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Kids Summer 2012

Kids Summer 2012

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THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN

WWW.SANTAFENEWMEXICAN.COM
2012
SUMMER
2 KIDS SUMMER 2012
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 3
COVER PHOTO
Natalie Guillén
DESIGN
Lori Johnson
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
Robin Martin
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Ginny Sohn
MANAGING EDITOR
Rob Dean
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Deborah Villa, 986-3027, dvilla@sfnewmexican.com
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Pat West-Barker
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Tamara Hand, 986-3007
ART DEPARTMENT
Scott Fowler, manager
Rick Artiaga, Dale Deforest, Elspeth Hilbert, Melyssa Holik
Christine Hufman, advertising layout
ADVERTISING SALES
Michael Brendel, 995-3825
Gary Brouse, 995-3861
Mike Flores, 995-3840
Margaret Henkels, 995-3820
Belinda Hoschar, 995-3844
Cristina Iverson, 995-3830
Stephanie Green, 995-3820
Jan Montoya, 995-3838
Art Trujillo, 995-3820
COMMERCIAL PRINT SALES
Rob Newlin, 505-995-3841, printsales@sfnewmexican.com
SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR
Michael Campbell
PRODUCTION
Al Waldron, operations director
Tim Cramer, assistant production director
Dan Gomez, prepress manager
Larry Quintana, press manager
Brian Schultz, packaging manager
DISTRIBUTION
Michael Reichard, circulation manager
Casey Brewer, distribution coordinator
DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT
Geof Grammer
www.santafenewmexican.com
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN
202 E. Marcy St.
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday
Advertising information: 505-986-3082
Delivery: 505-986-3010, 800-873-3372
For copies of this magazine, call 428-7645
or email caseyb@sfnewmexican.com.
4 Bike trails are the wheel deal for families
6 Mother and daughter fnd peace ofine
8 Prepraration is the key to fun family hikes
12 Museums and zoos educate and entertain
14 The world of creative writing
16 Adventure is just a fun train ride away
18 Summer camps for every boy and girl
20 Etc. ... but wait, there’s more!
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SUMMER
2012
Helena Sutphin, 8, celebrates the
beginning of summer at Bicentennial Pool
hen3-year-oldFrannyAndersongoes toher neighborhoodplayground,
she hops in her green bike seat between the handle bars and her dad.
Tey cruise along wide Calle Conquistadora to catch the Santa Fe River
Trail at Avenida Cristóbal Colón.
“Franny and I like it a lot,” said Franny’s dad, Stewart Anderson. “We can talk and
sing and play together along the way.”
Andersontravels onstreets he describes as mellow, andtrails like the Santa Fe River
Trail alongWest Alameda Street, or the Rail Trail that follows the traintracks fromthe
Railyard to Zia Road. Te path extends farther to Rabbit Road, where it becomes an
unpaved path to Eldorado.
FamiliesinSantaFehaveseveral optionsforbiking, fromtrailsandroadstoparksand
neighborhoods. Bike riders acknowledge Santa Fe’s reputationas a challenging city for
cyclists, but they say biking is safe and fun if you avoid the major, busy streets, plan
your routes carefully, stay aware of vehicles and assert your rights on the road.
“I feel like if you pick routes, and are defensive about being on the road, it’s a great
place to bike, particularly because of the weather here,” said Ben Stricks, a 40-year-
old bicyclist who has lived in Santa Fe for eight years.
Stricks lives in an east-side neighborhood where there aren’t designated trails for
bike riders. He weaves through side streets to travel to the Plaza, the Santa Fe Chil-
dren’s Museum or the Railyard with his daughters, Lottie, 3, and Hazel, 1, who ride
together in a bike trailer.
“It’s a pretty good way to take them around,” Stricks said. “We can put books and
snacks in there, and they can play with each other.”
Tere is no need for people to bike on major roadways, said Tim Rogers, an avid
bicyclist who is consulting with the Santa Fe Metropolitan Planning Organization to
create a bicycle master plan for the city and county of Santa Fe.
Rogers has been biking with his three children for most of their lives. Ten-year-old
Nick Rogers can now bike by himself through Bicentennial Park to Gonzales Com-
munity School. Nick and his 7-year-old sister, Clare, bike with their dad on the Rail
Trail to a karate class of of St. Michael’s Drive.
In the last fve years, the city has expanded its trail system. Crews recently fnished
connectingBicentennial ParktoFrenchy’s FieldParkthroughtheRiver Trail that goes
under Camino Alire.
People don’t have to rely only on trails, Rogers said. “We’re trying to create a grid of
trails and mellow roads that are something anyone who wants to ride a bike can use.”
Te Acequia Trail is one example of a trail that connects tosafe side streets. Te trail
goes fromthe Railyard to Potencia Street. Tere, you can cross Baca Street and head
for Montaño Street, which leads to the Career Academy at Larrogoite. You can then
continue on to Ashbaugh Park, Otowi Road and Maclovia Park. Except for a short,
unpaved portion, the path is easily traveled.
Forrecreational riderswhowant totest theirskills, Bicentennial ParkandRaglePark
have what are called pump tracks. To ride up and down the pump tracks’ dirt hills,
bicyclists use their own momentum instead of pedaling.
For beginning bikers, there are several small neighborhood and park trails.
Franklin E. Miles Park, Ragle Park, Frenchy’s Field Park and the Nava Adé trails
near the Santa Fe Place mall are a few examples of where there are short, safe paths
for young children.
CharlieChapmanstartedusingabalancebikeonkid-friendlypaths throughBicen-
tennial Park and around the Fort Marcy Recreational Complex when he was 2, said
Mike Chapman, Charlie’s dad and owner of Broken Spoke in Santa Fe.
Charlie, now 5, has more recently been riding his pedal bike, and his 2-year-old
sister, Rosie, rides on the balance bike for family trips. Sometimes they travel down-
hill to Frenchy’s Field fromtheir Casa Solana neighborhood and have someone pick
them up so that the ride isn’t too long.
“Tey love it,” Mike Chapman said. “It’s really fun to get out and breathe the fresh
air, get some exercise and instill confdence in the kids.”
Birgitte Terkildsen said that anyone can use a combination of trails and roads to
bike throughout Santa Fe.
Fromher home near Cordova Road, Terkildsen bikes everywhere —to Sam’s Club
using the Rail Trail and Arroyo de los Chamisos Trail, to her 3-year-old son, Frederik
Mernild’s, Dragonfy School on Alto Street, and to her ofce at Garcia Street Club.
“I would say to people that they can absolutely do it,” she said.
To plan the best bike route, check out the Santa Fe Metropolitan Planning Organi-
zation’s detailed 2012 Santa Fe Bikeways and Trails Map, which shows all trails and
street routes. Parks, transit centers and bike shops are marked on the map as well.
For a copy of the map, go to santafempo.org/bicycle-master-plan.
BIKE TRAILS
ARE THE WHEEL DEAL FOR FAMILIES
Deborah Busemeyer For The New Mexican
Taran Hunter, 13, fromSanta Fe,
on the Santa Fe River Trail
4 KIDS SUMMER 2012
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Bicyclistslookingfor helprepairingtheir bikesinSantaFehaveseveral options, including
full-service repair shops, low-cost classes and workshops that teach the basics of bike
mechanics.
CHAINBREAKER COLLECTIVE, 1515 FIFTHST., has operated a bicycle resource center
for the past 8 years as part of its goal to create healthy and afordable transportation.
People whocan’t afordtransportationcanreceive donatedbikes at the center, andme-
chanics will teach them how to fx the bikes themselves. Bicyclists can also bring their
ownbikes tothecollectivetolearnhowtodorepairs. Thegroupuses timeas its currency,
soonebikeis worthfour hours of volunteer time. Tomas Rivera, director of Chainbreaker
Collective, said the group encourages people to become members. A membership re-
quires annual dues equal totwotimes a person’s hourly wage at his or her job. Inthe last
8 years, the program has given almost 1,000 bikes to people, Rivera said. “The need for
the work far outweighs our ability to meet that need,” he said. Some Santa Feans go to
Chainbreaker Collective because they don’t have any other transportation, while others
are looking to save money on gas.
ROB AND CHARLIE’S, 1632 ST. MICHAEL’S DR., ofers bike maintenance classes for
$10 each or $30 for four classes. The classes, ofered in winter only, teach basic repairs
needed to get a people to their destinations safely — fxing a fat tire and brakes, ad-
justing gears and putting a chain back together. The classes are ofered through Bike
Santa Fe, the local bicycle advocacy organization. “The idea is to encourage more peo-
ple to ride,”said Stephen Newhall, manager at Rob and Charlie’s and a board member of
Bike Santa Fe, which ofers bike safety classes in the spring, summer and fall. The classes
teach people howto ride safely in trafc based on curriculumfromthe League of Amer-
ican Bicyclists. Classes include a four-hour session for children ages 8 to 14 and a nine-
hour adult class that divides time between the classroomand the road. For information
on class schedules, visit bikesantafe.org.
FRANKIE FLATS, 1600 LENA ST. #D3, ofers basic bicycle repair clinics in the winter.
One-on-one classes cost $150, and group classes are $50.
Chainbreaker Collective...................... chainbreaker.org.......................................505-989-3858
Rob and Charlie’s ................................... robandcharlies.com.................................505-471-9119
Frankie Flats............................................. frankiefats.com.........................................505-473-1712
The Broken Spoke ................................. brokenspokesantafe.com......................505-992-3102
New Mexico Bike N Sport ................... nmbikensport.com...................................505-820-0809
Santa Fe Mountain Sports.................. santafemountainsports.com................505-988-3337
Mello Velo Bicycles................................ mellowvelo.com........................................505-995-8356
SpinDoc..................................................... spindoc.com...............................................505-466-4181
REI ............................................................... rei.com..........................................................505-982-3557
WHERE TO GO WHEN YOU NEED A FIX
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 5
Ten-year-old Jose Chumacero,
fromSanta Fe, helps his
friend with his BMX bike at
Chainbreaker Collective.
