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Transforming Communication

Transforming Communication

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Published by James Souttar
Transforming Communication explores ways of looking at visual communication as a human, and humane, activity.
It also, one way or another, articulates what I have learned in more than twenty years as a practitioner.
Transforming Communication explores ways of looking at visual communication as a human, and humane, activity.
It also, one way or another, articulates what I have learned in more than twenty years as a practitioner.

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Published by: James Souttar on Dec 09, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/18/2015

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quest’. And Dr. Jung would have nodded his head in approval. It’s a

bit more di›cult to explain this to a board of directors — but actually,

sometimes they can be more open-minded and progressive than their

design consultants.

To find symbols, one has to have some sympathy with them — not a

thing our age is known for, but not entirely forgotten for all that. A

symbol will appear through a dream, an insight or an unexpected ser-

endipity — but in all cases, there will be one or more significant coin-

cidences that identify it as being right for your purposes. Without

an easy familiarity with the worlds of dreams, mythology and poetic

expression, one might easily miss it. To say more on this subject is not

easy; some people will know what I’m talking about, whilst others will

think it idiocy — and there is not really any middle ground.

196

transforming communication

Filling up

11 March 1998

gunnar:

James’ objection to the cleaned up Shell and Jim’s disgust at the Mobil

wordmark ignore a major emotional justification for the modern aes-

thetic applied to the gas station. In addition to the reasonable (and

largely successful) attempt at linking the products with a notion of tech-

nical progress, remember that before the mega chains most gas stations

were grimy places where people didn’t want to let people touch their

cars. Going to the bathroom was, by middle class standards, a horrible

experience. In this sense less - is - more.

In the village where my children go to school, there is a sweet little fill-

ing station that has been le· behind by the march of time. It reminds

me and the boys of Roald Dahl’s Danny the Champion of the World — which

is presumably why we like to fill up there (even though they don’t take

credit cards, and one has to wait interminably for the owner to get

around to serving you). There are bits of cars of uncertain age scattered

about the yard, sat in pools of motor oil and grease. There’s no branded

canopy or forecourt, no computerised tills or digitised pumps, simply

a rickety old shack, some very doubtful mathematics, and an ancient

pump that I’m sure doesn’t meet modern safety standards. And I sin-

cerely hope nobody has ever asked to ‘use the bathroom’!

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