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Pacific Resources for Education and Learning

Building Capacity Through Education

© 2011 PREL

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Convex Lense Light Light Concave Lense

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astronomy n. the scientific study of the stars, planets, and other natural objects beyond Earth’s atmosphere Ancient Hawaiian knowledge of astronomy was based on their careful observations of the moon, stars, and sun. axis n. an imaginary line through Earth’s center from the North Pole to the South Pole Earth turning on its axis results in day and night. It takes Earth 24 hours to complete one turn on its axis. force n. pulling effect that an object has on another object The force of gravity is strong enough to keep us from falling off Earth. gravity n. a physical energy in the universe that pulls objects together The planet Jupiter has the strongest force of gravity. galaxy n. a collection of billions of stars, dust, and other objects that are held together by gravity Our solar system is part of the Milky Way Galaxy. hemisphere n. one of the two halves of Earth, either north or south of the equator, or east or west of the Meridian Countries north of the equator are in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas countries south of the equator are in the Southern Hemisphere. orbit n. in space, the path of an object around another object Each planet travels around the sun in its own orbit. orbit v. to travel around an object The planets, their moons, meteoroids, and asteroids orbit the sun. revolve v. to move around in a circle around a central point Earth revolves around the sun once every 365 days. revolution n. the act of moving around in a circle around a central point It takes approximately 29 days for the moon to complete one revolution around Earth. rotate v. to turn around on an axis Earth rotates on its axis at an approximate rate of 1,000 miles per hour. solar system n. the sun, its eight planets and their moons, and all the other objects that travel around it All of the planets and objects in the solar system travel around the sun.

brilliant adj. very bright or shiny; bright in color On a clear night, we can see the brilliant stars in the sky. capture v. (1) to put into a form that will last Galileo was sure to capture what he saw in the sky in his journal. (2) to take control of by force; to catch Māui captured the sun, Kalā, to slow its journey across the sky. convert v. to change one thing into a different form or shape Solar panels convert light energy into electrical energy. dense adj. packed closely together The planets that are made of gas are less dense than planets made of rocks. energy n. force or power, capacity to do work According to scientists, energy cannot be destroyed, but changes from one form to another (e.g., from heat to light). equator n. an imaginary line circling Earth, halfway between the North and South poles If you look at a globe or map, you see that the equator divides Earth into the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere. establish v. to show to be true Galileo established that the sun is the center of the universe. expansion n. something made larger Scientists are gathering evidence to explain the rapid expansion of the universe. glare n. a very bright, strong, dazzling light When looking through a telescope, avoid the glare of the sun. gradual adj. changing very slowly over a long period of time Do you feel the gradual increase of temperature during the day? maintain v. to keep something going; to continue to have it The planets maintain their same orbits around the sun. motion n. a continuous movement The pull of the sun’s gravity explains the planetary motion of Earth. occur i.v. to happen Days and night occur as Earth rotates on its axis. reflect v. return back as light or heat The moon does not shine; it reflects the light of the sun. represent v. to stand for something; to be a sign or symbol of something The arrival of the Makali‘i represents the arrival of the new Hawaiian year. telescopic adj. visible only with the help of a telescope The telescopic view of Mars showed possible life-like processes taking place on the planet. visible adj. able to be seen A few planets, such as Venus and Mars, are visible in the night sky.
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Science Related Words
accelerate v. to increase the speed of After liftoff, rockets need to accelerate to get into a space orbit. approximate adj. very close to, but not exact The approximate date of Haleakalā’s last eruption is 1790. attract v. to cause an object to move toward another object A magnet attracts objects made of steel or iron. attraction n. the act or power of causing an object to move toward another object The gravitational attraction of objects in the universe keeps all objects in place.
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‘ae n. yes ‘aha n. sennit rope ‘ano ‘ai n. a form of greeting Hōkūle‘a n. Arcturus, the guiding star for navigators (Hōkūle‘a means “Star of Happiness”) ipu n. a gourd that is used for creating beats for chants and dances Kalā n. the sun in the story, Why Māui Snared the Sun (ka lā “the sun”) kapa n. Hawaiian cloth made from the bark of the māmaki or wauke tree kīhei n. cape ko‘i n. adze kukuna n. a sun’s ray kuleana n. rights and responsibilities malo n. loin cloth māmaki n. native tree used to make kapa Māui n. a hero in Hawaiian stories moa kāne n. rooster pākīkē adj. rude, impolite pā‘ū n. woman’s skirt, made of kapa cloth wauke n. a paper mulberry plant used to make kapa

Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL)
President and CEO Sharon Nelson-Barber Creative Producer Michael Q. Ceballos Executive Producer Ormond Hammond Curriculum Developer Ellen Miyasato Line Producer Kaira Resch Cultural Advisor Keikio‘ewa Ka‘ōpua, Kamehameha Schools Production Assistant Frances Oshiro

Curriculum Advisors Susan Hanson Cheryl Taitague

Evaluators Andrew Sahalie Chuck Giuli

Special Thanks To
Christine Antolos John Camac Terry Kelly Gwen Okamoto Roger Osentoski

Why Māui Snared the Sun
Written By Lee Cataluna Adapted By Meagan KawenaRothschild Artists Michael Q. Ceballos Bryson Luke Maurice F. Morgan Layout Design Michael Q. Ceballos

“Supah” Ikaika
Written By Meagan Kawena Rothschild & Michael Q. Ceballos Character Design Spencer Wong Layout Design Spencer Wong Michael Q. Ceballos

Phrases
I le‘ale‘a ka hana! Maika‘i nō Mai poina Have fun Very good Don’t forget

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