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2012 Summer Camps for Ages 5-14
DRAWING, PAINTING, PRINTMAKING,
SCULPTURE, COLLAGE
Week-long sessions from June 4th - July 27th
Tuition is Sliding Scale ● Additional scholarships are available!
NOW IN TWO LOCATIONS!!!
FACT ARTbarn Community Studio FACT Zona del Sol Community Studio
1516 Pacheco St. on the corner of Jaguar Dr. and
Santa Fe, NM 87505 Country Club Rd
Call us at 992-2787 or visit our website at www.factsantafe.org
WHERE GREAT THINGS BEGIN
Santa Fe YMCA Summer Day Camp
May 29-Aug 3 Pinon Elementary School
$130/week (Finacial assistance available and CYFD contracts accepted)
Ages 5-12 2921 Camino Los Caballos
Register online at ymcacnm.org or call 505-424-8077
~
he New Mexican asked a plugged-in writer and her 15-year-old daughter, a
freshman at the New Mexico School for the Arts, to go ofine for two days
and tell us how it felt. Te rules were simple: no media unless it was a “real”
newspaper or magazine; no texting or emailing; no websurfng or electronic gaming,
no television, movies or online social networking. Mini-vacation? Or high anxiety?
MOTHER, Candelora Versace
Howhardcanit be?Tat wasmyfrst thought whenIwasconfrontedwithaconnection
“blackout.”
I wondered howmy heavily-wired daughter would manage, but the tables quickly
turned. She took the challenge quite readily while I, on the other hand, was nervous
enough that I felt I needed to plan for the optimum time to disconnect.
I rarely watch television, so that would not be a loss, but I work at home, and my
communication with the outside world is almost entirely online. I’mnot a big phone-
talker, but I do rely on texting with my daughter for endless afer-school logistics.
In addition, I enjoy a vigorous online social network that’s intellectually stimulat-
ing and emotionally supportive —when it’s not a trivial and over-reactive time suck.
Turningonthe computer inthe morningwas frequentlybecomingthe frst stepdown
the rabbit hole. I was probably overdue for a fast.
Te abundance of time unfolding before me, coupled with an unexpected sense
of contentment, were sudden and enormous gifs. Yes, I had begun a mental list of
the pile of projects around the house I could put my attention to, which I did —with
plenty of time ahead of me. I never used to have such a backlog of little things that
needed to be fnished, and while making quick work of them, I realized just how
much time I had been letting dribble away.
Intruth, I felt envelopedina peaceful silence. And, surprisingly, I felt relief fromthe
onslaught of political and cultural information I had been immersed in daily. I spent
several hours reading a novel. I talked on the phone with an old friend. I fred up the
yogurt machine, still in its box from Christmas. I found myself breathing deeply
and slowly and calmly, and I was happy. Very, very happy.
DAUGHTER, Sofia J. Howard
Without electronics, Iwasonmyownalot morethanIwasusedto. Ihadcometodepend
onmy cellphone tokeepmyself fromthinking toohard, diving toodeep, by distracting
myself with conversations that may or may not actually have made matters worse.
With the distractions of electronics eliminated, a kind of blissful emptiness flled
my brain. I could almost feel it, an empty room in my head with nothing but white
walls, a white foor, and one window with the blinds cracked and strips of golden
sunlight projected onto the blank space.
IbegantoimmersemyselfinthemusiccollectionIhaveamassed,whichbecamemore
important than ever when I found myself not knowing what else to do. I did my
homeworkquickly andefciently, made cookies andplayedwiththe cats andthe dog,
talkedonthephonewiththepeoplewhomatteredanddidn’t sidetrackmyself withthe
people who didn’t.
Beingawayfromit all mademerealizeI couldsurvivewithout it, but it alsomademe
realizethat therearepeoplenow, myageandyounger, whodon’t knowhowtodowith-
out Facebookandtextingnonstop, whilesimultaneouslydecreasingtheir face-to-face
social skills. I don’t evenhaveaFacebookaccount —I prefertokeepmyexposuretothe
drama of high school to a minimum.
Tis experiment has mademeworriedfor thegenerations afer me. I ambeginningto
wonder if the high-tech future we all dream of would really be so great afer all.
Candelora Versace and Sofia J. Howard For The New Mexican
6 KIDS SUMMER 2012
Just one of the things that CandeloraVersace, right, and her daughter,
Sofia Howard, 15, did during their 48 hours without technology was bake
cookies. Father and husband, Marc Howard, was very happy about that.
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MOTHER & DAUGHTER FIND
PEACE OFFLINE
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 7
PEDI ATRI CS
Arroyo Chamiso
Pediatrics
505.995.4901
2025 S. Galisteo
Santa Fe, NM 87505
DeVargas
Health Center
505.913.4660
510 N. Guadalupe St.
Suite C
Santa Fe, NM 87501
Camino Entrada
Pediatrics
505.913.3233
2590 Camino Entrada
Santa Fe, NM 87507
Keep them healthy and happy
all summer long.
Great pediatric care at three locations in Santa Fe.
Invested in YOU.
t Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, 11-year-old Hannah Laga-
Abram and her 8-year-old brother, Leander, appreciate the colors and geology
of the rocks. But it’s the hiding places that make the hike one of their favorites.
“We feel the mysteriousness of burrowing ourselves into these tight places, and
then getting through to wide-open spaces,” said Carmen Harris, Hannah and Lean-
der’s stepmom. “Te kids like the little niches. Tey love to fnd hiding places and
pop out at us. Tey like that sense of wonder. And there’s a certain pace; they don’t
have to look too far ahead at any one moment to see where they are going.”
Tent Rocks, near Cochiti Pueblo, is known for its unique rock formations that re-
quire hikers to squeeze through tight spaces and, at times, scramble up boulders. It
is one of many options for hiking with children in the Santa Fe area. Depending on
the season, and on the ability and interests of the children, parents can fnd hikes of
varying lengths and terrains to explore with kids of all ages.
When Harris and her husband, David Abram, take their kids for a hike at Tent
Rocks, they delight in playing hide-and-seek or drawing in the sand along the way.
“Onother hikes, thekids aremorelustful toget totheriver andplay, for example, and
then it’s a drag to go back. Here, there’s more of a sense that we have to get somewhere
and then get back,” Harris said. “Tent Rocks is so delightful at every moment.”
Playing games while hiking with children is a good way to keep them interested
andhelpthemdevelopanawarenessof animalsandnature, saidKerryHelke, outreach
specialist at REI. As part of her work, she coordinates REI’s educational classes and
children’s programs.
She suggests making a treasure-hunt list and searching for those items on the trail,
or having leaf/twig boat races rivers or lakes.
Harrisandherfamilyaretrackers. Teylookforscatandotheranimal signs, whether
they are climbing up steep Sun Mountain or toward water in Bear Canyon. “We all
pay attention, as much as we can, to what animals might live in the area,” Harris said.
Sometimes they play “Eagle Eye,” in which the “eagle” tries to fnd someone who
is hiding in plain sight. Or they sit in silence for a few minutes. Tey listen to every
sound and then report what they heard to one another.
Te Big Tesuque Trail on the way to the Santa Fe Ski Basin is a fun trail for Leona
Hooper, 5, and her family because they collect leaves, fowers and twigs along the
way. Tey look for bugs hiding under rocks. Sometimes they bring art supplies and
stop at a picnic table to glue their fndings to paper.
“I love to hike,” said Leona’s mom, Carol Hooper. “To motivate her to go, I make it
an adventure for her. We have a pet snail from a hike that is still living with us. Leona
made a terrariumfor her bugs. Nowthat she’s older, she has her own pack to carry and
put her fndings in. She likes carrying her own water and her own snacks.”
Parents say having plenty of water and snacks is essential when hiking with kids.
It’s part of being prepared. Also, remember to use sunscreen, wear hats and layers of
clothes, know your route and carry a frst-aid kit. Helke takes her nephews, ages 4
and 12, to Whole Foods so they can make their own trail mix snacks from the bins
of dried fruit, nuts and seeds.
“Kids like to have their own bag. Get them little backpacks so they can carry
snacks and a whistle,” she said. “And, you always want to have whistles for kids. Talk
to young hikers about the importance of not blowing their whistles unless they can’t
see you.”
Carol Hooper learned the importance of carrying a frst-aid kit afer Leona cut
her arm on a sharp rock along the Cave Creek Trail in the Pecos Wilderness. She
tripped and hurt herself when they were two miles from their car, close to the caves
they like to explore. Tey had a small frst-aid kit with them, but the butterfy ban-
dage they needed was in the bigger kit in their car.
“Now, we take the main frst-aid kit, even on the simplest hikes, because you never
know,” Hooper said.
Parentsalsorecommendbringingbooksthathavenature-awarenessgamesforhiking
lulls. It’s helpful to have a carrier in case younger kids tire of walking. Plan your
route carefully, so you and your kids can adequately prepare and will know what to
expect.
“Let the kids set the pace,” Helke said. “Don’t force a destination.”
continued on Page 10
8 KIDS SUMMER 2012
Deborah Busemeyer For The New Mexican
Fromleft, Jacob Gascon, 7, and Stevie
Belian, 9, hike the Santa Fe River
PREPARATION IS THE KEY TO FUN
FAMILYHIKES
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THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 9
Elephant Butte
Kasha-KatuweTent Rocks National Monument
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AREA HIKES
DOROTHY STEWART TRAIL: Located of Camino de Cruz Blanca, it is part of the Dale
Ball Trails system. You can park in designated spots at St. John’s College or at Camino
de Cruz Blanca.
