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Scale and Arpeggio Resources

Scale and Arpeggio Resources

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Published by rich_cochrane
This is the most complete book of guitar scales and arpeggios ever written.

It's truly massive: more than 400 large pages packed with diagrams, analysis and explanations. Of course it includes all the basic, common scales you need to play rock, blues, jazz and so on, but also a vast number of exotic resources for you to experiment with and use to develop your own unique sounds. Many of these have never or hardly ever been used before.

A very thorough chapter on scale theory is included: it provides a solid foundation and ensures you'll never again be confused about modes, the most useful but also most misunderstood concept in modern guitar theory. I use this as the basis for most of my theoretical teaching with students who are ready for single-note work.

The complete electronic version of this book is provided FREE by the publisher under a creative commons license. Please seed and share at will, and consider supporting the author by buying a paper copy if you like it.
This is the most complete book of guitar scales and arpeggios ever written.

It's truly massive: more than 400 large pages packed with diagrams, analysis and explanations. Of course it includes all the basic, common scales you need to play rock, blues, jazz and so on, but also a vast number of exotic resources for you to experiment with and use to develop your own unique sounds. Many of these have never or hardly ever been used before.

A very thorough chapter on scale theory is included: it provides a solid foundation and ensures you'll never again be confused about modes, the most useful but also most misunderstood concept in modern guitar theory. I use this as the basis for most of my theoretical teaching with students who are ready for single-note work.

The complete electronic version of this book is provided FREE by the publisher under a creative commons license. Please seed and share at will, and consider supporting the author by buying a paper copy if you like it.

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Published by: rich_cochrane on Apr 01, 2012
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11/26/2015

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The cycle of fifths is a classic jazz sound that provides a nice way to build a substitute

chord sequence over a long static harmony. Say you’re playing over the first four bars

of a blues in C, which consist of just C7:

C7

You can take any dominant seventh and replace the first part of it with the dominant

seventh built on its own fifth5

. In this case, it will be G7, because G is the fifth of C

major. The idea is that G7 resolves to C, C will resolve to something else (F in this

case):

G7

C7

You can use this approach chord anywhere where you see a dominant chord, even

on top of another superimposed arpeggio, such as in the Charlie Parker or Coltrane

cycles. The important thing is that it sets up a resolution, so you should be able to

provide some kind of cadence at the end of the dominant chord, although you may

choose to defeat your listeners’ expectations by not resolving it after all, or not doing

so in an obvious way.

The really nice thing about this trick, though, is that this can be repeated. So the

G can be approached by its fifth, which is D7, and that in turn can be approached

by its fifth, A7:

A7

D7

G7

C7

This chain of dominant chords built on the fifth of the next chord provides a sequence

that resolves step by step, but resolves imperfectly because each chord is a dominant

seventh that points the way to the next resolution.

The application of this idea requires some preparation. At the beginning of the

chorus, you need to decide to play a cycle of fifths that will last four bars, with

one change per bar. You then need to work out where to start in order to achieve

this. One useful approach is to learn the most common jumps you need to make

at the beginning; for example, you can see that starting on the sixth of the original

chord (A of C) will give you a four-step cycle, whereas starting on the 2 (D of C)

gives three steps. When improvising it’s worth making the cycle move fairly quickly,

since the beginning of the superimposition will sound quite dissonant; reducing the

time spent on each arpeggio to two beats would provide a framework for building a

quickly-moving line whose dissonance was resolved reasonably smoothly.

5

In other books you might see this referred to as the ‘V of V’ substitution

36

CHAPTER 3. APPLICATIONS OF THE TRIAD AND SEVENTH ARPEGGIOS

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