other it makes a symbolical representation of the true Slocum spirit. "Ever seeking the secrets of heaven" what memories we have of its study halls, (North Hall, corridors, offices). There in its room we fell and died like Hector at the Walls of Troy; In its corridors as officer students we wandered the earth as Ulysses once did the sea; in its'offices (the Asst. Commandant's) we were like Moses on Mt. Sinai, where amidst the thunder and lightning of a wrathful God we received our ten commandments (Courts Martial Manual); in its study halls we were like the alchemists of old, ever brewing concoctions of marvel. Let us get on now and pack our barracks and mess hall. Those comfortable- cots neatly arranged, foot lockers and wall lockers, all of which make pretty lasting memories. We must not fail to include the latrines, they have their decorative value. Here we have been hasty, where did we put the mess hall, ah there it isin our Time Barracks Bag, our rness-hall=-in its towering walls we became medieval Lords, feasting in the great hall of a feudal manor with our fawning servants about us (Mess Attendants). Oh, what memories! how smugly they fit into the barracks bag. The faculty, and what a faculty it is! Lentz, Hotchkiss, Willson, Hagedorn, Robbins, 'Nilson, Hopple, Carnesi, Smith, Johnson, like the battle list of some unknown ancient regiment. These names recall to us our victories and defeats. Each has left his mark upon us for better or for worse. But they're not a bad

SO

----~~-::--i:' i..._________ .:

group notwithstanding :sheir faults. Perhaps we officer students did manage to teach them something in spite of the very evident lack of desire to learn on their part and we think we did a pretty good job too, considering we had only six weeks to do it in, but, they too, have been doing a little teaching of their own. They have managed to put us wise to a lot of little things we never knew before. So when we lay the faculty into our Barracks bag let us be careful and tender, for they are our badge and our medals, showing us as battle scarred veterans. Ah, that's it. Easy does it. They're in at last. And now we come to our subjects=the cause of all our worries, the true banes of our indoctrination in things military-edrills, weapons, military courtesy, map reading, night problems and lectures, just to mention a few. But then, how can we continue without a few words for Butts' Manual-s-good old Butts-> symmetrical beat of Atlas at play= a famous concoction for first degree murder conceived by General Butts. \Ve, all may raise cries of-"Praise the Gods" at giving them up, but we still fed a strange twinge in doing so. What would it be like not to have a chronic case of writer's cramp or not to know the tortures of headaches because of good old Butts or never given to have that feeling of' mortification rise in us every time We muff a command set forth in the Lentz system of cadence drill. What will it be like? Every thing has suddenly taken on a new aspect. Some- of us are actually a little sad at the thought of not having it any' more! How strange! Oh well, that completes our packing. The Time Barracks Bag Is FulL My~w"hat memorabilia for the archeologists! What treasure trove! Pardon us, here comes the Q.M. Lorry with a detail of GI lads, clad in denim to entomb our Time Barracks Bag in some crypt in New Rochelle, a mausoleum befitting the Slocum lore. It is predicted by Major Domo, a GI Gremlin, that this is to be the .eighth wonder of the world. And there Masorite, famous for his traditional readings of the Scriptures, shall read the stencils on our Time Barracks Bag. OIl well, anyway we have given something to civilization-s-or ' haven't we?

T jSGT.

DANIEL

R.

JORDAN

~---------------------------------------~_~

POiSt YMCA
(

hasty conclusions be drawn from the above title, let us make clear at once that this is not an Edgar Wallace type of thriller or a Sax Rohmer clutching-hand mystery. Neither does it have anything to do with the study of palmistry.
EST

L

Those of us who have come successfully through the course at the Atlantic Coast Transportation Corps Officers Training School know only of one thing when we speak of "The Hand". "The Hand" Fort Slocum. is Colonel Bernard Lentz, Commandant of the school and Commanding Officer of

Anyone who has not been privileged to be exposed to the Lentz system of teaching and indoctrination surely must wonder why we refer to the Lexicon as "The Hand"· And if you were to put the question direct to any of his devotees, it would undoubtedly produce a gleam in the eye, a slight upturning of the lips-and the following explanation. Colonel Lentz has a favorite question that he puts to almost any assemblage: "Who is the immortal Samuel Goldwyn?" Invariably someone raises his hand and answers, "Samuel Goldwyn is a famous movie producer." Then Colonel Lentz' facial expression breaks into a boyish grin and, nodding his' head, he says, "Yes, yes, Samuel Goldwyn is a famous movie producer, but he is also known for murdering the king's Englishmixing his metaphors to a terrific degree." "One particular story about Goldwyn," Colonel Lentz goes on, "had him surrounded by all his Hollywood directors and technical advisers, in the midst of a heated discussion of a forthcoming Goldwyn special. They argued and bickered over details, none of which Sam Goldwyn could quite agree with. Finally, in desperation, he threw his hands to his head and eidaimed in a loud, agonized voice, 'Oh dem directors! They're always biting the hand that lays the golden egg!' " As he ends his pet story, the Colonel strides from behind the speaker's table, steps forward to the edge of the podium and, gazing out upon the sea of upturned faces, says: "Gentlemen, by virtue of being .Commanding Officer of Fort Slocum and Commandant of this school,
I am the hand that lays the golden egg. And my advice to you is don't bite the hand that lays the golden egg!"

Here at the ACTCOTS we have been taught the technique of military transportation .. But in addition; Lexicon Lentz has striven to instill in us the spirit of military leadership .•
It has often been said that the perfect relationship between the military leader and his men is achieved when the unit becomes one large family. This does not mean merely that the men are the family of the leader, but that the leader is the family of the men. And, in a very real sense, he is the family. He is the father who molds the character, charts the course, and breaks the trail. He is the mother who listens and understands-constantly fanning the spiritual flame that burns within men. He is also "my Uncle Charlie from Wisconsin." He is all those things which the men need, want, and respect in [he man who leads them.

It is the military _leader who must lead the men-and cheerfully, willingly, and with confidence.

it

IS

the leader whom men want

to follow-

All of us owe our understanding of these fundamentals of military leadership to Colonel Bernard Lentz; and we leave this station outward bound, with the thought tbat-mixed metaphor or no-this time "The Hand" realty did lay a priceless golden egg.

i

;~-=------------------~~==~~===g=~=.=====~===========================.~ =

"

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