GALISTEO BASIN PRESERVE: Located of U.S. 285, south of Eldorado, this is a good
spring/fall hike since there’s not much shade. The area features lots of little trails that in-
tersect with one another, so you can decide the length of your hike as you’re walking.
CERRILLOSHILLSSTATEPARK:Located15milessouthofSantaFeonN.M.14inthevillage
of Cerrillos, the park features old mine sites.
BLACK CANYON TRAIL: Park in the Black Canyon campground near Hyde Memorial
StatePark. Thetrailheadis at CampsiteNo. 4. It’s agreat summer hikebecauseit’s shaded
and cool. The loop is two miles.
BORREGOBEARWALLOWLOOP: Locatedpast HydePark, this trail is better for older kids be-
cause it descends to theTesuque River and is a steep climb out. The loop is four miles long.
NATURE CONSERVANCY: This 1.3-mile loop features beaver dams; no dogs allowed.
RANDALL DAVEY AUDUBON CENTER: This short loop around the Audubon Center
continues alongBear Canyontrail; followthesigns. Thetrail features manybirds, fowers,
plants and other wildlife. No dogs allowed.
CAVE CREEK: This trail is located about an hour fromSanta Fe, near Cowes in the Pecos
Wilderness. There are lots of places to stop along the drive and play in the river. The trail
is 16 miles long, but the caves, created by water, are just two miles from the trailhead.
RIOENMEDIO: Located past the village of Rio en Medio and N.M. 592, this trail is about
six miles northeast of the village of Tesuque. The trail follows a stream for about a mile
through woodland to connect with a Forest Service road and, ultimately, with Pacheco
Canyon. There are waterfalls (turn left before a steep climb that you have to scramble
up) and plenty of shade.
ARROYO HONDO: This open space is located about seven miles south of downtown
Santa Fe. The parking lot is accessed of of Old Agua Fría Road. The area features several
loops of varying lengths, and panoramic views of Galisteo Basin, Cerrillos Hills, the Ortiz
Mountains and Arroyo Hondo. It’s hot in the summer.
DALE BALLTRAILS: This trail systemincludes more than 22 miles of hiking and moun-
tain-biking trails that connect to other Santa Fe trails.
KASHA-KATUWETENTROCKSNATIONAL MONUMENT: Near Cochiti Pueblo, this trail
is located 40 miles southwest of Santa Fe. Both segments of the trail begin at the mon-
ument’s parking area. The Cave Loop Trail is 1.2 miles long. The more difcult Canyon
Trail is a 1.5-mile, one-way trek into a narrowcanyon with a steep climb to the mesa top
for excellent views of the Sangre de Cristo, Jemez and Sandia Mountains, and the Rio
Grande Valley. No dogs allowed; $5 fee for cars.
RESOURCES
• For a map of trails in Santa Fe County’s Open Space and Trails Program, visit www.
santafecounty.org/public_works/open_space_and_trails_program.
• Pick up the Sierra Club book, Day Hikes in the Santa Fe Area.
• REI provides free family adventure journals that include information on local hikes,
games andactivities. Thestoreofers classes throughout theyear onhikingandbiking.
For more information, visit www.rei.com/santafe.
• I Love Dirt —52 Activities to Help You and Your Children Discover the Wonders of Nature,
by Jennifer Ward, ofers many ideas for fun, family activities.
• Sharing Nature with Children, by Joseph Cornell, will inspire both you and your children.
10 KIDS SUMMER 2012
Children learn
about the Santa
Fe watershed
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THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 11
A Summer Camp
of Living Arts & Culture
for ages 5 – 11
Healing Arts
Cultural
Experiences
Permaculture
Intuitive
Development
Yoga
T’ai chi
The way to a peaceful future
is through our children
Six one week sessions: June 18 – July 27
To register, please call Helen at 795-9079
or email goldenacornscamp@gmail.com
www.goldenacornscamp.com
Dance, Music, Story and Healing Arts
of India, Nigeria & the Mediterranean
Clowning Week! Urban Culture Week:
Breakdancing & Graffiti Art
Now
Enrolling
for the Summer
and Fall
programs
for 2, 3, 4 year-
olds and PreK/
Kindergarten
NAEYC Accredited
www.vladfoto.com
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM 205 East Barcelona Road • 982-6888
Temple Beth Shalom
Preschool & Kindergarten
LIFELONG LEARNING AND CARING
Camp Shalom
A Summer of fun and enriched
activities led by experienced
teachers with loving care.
Celebrating multicultural arts
and ecology.
For information: 982-6888
preschool@sftbs.org
Julia Linder Bell For The New Mexican
MUSEUMS&ZOOS
EDUCATE & ENTERTAIN
anta Fe and surrounding area are bursting with museums whose mission
it is to educate and entertain children of all ages.
Amust-stopfor children—frominfants to12-year-olds —is the Santa Fe
Children’s Museum, where the fun begins even before you enter the building.
Near the museum’s parking lot is a ceramic and concrete sundial. Stand in the
middle of it and raise your arms, and you are transported back to an age when
sundials were the method of telling time. Ten, enter the museum, where a little
door opens to a world of education and play.
“Weareanexploratorylearningmuseum, whichmeans weencouragechildren
to explore what they are drawn to,” said Aoife Runyan, the museum’s foor man-
ager and volunteer feld-trip member coordinator.
Infants andtoddlers canexplore the museum’s sof, mattedplayarea, withmir-
rored, triangular crawl spaces, and activities that test fne motor skills. Toddlers
also can explore the brand-new toddler climbing structure.
For school-age children, 5 to 12, two exhibits demonstrate the components of
magnetic forces. And, kids canlearnabout the laws of physics by sending billiard
balls on a roller-coaster ride along a set of rails with dips and hills.
Childrenof all ages canpartake inthe museum’s popular bubble-blowingpool,
as well as its dress-up stage, puppetry display, face-painting stand and water-
works exhibit. Visitors who weigh 50 pounds or more can dare themselves to
attempt the museum’s rock-climbing wall.
Outside the museum are exhibits featuring many live animals. Peaches the
corn snake is available for petting.
If you are interested in tracking some of the oldest dinosaur bones in North
America, the Ghost Ranch Education and Retreat Center’s Museum of Paleon-
tology is a sure crowd pleaser with its 22,000-acre outdoor classroom. Te home
of Georgia O’Keefe, just north of Abiquiú, is known worldwide as the home of
the Coelophysis fossils, as well as the richest quarry of the Triassic Period, dating
back 220 million years.
“Most people have heard of the T-Rex,” says Cheryl Museus, who volunteers
at the museum. “Well,” she continues, “we have the bones of T-Rex’s great, great,
great — to the power of 63 — grandmother.”
Te museumofers a range of programs, fromactivities for 3-year-olds to ses-
sions for college students. Children can learn geology, anthropology and paleon-
tology by digging for bones, collecting fossils, casting bones, hiking and more.
Head up the hill to Los Alamos, where the Bradbury Science Museum ofers
numerous exhibits teaching math, geometry, logic and topology.
“We have a great family puzzle room,” says Liz Martineau, an educator at the
museum. Tis summer, the museum will be ofering special programs that
coincide with the mission of Mars rover Curiosity, which NASA launched in
November. “Some of the rover’s parts are fromLos Alamos National Laboratory,”
Martineau says, “so we have discussions about it, as well as its mission.”
If you drive an hour south on Interstate 25, you will fnd a playground of
museums and attractions for all ages. Te Albuquerque BioPark includes a zoo,
aquarium, botanic garden and Tingley Beach.
Te Rio Grande Zoo is a 64-acre playground ofering close encounters of the
animal kind. You canfeed baby baboons, ride camels and runwiththe peacocks.
Special summer music programs are ofered as well.
Inthe 36-acre botanic garden, childrencanrunthrougha giant, gooey, rubber
pumpkin, and explore the butterfy pavilion, a Japanese Garden and the Rio
Grande Heritage Farm.
Nearbyis theBioPark’s impressiveaquarium, witha285,000-gallonsharktank.
12 KIDS SUMMER 2012
Lucia Rosen, 7, uses
recycled materials to
create an art project
at the Santa Fe
Children’s Museum
Inside a kaleidoscope at the Bradbury Science Museum
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Visitors can get up close and personal with sting rays and watch fsh feedings
while learning about aquatic life and the environments in which they live.
TingleyBeachisaman-madebeachwherevisitorscanfsh,walk,bike,picnicand
enjoy a bit of tranquility, right in the middle of the city.
If you are looking for a hands-on museumfor all ages, the NewMexico Muse-
um of Natural History and Science will excite both your hands and your mind.
Meet some of New Mexico’s giant dinosaurs, walk into a volcano and view mes-
merizing Polaris (the North Star) in the planetarium. Te museum also has live
animals on display, including reptiles and insects.
“Oneday, duringour CreepyCritters exhibit,” says Michael Sanchez, themuse-
um’s Naturalist Center educator, “there was a womanabout 70 years oldwho had
always had a fear of snakes. Her friends coaxed her to hold our corn snake. She
fnallyagreed, andthesnakegentlyslithereduptohershoulderandfell asleep. Te
woman marveled at the fact that she had just conquered a lifelong fear. When
she lef, she was in heaven”
Children 10 and older are in for an emotional and enlightening experience
when they visit the New Mexico Holocaust and Intolerance Museum. “Before
arriving, we ask that parents and teachers talk to kids about historic racial and
religious hatred and intolerance,” says Harold Folley, a docent at the museum.
In addition to the Holocaust, the museum also addresses the mistreatment of
African Americans and Native Americans, among others. “Tis is a great op-
portunity to teach children howthey can help others by not just standing by and
watching, but by speaking up for victims or getting help,” says Folley.
Finally, 25 miles east of Santa Fe, of I-25, is the Pecos National Historic Park,
a monument that preserves 12,000 years of NewMexico history. Beginning with
the ruins of the Pecos Pueblo, the park ofers visitors a journey through the
Spanish Mission period, the bustling days of the Santa Fe Trail, 20th-century
ranch history and the Civil War battle of Glorieta Pass.
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 13
THE SANTA FE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM1050 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, 989-8359,
www.santafechildrensmuseum.org
GHOST RANCHEDUCATIONANDRETREAT CENTER 1708 U.S. 84, Abiquiú,
505-685-4333, www.ghostranch.org
BRADBURY SCIENCE MUSEUM1350 Central Ave., Los Alamos, 505-667-4444,
www.lanl.gov/museum/index.shtml
ALBUQUERQUE BIOPARK 2601 Central Ave. N.W., Albuquerque, 505-764-6200,
www.cabq.gov/biopark
NEWMEXICOMUSEUMOF NATURAL HISTORY ANDSCIENCE 1801 Mountain Rd.
N.W., Albuquerque, 505-841-5955, www.nmnaturalhistory.org
NEWMEXICOHOLOCAUST ANDINTOLERANCE MUSEUM616 Central Ave. S.W.,
Albuquerque, 505-247-0606, www.nmholocaustmuseum.org
PECOS NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK 1 Peach Tree Lane, Pecos, 505-757-7200,
nps.gov/peco/index.htm
FOR MORE INFORMATION
Steven Roybal, left,
and AaronVigil
examine a wallet and
letters fromthe Civil
War at Pecos National
Historic Park
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Join us as we celebrate the champion athletes
traveling to compete in London this summer.
Be a star athlete at Tumbledown in
gymnastics, tumbling, and parkour.
Three week sessions offered from
May 28-August 18.
505-473-0926
3214 Calle Marie
Santa Fe, NM
87507
it’s not
just about
the fork
summer classes
505.988.2070
www.etiquettesantafe.com
manners
social graces
dining skills
Well mannered children
become well mannered adults
It’s Fair Time!
Santa Fe County Fair
August 2-5 2012
Fun for the whole family–
and it’s free!
For more information contact the Santa Fe County Extension office:
http://santafeextension.nmsu.edu
505-471-4711
Enroll your child in
Big Brothers Big Sisters
and start them
on a path to Big things!
Call 505-983-8360 or visit
www.bbbsnorthernnm.org
for more informaton
or to enroll your child today!
14 KIDS SUMMER 2012
aren Hansen, 11, was trying to fgure out how her teenage main character,
Nari, was going to be able to straighten out the terrible mess the dragons and
their human partners had created for the world’s citizenry. “Tey are suppose
to be helping the people, not making things worse,” said Karen, one of Sarah Stark’s
young writing students.
Phoenix Avalon, 11, another student, crouched over his latest piece of fction devis-
ing ways that his character, a young time traveler, might be able to feed his family back
home, even though he had somehow become king of Germany in another era.
“Tey are working on journey stories,” Stark said of her class of four gathered for
their weekly writing class at her home. Some were taking their characters —or rather
the characters were taking them — on trips across time and space. For others, it was
more of a journey of personal discovery. “I give them the writing guidelines to start
out, and they go in their own directions,” Stark said.
Stark, herself a novelist and former writing coach at the Institute of American In-
dian Arts, has been conducting the class for 10- to 15-year-olds for 6 years. She be-
lieves in having the youngsters write in longhand frst, before typing the stories on
computers. Tat gives the young writers a physical feel for the fow of their words
across the page, and the knowledge that if their characters begin straying they can
crumple up a piece of paper and literally throw it away.
“I believe in writing by hand,” she said. “Plus, lots of kids don’t have laptops.”
BeginningJune4, Starkwill onceagainbeoferingfour one-weeksessions for child-
ren, ages 10 to 15.
She encourages parents to keep writing alive for their children and to make sure
they are doing it for the right reasons. “Te kids shouldn’t be writing just so they
can performwell on their SATs in 10 years,” said Stark. She also reminds the parents
not to push too hard. “I want the kids to feel safe when they are writing, to let them-
selves write badly at frst if that’s how it comes out. It’s a very tender process.”
Starkofers anumber of suggestions for howparents canencouragekids tocontinue
writing during the summer when teachers aren’t hovering over them, red correction
pens in hand.
• Create both indoor and outdoor spaces that encourage daydreaming —“a ham-
mock, a quilt in the backyard under a shade tree, a pillow haven in an oversized
closet, a table facing a peaceful outdoor view. Who says you have to write at a desk?
• Write with your kids. Get your own notebook and sit down and write when your
kids are writing. Do the same exercises. Take turns assigning writing prompts
• Explore your neighborhood with your young writers and carry notebooks on your
walks. Make up stories about unusual houses in your neighborhood, or about the
frst person you see along the way. Take your notebooks to the park or cofee shop
and make up stories about the characters you observe.”
Stark, who has written extensively on foreign-policy matters, including nuclear
proliferation issues, advises parents to encourage their children to write open-ended
stories. It’s not important that they fnish every story they start.”
It’s especially important for parents, said Stark, to turn of that parental, editorial
critic’svoice, andasklotsofquestionsaboutwhatyourkidsarewriting—ifthey’reopen
to that kind of help. And ofer to read drafs — again, only if your kids are willing to
share such inner thoughts.
Shealsoadvises visitinglibraries andbookstores together and, of course, turningof
the TV and other electronic devices for large chunks of each day.
But, perhaps most importantly, Stark says, acknowledge that writing can be a great
joy in your kid’s lives. “It’s a wonderful gif, and it’s good for the soul.” said Stark.
Tose interested in Stark’s class are asked to email her at sarahstarkdoyle@hot
mail.com or call her at 470-3210.
Dennis J. Carroll For The New Mexican
Clockwise, frombottom, left, Karen Hansen,11, Mikesch Karl,14, HannahTomkins,13, creative writing teacher
Sarah Stark, Ben Murdock,15, and Phoenix Avalon,11, practice creativity during Sarah Stark’s writing class. Sarah Stark
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THE WORLD OF
CREATIVE WRITING
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THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 15
Teen Programs (13 and over)
Activities for teens at Carlos Ortega Teen Center,
737 Agua Fria from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Mon - Fri.
Registration begins May 15th at the Carlos Ortega Teen
Center. Space is limited, so register early!
For more information on the teen programs please contact
Victor Vigil at 955-6860.
Programs for children ages 6 - 12
Activities Include: Reading, Music, Jewelry
Making, Arts & Crafts, Storytelling,
Swimming,
Roller-skating, Basketball, Kickball,
Cooking & Field Trips
Locations for these programs:
Carlos Gilbert Elementary
Cesar Chavez Elementary
Chaparral Elementary
Salazar Elementary
DeVargas Middle School
Monica Roybal Youth Center
Nova Elementary
A limited number of 6 & 7 year olds will be registered at
each site.
• Please present birth certificate at time of registration for
6, 7 and 12 yr. olds.
2012 Summer Youth Program
June 4 - July 26
Monday - Friday
7:30 am - 5:30 pm
information line 955-6708
www.santafenm.gov/index.aspx?nid=1722
for more information Calll 955-6568
RegiSTRATiOn for these program will be on
Saturday, May 12, beginning at 8:30 a.m.
at the following locations:
Southside Library, Jaguar Drive
genoveva Chavez Community Center, 3221 Rodeo Rd.
Mary esther gonzales Senior Center, 1121 Alto
The City of Santa Fe has changed the
format for registration this year.
No one will be allowed to line up
until Saturday Morning at 8:00 am.
SECURITY WILL ENFORCE THIS
AT ALL THREE LOCATIONS.
Summer
Fun
with the City of Santa Fe
Community Services Department
The cost per child is based on
the sliding fee scale below:
Above $80,000.................. $160.00
$70,001 - 80,000............... $160.00
$50,001 - 70,000............... $140.00
$36,001 - 50,000............... $120.00
$25,701 - 36,000............... $100.00
$16,151 - 25,700................. $80.00
$10,001 - 16,150................. $60.00
Less than $10,000.............. $20.00
SUMMER MUSICAL THEATER CAMP
Students study acting, singing, dancing
and perform in the Family Favorite
June 18th ~ July 29th 2012
9:00 am~1:00 pm
Monday ~ Friday
Ages: 7~17
All performances at the
James A. Little Theatre
Rehearsals at New Mexico School for the Arts
Space is limited ~ Scholarships available
To register call (505) 920-0704
www.pandemoniumprod.org
Erika Dávila For The New Mexican
hedaymydaughter, Sofa, celebratedher4thbirthday, inearly2009, alsomarked
amemorablemilestoneforourfamily.ItwasthefrsttimewerodetheNewMexico
Rail Runner Express.
For Sofa, and our then-3-month-old baby, Gabriel, it was their frst experience on
atrain. TeRail Runner hadjust begunservice, sowedecidedtospendSofa’s birthday
in Albuquerque. My husband and I were excited that, for the frst time, we wouldn’t
have to drive, and we welcomed the idea of a relaxing train ride. Once there, we sawa
movie and had lunch at a restaurant on Central Avenue.
As it turns out, riding the train has become our tradition on Sofa’s birthday, and
there have been many other trips on the Rail Runner in between for our kids, now
7 and 3 years old. It is one of our favorite family activities, and the kids always look
forward to the rides.
For parents who plan to be home with their kids this summer, a ride on the Rail
Runner is a great way to spend the day with your child. With a little schedule naviga-
tion and patience, there are several manageable destinations from which to choose
in and around Albuquerque. Plus, children under 9 years old ride free.
It’s true that train schedules don’t always coincide with what you’d like to do. For ex-
ample, when the earliest weekend trains leave Santa Fe between 12:15 and 12:40 p.m.
(depending on where one boards), it makes it difcult to go on longer outings, such
as to the zoo. Te train doesn’t arrive in downtown Albuquerque until 1:45 p.m. When
I take the kids to the zoo, I like to be there much earlier.
Santa Fe mom Sarah Griego said she and her 3-year-old daughter, Bella, take the
train to Albuquerque every weekend to visit her sister. In the summer, they’ve gone
to the zoo and Clif’s Amusement Park, but have only managed this because her
sister picks them up at the Alvarado Transportation Center in downtown Albuquer-
que. Tey spend the night there and return to Santa Fe the next afernoon.
“I’d rather ride the train than drive,” Griego said.
Griego usually packs lunch for her and Bella to have on the train. She also takes
Bella’s car seat for her stay in Albuquerque. Griego said she only wishes there were
earlier trains, sothat she andBella couldspendmost of their frst day inAlbuquerque,
rather than arriving late in the afernoon.
Last winter, there was just one southboundtraindeparture onSaturdays. Rail Run-
ner ofcials plan to add additional departures in April, said Jay Faught, marketing
manager for the Rio Metro Regional Transit District. However, the earliest depart-
ing Saturday train will still be during the 12:15-12:40 p.m. slot.
During the week, there are early trains that go to Albuquerque to accommodate
commuters, meaning they’re probably not the best on which to take kids. Tere is
also a southbound train that leaves between 1:00 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. that would work
for shorter activities.
Santa Fe resident Valerie Gonzales was recently riding the train with her two
grandchildren, 8-year-old Karrianna and 6-year-old Ryan. Te children live in Los
Lunas, Gonzales said, so she takes the train from her home in Santa Fe on Fridays to
spend the night with them there.
Onthis particular weekend, thethreealsoreturnedtoSantaFeonSaturdaytospend
another day and a half together. Gonzales then rode the train back to Los Lunas on
Sunday to drop them of.
“Tey really look forward to riding the train,” Gonzales said of Karrianna and
Ryan, who have taken the train more times than she has. “Tey think it’s fun.”
Karriannasaidher parents havetakenher andher brother toAlbuquerquefor other
fun activities, and that she likes how peaceful the train rides are.
Because this trip was a bit longer, the three took lunch, crossword puzzles and a
DVD player, just in case they got bored.
Afer three years of riding the train on a consistent basis, I would recommend the
following outings for parents and children:
DOWNTOWN ALBUQUERQUE Te easiest thing to do is to get
ofat theAlvaradoTransportationCenter andenjoylunchdown-
town before going to a movie at the Century Rio 14 right across
the street. We’ve done this numerous times. Te only challenge
is fnding a movie time that coincides with train arrival times.
DOWNTOWN ALBUQUERQUE, KIMO THEATER I recently
took Sofa to see a ballet performance at the Kimo Teater,
and it worked out perfectly as a Sunday outing. We got of the
train at the Alvarado Transportation Center at about 1:45 p.m.
andtooka briskfve-minute walktothe KimoTeater onCentral
Avenue for a 2 p.m. show. (Te Kimo has a number of matinees
that beginat 2 p.m. onSundays, socheckthe schedule.) Te show
ended at 4 p.m., so we grabbed some pizza aferward at JC’s
New York Pizza before boarding the 4:46 p.m. return train to
Santa Fe.
ALBUQUERQUE AQUARIUM AND BOTANIC GARDEN Tis
is another favorite of ours. Again, get of at the Alvarado
Transportation Center, and then cross the street to grab the Red
Line Rapid Ride city bus westbound. Te bus ride is less than 10
minutes. If you’re not sure where to get of, just ask the driver.
Te aquarium and botanic gardens are small enough to ex-
plore in a couple of hours. Depending on what time you want
to head back to Santa Fe, you should also have time to get a bite
to eat. Just make sure you pay attention to the city bus schedule.
Buses usually run every 20 minutes or so.
16 KIDS SUMMER 2012
Dave Trimmer and his grandson,
Trenton, 12, enjoyed themselves
so much on their maiden Rail
Runner voyage that they plan to
repeat the trip once a month.
ADVENTURE
IS JUST A FUN TRAIN RIDE AWAY
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OLDTOWN, ALBUQUERQUE Te Red Line Rapid Ride also goes to Old Town (get
of at Rio Grande), where you can have lunch and do a bit of shopping, (though this
might not be as interesting for kids). By taking a short walk through Old Town, you
can also visit the Explora museumfor kids and the NewMexico Museumof Natural
History and Science.
BERNALILLO If you think your little one can only handle a short day, but you still
want the train experience, ride the train on a weekday to Bernalillo. Tere are two
stops, the Sandoval County/U.S. 550 stop and the downtown Bernalillo stop (not all
trains stop at the latter station, so check the schedules). From the 550 stop, you can
take a short walk to the Flying Star and have lunch before returning to Santa Fe. If
you get of at the downtown Bernalillo station, you can walk to Te Range Cafe on
Camino del Pueblo for lunch (go down Calle Don Francisco to get there) and also
browse the adjoining gif boutique and other shops nearby.
Marketing manager Faught emphasizes that even though there may not be train
stops near your desired destination in Albuquerque, you can get almost anywhere by
taking a short bus ride from the Alvarado Transportation Center.
For parents whohaveolder children, Faught suggestedtakingbikes onthetrainand
getting of at the Los Ranchos/Journal Center stop. If you go westbound on the bike
trail at the stop, it will take you to the Paseo del Bosque bike trail of Paseo del Norte.
“Kids ride this trail all the time,” said Faught, who’s biked the path numerous times.
“It’s a great activity for all ages.”
Faught saidthat inthepast he’s startedhis bikerideat Paseodel Norte, headedsouth
andhadlunchdowntownbeforehoppingbackonthenorthboundtrainattheAlvarado
Transportation Center.
FromSanta Fe, you can also get of at the Sandia stop. Ashort walk north will take
youtotheSandiaLakes RecreationArea, whichhas catch-and-releasefshingfor afee.
Te downside is, because there is no designated walking trail, you have to walk along
the road, which isn’t the safest route for small children.
IF YOU GO
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 17
Cochiti Elementary School students took a
feld trip on the Rail Runner —for many, it
was their frst train ride —and loved it.
Day passes from Santa Fe to Albuquerque were $7 for adults this winter, but prices will
probably go up a bit in May.
Albuquerque city bus rides are free if you show your Rail Runner receipt.
For all information including rates, schedules and connecting buses, visit the Rail Runner
website at http://nmrailrunner.com/ or call customer service at 866-795-RAIL.
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AMERICANDIABETES ASSOCIATION
CAMP FOR KIDS
OFFERS: A one-week camp for children with
diabetes ages 8-13, located in the Manzano
Mountain Retreat, 90 minutes outside Albu-
querque. The camp ofers comprehensive
medical care, dietary principles and diabetes
education in an informal setting. Also ofered
are hiking, sports, swimming, archery and arts
and crafts.
SESSION: July 1-7
CONTACT: 1-800-Diabetes, www.diabetes.org.
ASPENSANTA FE BALLET
OFFERS: Instruction in classical ballet, from
creative dance (beginning at age 3) to pre-
professional and adult. Classes in jazz and folk-
lorico. Three locations; 550B St. Michael’s Dr.,
La Tienda in Eldorado, and Genoveva Chavez
Center, 3221 Rodeo Rd.
SESSION: Begins June 4
CONTACT: 983-5591, www.aspensantafebal-
let.com
BIGSKY BUILDIT!
OFFERS: The ultimate summer of art and
invention for kids 5-6, 7-8, 9-11, and 12-14.
Star in your own super hero movie, build a real
levitating wizard wand, a high fying rocket, a
solar -powered iPod charger, a jousting battle
bot, and much more.
SESSIONS: 8 weeklong, full-day camps;
June 11-Aug. 10, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Quality prec-
are and aftercare available.
COST: $145 to $235 (plus materials) per week.
Scholarships and multi-camp discounts available.
CONTACT: 428-7575, email infobigsky@bigsky-
learning.com
BISHOP STONEY SUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: Weeklong residential camps for 2nd-
12th graders. Campers choose from 12 difer-
ent camps throughout the summer, which
promote Christian fellowship and learning.
Each week has a diferent theme, including
Harry Potter, Narnia, adventure camping, arts
and crafts, leadership and a long, weekend
family camp.
SESSION: May 25-July 21
COST: $400-$500 per week
CONTACT: 505-983-5610, email info@camp-
stoney.org, www.campstoney.org
CREATIVE ARTS MUSIC AND
PERFORMANCE (C-A-M-P)
OFFERS: Noncompetitive workshops, including
music, performance, dance, art, creative writing
and flm for boys and girls ages10-17. Counsel-
ing in training program for ages 16-17, with
workshops in auditioning and leadership.
SESSION: 13-day sleepover enrichment pro-
gram July 15-28 at Santa Fe University of Art
and Design
COST: $695 for day campers (9 a.m.-5 p.m.)
$1,095 for overnight campers. Some scholar-
ships available.
CONTACT: 946-0488, www.c-a-m-p.net
CAMP INVENTION
OFFERS: The Camp Invention program is a
nonproft, enrichment program that focuses
on science, technology, engineering and
math (STEM) activities through inquiry-based,
hands-on learning for children entering
grades 1-6. New curriculum each year. The
Camp Invention program is run in partnership
with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Ofce.
SESSIONS: Santa Fe, Amy Beal Community
School, June 25-29; Los Alamos, Barranca Mesa
Elementary, June 18-22. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
COST: Santa Fe, $215 a week; Los Alamos, $220 a
week, early registration discounts available online
CONTACT: 1-800-968-4332, www.campinven-
tion.org.
CAMP SHALOM
OFFERS: An indoor/outdoor program with a
one-acre playground. Art, science, gardening,
weather activities and mud and sand play are
explored. The theme this year is multicultural
folk arts. Open to children of all faiths ages 2-7.
Camp is open 8 a.m-5:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Part-time options available.
SESSIONS: Three, 3-week sessions, June 4-Aug. 3
COST: Varies. Call for information.
CONTACT: 982-6888, email preschool@sftbs.org
CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF ST. FRANCIS
OF ASSISI
OFFERS: Sky program for children 4 years old
to entering 4th grade. Two weeks of faith-based
theme crafts, storytelling and other activities.
SESSIONS: June18-22, June25-29, 9a.m.-11:30a.m.
COST: $25 for frst child and $10 for each ad-
ditional sibling
CONTACT: 982-3625, www.cbsfa.org
CHILDREN’S ADVENTURE COMPANY
OFFERS: Day camps for kindergartners and
1st graders, and Little Trekkers for 2nd graders.
Cooking, art, movement, swimming and Friday
feld trips. Young Trekkers, grades 3 and 4, fo-
cus on nature and outdoor activities including
kayaking, swimming, art, rock climbing, hiking
and Friday feld trips to Albuquerque. Outdoor
Trekkers for grades 5-7. Activities include kaya-
king, rock climbing, hiking, survival skills and
Friday feld trips to Albuquerque.
SESSION: May 28-Aug. 10
COST: $225 plus tax per week for full-day pro-
gram, from 7:45 a.m.-6 p.m., $205 plus tax for
short-day program, 7:45 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Camp
location is 935 Alto St.
CONTACT: 988-7201, email childrensadventure-
company@gmail.com, www.childrensadventure-
company.org
CHILDREN’S GARDENMONTESSORI
OFFERS: Children 2-6 years old participate in
arts and crafts and playing outside.
SESSIONS: Summer program June 4-29 and
July 9-Aug. 10, 8:15 a.m.-3 p.m. Extended hours
available.
COST: $700for frst session, $875for secondsession
CONTACT: 466-1251, www.childrensgarden-
santafe.com
CHILDREN’S WRITINGWORKSHOP
OFFERS: Children ages 10-15 explore writing
exercises and pursue their love of writing fc-
tion in a friendly and writer-safe environment.
SESSIONS: Four, 1-week summer programs,
June 4-8, June 11-15, July 9-13 and July 16-20.
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-noon
CONTACT: Sarah Stark at 470-3210, email
sarahstarkdoyle@hotmail.com
DRAGONFLY STUDIOSUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: A place where kids can express
themselves through art, including painting
and sketching, recycling, print-making, sewing,
textiles, folk art and classic New Mexico art
forms. Hikes and outdoor games also possible.
Kids bring snacks and lunch. For ages 6-16.
SESSIONS: Weeklong sessions from June 4-
Aug. 10. Camp hours: 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Classes
start at 10 a.m.
COST: $275 a week, includes materials fee and tax
CONTACT: 670-5019, dragonfyartsf@gmail.
com, www.dragonfyartstudioforkids.com
EL RANCHODE LOS GOLONDRINAS
OFFERS: 1-week Adventures in the Past day
camp, ages 9-12.
SESSION: July 23-27; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
COST: $260
CONTACT: 471-2261 for information, email
mking@golondrinas.org
18 KIDS SUMMER 2012
Children’s Adventure Company
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Erika Dávila For The New Mexican
SUMMER CAMPS
FOR EVERY BOY & GI RL
ETIQUETTE SCHOOL OF SANTA FE
OFFERS: Beginning etiquette to advanced
lessons. Children, adults, corporate business.
Private and group lessons.
SESSIONS: Ongoing. Call for appointments
and class schedules. Also, Elbows of the Table
etiquette class at Santa Fe Community College
June 16 and June 23 from 11 a.m.-
1 p.m. Call 428-1676 for more information.
CONTACT: 988-2070, email etiquette@eti-
quettesantafe.com, www.etiquettesantafe.com
FINE ARTS FOR CHILDRENANDTEENS
OFFERS: Award-winning visual arts classes for
youth ages 5-18.
SESSIONS: Half-day art camps for ages 5-7,
8-10, and 11-14 in weeklong sessions running
from June 4 to July 26. Teen workshops for
students ages 13-18 on Saturdays. Camps and
workshops are ofered in two locations: the
ARTbarn Community Studio and the new Zona
del Sol Studio on the southside.
COST: Sliding scale tuition. All art materials,
instruction and snacks are included. Weekend
workshops for teens $10.
CONTACT: 992-ARTS(2787), email program@
factsantafe.org to register, www.factsantafe.org
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OFFERS: Vacation Bible School for ages 5 years
to 6th grade. Music, arts and crafts, snacks,
recreation and Bible stories.
SESSION: June 4-9. 9 a.m.-noon
COST: Free
CONTACT: 983-9141, www.fbcsantafe.com
THE FIRSTTEE OF SANTA FE
OFFERS: Golf camp and session for children
and teens ages 7 to 17.
SESSIONS: Camps June 5-8 and 12-15, sum-
mer session June 18-Aug. 6
COST: $40 camp fee, $65 session fee including
annual membership fee of $25. Scholarships
available.
CONTACT: Dennis O’Connor at 424-0413,
www.thefrstteesantafe.org
GALISTEOSUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: Nature camp for children ages 4-9.
Activities include hikes, crafts and learning
about plants and animals.
SESSIONS: Tuesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
beginning June 5. Pick-up and drop-of are in
Eldorado.
COST: $45 a day
CONTACT: 603-0637
GENTLE NUDGE SCHOOL SUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: For children ages 3-6. Art, dramatic
play, music, yoga, outdoor play, nature walks
and exploration. Fun and varied themes.
HOURS: Regular hours: 9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Ex-
tended hours: 7:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
SESSIONS: Enrollment available by session
(3-weeks), by week, or on a part-time basis (2
or 3 days per week)
COST: Varies
CONTACT: 982-0879, email naomi@gentle-
nudgeschool.net, www.gentlenudgeschool.net
GIRLS, INC.
OFFERS: A safe, fun, positive, girl-centered
environment that inspires self-confdence in
girls ages 5-15. Activities include art, swim-
ming, science, computer skills, sports, fun and
making new friends.
SESSIONS: Eight 1-week sessions, 7:30 a.m.-6
p.m. Monday-Friday, June 4-July 27.
COST: Sliding-scale tuition, sign-up available
for 1-week session or all eight 1-week sessions.
CONTACT: 982-2042, www.girlsincofsantafe.org
GIRL SCOUT SUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: Programs for girls ages 6-17 at Ran-
cho del Chaparral and Camp Elliott Barker. Girls
can experience nature frsthand, learn new
skills, participate in new activities and make
new friends. Summer camp is open to Girl
Scouts and non-Scouts. All sessions include
a general program of songs, games, crafts,
nature activities and hikes. Also ofered are
specialty programs including horseback riding,
archery, ecology, arts, family camping and
canoeing. Scholarships are available.
SESSION: June 10-July 27
COST: $150-$640, depending on session and
number of days
CONTACT: 505-343-1040 or 1-800-658-6768,
www.nmgirlscouts.org, Facebook
GHOST RANCH, ABIQUIÚ
OFFERS: Family week features music, arts and
crafts, intergenerational worship, hiking, camp-
fres stories, concerts and freworks.
SESSION: July 9-15
COST: Registration fees begin at $350 for a
family of two, plus housing and meals.
CONTACT: 505 685-4333, ext. 4152, www.
ghostranch.org
GOLDENACORNS SUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: Camp focuses on cultural and
healing arts led by instructors from various
countries and cultures. Each of the 6 weeks
emphasizes a diferent culture and healing
traditions. A core curriculum includes yoga,
Tai Chi, gardening and permaculture, herbs,
cooking and intuitive development. Children
ages 5-11.
SESSION: June 18-July 27
COST: $225 per week, $200 for each
additional sibling
CONTACT: Caren Gala or Helen Wildman at
795-0934, goldenacornscamp@gmail.com,
www.goldenacornscamp.com
HEIDI LOEWEN
OFFERS: Private ceramic wheel and sculp-
ture classes. Group classes are also available.
Located at 315 Johnson St.
SESSIONS: Classes can be scheduled for any
day or night of the week, including weekends.
COST: Call for rates
CONTACT: 988-2225, www.heidiloewen.com
HOMEGROWNCAMP
OFFERS: Ages 5-10, with optional overnights
once every 2 weeks. Transportation is provided
from Eldorado and Santa Fe. Hours are Monday
through Friday 8:45 a.m.-4:45 p.m. from Santa
Fe and 8:15 a.m.-5:15 p.m. from Eldorado. We
are together to respect ourselves, each other
and Mother Earth through kindness, coopera-
tion, caring and creativity in a noncompetitive
environment. Activities include shelter build-
ing, exploring, archery, making sculptures with
recycled materials, hiking and mask making.
Homeopathic frst aid is used.
SESSION: June 4-Aug. 17
COST: Call Tajali for costs
CONTACT: 466-8444
IMMANUEL LUTHERANCHURCH
VACATIONBIBLE SCHOOL
OFFERS: The Amazing Desert Adventure
theme for ages 4-12. Bible lessons, music, crafts
and games.
SESSION: July 30-Aug. 3, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Includes
a light supper.
COST: Suggested donation, $20 per child,
$30 per family.
CONTACT: 983-7568
GENTLE SHEPHERDPRESCHOOL
SUMMER CAMP
AGES: 3-5
COST: $200 per each three-week session
SESSIONS: Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday
June 5-21, 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Tuesday/
Wednesday/Thursday July 10-26, 7:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m.
CONTACT: 983-9383
INSTITUTE FOR SPANISHARTS
OFFERS: Ongoing classes and workshops in
Spanish dance, guitar and culture for adults,
youth and children.
SESSIONS: Vary
COST: Varies
CONTACT: 470-7828, www.mariabenitez.com
LA CASITA PRESCHOOL
OFFERS: A program for children ages 3-6 that
is based on the world-famous preschools of
Reggio Emilia of Italy, which encourage play
and consider it essential for learning. Activities
include art, music, water play and literacy.
SESSIONS: Call for information
CONTACT: 983-2803, email lacasitapreschool@
gmail.com, www.lacasita.edu
LITTLE EARTH SCHOOL SUMMER
DAY CAMP
OFFERS: Memorable summer experiences
for children ages 4-9. New this summer is the
outdoor exploration and nature-based camp
program for children 9-12. Children may enroll
for 3, 4 or 5 days per week. Activities include
art, cooking, weekly nature feld trips, yoga,
swimming, gardening and games. There is
a low student-teacher ratio. Enrollment is
limited.
SESSIONS: Minimumenrollment for all ages
is one session, June 4-June 22, June 25-July 20
and July 23-Aug. 10. Camp hours are 8 a.m.-
5:30 pm.
COST: Call for costs and to register
CONTACT: 988-1968, www.littleearthschool.org
THE MAY CENTER FOR LEARNING
OFFERS: Classes in reading, writing, mathe-
matics and organizational skills will be ofered.
All Summer LEAP programs will be ofered at
Desert Montessori School, 316 Camino Delora
in Santa Fe. The May Center is committed to
providing a short term, accelerated skill acqui-
sition program for students in grades 2-10 that
enables them to achieve to their intellectual
potential.
SESSIONS: 8 weeks, June 11-Aug. 10, with the
week of July 4 of. Students may sign up for ei-
ther one 4-week session or the entire 8 weeks.
CONTACT: Go to (www.maycenter.org) for
pricing and registration materials
MOVINGPEOPLE DANCE SUMMER CAMPS
OFFERS: Story theater flm camp ages 8-14,
May 30-June 8, 1-4 p.m. create your own
story and bring home a DVD of your creation;
Dance! Dance! Dance! ages 8-12, July 23-27,
1-4 p.m., show of in the fnal performance;
Let’s Dance ages 5-9, June 4-8, 10:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m. and July 16-20, 1-3 p.m., try a new style or
enjoy your favorites; pre-school dance, May 23-
June 8 and July 10-26, a perfect intro to dance.
CONTACT: 438-9180, email tara@movingpeo-
pledance.org, www.movingpeopledance.org.
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 19
Golden Acorns
Summer Camp
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NATIONAL DANCE INSTITUTE
OF NEWMEXICO
OFFERS: Arts in Motion summer camps at the
Dance Barns for ages 3-17. Pre-professional
dance intensive for ages 10-17 includes classes in
ballet, jazz and modern. Young students age 3-9
can take creative movement, ballet, tap and jazz.
SESSIONS: Pre-professional dance intensive,
July 9-21. Arts in Motion for beginning levels,
July 23-Aug. 3
COSTS: Vary. Sliding scale available
CONTACT: Danny Silver at 795-7088, www.
dancebarns.com
NEWMEXICOFENCINGFOUNDATION
OFFERS: Modern Olympic fencing camps for
boys and girls, 5 to 13.
SESSIONS: Juniors ages 8-13, June 4-7, June
18-21, July 16-19, July 23-26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Youths, ages 5-8, June 11-14, July 9-12, 9 a.m.-
noon.
COSTS: Juniors $125, youths $100
CONTACT: James at 699-2034, www.nmfenc-
ing.org
PAJARITOENVIRONMENTAL
EDUCATIONCENTER, LOS ALAMOS
OFFERS: Three programs through the Nature
Odyssey Program for students entering grades
4-6, and the Living Earth Adventure Program
(LEAP) for grades 7 and 8. The programs provide
opportunities for young people to become
immersed in nature and learn with enthusiastic
environmental educators. Classrooms range
from the river beds and canyons of the Rio
Grande Valley to the headwaters of the Jemez
River on the Valles Caldera National Preserve.
SESSIONS: Rio Grande Valley, June 4-8; Valles
Caldera National Preserve, June 11-15; and
LEAP, June 18-July 22.
COST: Nature Odysey, $325/nonmembers,
$305/members, LEAP is $375/nonmembers
and $355/members. Scholarships available.
CONTACT: 662-0460, www.Pajaritoeec.org
PUEBLOOF POJOAQUEWELLNESS CENTER
OFFERS: Swimming lessons in eight, 45-minute
sessions for all ages and skill levels. Every Friday
is Family Fun Night from 5:30-7:45 p.m., begin-
ning in June. Other activities include mixed
martial arts, and soccer and basketball leagues.
SESSIONS: Swimming lessons Monday-
Thursday beginning frst week in June. Call for
information about other activities.
COST: $75 each 2-week swimming session
CONTACT: 455-9355, www.puebloofpojoaque.org
RANDALL DAVEY AUDUBON
SUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: Audubon Summer Day Camp is for
children ages post-kindergarten-15. Each week
of camp is flled with science investigations,
nature explorations, creative arts, stories, hiking
and active play in the outdoors. A variety of
themes is ofered throughout the summer,
and activities are adapted to each age group.
Youth counselor opportunities are available for
children ages 12-18. Online registration began
March 24.
SESSION: June 4-Aug.10
COST: $225 per week for members, $260 for
nonmembers. Aftercare 3-5 p.m. for most
camps. Leadership camp, $385.
CONTACT: Cara Goodwin, 983-4609, email
cgoodwin@audubon.org, nm.audubon.org
(no www)
ROCKIN’ ROLLERS EVENT ARENA
OFFERS: Roller skating, scooters, roller blading,
interactive games and music for all ages with
a focus on fun and ftness. Featuring private
birthday parties, public skating, school feld
trips and special events. Fresh pizza, snack bar,
novelties, video arcade.
SESSIONS: Public skate Friday, 6-8 p.m. Private
birthday parties Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m.-
7 p.m. Adult skating classes Tuesday 7:30-9 p.m.
$5 to $7.
COST: Admission $5 for Friday night all-ages
public skate, including skates and scooters; $3
per student for feld trips (by reservation only
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday), includes
admission for 50 people, skates and scooters;
$110 for private parties (by reservation only)
includes admission for 50 people and skates
and scooters. Adult skating class, $7. Zumba
and yoga classes also available. Call for days,
times and costs.
CONTACT: 473-7755.
SAFE SPACE SANDPLAY
OFFERS: Children explore challenging life
situations using the imaginary world of play.
Toys used in the sand tray include plants,
animals, houses, vehicles and creepy creatures.
Expressive, fun and nonthreatening. Sandplay
addresses aggression, fear and grief, and en-
courages safety, stability and wellbeing while
enhancing self-esteem and creativity.
CONTACT: Kathryn McGlynn at 690-6401, email
kitmcglynn@yahoo.com
SANTA FE ANIMAL SHELTER
OFFERS: Critter Camp summer program for
children ages 9-12 provides a fun and educa-
tional opportunity to work with animals, includ-
ing dog walking and socializing, cat socializing,
dog training, humane education, and animal
artwork and games. Participants will also help in
the clinic. The camp’s third session, for children
ages 10-13, who have taken previous camps or
have a strong interest in animal welfare, ofers a
more in-depth, hands-on experience.
SESSIONS: June 4-8, June 25-29, July 16-20
COST: $300 per session
CONTACT: 983-4309, ext. 202, www.sfhu-
manesociety.org.
SANTA FE ART INSTITUTE
OFFERS: 6-week summer camps featuring
poetry, painting, creative movement drama,
African dance, hip-hop and drawing are
among the many activities.
SESSIONS: June 11-July 27, ages 6-12
Teen intensive workshops, July 23-Aug. 3, ages
13-17
COST: Varies, scholarships available.
CONTACT: Shayla Patton at 424-5050, www.
sfai.org
SANTA FE CLIMBINGCENTER
ADVENTURE CAMP
OFFERS: The 4 summer camps will combine
the indoor and outdoor programs. The pro-
grams will build leadership skills, confdence,
problem-solving skills, teamwork, wilderness
skills and respect for the natural environment.
Cadet Adventure Camp for ages 5-8, High
Adventure Camp for ages 9-13 and Teen Over-
night Adventure Camp for ages 12-16. Each
camp led by experienced instructors who are
familiar with teaching rock climbing to their
age group.
SESSIONS: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday, May
29-Aug. 31
COST: $349 per week; overnight teen camp,
$449 a week
CONTACT: 986-8944, www.climbsantafe.com
SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
OFFERS: Children and teens build skills and
learn new ideas to assist in their understand-
ing of our world. Classes range from cooking,
guitar and swimming to a variety of camps,
including animation camp, computer camp
and arts activities.
SESSIONS: Vary
COST: Varies
CONTACT: The Continuing Education ofce at
428-1676, www.sfcc.edu
SANTA FE PERFORMINGARTS
OFFERS: Classes in acting, singing and stage
movement for children 7-12 and teenagers.
SESSIONS: Preschool mini-theater camp, June
4-15, summer intensive camp, June 18-July 29,
culminating in main stage productions by the
teenagers and children.
COST: Varies
CONTACT: 982-7992, email ofce@sfperform-
ingarts.org, www.sfperformingarts.org
SANTA FE PREPARATORY SCHOOL
OFFERS: Two, 1-week programs emphasizing
interactive hands-on scientifc learning.
SESSIONS: July 25-29 and Aug.1-5, 8:30 a.m.-
3 p.m. Students can sign up for one session or
both. For children entering grades 5-8.
COST: $300 session; includes lunch
CONTACT: 982-1829 or 629-7675, email
jheidenberger@sfprep.org, www.sfprep.org
SANTA FE SCHOOL FORTHE ARTS
&SCIENCES SUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: A 6-week program for ages 4-high
school. Numerous 1-week theme camps are
ofered for various ages including art, pirates,
Japan, hiking, adventure, trains, dinosaurs,
rock band camp and more. Exploration camps
including flmmaking, digital photography,
robotics and videogame design are available
for older students.
SESSIONS: 6-week program, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. with
after-camp hours until 5:30 p.m.
COST: Varies, but averages $200 a week with
full and partial scholarships available. Funds
through the Children, Youth and Families De-
partment accepted.
CONTACT: 438-8585, email santafeschool@aol.
com, www.santafeschool.org
ALSO: Hooked on Books Summer Reading
Camp
OFFERS: A free camp specially designed to
20 KIDS SUMMER 2012
Santa Fe Community College Culinary Camp
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assist children who struggle with reading in
school. Tons of games and summer fun along
with individualized reading support. For
children entering grades 3 and 4. First come,
frst served. Teacher referrals welcomed.
SANTA FE YOUTHTHEATER
PANDEMONIUMPRODUCTION
MUSICAL THEATER SUMMER CAMP
OFFERS: Musical theater summer camp for
ages 7-17. Students study acting, singing
and dance, and perform in a Broadway musi-
cal production at the James A. Little Theater.
SESSION: June 18-July 19, rehearsal hours
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday-Friday. Space is
limited. Scholarships available. Call for more
information.
CONTACT: 920-0704, www.pandemonium-
prod.org
SANTA FE WALDORF SCHOOL
OFFERS: Nature camp, circus camp, moun-
tain craft camp and tie-dye camp for ages
4-12. Special activities for 4-year-olds.
SESSION: June and July
COST: Varies
CONTACT: 467-6431, www.santafewaldorf.org
SANTA FE YMCA
OFFERS: Camps provide children with sum-
mer adventures that promote a healthy spirit,
mind and body. Children spend time indoors
and outdoors as experienced staf leads a
wide variety of activities each day, including
arts and crafts, games, skits and songs, sports,
swimming and weekly feld trips. Programs
available for youths in grades K-5.
SESSION: May 29-Aug. 3
COSTS: $130 a week. CYSD and fnancial aid
available
CONTACT: 424-8077, www.ymcacnm.org
SKATEBOARD SCHOOL
OFFERS: Various activities and lessons for
youth of all ages who love to skateboard.
Several camps are scheduled in June, July
and August.
SESSIONS: See website
COST: See website
CONTACT: 474-0074, www.skateboardsafety.com
PLAYHOUSE CHILDREN’S THEATRE
OFFERS: Students create their own charac-
ters and plot for a summer show complete
with original songs and music. Children in
grades 3-8 also write their own play, and
design their own costumes.
SESSIONS: Summer theater runs June 19-
July 28, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thurs-
days from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
COST: Sliding scale
CONTACT: 988-4262, www.southwestchild-
renstheatre.com
WISE FOOL CIRCUS CAMP
OFFERS: Two, 2-week camps of circus
activities including clowning, trapeze, stilt
walking, puppetry and acrobatics.
SESSIONS: All levels, including beginners,
July 9-20; intermediate camp July 23-Aug. 3.
COSTS: $475, scholarships available.
CONTACT: 992-2588, www.wisefoolnew-
mexico.org
THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN 21
Big Sky Learning
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drawing, painting, hip-hop, African-dance, drama,
recycled art... FUN!
Ages 6-12 June 11 - July 27, Mon-Fri
“teen audio revolution”
2 week intensive for teens
July 16 - 27
“kids create”
summer arts camp at SFAI
For info or to register contact Shayla
505-424-5050 or spatton@sfai.org
generous scholarships available
ARTS ALIVE
Museum Hill
Three of the Museum Hill museums sponsor free, hands-on art workshops for people ages 3 to 103. An adult must be present with
children. Workshops are held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Check museum websites for details.
MUSEUMOF INDIANARTS ANDCULTURE
www.indianartsandculture.org • 476-1250
June 14,16...................................................Pottery
June 21..........................................................Native foods
June 23..........................................................Yarn painting
June 28..........................................................Beadwork
MUSEUMOF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART
www.internationalfolkart.org • 476-1200
July 19, 21....................................................Make khamsas (good-luck hands)
July 26, 28....................................................Make Peruvian retablos
Aug. 2, 4........................................................Paint your own ceramic tile
Aug. 9, 11.....................................................Make dance capes
THE MUSEUMOF SPANISHCOLONIAL ART
www.spanishcolonial.org • 982-2226
June 15..........................................................Retablo making with John Jimenez
June 2 ...........................................................Straw applique with Martha Varoz Ewing
June 29..........................................................Ramilletes (paper fowers and garlands) with museum docents
July 6...............................................................Punched tin with Cleo Romero
The Museum of Spanish Colonial Art has just opened a new youth gallery, showcasing art produced by Spanish Market youth artists.
The gallery also has Spanish Colonial dress-up clothes and other activities for children. The museum is planning outdoor activities for
children this summer. Check the website for details.
Children love to visit the youth artists at Spanish Market (July 30 and 31), and can learn to make Spanish Colonial art in the Kids Teach-
ing Kids tent both days.
EL RANCHODE LAS GOLONDRINAS
www.golondrinas.org • 334 Los Pinos Rd. • 471-2261
A visit to El Rancho de las Golondrinas, Santa Fe’s living history museum, can be fun at any time. But festival weekends — some spe-
cifcally focused on children — provide the most fun.
Festival activities vary (spring, summer and harvest festivals have the most going on), but volunteers may be baking bread in the
horno (adobe oven), making yucca rope, blacksmithing, teaching fint knapping or how to brain-tan bufalo hides, or any number of
activities.
At the spring, summer and harvest festivals, kids can see Professor Cheesecurdle’s Magic Show or learn to grind corn and make adobe
bricks, which are used to construct mini-adobe houses at Fiesta de los Niños.
Fiesta de los Niños also features a puppet playhouse and a host of child-centered events. Archery lessons are being ofered at every
festival between Aug. 6 and Oct. 2.
Other festivals kids enjoy are Survival New Mexico, where they can learn everything from making fres to building shelters, and the
Santa Fe Renaissance Fair.
FINE ART FOR CHILDRENANDTEENS
http://factsantafe.org • 1516 Pacheco St. • 992-2787
SUMMER ARTBARNCAMPS
June 6, Aug. 12.........................................Monday-Friday
ARTbarn camps include snacks and all materials for classes in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and collage. Previous camps
have focused on self-portraits, graphic illustration/manga, printmaking and architectural design. $225 per week session, $205 per
week session if registered by June 1. Scholarships available.
THE PLANETARIUMAT SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
www.sfcc.edu/planetarium • 428-1677
Tickets are $5 for adults, $3 for preteens and seniors, and free for SFCC students, SFCC employees and planetarium members. Tickets
go on sale at the door 30 minutes before each program. Shows begin promptly. Latecomers are not admitted. All children must be
accompanied by an adult. Regular programs are not suitable for children under 5 years old. Programs are from 8:00 p.m.- 9:00 p.m.
through Sept. 16, unless otherwise noted.
June 1, July 6, Aug. 3, Sept. 16........Echoes of the Night features a selection of Native American stories.
June 2, July 7, Aug. 4, Sept. 7...........Backyard Astronomy is a live presentation of the current skies in the Planetarium and an outdoor
viewing of the night sky, weather permitting.
June 16 and 23.........................................Deep Sky explores nebulae, double and variable stars, open and globular clusters, astronomical
equipment and astrophotos.
July 13............................................................Astronomy with Binoculars
July 14............................................................Practical Astrophotography: Film
July 21............................................................Practical Astrophotography: Digital
July 20............................................................Constellation: Figures in the Sky
Aug. 11..........................................................Light Pollution: The Dark Side of Light
Aug. 17..........................................................The Paradigm Shift: Copernicus, the dawn of the Scientifc Age
Aug. 1 ............................................................The Paradigm Shift: Galileo, compromise with the truth
Aug. 25: ........................................................The Paradigm Shift: Kepler and Tycho, the Geometry in the Skies
Sept. 22, 7-8 p.m......................................Ring World: The Cassini-Huygens mission to the planet Saturn
Sept. 23.........................................................The Hubble Space Telescope
Sept. 29, 7-8 p.m......................................El Universo de Lorca is an astronomical journey through Lorca’s characteristic metaphors and sym-
bols related to the sky.
Arin McKenna For The New Mexican
Besides the usual sports, swimming
and outdoor recreation, Santa Fe ofers
creative summer activities for children.
Here are a few of the most popular
ones. Check Pasatiempo in Friday’s edi-
tion of The Santa Fe NewMexican for a
weekly calendar of events.
ETC.
22 KIDS SUMMER 2012
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Bio 2012
Sandia Mountain Natural History Center
Join the Sandia Mountain Natural
History Center and the NM Museum of
Natural History & Science for
BioBlitz 2012!
Friday, August 10, 2012 5-9pm
Saturday, August 11, 2012 7am-4pm
BioBlitz is like a scavenger hunt—our goal is to fnd
as many living organisms as we can in 24-hours.
Come and join scientifc experts as we look for
mammals, insects, birds, reptiles, wildfowers,
trees, fungi, and more!
BioBlitz is FREE. All ages welcome. Pre-registration
required for some activities.
Information: www.nmnaturalhistory.org/smnhc or
505-281-5259
Find us on Facebook!
As you have for 163 Years, You Turn To Us.
GET ONGOING ANDCOMPREHENSIVE
NEWS COVERAGE
Call Now: 505.986.3010 or visit www.santafenewmexican.com
OF ELECTION
2 2 1
SubSCrIbE TOday!
24 KIDS SUMMER 2012

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